Гид по Афганистану — 2010


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AFGHANISTAN RESEARCH AND EVALUATION UNIT
Research for a Better Afghanistan
2010
to Afghanistan Assistance
IMPORTANT NOTE:
The information presented in this guide relies on the voluntary contributions
of ministries and agencies of the Afghan government, embassies, development agencies
and other organisations representing donor countries, national and international NGOs, and
other institutions. While AREU undertakes with each edition of this guide to provide the most
accurate and current information possible, details evolve and change continuously. Users
of this guide are encouraged to submit updates, additions, corrections and suggestions
to publications@areu.org.af.
© 2010 Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit. All rights reserved. No part of this publication
may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means,
electronic, recording or otherwise without prior written permission of the publisher, the Afghanistan
Research and Evaluation Unit. Permission can be obtained by emailing areu@areu.org.af or by
Editor:
Jay Lamey
Research and writing:
Government:
Anna Larson and Jay Lamey
Mohammad Karim and the map-making team at the Afghan Geodesy and Cartography
HeMd Of�ce (AGFHO)
Special thanks:
Mohammad Yasin Safar, Antonio Giustozzi, Richard Will, Royce Wiles, and Sayed
Cover photograph:
Boys looking out onto
Band-i-Amir
, BMmiyMn ProvinceCGulNudin ElOMm (AHNA)
Cover design:
Wakil Wasim
Tab photographs:
(A Po Z) Spring in GMrMyim GisPricP, BMdMkOsOMn ProvinceCGulNudin ElOMm (AHNA);
(GovernmenP) Iife HMrdsOipCOil Mnd Acrylic on FMnvMs Ny KOMdijM HMsOemi, 2007 (courPesy of POe
FenPer for FonPemporMry ArPs AfgOMnisPMn); (GocumenPs) AfgOMnisPMn’s �rsP juice concenPrMPe
fMcPoryCFMrdin JMezi (UNAMA); (MMps) ReconsPrucPionCGulNudin ElOMm (AHNA); (FonPMcPs)
PrepMring for Eid-Al-AdOMCFMrdin JMezi (UNAMA); (Hndex) PeMce GMy celeNrMPionsCJMRMd JMlMli
(UNAMA)B
AREU grMPefully McknoRledges POe �nMnciMl MssisPMnce of POe governmenPs of FinlMnd, NorRMy,
Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom in publishing the eighth edition of the
A Po Z Guide
Po AfgOMnisPMn AssisPMnceB
AFGHANISTAN RESEARCH AND EVALUATION UNIT
FloRer SPreeP (corner of SPreeP 2)
Shahr-i-Naw
Kabul, Afghanistan
website: www.areu.org.af
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Table of Contacts
About the Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit
About t
A Po Z Guide Po AfgOMnisPMn AssisPMnce
The AREU Library
A to Z: Contents
Government: Contents
Background
Government in Afghanistan
The Public Sector
Organogram: Central Government of Afghanistan
Elections 2009-2010
Documents: Contents
The Afghanistan Compact (2006)
Code of Conduct for NGOs engaged in Humanitarian Action, Reconstruction,
and Development in Afghanistan (2005)
Contacts: Contents
Kabul
Other Provinces
210
Pakistan
Index
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
About the
Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit
The Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU) is an independent research institute based
in KMNulB AREU’s mission is Po inform Mnd in�uence policy Mnd prMcPice POrougO conducPing OigO-
quality, policy-relevant research and actively disseminating the results, and to promote a culture
of research and learning. To achieve its mission AREU engages with policymakers, civil society,
researchers and students to promote their use of AREU’s research and its library, to strengthen
POeir reseMrcO cMpMciPy, Mnd Po creMPe opporPuniPies for MnMlysis, re�ecPion Mnd deNMPeB
AREU conducts research on a wide variety of topics and produces dozens of research publications
eMcO yeMr, rMnging from policy-focused Nrie�ng pMpers Po compreOensive issues Mnd synPOesis
reports. Many are translated into Dari and Pashto. AREU also publishes the annual
A Po Z Guide
to Afghanistan Assistance
and the quarterly
AfgOMnisPMn ReseMrcO NeRslePPer,
and maintains a
website (www.areu.org.af). AREU also regularly organises workshops and conferences to facilitate
research use and enable and encourage debate among policymakers and other stakeholders.
AREU was established in 2002 by the assistance community working in Afghanistan and has a
board of directors with representation from donors, the United Nations and other multilateral
agencies, and nongovernmental organisations. AREU currently receives core funds from the
governmenPs of FinlMnd, NorRMy, SReden, SRiPzerlMnd Mnd POe UniPed KingdomB Speci�c projecPs
OMve Neen funded Ny POe FoundMPion of POe Open SociePy HnsPiPuPe AfgOMnisPMn (FOSHA), TOe AsiM
FoundMPion (TAF), POe EuropeMn Fommission (EF), POe UniPed NMPions HigO Fommissioner for
Refugees (UNHFR), POe UniPed NMPions FOildren’s Fund (UNHFEF), POe UniPed NMPions GevelopmenP
Fund for Jomen (UNHFEM), Mnd POe Jorld BMnkB
A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Updated each year, the
A Po Z Guide Po AfgOMnisPMn AssisPMnce
aims to enhance general
understanding of the array of actors, structures and government processes related to aid and
reconstruction efforts in the country. The guide provides: a wide-ranging glossary of assistance
terms, an overview of Afghanistan’s system of government, a series of country and city maps,
key primary documents, and an extensive contacts directory that includes government agencies,
NGOs, donors, and international actors. The guide is also published in Dari and Pashto.
JOen POe �rsP ediPion of POe
A Po Z Guide
was published in 2002, the goal then—as it is now—
was “to provide a guide to the terms, structures, mechanisms and coordinating bodies critical to
the Afghanistan relief and reconstruction effort to help ensure a shared vocabulary and common
understanding.” Over the years the guide increased in scope and size, but has always followed the
same successful model.
This 2010 edition includes an expanded glossary section, a detailed explanation of Afghanistan’s
electoral system as well as a review and analysis of the 2009-10 election cycle, and a variety of new
mMps, provided for POe �rsP Pime Ny POe AfgOMn Geodesy Mnd FMrPogrMpOy HeMd Of�ceB
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
The information presented in the guide relies on the voluntary contributions of agencies and
organisations, and the situation in Afghanistan can change rapidly. Users of the guide are
encouraged to contact publications@areu.org.af with suggestions for additions, updates,
corrections or improvements.
The AREU Library
Established in 2003, the AREU Library supports the research activities of AREU and provides public
access to approximately 11,000 titles held about Afghanistan. The library is open to everyone.
Contemporary materials produced inside Afghanistan and materials in Afghan languages are the
focus of collecting, with an emphasis on long-term research value.
The library also aims to make available in Afghanistan research produced overseas about the
counPry Mnd POe regionB MMPeriMls of Mll Pypes (Nooks, journMl MrPicles, mMps, posPers, FGs, GVGs,
databases and more) are available for use inside the library (no public borrowing is allowed).
Photocopying facilities are available and the entire collection is listed online (see the “Library”
page of AREU’s website at www.areu.org.af). The library also has over 50 GBs of accumulated
softcopy publications on Afghanistan, all of which are indexed and listed in the library database
and made available for research use (where copyright laws permits).
Since 2004, AREU Library staff have also prepared the
AfgOMnisPMn ReseMrcO NeRslePPer
, released
in January, April, July, and October each year, which attempts to broaden and improve access to
new materials from and on Afghanistan. All issues are on the AREU website and the new materials
listed in these newsletters are cumulated in the library database.
Researchers are welcome to visit in person or email inquiries to library@areu.org.af. Library
staff work in collaboration with several other libraries in Kabul and can also suggest sources for
materials not available at AREU.
Library location and opening hours:
AREU Of�ce, FloRer SP (corner of SPreeP 2)
SundMy Po TOursdMy (closed FridMy, SMPurdMy Mnd puNlic OolidMys)
9:00-12:30 and 13:00-16:00 (8:00-14:00 during Ramazan)
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
These and all other AREU publications are available for download from www.areu.org.af and most
in OMrdcopy from POe AREU of�ce in KMNul (* indicMPes POMP M puNlicMPion or M summMry is MvMilMNle
in Dari and Pashto).
A Holistic Justice System for Afghanistan, by Deborah J. Smith and Jay Lamey
Community-Based Dispute Resolution Processes in Nangarhar Province, by Deborah J. Smith
Community-Based Dispute Resolution Processes in Bamiyan Province, by Deborah J. Smith
Iosing IegiPimMcy? Some AfgOMn VieRs on POe GovernmenP, POe HnPernMPionMl FommuniPy, Mnd
POe 200E ElecPions, Ny NoMO FoNurn *
VoPing TogePOer — JOy AfgOMnisPMn’s 200E ElecPions Rere (Mnd Rere noP) M GisMsPer, Ny NoMO
FoNurn Mnd AnnM IMrson *
AfgOMnisPMn ReseMrcO NeRslePPer 23 *
A Closer Look — The Policy and Law-Making Process Behind the Shiite Personal Status Law,
Ny IMuryn OMPes *
Toward an Afghan Democracy: Exploring Perceptions of Democratisation in Afghanistan, by
AnnM IMrson *
PMPronMge, PosPuring, GuPy, GemogrMpOics: JOy AfgOMns VoPed in 200E, Ny NoMO FoNurn Mnd
AnnM IMrson *
Searching for My Homeland: Dilemmas Between Borders — Experiences of Young Afghans
Returning “Home” from Pakistan and Iran, by Mamiko Saito
From Access Po HmpMcP: MicrocrediP Mnd RurMl IiveliOoods in AfgOMnisPMn, Ny PMulM KMnPor
AfgOMnisPMn ReseMrcO NeRslePPer 22 *
Beyond PoverPy — FMcPors Hn�uencing Gecisions Po Use FOild IMNour in RurMl Mnd UrNMn
Afghanistan, by Pamela Hunte
Water Management, Livestock and the Opium Economy: Opportunities for Pro-Poor Agricultural
GroRPO, Ny Iorene FlMming
Policy Note: Improving Mutual Accountability for Aid Effectiveness, by Rebecca Roberts
FonfronPing FOild IMNour in AfgOMnisPMn, Ny AmMndM Sim *
PolicymMking in AgriculPurMl Mnd RurMl GevelopmenP, Ny AdMm PMin *
Poppy Free Provinces: A MeMsure or M TMrgeP?, Ny GMvid MMns�eld
Research and Development for Better Livestock Productivity, by Euan Thomson
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Between Discipline and Discretion: Policies Surrounding Senior Subnational Appointments, by
MMrPine vMn BijlerP *
Water Management, Livestock and the Opium Economy: Challenges and Opportunities for
Strengthening Licit Agricultural Livelihoods, by Alan Roe
HnPerrogMPing HrrigMPion HnequMliPies: FMnMl HrrigMPion SysPems in Hnjil GisPricP, HerMP, Ny SrinivMs
Chokkakula
JMPer, Opium Mnd IivesPock: Findings from POe FirsP YeMr of FMrm Mnd HouseOold MoniPoring,
by Alan Roe
AfgOMnisPMn ReseMrcO NeRslePPer 21 *
JMPer SPrMPegy MeePs IocMl ReMliPy, Ny KMi JegericO *
IMnd Fon�icP in AfgOMnisPMn: Building FMpMciPy Po Address VulnerMNiliPy, Ny Folin GescOMmps
Mnd AlMn Roe *
Re�ecPions on POe PMris GeclMrMPion Mnd Aid EffecPiveness in AfgOMnisPMn, Ny ReNeccM RoNerPs *
Policymaking in Agriculture and Rural Development in Afghanistan, by Adam Pain and Sayed
Mutual Accountability in Afghanistan: Promoting Partnerships in Development Aid?, by Marieke
A Historical Perspective on the Mirab System: A Case Study of the Jangharok Canal, Baghlan,
Ny VincenP TOomMs Mnd MujeeN AOmMd
AfgOMnisPMn’s NeR PoliPicMl PMrPies: A MeMns Po OrgMnise GemocrMPisMPion? Ny AnnM IMrson *
Gecisions, Gesires Mnd GiversiPy: MMrriMge PrMcPices in AfgOMnisPMn, Ny GeNorMO JB SmiPO *
AfgOMnisPMn NMPionMl GevelopmenP SPrMPegy (ANGS) FormulMPion Process: Hn�uencing FMcPors
and Challenges, by Sayed Mohammed Shah
AfgOMnisPMn ReseMrcO NeRslePPer 20 *
TOe A Po Z Guide Po AfgOMnisPMn AssisPMnce 200E (SevenPO EdiPion) *
Gelivering on PoverPy ReducPion: Focusing ANGS HmplemenPMPion on Pro-Poor OuPcomes, Ny
PMulM KMnPor, AdMm PMin, eP MlB *
A to Z
A to Z: Contents
AfgOMn Fivil SociePy Forum OrgMnisMPion (AFSFO)
Afghan Development Association (ADA)
AfgOMn Geodesy Mnd FMrPogrMpOy HeMd Of�ce (AGFHO)
Afghan Interim Authority (AIA)
Afghan National Army (ANA)
Afghan National Police (ANP)
AfgOMn NMPionMl SecuriPy Forces (ANSF)
Afghan NGO Coordination Bureau (ANCB)
Afghan Transitional Authority (ATA)
Afghan Women’s Network (AWN)
Af-Pak
Afghanistan Centre at Kabul University (ACKU)
Afghanistan Compact
Afghanistan Country Stability Picture (ACSP)
AfgOMnisPMn GevelopmenP Forum (AGF)
Commission (AIHRC)
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS)
Afghanistan New Beginnings Programme (ANBP)
AfgOMnisPMn NGO SMfePy Of�ce (ANSO)
AfgOMnisPMn PMrliMmenPMry AssisPMnce ProjecP (APAP)
AfgOMnisPMn ReconsPrucPion TrusP Fund (ARTF)
Afghanistan Rural Enterprise Development
Program (AREDP)
Agency Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief (ACBAR)
Alternative Livelihoods (AL)
Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS)
Berlin Meeting and Declarations
Bonn Agreement
Budget
Calendars in Afghanistan
Civil Service Commission
FoMliPion Forces (FF)
FomNined JoinP TMsk Force (FJTF 101)
Combined Security Transition Command—Afghanistan (CSTC-A)
Community Development Council (CDC)
Consultative Group (CG)
Constitutional Loya Jirga (CLJ)
Coordination of Humanitarian Assistance (CHA)
Counter-Narcotics (CN)
FounPer NMrcoPics TrusP Fund (FNTF)
Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration (DDR)
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Disbandment of Illegal Armed Groups (DIAG)
Development Assistance Database (DAD)
Electoral Complaints Commission (ECC)
Emergency Loya Jirga (ELJ)
Enhancing Legal and Electoral Capacity for
Tomorrow (ELECT)
European Police Mission in Afghanistan (EUPOL)
Free Mnd FMir ElecPion FoundMPion of AfgOMnisPMn (FEFA)
Government Media and Information Centre (GMIC)
Hague Conference on Afghanistan
Humanitarian Action Plan (HAP)
Independent Administrative Reform and Civil Service Commission (IARCSC)
Independent Directorate of Local Governance (IDLG)
HnPernMPionMl SecuriPy AssisPMnce Force (HSAF)
Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB)
Justice Sector Reform (JSR)
IMR Mnd Order TrusP Fund for AfgOMnisPMn (IOTFA)
Laws in Afghanistan
London Conferences
Micro�nMnce HnvesPmenP SupporP FMciliPy for
AfgOMnisPMn (MHSFA)
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)
Mine Action Programme for Afghanistan (MAPA)
National Area-Based Development Programme (NABDP)
National Budget
NMPionMl GevelopmenP FrMmeRork (NGF)
National Human Development Report (NHDR)
NMPionMl Risk Mnd VulnerMNiliPy AssessmenP (NRVA)
National Solidarity Programme (NSP)
National Surveillance System (NSS)
Of�ce of AdminisPrMPive AffMirs Mnd Founcil of MinisPers SecrePMriMP (OAACFMS)
Paris Conference
Policy Action Group (PAG)
Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP)
Provincial Development Plan (PDP)
Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT)
Public Administration Reform (PAR)
Rome Conference on Justice and Rule of Law
Security Sector Reform (SSR)
Southern and Western Afghanistan and Balochistan Association for Coordination (SWABAC)
Tokyo Meetings
United Nations Assistance Mission in
UniPed NMPions GevelopmenP AssisPMnce FrMmeRork (UNGAF)
United Nations Coordination in Afghanistan, 1998-2010
A to Z
AfgOMn Fivil SociePy Forum OrgMnisMPion (AFSFO)
www.acsf.org
TOe AfgOMn Fivil SociePy Forum OrgMnisMPion (AFSFO—formerly AFFS) is M nePRork of AfgOMn civil
society groups and actors. It provides a platform for dialogue and aims to develop the role of civil
sociePy in poliPicMl decision-mMkingB AFSFO RMs esPMNlisOed MP POe
Afghan Civil Society Conference,
held in parallel with the
Bonn Fonference (pB 27) in lMPe 2001B AFSFO RMs iniPiMlly supporPed
Ny SRisspeMce FoundMPion Mnd OMs Neen complePely independenP since JMnuMry 2006B AFSFO
has 137 members, including 85 organisations and 52 individuals. It also has 315 partners for
capacity building, civic education, advocacy, research and media. Its Board of Directors comprises
seven Afghan and two international representatives, elected for two-year terms at the annual
generMl meePing of AFSFO memNersB
According Po POe AFSFO de�niPion, “civil sociePy” is POose ROo come PogePOer volunPMrily Po
participate in civic affairs for the common good—in peace and without consideration for personal
or poliPicMl gMinB TOe overMrcOing goMl of POe AFSFO is Po promoPe developmenP of civil sociePy Ny:
Coordinating, expanding and fostering civil society networks in Afghanistan and abroad
Promoting a sense of active citizenry among Afghan men and women
Building institutional capacities of public and civil society entities
Collecting, analysing, and incorporating civil society’s perspectives and concerns in the
political, social and economic development processes of Afghanistan
From 2002-06, AFSFO supporPed POe implemenPMPion of POe Bonn AgreemenP, conducPed
educational, media and advocacy activities on the constitution-making process, and carried out
civic education and registration campaigns for the 2004 presidential and 2005 parliamentary
elecPionsB PosP-elecPions, AFSFO modi�ed iPs MpproMcO, moving MRMy from puNlic ouPreMcO Mnd
PoRMrd POe supporP of insPiPuPion-NuildingB TOe orgMnisMPion’s sPrMPegy focuses on �ve MreMs:
coordination and networking, capacity building, advocacy, civic education, and research. In 2010,
good governance, rule of law, transparency and accountability, participation, and development
will be added to its area of focus.
Since 200D, AFSFO OMs Neen Mn implemenPing orgMnisMPion of POe HniPiMPive Po
Promote Afghan
Civil Society (IPACS), which aims to promote the development of an active civil society with an
empOMsis on gender equMliPyB Hn 2006, AFSFO developed Mn MdvocMcy sPrMPegy Po mMinsPreMm POe
work of civil society actors with the work of parliament and other stakeholders. This work continues
PodMy Mnd is orgMnised inPo �ve mMjor MdvocMcy MreMs: Romen, POe environmenP, disMNiliPy issues,
transparency and accountability, and youth.
Hn mid-2007, in MddiPion Po iPs KMNul OeMdquMrPers, AFSFO esPMNlisOed regionMl of�ces in JMlMlMNMd,
Mazar-i-Sharif, Bamiyan and Gardez. Its peace-building, capacity building, and civic education workshops
are now offered in each of these locations to the Afghan government, the private sector, and its partners.
Hn 2008, AFSFO represenPed AfgOMn civil sociePy MP POe June 2008
Paris Conference (p. 61).
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
AFSFO mMinPMins M Fivic EducMPion Resource FenPre, esPMNlisOed in 2006B TOis free puNlic
service is comprised of a library (with over 2,500 books), an internet centre, and an archive. As
of November 2009, there are more than 700 members, including students, teachers, NGOs,
civil sociePy memNers, Mnd governmenP sPMffB AFSFO plMns on esPMNlisOing resource cenPres in
iPs regionMl of�ces in 2010B AFSFO Mlso puNlisOes POe
magazine (in Dari and
PMsOPo) Mnd M monPOly neRslePPer (in EnglisO, GMri Mnd PMsOPo)B AFSFO receives funding from M
wide range of international NGOS, agencies and donor governments.
Afghan Development Association (ADA)
www.ada.org.a
TOe AfgOMn GevelopmenP AssociMPion (AGA) is M nongovernmenPMl Mnd nonpro�P orgMnisMPion
whose mission is to eradicate poverty throughout Afghanistan. ADA was originally founded in
Pakistan in 1989, where it worked mainly in Afghan refugee camps. With its current headquarters
in KMNul, AGA’s sPMff of 671 noR operMPes in 10 provinces: BMgOlMn, TMkOMr Mnd FMryMN in POe norPO,
NMngMrOMr in POe eMsP, FMrMO, ZMNul, UruzgMn, Mnd KMndMOMr in POe ResP, Mnd GOMzni Mnd IogMr in
central Afghanistan. The association hopes to expand to six more provinces in the near future.
ADA provides necessary assistance and empowerment to marginalised groups, including
repatriated refugees, internally displaced persons (IDPs), women, the poor, and the unemployed.
Particular attention is also given to the agricultural sector and rural activities that can contribute
to more productive and sustainable livelihoods at the grassroots level. ADA stresses community
pMrPicipMPion Ms pMrP of iPs projecP plMnning Mnd implemenPMPionB
AGA is currenPly operMPionMlising iPs �ve-yeMr (2006-2010) sPrMPegic plMn, Mnd is orgMnised inPo
�ve depMrPmenPs: PlMnning, FMpMciPy Building, EducMPion, HnPegrMPed RurMl GevelopmenP (HRG),
Mnd FinMnceB EMcO depMrPmenP is OeMded Ny M direcPor Mnd is supporPed Ny line sPMff, resources
Mnd equipmenPB An Emergency FMciliPMPion UniP is Mlso undergoing iPs preliminMry sePup Mnd
training phase and will coordinate emergency related issues, including disaster risk reduction,
response and management with community stakeholders, local organisations, government, and
international agencies in Kabul.
AfgOMn Geodesy Mnd FMrPogrMpOy HeMd Of�ce (AGFHO)
www.agcho.org
TOe AfgOMn Geodesy Mnd FMrPogrMpOy HeMd Of�ce (AGFHO) is POe governmenP Mgency responsiNle
for Mll of�ciMl mMpping Mnd relMPed McPiviPies in AfgOMnisPMnB HPs focus of Rork is POe producPion,
publication and distribution of physical, topographical, political, thematic, cadastral, and natural
resources
maps; geodetic affairs; and the national atlas. Reporting directly to the President,
AGFHO OMs MpproximMPely 700 sPMff Mnd regionMl of�ces in 16 provincesB TOe of�ce is divided
inPo �ve depMrPmenPs: mePMdMPM Mnd clienP service provision, cMrPogrMpOy Mnd GHS, cMdMsPre,
photogrammetry and remote sensing, and geodesy. Prior to its establishment as an independent
agency in 1958, all mapping was done by the military.
A to Z
Until the Soviet Invasion in 1979, AGCHO completed 26% of the geodetic triangulation of
Afghanistan and 30 percent of the cadastral surveys necessary to cover the country. During this
period, then-state-of-the-art mapping and printing equipment was installed from Switzerland,
Germany and the Netherlands. This included a large Leica camera and two-colour off-set
printing machines, and much of the equipment is still in use for map production. Since 2001
there have been renewed efforts to modernise the agency; AGCHO has produced a number of
thematic maps for government departments and external organisations and now also provides
GIS training. It also established departments of Geography and GIS at
Kabul University and
KMNul PolyPecOnic UniversiPyB PlMns for 2010 include puNlisOing POe �rsP compreOensive MPlMs of
Afghanistan since 1979.
AGCHO provides its services to government ministries and to international organisations, who in
some cMses require speci�c supporPing documenPMPionB All mMps POMP Mre prinPed in AfgOMnisPMn
must legally be approved by AGCHO.
Afghan Interim Authority (AIA)
See Afghan Transitional Authority (ATA), p. 9.
Afghan National Army (ANA)
www.mod.gov.af
The Afghan National Army (ANA) was created on 1 December 2002 under a decree issued by
Hamid Karzai. Serving under Afghanistan’s Ministry of Defence, the ANA makes up
one part of the
AfgOMn NMPionMl SecuriPy Forces (ANSF), POe oPOer pMrP of ROicO is POe AfgOMn
National Police (ANP, p. 6). Conceived as an all-volunteer force inclusive of Afghans of all social
and ethnic origins, the ANA was originally to be capped at an end-strength of 70,000 service
members. When established in 2003, the ANA was adopted by the
Bonn Agreement as one of the
�ve pillMrs of POe AfgOMn governmenP’s
Security Sector Reform strategy (SSR, p. 65). The roles of
the ANA are: 1) to secure the borders and deter external threats; 2) to defeat terrorist forces; 3) to
disband, reintegrate or imprison illegal armed groups; and 4) to manage internal security threats
and emergencies in cooperation with the ANP.
In January 2010, the
Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB, p. 47) approved the lifting
of the troop ceiling from 134,000 (consisting of 122,000 operational troops and 12,000 soldiers-
in-training) to a new level of 171,000 by October 2011. The ANA’s personnel charts in January
2010 stood at approximately 100,000 troops; of these, approximately two-thirds were combat
forces Mnd MpproximMPely POree percenP Rere Mir corpsB Under POe previous 134,000 �gure plMn,
approved by the JCMB in September 2008, the ANA would have consisted of: 21 brigades (18
infantry, one mechanised, one for headquarters security support, and one commando); the
Kabul-headquartered Capital Division responsible for the security of the capital and the seat of
government; and an air corps providing essential airlift support to ANA brigades. More brigades
mMy Ne Mdded under POe revised plMnB Beyond POe Mpproved 171,000 �gure, M poPenPiMl increMse
of ANA numbers to 240,000 troops was outlined in 2009 by
HSAF Mnd US forces commMnder
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Stanley McChrystal. Continuing to build the ANA is central to US strategy in Afghanistan.
In August 2008, the ANA—along with the ANP—took over lead security responsibility for Kabul from
POe HnPernMPionMl SecuriPy AssisPMnce Force (HSAF, pB 4D)B
The ANA is a conventionally structured and light infantry-based force. It is designed primarily
to combat insurgents but lacks overall capability in terms of defending Afghanistan’s national
sovereignPy Mnd PerriPoriMl inPegriPyB HPs �ve ground-mMnoeuvre corps Mre disPriNuPed Ms regionMl
commands in Kabul, Gardez, Kandahar, Herat and Mazar-i-Sharif. The personnel charts of ANA
battalions, or
kandaks,
consisP of 6D0 soldiers, sergeMnPs Mnd of�cersB MosPly equipped RiPO
refurbished Soviet Union-era aircraft, the Afghan National Air Corps is being trained to perform a
range of missions including presidential airlift, medical and casualty evacuation, reconnaissance
and airborne command and control, and light air attack.
To ensure geographic and ethnic diversity, the ANA has recruitment centres in each of Afghanistan’s
34 provincesB Around 2,D00 neR recruiPs join POe ANA every monPOB RecruiPs complePe 12-Reek
training courses at the
Kabul Military Training Centre (KMTC). All trainers are Afghan, supported
Ny miliPMry PrMiners from POe UniPed SPMPes, POe UniPed Kingdom, FrMnce Mnd oPOer counPriesB
Upon graduation from the KMTC, ANA soldiers undergo an additional six weeks of training and
equipping (joining POeir felloR uniP of�cers Mnd non-commissioned of�cers) Nefore Neing deployed
Po POeir respecPive corpsB AddiPionMlly, in 200E POe �rsP-ever clMss of ANA of�cers grMduMPed from POe
National Military Academy of Afghanistan, which was established in 2004. ANA personnel sign three-
year contracts, which can be voluntarily renewed. The maximum length of service is 25 years.
US training teams are embedded in most ANA units, ranging from
kandaks
to corps. Through its
OperMPionMl MenPor Mnd IiMison TeMm ProgrMmme, HSAF similMrly emNeds menPors in selecPed
TOe UniPed SPMPes is POe key pMrPner in PrMining Mnd equipping POe ANA, providing POe mMjoriPy
of POe required PecOnicMl Mnd �nMnciMl supporPB HP OMs commiPPed Po spending US$17 Nillion on
training and equipping the army from 2008 to 2013.
Afghan National Police (ANP)
www.moi.gov.af
The Afghan National Police (ANP) is the Afghan government’s overarching police institution; it
operates under the authority of the Ministry of Interior (MoI). The ANP’s roles span a wide spectrum
of security activities including law enforcement, maintenance of order, criminal investigation,
border security, counter-narcotics, and counter-terrorism. The ANP consists of the following police
forces:
National Police, or Afghan Uniformed Police (AUP) — responsible for most day-to-day police activities
and assigned to police districts as well as Provincial and Regional Commands; each of the six
regions ultimately reports to the Deputy Minister of Security; authorised strength of 82,000
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Afghan National Civil Order Police (ANCOP) — a highly trained, quick-reaction and specially
equipped police force aimed at dealing with “advanced police situations” such as civil disorder,
looting, hostage-taking and riots; authorised eventual strength of 5,442 (20 battalions)
Afghan Border Police (ABP) — engaged in law enforcement at international borders and the
counPry’s oPOer poinPs of enPry; sPrengPO of 18,000, sPrucPured inPo �ve zones
Counter Narcotics Police of Afghanistan (CNPA) — the lead law enforcement agency charged
with reducing narcotics production and distribution in Afghanistan; authorised strength of
Criminal Investigation Division (CID) — responsible for investigating criminal offences under
Afghan law; authorised strength of 4,148
Afghan Customs Police (ACP) — enforces customs regulations in Afghanistan; ACP operations
come under POe MuPOoriPy of POe MinisPry of FinMnce
Counter Terrorism Police (CTP) — leads police and law enforcement counter-insurgency and
anti-terrorism efforts; authorised strength of 406
AfgOMnisPMn NMPionMl Fire GepMrPmenP — responsiNle for providing �re suppression, prevenPion
Mnd rescue; POe Fire GepMrPmenP operMPes POrougOouP POe counPry Mnd OMs Mn MuPOorised
Afghan National Auxiliary Police (ANAP), which was established in 2006 as a temporary,
community-based force to reinforce the ANP, is no longer a recognised police force. It was
dismMnPled in 2008B HoRever, POe neRly esPMNlisOed (FeNruMry 200E) AfgOMn PuNlic ProPecPion
ProgrMmme (APPPCAP3) RMs designed Po come under MoH conProl Mnd iP closely resemNles POe
ANAP in many of its features.
The 2006
Afghanistan Compact (p. 12) established as a benchmark for 2010 a fully constituted,
professional, functional, and ethnically balanced ANP force of up to 62,000 members. In April
2007, in response to increased insurgency in southern Afghanistan, the
Joint Coordination and
Monitoring Board (JCMB, p. 47) raised this number to 82,000. The authorised size of the ANP was
again increased to 96,800 in the run-up to the 2009 elections, and the breakdowns listed above
are based on this. However, in January 2010, the JCMB approved a further increase to 109,000
by October 2010 and to 134,000 by October 2011. Some donors have raised concerns about
POe �scMl susPMinMNiliPy of increMsing POe size of POe ANP; oPOers Mre concerned POMP POe focus of
police reform is shifting from the establishment of a civilian police force to that of a paramilitary or
counterinsurgency force. The ANP’s strength was approximately 93,800 as of December 2009.
Reform of POe police secPor, one of POe �ve pillMrs of POe AfgOMn governmenP’s SecuriPy SecPor
Reform strategy (SSR, p. 65), has focused primarily on training and mentoring, provision of
equipment and infrastructure, and institutional restructuring such as pay and rank reform. The
IMR Mnd Order TrusP Fund for AfgOMnisPMn (IOTFA, pB D0) OMs primMry responsiNiliPy for coordinMPing
donor support for ANP salaries. The police sector in Afghanistan has been supported by some 25
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
donor countries, with Germany taking the coordinating role of “key partner” until 2007. Since
2004, POe UniPed SPMPes OMs Neen Ny fMr POe lMrgesP overMll conPriNuPor of OumMn Mnd �nMnciMl
resources Po supporP POe police secPor, RiPO M cumulMPive conPriNuPion of $6B2 Nillion Ms of MMrcO
2009. Since 2005, CSTC-A (See
FoMliPion Forces, pB 2E) OMs led police reform efforPs Ny POe US,
along with the training and development of the ANA. CSTC-A has roughly 2,500 personnel and
contractors dedicated to its ANP mission.
Germany coordinated support for the ANP among EU member nations during 2003-07, also
conPriNuPing $80 million POrougO POe
GermMn Police ProjecP Of�ce (GPPO)B Guring pMrP of POis
period, the
Inter-Agency Police Coordinated Action Group (IPCAG) served as the international
community’s main police coordination body in Afghanistan. In June 2007, the
European Union
Police Mission in Afghanistan (EUPOL, p. 38) subsumed Germany’s primary role in police reform
with the aim of consolidating different approaches among EU members; the mission is mandated
until June 2010.
Approaches to police reform varied widely among donors and efforts to consolidate and integrate
these approaches were slow to emerge. In early 2007, donors and the Afghan government
established the
International Police Coordination Board (IPCB) aimed at consolidating and
integrating international police reform efforts and enhancing Afghan ownership of the reforms. By
late 2007, the IPCB Secretariat was operational, its members meeting regularly and engaging with
FSTF-A, EUPOI, Mnd POe HnPernMPionMl SecuriPy AssisPMnce Force (HSAF, pB 4D)B Hn June 200E, POe
NATO Training Mission — Afghanistan (NTM-A) was established to train the ANP. NTM-A cooperates
with CSTC-A in a single headquarters.
The main laws governing the ANP are the 2005 Police Law and the 2004 Interim Criminal Procedure
Code. These laws are based on Articles 56, 75(3) and 134 of the Constitution. In 2006, the MoI
issued an order superseding Article 4 of the Police Law, revising the police chain of command.
The new chain of command is: 1) Minister of Interior, 2) Deputy Minister for Security Affairs, 3)
Regional Commanders, 4) Provincial Chiefs of Police, and 5) District Chiefs of Police. There are
currently six ANP regions (Kabul Province, North, East, South, West and Central).
Hn principle, M commissioned ANP of�cer (
) requires a 12th-grade education and three years
of PrMining MP POe KMNul Police AcMdemy (KPA)B A non-commissioned of�cer or sergeMnP
is required to complete 9th grade and a nine-month course at KPA. Patrolmen
(sMPunkMi)
complete
training courses at either the Central Training Centre in Kabul or one of the Regional Training
Centres in Bamiyan, Gardez, Herat, Jalalabad, Kandahar, Kunduz and Mazar-i-Sharif.
A mMjor MoH iniPiMPive for police reform is
Focused GisPricP GevelopmenP (FGG), ROicO NegMn in
December 2007. The programme serves as an overarching strategy for training AUP, which makes
up the largest part of the ANP. Aimed at enhancing district-level police capabilities and rule of law,
POe FGG uses M six-pOMse MpproMcO Po Mssess, PrMin, menPor, reorgMnise, re-equip Mnd moniPor
police in selected districts. AUP assigned to Kabul undergo the “Jump Start” training programme.
TOe Focused Border GevelopmenP progrMmme PrMins ABP uniPsB
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AfgOMn NMPionMl SecuriPy Forces (ANSF)
TOe AfgOMn NMPionMl SecuriPy Forces (ANSF) consisP of POe AfgOMn NMPionMl Army (ANA, pB D) Mnd
the Afghan National Police (ANP, p. 6).
Afghan NGOs Coordination Bureau (ANCB)
www.ancb.org
The Afghan NGOs Coordination Bureau (ANCB) was founded in 1991 and aims to coordinate the
activities of Afghan NGOs with the Afghan government, the
UN, international organisations, and
donor agencies. ANCB strives to strengthen democracy and enhance the capacity of its member
organisations through workshops, seminars and partnerships.
ANCB membership is restricted to Afghan NGOs. ANCB has approximately 200 members, some
of which are also members of the Agency Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief (ACBAR, p. 23).
Applications for ANCB membership are considered by the Board of Directors and subsequently
voted on at the General Assembly (the quarterly meeting of member organisations). ANCB’s 11-
member Board of Directors is elected for a period of one year by the General Assembly. ANCB’s
OeMdquMrPers is locMPed in KMNul Mnd iP OMs sMPelliPe of�ces in JMlMlMNMd Mnd PesOMRMrB
ANCB convenes monthly member meetings on topics such as health, education, agriculture,
sanitation, reconstruction and government policy. It also arranges seminars and training courses
aimed at building the technical capacity of member NGOs in needs assessment, management,
�nMnce, MdminisPrMPive developmenP, reporP Mnd proposMl RriPing, Mnd compuPer skills, Mll
considering gender balance requirements. ANCB provides internet facilities for its members in the
ANFB of�ce Mnd produces M Reekly neRslePPer, POe quMrPerly mMgMzine
Paiwastoon
(Coordination),
and a directory of all its members.
ANCB is a member of the
HnPernMPionMl Founcil of VolunPMry Agencies, POe
World Civil Society
Forum, Mnd POe
Af�niPy Group of NMPionMl AssociMPionsB HP is Mlso McPively involved in POe AfgOMn
Fivil SociePy Forum (AFSFO, pB 3)B Funding for ANFB comes from memNersOip fees, smMll projecP
funders, and the
National Endowment for Democracy (NED).
Afghan Transitional Authority (ATA)
The Afghan Transitional Authority (ATA) was a governing body established by the
Emergency Loya
Jirga (ELJ, p. 37) in June 2002. It was preceded by the
Afghan Interim Authority (AIA), a temporary
governing body created at the
Bonn Conference (p. 27). The head of the ATA was President
Karzai, previously the Chairman of the AIA, who was elected in a secret ballot by members of the
Under the ATA, in January 2004, the
Constitutional Loya Jirga (CLJ, p. 31) decided on a constitution
for the new Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. As per the 2004 Constitution, the ATA was due to stay
in power until a fully representative government could be elected through free and fair elections.
In October 2004, Hamid Karzai was elected as President; at his inauguration in December 2004,
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
the ATA was transformed into the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, despite the rescheduling of
National Assembly elections until September 2005.
Afghan Women’s Network (AWN)
www.afghanwomensnetwork.org
The Afghan Women’s Network (AWN) is a network of NGOs and individuals working for the
promotion of Afghan women’s empowerment, rights, and equal participation in society. AWN’s
OeMdquMrPers Mre in KMNul, RiPO suN-of�ces in PesOMRMr, HerMP Mnd JMlMlMNMdB TOe NePRork
currently has 68 member NGOs and more than 3,250 individual members. AWN is active in the
areas of capacity building, coordination among NGOs working on women’s issues, and advocacy
on behalf of women and children.
TOe ideM of AJN �rsP Mrose MP POe 1EED UN Jorld Fonference on Jomen, ROere pMrPicipMnPs
idenPi�ed M need for cooperMPion Mmong Romen in AfgOMnisPMn Mnd POe AfgOMn diMsporMB TOe
network became a formal structure in 1996, comprising NGOs focused on providing: humanitarian
assistance; literacy, education, and vocational and computer skills for refugee women; and aid
for street children. After the fall of the Taliban, AWN revised its mission to focus on three priority
areas: 1) capacity building, 2) networking, and 3) advocacy.
In 2006-07, AWN became involved in promoting gender equity issues in the
National Development Strategy process (ANDS, p. 15). Since that time, AWN has conducted
awareness campaigns for the reduction of gender-based violence in various provinces and
provided legal counsel for victims of such violence. In 2008, together with its implementing
partners, AWN conducted leadership and management workshops, vocational and legal trainings,
and civic education courses for Afghan NGOs.
In 2009, AWN participated in the calling for a review of the draft of the Shiite Personal Status Law,
emphasised the importance of women’s and children’s rights as stated in the Constitution, and
MdvocMPed gender-sensiPive MmendmenPsB AJN Mlso implemenPed Mnd supporPed POe Five Million
Jomen FMmpMign (DMJF), Po encourMge �ve million Romen Po voPe for POe 200E presidenPiMl
The Network’s General Assembly, comprised of AWN members, meets monthly. Members elect an
Executive Committee once a year to serve as the principal decision-making body for AWN. The AWN
also has an Advisory Committee to assist with strategic planning, coordinate with international
NGOs, support fundraising efforts, and advise the Executive Committee. AWN continues to publish
the monthly
Ertiqa
Magazine and a youth magazine. It maintains a library and internet cafe for
use by women’s NGOs, and AWN’s website allows member organisations to submit activity reports
and access training and other resources online.
Af-Pak
Af-Pak, an acronym for “Afghanistan-Pakistan,” was coined by the Obama administration to include
PMkisPMn in iPs sPrMPegic vocMNulMry relMPing Po AfgOMnisPMnB TOe Perm signi�es M sOifP in US foreign
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policy toward a coordinated two-front approach in the region, emphasising that the political and
military circumstances in each country are intrinsically linked, and that one cannot be addressed
without the other.
Obama unveiled his Af-Pak Strategy in March 2009, at which time he committed 17,000
additional troops and 4,000 additional trainers for the
AfgOMn NMPionMl SecuriPy Forces (ANA, pB
D, Mnd ANP, pB 6), Ms Rell Ms signi�cMnP foreign Mid Po PMkisPMnB HP focuses more inPensively on
diplomMPic relMPions RiPO POe PMkisPMni governmenP POMn in POe pMsP, Nringing signi�cMnP increMses
in US and international economic and military support.
In October 2009, President Obama signed the Enhanced Partnership with Pakistan Act (more
commonly knoRn Ms POe Kerry-IugMr Bill) ROicO Pripled civiliMn Mid Po PMkisPMn Po $7BD Nillion over
POe nexP �ve yeMrsB TOe Nill RMs meP RiPO some puNlic opposiPion in PMkisPMn NecMuse of POe
conditions it sets for the aid to be delivered. The same month, US Secretary of State
Hillary Clinton
visiPed POe counPry Po reMf�rm POe US commiPmenP ROile Mlso pressuring POe governmenP Po deliver
on counterinsurgency promises.
Hn NovemNer 200E, ONMmM Mnnounced 30,000 more Proops for AfgOMnisPMn, Nringing POe projecPed
US troop strength in the country to over 100,000. Obama also stated that the United States would
begin some degree of withdrawal by July 2011 and aim to hand over security responsibility to
the Government of Afghanistan. By December 2009, 25 other nations had announced that they
would also deploy a total of 7,000 additional troops in 2010.
Source: US Central Command
US Troop Levels in Afghanistan, 2001–2010
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Afghanistan Centre at Kabul University (ACKU)
www.ackuaf.org
TOe AfgOMnisPMn FenPre MP KMNul UniversiPy (AFKU) is M nonpro�P orgMnisMPion POMP collecPs Mnd
makes available resources to contribute to an understanding of the social, economic, political
and cultural dynamics of Afghan society in the past, present and future, and facilitate research
that addresses Afghanistan’s nation-building challenges. With more than 19,000 catalogued
items (and a total of 48,000 volumes), it provides the most comprehensive collection of materials
relMPed Po AfgOMnisPMn in POe regionB Formerly POe AFBAR Resource Mnd HnformMPion FenPre (ARHF;
see ACBAR, p. 23), ACKU was established independently at
Kabul University in September 2005.
The collections—in Dari, Pashto, English and other languages—are largely generated by the Afghan
government, UN agencies, NGOs, and international scholars and observers. They contain practical
works on health and agricultural practices, political analyses, unique internal documents charting
POe sPruggle for Romen’s rigOPs, recenP lMRs, rMre mujMOiddin puNlicMPions, culPurMl OeriPMge
issues, and many works of Afghan literature. ACKU also holds bodies of research conducted before
POe con�icP erM: 2D FGs of folk music collecPed Ny MnPOropologisP
Louis Dupree in 1969, 1970
and 1975, and some 700 CDs of oral folklore and histories collected by
Margaret Mills during
the 1970s. In 2007, in collaboration with the
University of Arizona and funded by the
EndoRmenP for POe HumMniPies, AFKU NegMn M projecP Po creMPe Mn online digiPMl cMPMlogue of Mll
ACKU resource centre holdings.
The ACKU reading room provides students, faculty and policymakers with computers connected to
the internet and the ACKU database. The audiovisual section contains current news reports and
various videotapes on NGO programmes, events in Afghanistan’s recent history, and ethnographic
Mnd culPurMl �lmsB TOe AFKU sPMcks Mnd reMding room Mre locMPed in POe cenPrMl liNrMry of KMNul
UniversiPyB A neR, US$2 million fMciliPy is under consPrucPion on POe universiPy cMmpus, funded Ny
POe AfgOMn governmenPB FomplePion is projecPed for mid-2010B
ACKU also operates the
ACKU Box Library Extension (ABLE), designed to provide libraries for
provincial communities, high schools and councils. Managed by local community custodians
(including teachers, NGO staff, shopkeepers and
), the box libraries (small, shelved
containers on wheels) hold a wide variety of titles on topics ranging from history to the environment,
home management to good health practices, the use of computers, and dictionaries. ABLE, which
supplies libraries in 32 out of 34 provinces, also publishes its own easy-to-read books for new
liPerMPes on suNjecPs sucO Ms POose given MNove Ms Rell Ms moPOer-cOild cMre, MgriculPure, MnimMl
welfare, and Islam. To date, ABLE has published more than 171 titles in both Dari and Pashto and
provided 123,750 books to 184 schools, community centres, and provincial council libraries.
Afghanistan Compact
For POe full PexP of POe FompMcP, see pB 12DB
The Afghanistan Compact was launched together with the
Interim Afghanistan National
Development Strategy (see ANDS, p. 15) at the January 2006
London Conference (p. 51). It is
A to Z
13
M �ve-yeMr frMmeRork for cooperMPion Mmong POe AfgOMn governmenP, POe
UN, and donors, and
was developed through consultation among these actors. The Compact—endorsed by
UN Security
Founcil ResoluPions 16DE, 1662 Mnd 1746—reMf�rms POe commiPmenP of POe AfgOMn governmenP
and the international community to work toward a stable and prosperous Afghanistan, with good
governance and human rights protection for all under the rule of law. It states:
The Afghan Government hereby commits itself to realising this shared vision of the
fuPure; POe inPernMPionMl communiPy, in Purn, commiPs iPself Po provide resources Mnd
supporP Po reMlise POMP visionB
The Compact establishes a mechanism for coordinating Afghan and international development
and reconstruction efforts and follows the
Bonn Agreement (p. 27), which formally ended with
the holding of legislative and provincial council elections in September 2005. Consistent with the
I-ANDS and the goals articulated by the Afghan government in its
Millennium Development Goals
(MGGs, pB D2) FounPry ReporP 200D (“Vision 2020”), POe FompMcP idenPi�es POree criPicMl Mnd
interdependent areas of activity, or “pillars”: 1) Security; 2) Governance, Rule of Law and Human
Rights; and 3) Economic and Social Development. A further vital and cross-cutting area of work
highlighted in the Compact is eliminating the narcotics industry.
Annex I of the Compact sets out detailed outcomes, benchmarks, and timelines for delivery,
consistent with the high-level goals set by the I-ANDS. Annex II sets forth the commitment of
the Afghan government and the international community to improve the effectiveness and
accountability of international assistance. These actors also established the
Joint Coordination
and Monitoring Board (JCMB, p. 47) to oversee and provide regular public reports on the execution
of the Compact and the ANDS.
Afghanistan Country Stability Picture (ACSP)
gisBnc3MBnMPoBinPCMcsp
Afghanistan Country Stability Picture (ACSP) is a tool designed to provide countrywide
informMPion Mnd visiNiliPy on reconsPrucPion Mnd developmenP projecPs, pMrPiculMrly mulPi-donor
and multi-agency activities. An initiative of the
HnPernMPionMl SecuriPy AssisPMnce Force (HSAF, pB
45), the ACSP is based on an extensive database and can be graphically depicted in such formats
as maps, graphs and tables. The database contains up-to-date information on more than 109,000
projecPs from 140 sources, including POe AfgOMn governmenP, donors,
Provincial Reconstruction
Teams (PRT, p. 64), and international organisations.
TOe AFSP is puNlisOed on HSAF’s ReNsiPe Mnd periodicMlly disPriNuPed viM GVG Po POe inPernMPionMl
military, government ministries, and NGOs. The most recent version, Edition 20, was released in
EfforPs Po improve POe MccurMcy Mnd compreOensiveness of POe AFSP Mre ongoingB FuPure plMns
for the ACSP are for it to reside within the
Ministry of Economy’s Central Monitoring and Reporting
System (CMRS), as part of the
Afghan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15).
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
AfgOMnisPMn GevelopmenP Forum (AGF)
www.adf.gov.af
AfgOMnisPMn GevelopmenP Forum (AGF) is M mecOMnism for discussion of POe AfgOMn
government’s reconstruction and development plans and the mobilisation of resources. It brings
together the government of Afghanistan, bilateral and multilateral donors,
UN agencies, NGOs,
Mnd privMPe-secPor represenPMPivesB Four AGFs OMve Neen convened since POe signing of POe
Agreement—in 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2007.
TOe mosP recenP AGF RMs Oeld in KMNul on 2E-30 April 2007B TOe AfgOMn governmenP presenPed
its strategies on health, energy and education, and papers were presented on aid effectiveness,
provinciMl developmenP plMns, Mnd cMpMciPy developmenPB Hn M speecO Po POe AGF pMrPicipMnPs,
Hamid Karzai expressed gratitude to Afghanistan’s international partners, and
highlighted both progress and priority concerns in the areas of health, education, capacity
development, aid coordination, anti-corruption, counter-narcotics, energy, security, and regional
cooperMPionB RecommendMPions POMP Mrose from POe 2007 AGF Rere designed Po feed inPo POe
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15).
Commission (AIHRC)
www.aihrc.org.af
Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHRC) was established as part of
the Bonn Agreement (p. 27), and it became a permanent national institution under the 2004
FonsPiPuPion (pB E6)B Hn de�ning POe Fommission’s role, POe FonsPiPuPion sPMPes:
The State, for the purpose of monitoring the observation of human rights in Afghanistan,
Mnd POeir promoPion Mnd proPecPion, sOMll esPMNlisO POe HndependenP HumMn RigOPs
Fommission of AfgOMnisPMnB Everyone in cMse of violMPion of OisCOer OumMn rigOPs cMn
reporP or complMin Po POis FommissionB TOe Fommission cMn refer POe cMses of violMPion
of the human rights of the persons to the legal authorities, and assist them in defending
POeir rigOPsB SPrucPure Mnd mode of funcPion of POis Fommission Rill Ne regulMPed Ny
lMRB
AIHRC played a leading role in the Human Rights Working Group of the
Consultative Group (CG,
p. 30) process, and provided input and recommendations on human rights issues for inclusion
in the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15). Representatives on the AIHRC
NoMrd serve �ve-yeMr Perms Mnd Mre nominMPed Ny POe PresidenP of AfgOMnisPMnB
Hn recenP yeMrs, AHHRF creMPed Mnd equipped PrMnsiPionMl jusPice moniPoring Mnd invesPigMPion
teams. It has also been involved in the implementation of human rights education curriculum
around the country for grades one through six, with grades seven through twelve soon to follow.
AIHRC has developed radio shows, broadcast in six provinces, promoting information on human
A to Z
rights, and hosted media roundtables to raise awareness of human rights. The Commission’s
current work also concerns the rights of Afghan nationals who have been detained.
The AIHRC offers the publication
Human Rights Monthly
free of charge. AIHRC also runs a resource
centre in Kabul, open to the public.
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS)
www.ands.gov.af
The Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS) is intended to be the central framework
for Afghanistan’s development, aiming to promote pro-poor growth, support the development of
democratic processes and institutions, and reduce poverty and vulnerability. It aims to lay out the
strategic priorities and mechanisms for achieving the government’s overall development vision
and serves as the country’s
Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP, p. 63),
a key document used
by the
World Bank and the
HnPernMPionMl MonePMry Fund in Mssessing M counPry’s eligiNiliPy for deNP
reliefB TOe developmenP of POe ANGS RMs �rsP proposed MP POe 200D
Afghanistan Development
Forum (AGF, pB 14)B TOe �nMl ANGS RMs Mpproved Ny PresidenP
Hamid Karzai on 21 April 2008 and
subsequently presented at the
Paris Conference in June 2008 (p. 61) to gain support from the
international community for its implementation.
The Government intends for the ANDS to articulate both a policy framework and a road map for
implementation, translating strategic priorities into effective programs that deliver both immediate
and lasting results for the Afghan people. Together with the
Afghanistan Compact (p. 12), the
full ANDS is meant to provide a path to achieving Afghanistan’s
Millennium Development Goals
(MDGs, p. 52) by 2020.
TOe precursor Po POe �nMl ANGS RMs POe HnPerim ANGS (H-ANGS), ROicO RMs Mpproved Ny POe
Government in December 2005 and presented with the Afghanistan Compact at the January
London Conference (p. 51). In 2006, the Government and its international partners began
Hn MccordMnce RiPO POe AfgOMnisPMn FompMcP, POe prioriPies Mnd cOMllenges of POe �nMl ANGS Mre
organised under three broad pillars: 1) Security; 2) Governance, Rule of Law and Human Rights;
Mnd 3) Economic Mnd SociMl GevelopmenPB TOe �nMl ANGS comprises sPrMPegies for 17 secPors,
which fall under eight sub-pillars:
H) SecuriPy; HH) Good GovernMnce; HHH) HnfrMsPrucPure Mnd NMPurMl Resources; HV) EducMPion Mnd
FulPure; V) HeMlPO Mnd NuPriPion; VH) AgriculPure Mnd RurMl GevelopmenP; VHH) SociMl ProPecPion; Mnd
VHHH) Economic GovernMnce Mnd PrivMPe SecPor GevelopmenPB
It also includes strategies for six cross-cutting issues: Capacity Building, Gender Equity, Counter
Narcotics, Regional Cooperation, Anti-Corruption, and Environment.
The sector strategies cover the period SY1387-1391 (2007-08 to 2012-13). They can be downloaded
from: RRRBMndsBgovBMfCMndsCMnds_docsCindexBMspB For POe sPrucPure of POe ANGS, see pB 16B
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Structure of the
Afghanistan National Development Strategy
(Source: Government of Afghanistan)
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17
to implement the I-ANDS and to develop it into a full strategy to meet the requirements of a PRSP.
The I-ANDS covered the period 2006-10 and was linked intrinsically to the implementation of the
AfgOMnisPMn FompMcP; every FompMcP NencOmMrk RMs re�ecPed Ms M �ve-yeMr sPrMPegic oNjecPive
in the interim strategy.
The preparation of the full ANDS was coordinated by the
ANDS Secretariat and supervised by the
ANDS Oversight Committee (OSC), comprising seven cabinet ministers. The
Joint Coordination
and Monitoring Board (JCMB, p. 47), the high-level governing body overseeing the implementation
of the Afghanistan Compact, also provided guidance for the preparation of the ANDS.
The sector strategies, completed by the end of 2007, were drafted by
Sector Strategy Development
Groups (SSDGs) comprising representatives from sector ministries, the
MinisPry of FinMnce (MoF),
and the cross-cutting themes.
TOe �rsP sPep in POe ANGS developmenP process RMs POe prepMrMPion of 43 individuMl sPrMPegies Ny
all government ministries and agencies, following a template provided by the ANDS Secretariat.
After their completion in mid-2007, through
Consultative Groups (CG, p. 30), donor dialogue
meetings, and poverty analysis based on
NMPionMl Risk Mnd VulnerMNiliPy AssessmenPs (NRVA,
p. 57), these ministry and agency strategies were then reviewed and strengthened before being
merged into draft sector strategies. A sub-national consultation process organised in all 34
provinces, which resulted in
Provincial Development Plans (PDP, p. 63), was aimed at ensuring
POe �nMl ANGS re�ecPed M NroMd consensus on developmenP prioriPies RiPOin AfgOMn sociePyB
Key dates in the ANDS process

Benchmarks for the Afghanistan Compact drafted
Afghanistan Compact and the I-ANDS presented at the London Conference
2007
Mar.
Work on developing ministry strategies begins
AprB
AfgOMnisPMn GevelopmenP Forum; PGPs Necome pMrP of POe ANGS process
May
Ministry strategies completed
ANDS consultation process launched
Aug.
Work on developing sector strategies begins
Sector strategies sent to donors for comments
Sector strategies completed
MMrB
Gonors inviPed Po commenP on �nMl drMfP of ANGS
AprB
PresidenP Mpproves �nMl ANGS
ANDS launched at the Paris Conference
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
18
AfPer POe secPor sPrMPegies Rere �nMlised, POe
ANDS Oversight Committee prioritised them using
Mpproved criPeriM, including implemenPMPion resources MvMilMNle for POe �ve yeMrs POMP folloRed (Ms
idenPi�ed Ny POe ANGS MMcroeconomic FrMmeRork)B
The ANDS Secretariat, in cooperation with the line ministries, combined the sector strategies
inPo POe drMfP ANGSB TOe �nMl ANGS RMs revieRed Ny POe FGs Mnd senP for MpprovMl Po POe ANGS
Oversight Committee, ensuring that the strategy as a whole was in line with government priorities
and the Afghanistan Compact benchmarks.
JiPO POe �nMlisMPion of POe ANGS documenP, POe GovernmenP is focusing on implemenPMPion Mnd
monitoring of the sector strategies. The ANDS Oversight Committee has been restructured into the
Government Coordinating Committee (GCC), which is responsible for the high-level coordination of
the ANDS process as well as overseeing and reporting on the implementation of ANDS. The GCC
is made up of eight ministers, the National Security Advisor to the President, the Chief Economic
Advisor to the President, the Director General of the Independent Directorate of Local Governance,
Mnd POe GepuPy MinisPer of FinMnce; POe Rork of POe GFF is Po Ne supporPed Ny M secrePMriMPB JOile
line ministries have the primary responsibility for implementation of the ANDS, the Ministries of
FinMnce Mnd Economy PMke POe leMd role in mMnMging Mnd moniPoring POis processB To do so, POe
ANGS FoordinMPion of HmplemenPMPion Mnd GevelopmenP UniP RMs esPMNlisOed in POe MoF, Ms Rell
as the Monitoring and Evaluation Unit in the
Ministry of Economy.
The Afghan government is also taking steps to establish 17 Sectoral
Inter-Ministerial Committees
(IMCs), each of which will be responsible for coordinating and implementing ANDS sector
sPrMPegiesB Fomprised of relevMnP minisPers, POe HMFs Rill Ne co-cOMired Ny POe MoF Mnd reporP Po
the President and Cabinet through the GCC. The structure of the JCMB was also changed to better
address the challenges of implementation.
Afghanistan New Beginnings Programme (ANBP)
www.anbp.af.undp.org
TOe AfgOMnisPMn NeR Beginnings ProgrMmme (ANBP) is M UNGP-sponsored projecP esPMNlisOed
in April 2003 to implement the Afghan government’s goal of
Disarmament, Demobilisation and
Reintegration (DDR). ANBP has since evolved to encompass the
Disbandment of Illegal Armed
Groups (DIAG) and the
Anti-Personnel Mine & Ammunition Stockpile Destruction (APMASD).
TOe governmenP �rsP Mnnounced iPs inPenPion Po pursue M nMPionMl volunPMry GGR process MP
Tokyo MeePing (pB 67) in FeNruMry 2003, Ms pMrP of iPs
Security Sector Reform (SSR, p. 65)
sPrMPegyB TOrougO GGR, POe AfgOMn MiliPMry Forces (AMF)—comprising POe NorPOern AlliMnce,
warlord militias, and other Taliban-era armed groups—were supposed to surrender their weapons
and be reintegrated into civilian life. Soldiers who handed in their weapons through the DDR
process received M medMl Mnd M cerPi�cMPe, Mnd Rere offered M rMnge of reinPegrMPion pMckMges
such as vocational training, agricultural training, and small-business opportunities.
ANBP completed the disarmament and demobilisation segments of the DDR process by June
2005, and reintegration activities continued until June 2006. The ANBP’s original mandate was
A to Z
to demobilise and reintegrate 100,000 soldiers over three years, though this number was later
revised downward. When the DDR process formally came to an end in June 2006, 63,380 former
AMF of�cers Mnd soldiers OMd Neen disMrmed Mnd 2DE AMF uniPs OMd Neen decommissionedB
A vMsP mMjoriPy of POese ex-comNMPMnPs, DD,804, cOose one of POe reinPegrMPion opPions, ROicO
Nene�Ped D3,41D of POem, leMving Mside 2,7DE drop-ouPsB Only 2B3% of POe former comNMPMnPs
cOose Po join POe
Afghan National Army (ANA, p. 5).
With the completion of DDR in 2005, ANBP shifted its focus to support the government’s
APMASD and DIAG initiatives. Implemented by the
Ministry of Defence (MoD), APMASD assisted
the government in meeting its obligations as a State Party to the Convention on the Prohibition
of Use, Stockpiling, Production and Transfer of Anti-Personnel Mines and on Their Destruction
(more commonly known as the
OPPMRM FonvenPion)B By POe Pime POe projecP RMs complePed
in January 2009, it had surveyed a total of nearly 37,000 metric tonnes of ammunition and
destroyed approximately 20,000 metric tons. In addition, over 500,000 anti-personnel mines
were destroyed.
DIAG, which is slated to end in March 2011, is designed to disband the estimated 100,000 armed
miliPiM �gOPers operMPing ouPside POe former AMFB JOile GGR RMs M volunPMry process, GHAG is
mandatory and supported by both presidential decree and national legislation. Because DIAG
deals with illegal groups, it does not offer a reintegration package the way in which DDR did.
Instead of providing individual incentives for commanders or armed groups, DIAG focuses on
securing M sMfe environmenP Mnd projecPs POMP Rill Nene�P communiPiesB
SupporPed Ny ANBP, GHAG is M governmenP-led projecP under POe MuPOoriPy of POe GisMrmMmenP
& Reintegration Commission (D&RC). DIAG strategy, development and operations are led by the
D&RC, assisted by DIAG’s Joint Secretariat. The Joint Secretariat includes representatives from
National Directorate of Security (NDS), the Ministry of Defence (MoD), the
Ministry of Interior
UNAMA (p. 68), and the
HnPernMPionMl SecuriPy AssisPMnce Force (HSAF, pB 4D)B ANBP direcPly
provides personnel, policy, technical and logistic support in the implementation of DIAG, including
support to the Joint Secretariat. In November 2008, a DIAG Unit was established within the MoI to
enhance the government’s capacity to implement the initiative on its own.
By June 2009, DIAG had collected approximately 45,000 weapons; 105 districts had been
targeted and 73 of them had complied, and 599 illegal armed groups (IAGs) had signed the DIAG
Statement of Declaration, announced that they had disbanded their groups, and had handed over
their weapons.
AfgOMnisPMn NGO SMfePy Of�ce (ANSO)
www.afgnso.org
TOe AfgOMnisPMn NGO SMfePy Of�ce (ANSO), esPMNlisOed in 2003, provides M free securiPy Mdvice
service cMPering speci�cMlly Po POe needs of POe NGO communiPy in AfgOMnisPMnB HP is �nMnced Ny
EuropeMn Fommission HumMniPMriMn Aid Of�ce (EFHO), POe
Swiss Agency for Development and
Cooperation (SDC), and the
NorRegiMn MinisPry of Foreign AffMirsB Hn July 2006, ANSO cMme under
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
the administration of
Welthungerhilfe (formerly known as
German Agro Action); it was previously
International Rescue Committee (IRC).
ANSO is OeMdquMrPered in KMNul Mnd OMs regionMl of�ces in KMNul, MMzMr-i-SOMrif, HerMP, JMlMlMNMd
and Kandahar. All of ANSO’s national and international staff are experienced in safety and security
matters. NGOs registered with ANSO have access to regularly scheduled services, which include:
Daily threat warnings and security alerts, weekly incident listings, and biweekly and quarterly
reporPs MnMlysing Mnd projecPing securiPy Prends
Weekly regional security meetings
Monthly orientations for staff of NGOs
Representation of NGOs in relations with national and international security agencies
Training for guards and radio operators
ANSO may also provide other services upon request, depending on its available capacity. These
Countrywide safety information for NGO movement
Reviews of member NGOs’ security plans and site security
Security-related statistical data and analysis
Crisis response services
AfgOMnisPMn PMrliMmenPMry AssisPMnce ProjecP (APAP)
www.sunyaf.org
USAHG-funded AfgOMnisPMn PMrliMmenPMry AssisPMnce ProjecP (APAP) RMs lMuncOed in 2004 Po
assist in establishing a parliament that “is able to operate as a strong, independent and effective
deliNerMPive NodyB” TOe projecP’s primMry oNjecPives Mre Po:
Implement a programme to establish and develop such a parliament
Design a legislative strengthening strategy
Provide technical assistance to the National Assembly’s committees
SPrengPOen POe NMPionMl AssemNly’s represenPMPionCouPreMcO, legislMPive Mnd oversigOP
EsPMNlisO Mnd supporP M pMrliMmenPMry NudgeP of�ce Mnd pMrliMmenPMry educMPionMl insPiPuPe
Through the Afghanistan Parliamentary Institute, APAP works to develop the institutional capacity
of the
National Assembly secretariat to more effectively support Members of Parliament in their
A to Z
legislative roles. APAP also works to strengthen the capacity of the MPs themselves in carrying out
their legislative, representative and oversight responsibilities. This includes, but is not limited to,
helping the National Assembly to increase its engagement with constituents and build its linkages
with the executive branch of government, civil society, NGOs, and the media. Working with the
NMPionMl AssemNly, APAP seeks Po increMse puNlic con�dence Mnd Nuy-in Po POe legislMPive processB
APAP makes available several resources to the international community, including a regularly
published legislative newsletter containing updates on parliamentary activities.
APAP is operated by the Center for International Development at the
State University of New York
(SUNY-CID). In addition to APAP, efforts to assist the Afghan National Assembly include:
Support to
the Establishment of the Afghan Legislature (SEAL) as well as initiatives by
UNHFEM, POe
Democratic Institute, and the
International Republican Institute.
AfgOMnisPMn ReconsPrucPion TrusP Fund (ARTF)
RRRBRorldNMnkBorgCMrPf
TOe AfgOMnisPMn ReconsPrucPion TrusP Fund (ARTF) RMs esPMNlisOed in April 2002 Ms M meMns
for coordinating donor funds in support of the Afghan government’s recurrent expenditures. The
Fund is noR one of POe mosP imporPMnP delivery mecOMnisms for cOMnnelling Mid inPo POe AfgOMn
government’s Core Budget (
National Budget, p. 55)—not only for salaries and operating costs but
also for priority development programmes aimed at achieving the country’s national development
targets.
As of OcPoNer 200E, US$3B6 Nillion OMs Neen pledged Po POe ARTF Ny 30 inPernMPionMl donorsB
TOe ARTF MMnMgemenP FommiPPee consisPs of: POe
World Bank (the administrator), the
Development Bank (IDB), the
Asian Development Bank (ADB),
UNAMA (p. 68), and
UNDP. During
SY1387 (2008-0E), ARTF OMndled US$626 million in donor conPriNuPionsB For SY1388 (200E-10),
pledges OMve reMcOed US$6D4 millionB
TOe prioriPy use of ARTF funds is for POe GovernmenP’s Fore OperMPing
Budget. While government
revenues have increased substantially over the last 8 years, the recurrent costs of running the
governmenP OMve Mlso expMnded, in pMrPiculMr driven Ny POe size of POe securiPy secPorB TOe ARTF
Mlso �nMnces POe mMjor nMPionMl developmenP progrMms in POe Fore GevelopmenP BudgePB Since
POe ARTF’s incepPion (unPil OcPoNer 200E), more POMn US$1B8 Nillion OMs Neen disNursed Po POe
GovernmenP Po �nMnce recurrenP cosPs, Mnd US$ED0 million OMs Neen disNursed for invesPmenP
projecPsB
TOe GovernmenP encourMges donors Po cOMnnel funding POrougO POe ARTF rMPOer POMn POrougO
NGOs or oPOer McPors, NecMuse iP sees POe Fund Ms M RMy of increMsing AfgOMn oRnersOip of
the reconstruction process, facilitating the tracking and coordination of aid, and increasing
PrMnspMrencyB JOen donMPing funds Po POe ARTF, donors Mre MNle Po specify M preference for
supporPing M pMrPiculMr governmenP projecP or progrMmme; sucO preferences Mre limiPed Po D0%
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
ARTF OMs �nMnced severMl core nMPionMl developmenP progrMmmes, including POe NMPionMl
Solidarity Programme (NSP, p. 58), the
National Emergency Employment Programme (NEEP), the
EducMPionMl QuMliPy HmprovemenP ProjecP (EQUHP), POe
Emergency TelecommunicMPions ProjecP,
Micro�nMnce HnvesPmenP SupporP FMciliPy for AfgOMnisPMn (MHSFA, pB D2), Mnd rurMl Mnd urNMn
RMPer supply Mnd sMniPMPionB More recenPly, ARTF OMs Neen cOMnnelling pooled �nMnce PoRMrd
projecPs Ms pMrP of POe jusPice secPor sPrMPegy Mnd for POe
Civil Service Commission’s Management
FMpMciPy ProgrMm, Mn efforP Po recruiP quMli�ed AfgOMns inPo line minisPriesB
TOe ARTF underRenP PRo independenP exPernMl revieRs, ROicO resulPed in M numNer of
modi�cMPionsB AfPer Mn exPensive 200D evMluMPion, POe ARTF governMnce sPrucPure RMs modi�ed
to include the
MinisPry of FinMnce Ms Mn oNserver MP monPOly MMnMgemenP FommiPPee meePingsB
The Performance Assessment Matrix was also introduced to provide a stronger platform of mutual
MccounPMNiliPy for POe use of POe ARTF funds Mnd Po sPrengPOen POe role of POe Gonor FommiPPeeB
FolloRing POe second exPernMl evMluMPion, complePed in AugusP 2008, POe ARTF is evolving
toward a more programmatic, sector-oriented funding mechanism to drive the implementation
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15) priorities. In addition, since 2008
POe governmenP Mnd donors Mre using POe ARTF’s considerMNle leverMge Po supporP key economic
governMnce reforms, including revenue generMPionB TOis process, led Ny M joinP governmenPCdonor
Working Group, and facilitated by the World Bank, attaches reform targets on an annual basis to
funding levels.
TOe lMrgesP conPriNuPors Po POe Fund Mre POe UniPed Kingdom, POe UniPed SPMPes, Mnd FMnMdMB
Other donors include 15 European countries, the EC, India, Iran, Turkey, Australia, and the Gulf
States.
Afghanistan Rural Enterprise Development
Program (AREDP)
RRRBmrrdBgovBMfCMredp
TOe AfgOMnisPMn RurMl EnPerprise GevelopmenP ProgrMm (AREGP) is M nMPionMl �ve-yeMr projecP
ROicO Mims Po jumpsPMrP privMPe secPor groRPO in rurMl AfgOMnisPMnB EsPimMPed MP $87 million,
AREDP is managed by the Government of Afghanistan through the AREDP Program Management
Of�ce (PMO) RiPOin POe
Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development (MRRD), and is supported
by the
Jorld BMnk, POe AfgOMnisPMn ReconsPrucPion TrusP Fund (ARTF, pB 21), Mnd oPOer NilMPerMl
donorsB AREGP is expecPed Po Necome effecPive in FeNruMry 2010 Mnd Rill Negin implemenPMPion
in MpproximMPely 4,300 communiPies in �ve provincesB
AREDP seeks to cluster smaller existing microenterprises as well as community groups and
MssociMPions, PrMnsforming POem inPo lMrger, more ef�cienP enPerprise MssociMPionsB TOese Mre
then intended to have the ability to establish linkages to the rural economy as well as local and
regional markets. The proposed key elements of the programme are: formation and development
of community-level groups; provision of enterprise support services, such as technical assistance
offered by provincial-level business development centres; developing private-public partnerships;
A to Z
Mnd supporPing Mccess Po �nMnciMl services POrougO links Po micro�nMnce insPiPuPions Mnd
commercial banks.
TOe projecP is comprised of POree key componenPs:
FommuniPy-Ied EnPerprise GevelopmenP
This component aims to create Savings Groups (SGs),
EnPerprise Groups (EGs), Mnd VillMge SMvings Mnd IoMns AssociMPions (VSIAs)B TOese insPiPuPions Rill
be assisted and trained to build their own capacities, increase the value of trading, ensure production
is orienPed PoRMrd idenPi�ed mMrkeP opporPuniPies, Mnd creMPe Mccess Po crediPB TOe projecP’s enPry
point will be through the
National Solidarity Programme (NSP, p. 58) CDC’s male and female elected
committees, and, where possible, build on existing groups and institutions—e.g., Self Help Groups
(SHGs), Common Interest Groups (CIGs), Cooperatives, etc. This component will aim to maximise the
economic potential of rural entrepreneurs to improve market access, deliver technical knowledge,
raise basic business skills, and leverage economies of scale to increase the value of their sales.
SmMll Mnd Medium EnPerprise (SME) GevelopmenP
This component aims to support the emergence
of a stronger SME sector with improved trading linkages with the rural economy and adequate
Mccess Po �nMnciMl servicesB TOe projecP Rill idenPify key vMlue cOMins, cOoke poinPs, Mnd skill gMps
in each province, and enable SMEs to gain access to technical support necessary for market
developmenPB HP Rill fMciliPMPe improved Mccess Po �nMnce POrougO M POree-pronged sPrMPegy: 1)
a risk-sharing mechanism in the form of a partial guarantee will address risks related to the
provision of credit for rural SMEs; 2) provision of support for capacity building and new product
development for partner banks will address the lack of institutional capacity and appropriate
producPs Mnd services; Mnd 3) supporPed SMEs Rill Ne MNle Po idenPify Mnd presenP POeir �nMncing
requirements in line with the needs of partner banks.
The selection criteria for SME support will be weighted toward those businesses, or sectors, that
Mre judged mosP likely Po creMPe demMnd for locMlly produced producPs MndCor generMPe NoPO
direct and indirect employment.
ProjecP HmplemenPMPion SupporP
: TOis componenP Rill supporP MRRG projecP mMnMgemenP,
monitoring and evaluation; governance and accountability action plan design; gender action plan
design and implementation; and third-party audits.
Agency Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief (ACBAR)
www.acbar.org
Agency Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief (ACBAR) is an umbrella organisation that
facilitates transparency, accountability and coordination among NGOs in Afghanistan. ACBAR was
established in 1988 by NGOs working with Afghan refugees in Pakistan and acts as a conduit for
information among the UN, NGOs, donors, and the Afghan government. Among its funders are the
Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), the Norwegian and Dutch governments,
and the European Commission.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
ACBAR has a membership of 106 national and international NGOs. Membership is open to
nongovernmenPMl, nonpro�P orgMnisMPions POMP meeP cerPMin criPeriMB All memNers Mre required
to sign the Afghanistan NGO Code of Conduct (p. 60), which was launched in May 2005. The
General Assembly of the ACBAR membership meets twice a year, and the 16 members of the
steering committee (of which 12 are full members and 4 are alternate members) meet monthly
in Kabul. The chairperson of the steering committee is always Afghan, while other members are
represenPMPives of NoPO AfgOMn Mnd inPernMPionMl NGOsB Hn MddiPion Po iPs mMin of�ce in KMNul,
AFBAR OMs suN-of�ces in HerMP, JMlMlMNMd Mnd MMzMr-i-SOMrifB
ACBAR organises its work along two basic lines: the InfoCoord team is responsible for
disseminating information, organising meetings, publishing a weekly bulletin, maintaining an NGO
Directory, and other communication initiatives; the Advocacy and Policy team facilitates the
excOMnge of vieRs Mnd informMPion Mmong NGOs Po Oelp POem “develop Mnd susPMin M joinP, �eld-
led voice on key issues as they develop.”
ACBAR regularly conducts workshops on the NGO Law and Code of Conduct for ministries,
governmenP depMrPmenPs, Mnd NGOs, ROicO OMve PMken plMce in KMNul, MMzMr-i-SOMrif, FMryMN,
SMmMngMn, JMRzjMn, SMr-i-Pul, Kunduz, TMkOMr, BMmiyMn, KMndMOMr, PMrRMn, HerMP, IMgOmMn
and Jalalabad. Its activities aim to build capacity among NGO and civil society organisations as
well as to educate stakeholders in funding patterns and requirements of legislation. ACBAR also
assists in the appointment of NGO representatives to government-led, inter-agency coordination
mechanisms. In addition, ACBAR has played a coordination role between civil society and military
actors.
ACBAR represented the NGO community at the
AfgOMnisPMn GevelopmenP ForM (AGF, pB 14) in 2004,
2005 and 2007. ACBAR represented NGOs and the civil society at the 2008 Paris Conference (p.
61) and the 2009
Hague Conference (p. 40). ACBAR hosted a secretariat to represent Afghan civil
society in the
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15) process and continues
raising awareness of ANDS implementation to Members of Parliament.
In 2007, ACBAR launched the Afghanistan Pilot Participatory Poverty Assessment (APPPA), in
cooperation with civil society and the
Asian Development Bank (ADB), which aimed to document,
disseminate and advocate the perspectives of the poor on poverty; its results were intended to
feed into the ANDS. Several advocacy papers assessing the results of APPPA were printed in late
2008 on topics such as aid effectiveness, agriculture, education, health, social protection, and
water. In 2008, ACBAR also completed its run of informative radio dramas combating negative
perceptions of NGOs in Afghanistan.
In 2009, ACBAR continued its activities in the collection and sharing of vital information through
iPs ReNsiPe, ROicO includes M Rell-knoRn joN MnnouncemenP NoMrdB TOe Mgency Mlso Mdvised
numerous NGOs on the implementation of the Income Tax Law and the Labor Law, and participated
in numerous fora in and outside Afghanistan.
A to Z
Alternative Livelihoods (AL)
AlPernMPive IiveliOoods (AI) is POe Perm given Po rurMl developmenP McPiviPies speci�cMlly Mimed MP
supporting farmers and other rural workers with alternatives to opium poppy cultivation. AL is one
of the eight pillars of the Afghan government’s counter-narcotics strategy (See
Counter-Narcotics,
p. 32). Other terminology in use also describes these kinds of activities; for example, “Alternative
Development” is used by USAID, drawing from its experience in Colombia. The Ministry of Counter
Narcotics (MCN) has a department dedicated to AL, which oversees the Alternative Livelihoods
Implementation Plan approved by President
Karzai in July 2005. This entity also works toward
greMPer engMgemenP Ny donors in AI, Ms Rell Ms more coOerenP delivery of relMPed �nMnciMl Mnd
technical support.
In the short term, AL programmes seek to support those who have lost their livelihoods through
self-restraint from planting or forced eradication of their crops. This includes cash-for-work
projecPs POMP Nuild Mnd reOMNiliPMPe rurMl infrMsPrucPure, creMPe greMPer income generMPion,
and allow skill-building activities for vulnerable households. In the long term, AL programmes
are meant to be comprehensive rural-development initiatives, aiming to generate sustainable
economic development by providing opium farmers and labourers with alternative crop options,
credit mechanisms, business support, market access, and social safety nets.
The bulk of AL work has been undertaken by contractors sponsored by
USAID, the European
Commission, and the United Kingdom in association with key ministries, such as MCN and those
Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock;
Rural Rehabilitation and Development;
Public Works; and
Energy Mnd JMPerB HniPiMlly POeir Rork focused on some of POe counPry’s mosP signi�cMnP opium-
producing provinces—including Nangarhar, Laghman, Kandahar, Helmand, Badakhshan, Uruzgan,
GOor Mnd BMlkOB BuP, Ms levels of opium poppy OMve �ucPuMPed, MssisPMnce OMs Neen redirecPed
toward areas where cultivation is concentrated, particularly in the south of the country. Current
debates related to this issue concern the scale of, nature of, and mechanisms for providing
development assistance to those provinces that have been declared “poppy-free” by the
UN Of�ce
MMny rurMl developmenP progrMmmes POMP Mre noP speci�cMlly Mimed MP reducing opium producPion
in Afghanistan will nevertheless contribute to establishing the conditions for reducing cultivation;
these include some of the National Priority Programmes. Others, such as the Horticulture and
Livestock Programme and the National Rural Access Programme, have even been designed to
maximise impact on counter-narcotics outcomes. These programmes, however, are typically not
referred to as AL; it is often unclear whether they are included in the level of AL expenditure stated
by the Afghan government as well bilateral and multilateral agencies.
Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS)
Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS) was developed in 2002 by the
Ministry of Public
HeMlPO (MoPH) in collMNorMPion RiPO mMjor donorsB HP OMs PRo oNjecPives: 1) Po provide M sPMndMrdised
package of health services which forms the core of service delivery in all primary healthcare
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
facilities and 2) to promote a redistribution of health services by providing equitable access based
on population density.
The BPHS entails basic services at low cost and addresses the main causes of morbidity
and mortality. It has a strong focus on conditions that affect women and children. In line with
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs, p. 52), the BPHS aims to provide health
services to all Afghans, especially those who are poor and live in remote and rural areas.
As of GecemNer 200E, in MgreemenP RiPO iPs mMjor donors—primMrily POe
World Bank,
and the European Commission—the MoPH has contracted NGOs to deliver the BPHS in 31 out of
34 provinces Mnd OMs conPrMcPed iPs oRn ProvinciMl HeMlPO Of�ces Po deliver POe BPHS in POree
provinces. Though many initially viewed this public-private partnership with suspicion, it has
yielded positive results, making public health one of Afghanistan’s most effective sectors.
TOe de�ned pMckMge is offered Ny �ve levels of fMciliPy: 1) OeMlPO posPs, 2) OeMlPO suN-cenPres,
3) basic health centres, 4) comprehensive health centres, and 5) district hospitals, as well
Ms Ny MoNile TeMms in very remoPe MreMsB TOe BPHS Mlso provides sPMndMrds for sPMf�ng Mnd
infrastructure reconstruction and rehabilitation for these facilities.
BPHS is providing primary healthcare to more than 80% of Afghans living in rural Afghanistan,
according to an MoPH statement made in December 2008. The BPHS is being revised and the
revision OMs Neen of�ciMlly endorsed Ny POe MoPHB TOe revised BPHS Mdds pOysicMl POerMpisPs
and psycho-social counsellors to selected health facilities and adds primary eye care to the list of
basic services to be made available.
Berlin Meeting and Declarations
On 31 MMrcO–1 April 2004, AfgOMnisPMn’s mMjor donors Mnd developmenP pMrPners MPPended M
meePing in Berlin MP ROicO POe governmenP of AfgOMnisPMn presenPed M mMjor fundrMising documenP,
enPiPled Securing AfgOMnisPMn’s FuPure (SAF)B TOe documenP concluded POMP POe funds required
Po reNuild AfgOMnisPMn Po M sPMge ROere iP is M self-suf�cienP Mnd sPMNle sPMPe Rere MpproximMPely
US$27B4 Nillion over POe folloRing seven yeMrs—suNsPMnPiMlly more POMn POe US$1D Nillion over
ten years requested at the January 2002
Tokyo Ministerial Meeting (p. 67). At the
Berlin meeting,
donors pledged US$8B2 Nillion for POe folloRing POree yeMrs Mnd meP POe governmenP’s immediMPe
need of US$4B2 Nillion for POe 2004-0D �scMl yeMrB
Hn MddiPion Po discussing POe SAF documenP, POe Berlin MeePing gMve POe AfgOMn governmenP
an opportunity to give a progress report on the implementation of the
Bonn Agreement and to
present its current plan. “The Way Ahead: The Work Plan of the Afghan Government” set out
an ambitious agenda for
Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration (DDR, p. 35); election-
relMPed McPiviPies; Mnd iniPiMPives for puNlic MdminisPrMPion, �scMl mMnMgemenP, economic Mnd
social development, gender, counter-narcotics, rule of law, and human rights.
The participants at the meeting signed the
Berlin Declaration, in which the international community
committed to continue supporting the Afghan government in its mission to implement the Bonn
A to Z
Agreement, improve the security situation, and move forward with its development agenda. A
further agreement, the Berlin Declaration on Counter Narcotics, was signed by Afghanistan, China,
HrMn, PMkisPMn, UzNekisPMn, TurkmenisPMn Mnd TMjikisPMnB Hn POis declMrMPion, AfgOMnisPMn Mnd iPs
neighbours agreed to improve coordination in their efforts to eliminate the cultivation, production
Bonn Agreement
Bonn Agreement set out a timetable for the re-establishment of permanent government
institutions in Afghanistan, and served as a roadmap for the creation of provisional arrangements
until permanent ones could be put in place. It was signed on 5 December 2001 by representatives
of various Afghan factions (excluding the
Taliban) at the conclusion of the
UN-sponsored Bonn
Conference on Afghanistan.
The Bonn Agreement laid out several processes, including the Emergency Loya Jirga (ELJ,
p. 37) and the
Constitutional Loya Jirga (CLJ, p. 31), through which power would be exercised
and then transferred over time to a fully representative government selected through free and
fMir elecPionsB HP provided for POe sovereignPy of AfgOMnisPMn Po reside �rsP in POe
Afghan Interim
Authority (AIA), then in the
Afghan Transitional Authority (ATA, p. 9), and ultimately in an elected
government.
The Bonn Agreement was largely adhered to, although security conditions affected timelines. The
Afghan government and the UN successfully established most of the provisional arrangements
called for, except for the withdrawal of “military units from Kabul and other urban centres or other
areas in which the UN mandated force is deployed.” The last milestones of the Agreement were
the presidential and parliamentary elections that took place in October 2004 and September
2005, respectively. In January 2006, the Bonn Agreement was replaced by the Afghanistan
Compact (p. 12).
Budget
See National Budget, p. 55.
Calendars in Afghanistan
Three calendar systems are used in Afghanistan:
HijrMO-i SOMmsi
(solMr HslMmic) cMlendMr, AfgOMnisPMn’s of�ciMl cMlendMr, esPMNlisOed in POe
FonsPiPuPion Mnd in use of�ciMlly since 1ED7 (monPO nMmes differ from POe HrMniMn or PersiMn
forms). In 2010, the Afghan year begins on 1 Hamal 1388 (21 March 2010).
(lunar Islamic) calendar, used for religious events and holidays.
The Gregorian calendar, or
(solar Christian), used in international relations.
TOe ReNsiPe RRRBnongnuBorgCMfgOMncMlendMr provides doRnloMdMNle versions of AfgOMnisPMn’s
of�ciMl cMlendMrsB
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
To convert dates between
and Gregorian years (or to Persian dates using Iranian names) see:
RRRBfourmilMNBcOCdocumenPsCcMlendMr
RRRBirMncOMmNerBcomCcMlendMrCirMniMn_cMlendMr_converPerBpOp
www.cso.gov.af
The Central Statistics Organisation (CSO) is the central government agency responsible for the
collecPion Mnd disseminMPion of of�ciMl sPMPisPicsB TOe FSO collecPs Mnd MnMlyses dMPM from oPOer
government entities—on national accounts, price indexes, external trade, and population and
demogrMpOics—Po Ne used for moniPoring economic, �nMnciMl Mnd sPrucPurMl policies Ms Rell Ms
other activities.
Established in 1973, the CSO was declared an independent body by presidential decree in March
2006. Of its 800 staff, 550 are located at CSO headquarters in Kabul; the remainder is divided
Mmong suN-of�ces in eMcO provinceB TOe FSO reporPs direcPly Po POe PresidenP Mnd is Mdvised Ny
the National Statistics Committee and the National Census Committee (temporarily set up to carry
out the national
census). Both committees include representatives from many ministries and
from the private sector.
TOe Rork of POe FSO is grouped inPo Pen mMjor depMrPmenPs: economic sPMPisPics, demogrMpOic
and social statistics, national accounts, operations, publication and dissemination, strategic
planning and donor relations, administration, internal evaluation and audit, staff training centre,
and a secretariat. Plans are also underway to develop departments of agricultural statistics and
information technology.
Each year, the CSO produces the
Afghanistan Statistical Yearbook
, the
Fonsumer Price Hndex
Yearbook
, the
Afghanistan Trade Statistical Yearbook
(a publication focused on foreign trade),
and the
Estimated Population of Afghanistan
(with data on gender and rural-urban residence
at the provincial and local levels). The CSO also publishes a quarterly volume on foreign trade
statistics, the monthly Consumer Price Index (CPI), and daily updates on consumer price indexes
in Kabul. In 2008, the CSO launched the quarterly
Statistical Magazine
in Dari and Pashto
(previously published from 1976 to 1997) and, with the assistance of
UNHFEF, POe MnnuMlly
updated AfghanInfo (also known as the Afghanistan Socioeconomic Database), which contains all
CSO socioeconomic and demographic data. In 2007, the CSO conducted a survey of facilities for
disabled individuals in Kabul.
CSO created a Statistical Master Plan (SMP) in 2004 with the assistance of the
World Bank, the
Asian Development Bank (ADB), the
HnPernMPionMl MonePMry Fund (HMF), Mnd POe UK GepMrPmenP
for HnPernMPionMl GevelopmenP (GFHG)B Approved in 200D, POe SMP ouPlined M progrMmme designed
to build capacity within the CSO to collect the national data required by the government for its
programming. In mid-2005, the CSO partnered with the
National Surveillance System (NSS, p.
59) to open a unit within the CSO responsible for data collection for the NSS
National Risk and
A to Z
VulnerMNiliPy AssessmenP (NRVA, pB D7)B Hn 2006, M neR sPMPisPics lMR RMs enMcPed Po clMrify POe
of�ciMl funcPions of POe FSO, increMse iPs �exiNiliPy, Mnd ensure MccounPMNiliPy Mnd PrMnspMrencyB
In 2010, CSO will conduct a survey on Afghanistan’s labour force. In 2011, the CSO plans to
carry out the national population census mandated by the Bonn Agreement (p. 27). The last
census of this scope was begun in 1979 but was never completed. The CSO has been involved
in pre-census activities since 2003; initial household listings for all 34 provinces were released
in 2006. In preparation for 2011 census, the CSO has been working on the latest household
listings. As of October 2009, it is 15-20% complete. The census proper will take approximately
21 days and require approximately 37,000 staff. In mid-2007, the CSO initiated a pilot census to
identify obstacles it might have faced in 2008, the year originally scheduled for conducting the
national census. A new pilot census has been planned for 2010. The total budget is estimated at
$67 million: $2 million for POe OouseOold lisPing, $D million for POe piloP census, Mnd $60 million
for the census proper.
All organisations planning to conduct statistical research in Afghanistan are required by law to
coordinate their activities with the CSO.
Civil Service Commission
See Independent Administrative Reform and Civil Service Commission (IARCSC), p. 41.
FoMliPion Forces (FF)
RRRBcsPc-MBcom, RRRBcjPf101Bcom
FoMliPion Forces (FF) is POe generMl Perm used Po descriNe POe US-led miliPMry orgMnisMPion POMP
OMs Neen in AfgOMnisPMn since lMPe 2001B Hn cooperMPion RiPO POe NorPOern AlliMnce, FF overPOreR
TMliNMn regime in NovemNer 2001B Under POe mission of OperMPion Enduring Freedom (OEF),
these troops continue to engage the Taliban and al-Qaeda members in Afghanistan and reshape
the posture of the Afghan defence forces, who will ultimately be responsible for providing long-
Perm securiPy in AfgOMnisPMnB FF Mre M key pMrPner in implemenPing POe AfgOMn governmenP’s
Security Sector Reform (SSR, p. 65).
FoMliPion Forces, mosP recenPly reorgMnised in OcPoNer 2008 Ms
US Forces AfgOMnisPMn (USFOR-A),
are distinct from the UN Security Council-mandated
HnPernMPionMl SecuriPy AssisPMnce Force
(HSAF, pB 4D) POMP is Mlso operMPing in AfgOMnisPMnB USFOR-A is overseen Ny
US Central Command
(FENTFOM) ROile HSAF is M NATO-led forceB Since 6 OcPoNer 2008, OoRever, NoPO USFOR-A Mnd
HSAF OMve fMllen under M single commMnderB On POMP dMy, GenerMl
David D. McKiernan, the senior-
mosP US miliPMry of�cer in AfgOMnisPMn, RMs Mlso nMmed commMnder of USFOR-A, MfPer OMving
Mssumed commMnd of HSAF in June 2008B GenerMl McKiernMn RMs replMced Ny
General Stanley
A. McChrystal in April 2009.
USFOR-A RMs esPMNlisOed Po enOMnce POe coordinMPion Mnd effecPiveness of US supporP Po POe HSAF
missionB HP is inPended Po improve POe uniPy of HSAF Mnd US-led efforPs Ny Mligning Mnd sPreMmlining
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
command and control of all US forces serving in Afghanistan. As of January 2010, approximately
13,D00 Proops Rere Mssigned Po USFOR-AB
USFOR-A OMs PRo primMry suNordinMPe commMnds:
mNined JoinP TMsk Force 101
(FJTF 101),
NMsed MP BMgrMm Air Field, ROicO is responsiNle for
counter-terrorism and reconstruction operations
Combined Security Transition Command—Afghanistan
(FSTF-A)
, headquartered at Camp
Eggers in KMNul, oversees FF involvemenP in POe AfgOMn securiPy secPor, including PrMining of
POe AfgOMn NMPionMl SecuriPy Forces (ANSF)B A miliPMry sPrengPO of more POMn 1,000, FSTF-A
is under POe conProl of FENTFOMB
Under FSTF-A’s operMPionMl conProl is TMsk Force POoenix,
with military strength of more than 6,000, responsible for training, mentoring and advising
Afghan National Army (ANA, p. 5) and the
Afghan National Police (ANP, p. 6). CSTC-A is
M joinP service, coMliPion orgMnisMPion RiPO miliPMry personnel from POe UniPed SPMPes, UniPed
Kingdom, FMnMdM, PolMnd, AlNMniM, GermMny, FrMnce Mnd RomMniM, Ms Rell Ms conPrMcPed
civilian advisors, mentors and trainers.
FomNined JoinP TMsk Force (FJTF 101)
See FoMliPion Forces, pB 2EB
Combined Security Transition Command—Afghanistan
(CSTC-A)
See FoMliPion Forces, pB 2EB
Community Development Council (CDC)
See National Solidarity Programme, p. 58.
Consultative Group (CG)
TOe FonsulPMPive Groups (FGs) Rere secPor-speci�c, governmenP-led enPiPies POMP NrougOP PogePOer
government, donors and civil society to monitor progress toward the Afghanistan Compact
benchmarks and to review the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15). They
Mlso served Po resolve secPor-speci�c issues Mnd cOMllenges, Mnd mMximise POe coordinMPion
of development within Afghanistan. When the
ANGS RMs �nMlised in mid-2008, FGs ceMsed Po
exist. The coordination function between the Government and the international community—of
which CGs were a part—has now shifted to: the
Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB,
p. 47) and its Standing Committees when concerning policy discussions; and the Inter-Ministerial
Committees when concerning implementation.
FGs Rere �rsP esPMNlisOed in eMrly 2003 Po fMciliPMPe inPerMcPion Mmong governmenP, donors,
UN Mgencies, Mnd NGOs on POe 16 NMPionMl GevelopmenP ProgrMmmes (NGPs) idenPi�ed in POe
A to Z
31
NMPionMl GevelopmenP FrMmeRork (NGF, pB D6)B Hn 2006, POe FG mecOMnism RMs resPrucPured Po
align with the Afghanistan Compact (p. 12) and the ANDS—there were eight CGs, corresponding to
the eight sectors of the ANDS. The CG mechanism also supported the OSC in its role as a member
of POe JFMB, ROicO oversees POe ful�lmenP of POe AfgOMnisPMn FompMcP NencOmMrksB
Constitutional Loya Jirga (CLJ)
An English translation of the Constitution is available on p. 96.
The convening of the Constitutional Loya Jirga (CLJ) was the culmination of the process of
agreeing on a new Afghan constitution. The CLJ opened on 14 December 2003 and continued
for 22 days. Of the 500 delegates, 450 were selected through regional elections, and 50 were
appointed by President
KMrzMiB More POMn one-�fPO of POe seMPs Rere MllocMPed for speciMl-cMPegory
representatives, including women, refugees in Pakistan and Iran, internally displaced peoples
(IDPs), Kuchis, Hindus, and Sikhs.
The draft Constitution debated by the CLJ was produced by the Constitutional Drafting Commission
(CDC) and the Constitutional Review Commission (CRC). In mid-2003, after a month of civic
educMPion McPiviPies, M drMfP of POe FonsPiPuPion RMs suNjecP Po M puNlic consulPMPion process Mround
Afghanistan and among refugee communities in Iran and Pakistan.
UNAMA (p. 68) estimates that
178,000 people were reached through these consultations, 19% of whom were women. The CRC
puNlisOed iPs �nMl drMfP of POe FonsPiPuPion on 3 NovemNer 2003B
At the CLJ, delegates were divided into working committees to debate the text of the draft
Constitution. A Reconciliation Committee edited the draft text to incorporate the working
committees’ suggestions. Passionate debates, boycotts, and heated arguments featured in the
discussions that took place. A vote was supposed to be taken on all contentious articles, which
mostly regarded form of government, the role of Islam, national languages, the national anthem,
and the dual nationality of ministers. Although no vote took place, on 4 January 2004 a closing
ceremony RMs Oeld ROere POe delegMPes signMlled POeir MpprovMl of POe �nMl PexP Ny sPMnding upB
TOe FonsPiPuPion RMs of�ciMlly signed on 26 JMnuMry 2004 Ny PresidenP KMrzMiB HP provides for
Mn elecPed PresidenP Mlong RiPO PRo nominMPed Vice PresidenPs, M FMNineP of MinisPers, Mnd M
National Assembly (p. 75) with two houses—the lower
Wolesi Jirga
(House of the People) and the
Meshrano Jirga
(House of Elders). It grants equal citizenship to Afghan men and women,
and commits Afghanistan to uphold its international human rights obligations. It states that
Afghanistan is an Islamic Republic and that no law can be contrary to Islam.
Coordination of Humanitarian Assistance (CHA)
www.cha-net.or
FoordinMPion of HumMniPMriMn AssisPMnce (FHA) is M nonpro�P OumMniPMriMn orgMnisMPion founded
in 1E87B HPs core mission is Po provide emergency Mid for RMr vicPims in POe �eld, Po MssisP RiPO POe
rehabilitation of rural and urban life, and to work with communities for sustainable development
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
FHA NegMn iPs operMPions in PRo disPricPs in FMrMO province, NuP soon expMnded inPo eigOP MddiPionMl
provinces, including KMNul, KMndMOMr, BMlkO, HerMP, GOor, FMryMN, PMrRMn Mnd KMpisMB FHA
employs approximately 2,000 staff, making it one of the largest national NGOs in Afghanistan.
The organisation currently has four departments: Education, Agriculture, Health, and Capacity
Building. CHA, along with the Organisation for Human Resources Development (OHRD) and Saba
Media Organisation (SMO), is part of a network called Partners in Development (as of December
200E, of�ciMl regisPrMPion is sPill pending)B FHA is Mlso M memNer of
ACBAR (see p. 23),
the Disaster
Risk Reduction Consortium (DRRC),
the Human Rights Research and Advocacy Consortium
(HRRAC), and the
Asian Disaster Reduction and Response Network (ADRRN).
In 2006, CHA established the Improving Capacity for Integrated Development of Livelihoods
(HFHGI) projecP, ROicO inPegrMPes POe orgMnisMPion’s POree mMin secPors (OeMlPO, educMPion Mnd
MgriculPure), in four provinces: FMrMO, HerMP, PMrRMn Mnd GOorB By fosPering communiPy MRMreness
Mnd developmenP, POe projecP Mims Po implemenP POe
Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS,
pB 2D) in MreMs ROere POe nMPionMl progrMm cMnnoP reMcOB Hn 2007, FHA joined POe Building
Education Support Systems for Teachers (BESST) consortium, working directly with the Ministry
of Education (MoE) to improve teaching quality in primary and secondary schools in Kandahar and
Herat provinces. In 2008 and 2009, the organisation continued its work in education by founding
Education Watch for Afghanistan, launching the Global Education Campaign, and implementing
the Education Quality Program for Teachers in Kabul and Parwan provinces.
In 2010, CHA will continue and expand its advocacy and development work in its three main
secPorsB TOe HFHGI projecP Rill Negin in BMlkO ProvinceB FolloRing POe fooPsPeps of EducMPion JMPcO,
CHA will also create the Social Services Watch of Afghanistan. Discussions are also underway to
iniPiMPe M joinP projecP RiPO SMO on M disPMnce-educMPion progrMm in rurMlCinsecure MreMs, focusing
on girls’ secondary education.
Gonors include OxfMm-NoviN, USAHG, EU, UNHFR, UNHFEF, UNHFEM, UNOFHA, FMnMdiMn
International Development Agency (CIDA), ACTED,
JICA, Japanese Embassy, Norwegian Church
Aid (NCA), ECHO, the Ministry of Labour (MoL), the Ministry of Water and Energy (MoWE), and the
Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development (MRRD).
Counter-Narcotics (CN)
www.mcn.gov.af
Counter-narcotics (CN) efforts are considered integral to reconstruction and development initiatives
in Afghanistan, as the instability and insecurity related to the opium economy is thought to be a
mMjor oNsPMcle Po progressB Hn Ois inProducPion Po POe updMPed 2006 AfgOMn NMPionMl Grug FonProl
SPrMPegy, PresidenP KMrzMi sPMPed, “HP is dif�culP Po over-sPMPe POe dMngers of POe ‘opium economy’
for our country and the region’s future. It is the single greatest challenge to the long-term security,
development, and effective governance of Afghanistan.”
FN is one of �ve pillMrs in POe governmenP’s
Security Sector Reform (SSR, p. 65) policy and a cross-
cutting theme in the
Afghanistan Compact (p. 12) and the
Afghanistan National Development
A to Z
Strategy (ANDS, p. 15). Since the fall of the Taliban in 2001, the Afghan government has banned
POe culPivMPion, producPion, MNuse Mnd PrMf�cking of nMrcoPic drugsB Hn GecemNer 2004, MP POe
�rsP NMPionMl FounPer NMrcoPics Fonference, neRly elecPed PresidenP HMmid KMrzMi declMred FN M
priority of his government.
Ministry of Counter Narcotics (MCN) oversees policy, strategy and coordination of all CN
activities, working closely with many ministries, including the
Ministry of Interior Affairs, the
Ministry
of Agriculture, the Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development, the
Ministry of Public Health,
and the
UN Of�ce on Grugs Mnd Frime (UNOGF)B FN iniPiMPives Mre guided Ny POe NMPionMl Grug
Control Strategy (NDCS). As the strategic framework for the government’s CN efforts, the NDCS
idenPi�es four key prioriPies:
GisrupPing POe drugs PrMde Ny PMrgePing PrMf�ckers Mnd POeir NMckers Mnd eliminMPing POe NMsis
1.
for the trade
Strengthening and diversifying licit rural livelihoods
Reducing the demand for illicit drugs and providing treatment for problem drug users
Strengthening state institutions both at the centre and in the provinces
In addition to these priorities, the NDCS outlines eight “pillars of activities”: public awareness,
international and regional cooperation, alternative livelihoods, demand reduction, law enforcement,
The NDCS is backed by the Counter Narcotics Drug Law, enacted by presidential decree in
December 2005, and Article 7 of the 2004 Constitution, which stipulates that “the state prevents
all types of terrorist activities, cultivation and smuggling of narcotic drugs and production and
consumption of intoxicants.” As detailed in the Drug Law, the
Ministry of Justice has developed an
effecPive FN legMl frMmeRork, Mnd in FeNruMry 200D creMPed M FN FriminMl JusPice TMsk Force Po
deMl RiPO FN cMses Mnd PrMin judges, prosecuPors Mnd invesPigMPors in FN proceduresB
Much weight has been given to so-called “Alternative Livelihoods” (AL, p. 25) programmes, which
aim to provide opium farmers and labourers with alternative crop options, credit mechanisms,
business support, market access, and labour opportunities.
UnPil 2008, FN efforPs in AfgOMnisPMn OMd noP included M signi�cMnP componenP of erMdicMPion,
meaning the physical destruction of crops. The eradication that had taken place had been planned
by the Central Eradication Planning and Monitoring Cell within the MCN and carried out by the
FenPrMl Poppy ErMdicMPion Force (PEF) RiPO MssisPMnce from POe inPernMPionMl communiPyB Some
eradication was also conducted by provincial governors through the Governor-Led Eradication
programme (GLE), supplemented by the Afghan National Police (ANP, p. 6) and Afghan National
Army (ANA, p. 5).
Hn 200E, POe PEF RMs disNMnded Mnd focus RMs plMced on GIE for POe 2010 seMsonB An ErMdicMPion
Working Group meeting is held weekly by MCN, and includes representatives of the Afghan
Government, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the United Nations.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
There are two institutions designed to enforce CN legislation, both of which fall under the Deputy
Minister of Interior for Counter Narcotics. The Counter Narcotics Police of Afghanistan (CNPA),
expecPed Po develop inPo M speciMlised force of more POMn 2,000 of�cers in POe nexP feR yeMrs, is
the primary agency responsible for coordinating CN law enforcement, detecting and investigating
signi�cMnP drug-PrMf�cking offencesB TOe AfgOMn SpeciMl NMrcoPics Force cMrries ouP inPerdicPion
operations throughout Afghanistan, working closely with the CNPA. CN training is also provided to
the ANP including the Border Police.
Funding for FN iniPiMPives comes from M numNer of sourcesB Hn POe pMsP, some of iP RMs processed
through the centralised
FounPer NMrcoPics TrusP Fund (FNTF, pB 3D), lMuncOed in 200D Mnd
concluded in 2008. New funding mechanisms are currently under consideration. One current
scheme is the
FompreOensive AgriculPure Mnd RurMl GevelopmenP FMciliPy (FARG-F), ROicO is
TOe overMll Mim of FARG-F is Po enOMnce POe MNiliPy of POe AfgOMn MuPOoriPies Po promoPe susPMinMNle
rural economic development and generate growth in employment and licit rural incomes.
It will
provide an integrated programme for rural development that would “scale up” and complete existing
iniPiMPives, Ms Rell Ms iniPiMPe neR projecP inPervenPions MP disPricP-level Po ensure rurMl communiPies
OMve Mccess Po M criPicMl mMss of supporP ROicO enOMnces economic developmenPB
FARG-F Rill
work through district-based teams in close collaboration with other development partners, local
communities, and government bodies to identify development gaps and opportunities.
The broad high-level outputs are:
HncreMse employmenP Mnd income opporPuniPies POrougO more ef�cienP MgriculPurMl Mnd rurMl
enterprise markets across priority districts
Achieve greater impacts from existing, district-level (national and sub-national) programmes
through improved coordination of government and donor support to agriculture and rural
development
Address bottlenecks impinging upon purposeful livelihoods through strategic interventions
including MddiPionMl Pop-ups or gMp-�lling resources for viMNle progrMmmes Mnd projecPs Mnd
other interventions
Strengthen government institutional and operational capacity to deliver provincial and district-
level progrMmmes Mnd projecPs ROicO direcPly conPriNuPe Po economic developmenP
Key issues facing the actors within the CN sector include: the mix and prioritisation of CN activities,
the extent of linkages between the opium poppy economy and insecurity, how to integrate or
mainstream CN into other development activities, and the timing and interface between opium
poppy eradication and development assistance. Another central question is how to achieve short-
term political targets, such as reducing cultivation, while not undermining the long-term goal of
building a prosperous and stable Afghanistan that will ultimately deliver a sustainable reduction
in the opium economy.
A to Z
A cabinet sub-committee on CN has been formed and it includes relevant ministers, and embassy
Mnd donor represenPMPivesB TOere Mre Mlso severMl issue-speci�c NGFS Rorking groups under POe
auspices of the MCN, and CN is also on the agenda of the high-level
Policy Action Group (PAG, p.
62). A CN Consultative Group (CG, p. 30) was incorporated into the ANDS process.
FounPer NMrcoPics TrusP Fund (FNTF)
TOe FounPer NMrcoPics TrusP Fund (FNTF), esPMNlisOed in OcPoNer 200D, RMs M mulPi-donor funding
source POMP conPriNuPed Po ful�lling POe oNjecPives of POe NMPionMl Grug FonProl SPrMPegy (NGFS)B
TOe NroMd Mims of POe Fund included: providing greMPer resources for POe AfgOMn governmenP’s
counter-narcotics efforts, ensuring transparency and accountability in the allocation of those
resources, enabling greater government ownership over implementation of its CN strategy, and
promoting greater coherence in funding of counter-narcotics activities.
JOile UNGP RMs POe MdminisPrMPor of POe Fund, POe GovernmenP of AfgOMnisPMn rePMined POe overMll
responsiNiliPy for FNTF POrougO iPs designMPed insPiPuPions: POe
MinisPry of FinMnce Mnd POe
Ministry
of Counter Narcotics (MCN). Ten other ministries, including the
Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and
Development (MRRD) as well as Agriculture and Health, have served as implementing partners of
projecPs funded Ny FNTFB Funding Po POe FNTF RMs from 17 donors Mnd POe mMnMgemenP NoMrd
included representatives from the Government, UNAMA (p. 68), the Asian Development Bank,
UNDP, the European Commission, and the United Kingdom, with the World Bank as an observer.
FNTF is currenPly only Rorking on projecPs POMP OMve noP Neen complePed, sucO Ms POe Good
Performance Initiative (GPI). Established in 2007, GPI is a Government of Afghanistan initiative
aimed at providing high-impact development assistance to those provinces that have eliminated
or signi�cMnPly reduced poppy culPivMPion, or demonsPrMPed oPOer effecPive counPer-nMrcoPics
McOievemenPsB
TOe oNjecPive of GPH is Po supporP conPinued progress PoRMrd poppy eliminMPion
Mnd POe mMinPenMnce of poppy-free provinces POrougO POe provision of �nMnciMl supporP for prioriPy
developmenP projecPsB TOe UniPed SPMPes Mnd POe UniPed Kingdom Mre POe mMin conPriNuPors Po POe
Hn NovemNer 200E, POe UniPed SPMPes signed M neR MgreemenP giving $38B7 million dollMrs Po
27 AfgOMn provinces POMP eliminMPed or signi�cMnPly reduced opium producPion, NuP POis RMs noP
done POrougO FNTFB
TOe FNTF is likely Po Ne succeeded Ny POe FompreOensive AgriculPure Mnd RurMl GevelopmenP
FMciliPy (FARG-F), see FounPer-NMrcoPics (pB 32)B
Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration (DDR)
See Afghanistan New Beginnings Programme, p. 18.
Disbandment of Illegal Armed Groups (DIAG)
See Afghanistan New Beginnings Programme, p. 18.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Development Assistance Database (DAD)
dadafghanistan.gov.af
With the support of UNDP, the Afghan government established the Development Assistance
Database (DAD) in June 2002. This web-based database aims to provide up-to-date information
on Mll projecPs POMP fMll RiPOin POe nMPionMl developmenP NudgeP (see
National Budget, p. 55)
Ms Rell Ms some exPrM-NudgePMry projecPsB TOe dMPMNMse sPores dePMiled informMPion MNouP POe
locMPion of developmenP projecPs, ROo is �nMncing POem, Mnd ROicO orgMnisMPions Mre involved in
POeir implemenPMPionB TOe GAG relies on POe provision of dMPM from developmenP projecP funders
and implementers, including government organisations, development partners, and UN agencies.
The database is available in English and Dari.
TOe GAG RMs originMlly designed Po PrMck POe �oR of Mid Mnd record POe progress of developmenP
Mnd OumMniPMriMn projecPs Mround POe counPryB HP sPill serves POis purpose; OoRever, Ms POe
government of Afghanistan works to develop a more robust budget, the DAD is also used as a
budget formulation database. Thus, Afghanistan’s Development Budget has been largely based
on the DAD through the State Budget Planning System (SBPS). This may change in coming
yeMrs Ms POe GevelopmenP BudgeP incorporMPes prioriPies idenPi�ed in POe
Afghanistan National
Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15).
Electoral Complaints Commission (ECC)
www.ecc.org.af
The Electoral Complaints Commission (ECC) is an independent body responsible for hearing
Mnd MdjudicMPing complMinPs relMPed Po POe elecPorMl process, including cOMllenges Po POe lisP of
candidates and complaints about the conduct of campaigns and polling. The Commission was
established by Article 52 of the 2005 Electoral Law.
The ECC is separate from, and independent
Independent Election Commission of Afghanistan (IEC, p. 44).
According to the Election Law, the ECC is composed of two national Commissioners and three
international Commissioners. One Afghan Commissioner is appointed by the
Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHRC, p. 14) and the other by the Supreme Court of
Afghanistan, and the three internationals are appointed by the Special Representative of the
Secretary-General of the United Nations.
In addition, the Commission is assisted in its duties by a
staff, including legal advisors and investigators.
TOe EFF OMs iPs OeMdquMrPers in KMNul Mnd of�ces in Mll 34 provinciMl cMpiPMls, represenPed Ny POe
Provincial Election Complaints Commissions (PCCs). Each PCC consists of three commissioners
Mnd one supporP of�cerB EigOP of POe provinciMl of�ces OMve MddiPionMl legMl Mnd invesPigMPive
capacity to assist the PCC when required.
A person or organisation who claims that there has been a violation of the
Electoral Law
has the
rigOP Po �le M complMinP RiPO POe EFF Mnd iPs PFFsB TOis includes Mll eligiNle voPers Mnd cMndidMPe
As an independent body, the ECC does not disseminate information on plaintiffs to the
public or to other organisations.
A to Z
37
Hn MMy 200D, POe EFF MdjudicMPed MlmosP 7,000 cMses POrougO POe cOMllenge Mnd complMinPs
processes RiPO regMrd Po POe 2004 PresidenPiMl elecPionsB Hn 200E, POe EFF plMyed M mMjor role
in investigating fraud allegations of the August presidential elections. After receiving over 2,600
complMinPs, over 700 Rere considered Po Ne OigO prioriPyB TOe EFF disquMli�ed neMrly M quMrPer of
POe overMll voPes cMsP Mnd suNmiPPed iPs �ndings Po POe HEF, ROo POen ordered M run-off elecPionB
For more informMPion on POe 200E elecPions, see pB 8EB
Emergency Loya Jirga (ELJ)
As required by the Bonn Agreement, an Emergency Loya Jirga (ELJ) was held on 11-19 June 2002
to “decide on the transitional authority, including a broad-based transitional administration to
lead Afghanistan until such time as a fully representative government can be elected through
free and fair elections to be held no later than two years from the date of the convening of the
Emergency Loya Jirga.” The ELJ largely succeeded in its task by electing and swearing in
Karzai (formerly chairman of the Afghan Interim Authority) as President and by approving his
cabinet, thereby forming the
Afghan Transitional Authority (ATA, p. 9).
A special independent commission (the Loya Jirga Commission) determined the rules and
procedures for the ELJ, which was to have seats for 1,501 delegates, including 160 women.
In the end 1,650 delegates participated, including more than 200 women. Concerns about
the proceedings and results of the ELJ included: the criteria for the selection of delegates, the
failure to hold a proper vote to choose the structure of government and the cabinet members,
intimidation of delegates, and a perceived lack of transparency throughout the process. The
conduct of participants at the
Constitutional Loya Jirga (CLJ, p. 31), held in late 2003, was generally
thought to have been an improvement on that at the ELJ, with fewer reports of intimidation and
Enhancing Legal and Electoral Capacity for
Tomorrow (ELECT)
www.afghanelections.org
UNGP EnOMncing IegMl Mnd ElecPorMl FMpMciPy for TomorroR (EIEFT) projecP RMs esPMNlisOed
in 2006 based on recommendations from the 2004 and 2005 elections. It is the result of
SecuriPy Founcil ResoluPion 1806 (20 FeNruMry 2008), ROicO provides for inPernMPionMl elecPorMl
assistance to Afghanistan coordinated by the
UN Assistance Mission to Afghanistan (UNAMA, p.
Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General. The Resolution:
Speci�es, MP POe requesP of AfgOMn MuPOoriPies, Po supporP POe elecPorMl process (pMrPiculMrly
through the IEC) by providing technical assistance; coordinating efforts of international donors,
agencies and organisations; and channelling funds earmarked to support the process
Notes the leading role that Afghan institutions will play in the organisation of the next elections
L0EC10]; encourMges POe AfgOMn GovernmenP, RiPO supporP from POe inPernMPionMl communiPy,
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Po MccelerMPe plMnning Mnd prepMrMPion; Mnd empOMsises POe need for M permMnenP Fivil VoPer
Registry in accordance with the
Afghanistan Compact (p. 12)
While UNAMA has an overarching oversight role, ELECT is managed by UNDP within a
collaborative coordination and management structure, and is the implementation arm of the
UN’s coordinMPion mMndMPeB HP deMls RiPO projecP Mnd progrMmme design Mnd mMnMgemenP,
mobilisation of donor funding, activity coordination, channelling of funds for electoral support,
and reporting.
ELECT’s activities since it was established in 2006 have primarily concentrated on building the
capacity of the
Independent Election Commission (IEC, p. 44). In 2007, it achieved a principle aim
Ny complePing M civil Mnd voPer regisPry piloP projecP POMP comNined nMPionRide voPer regisPrMPion
with a national civil registration programme conducted in Kabul, Bamiyan and Nangarhar.
SuNsequenPly, POe EIEFT projecP provided PecOnicMl MssisPMnce Mnd supporP Po POe HEF in
conducting a voter registration update, which began in October 2008 and concluded its main
In 2009, ELECT was largely focused on supporting the presidential and provincial council
elections. This was accomplished through further strengthening the capacity of the IEC, providing
technical assistance and expertise to the main electoral institutions (including the
Electoral
FomplMinPs Fommission LEFF, pB 36]), Mnd Ny supporPing POe McPiviPies of M Rider group of
electoral stakeholders, including civil society, media, domestic election observers, and security
actors. A key part of ELECT’s mandate lies in providing a coordination focal point for main donors
Mnd orgMnisMPions supporPing elecPionsB EIEFT’s projecP design cMlled for over 400 nMPionMl Mnd
international staff members, operating across the country and working closely with the regional
and provincial electoral authorities.
The next election, for the
Wolesi Jirga
(p. 75), is scheduled for 2010. ELECT, the mandate of which
concludes October 2010, is envisaged to continue providing technical support to the IEC and
EFF, Ms Rell Ms supporP Po oPOer elecPorMl sPMkeOolders Ms descriNed MNoveB Hn 200E, POe projecP
received funding from over 20 donors.
European Police Mission in Afghanistan (EUPOL)
www.eupol-afg.eu
The European Police Mission in Afghanistan (EUPOL) was established to assist the Afghan
government in building a police force that respects human rights as well as in reforming the
Ministries of Interior and Justice. Its mission is to “contribute to the establishment of sustainable
and effective civil policing arrangements that will ensure appropriate interaction with the wider
criminMl jusPice sysPem under AfgOMn oRnersOipB”
EUPOL advises and trains Afghan authorities at the ministerial, regional, provincial and district levels
in six main areas: intelligence-led policing; police chain of command, control and communication;
criminal investigation; anti-corruption strategy; police-prosecutor linkages; and human rights and
A to Z
gender mainstreaming within the
Afghan National Police (ANP, p. 6). Outside of Kabul, EUPOL
personnel are also assigned to various
Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRT, p. 64).
OriginMlly M GermMn piloP projecP, POe mission RMs lMuncOed in June 2007 Ny POe Founcil of POe
European Union through the Common Security and Defence Policy (CSDP), which enables individual
EuropeMn nMPions Po collecPively McP in POe �eld of civiliMn Mnd miliPMry crisis mMnMgemenPB
EUPOL’s mandate is for three years until June 2010 and is likely to be extended. The current
mission strength is at approximately 245 international staff and 169 local staff. As of November
200E, POe NudgeP RMs €64 million (MpproximMPely $100 million), conPriNuPed Ny 1E EU sPMPes (RiPO
Germany being the largest contributor), Canada, Croatia, Norway and New Zealand.
Hn OcPoNer 2008, Police Fommissioner KMi ViPPrup of GenmMrk NecMme HeMd of Mission,
succeeding BrigMdier-GenerMl Jürgen ScOolz of GermMnyB From 2008 Po 200E, sPrucPurMl cOMnges
were implemented within EUPOL to delineate each international and national body’s role involved
Free Mnd FMir ElecPion FoundMPion of AfgOMnisPMn (FEFA)
www.fefa.org.a
TOe Free Mnd FMir ElecPion FoundMPion of AfgOMnisPMn (FEFA) is Mn independenP umNrellM
organisation established by civil society groups in March 2004 to:
Monitor elections to ensure that they are free and fair
Promote democracy in the country
Promote public participation in electoral affairs
Help consolidate public trust and faith in democracy and elections
TOe FoundMPion is AfgOMnisPMn’s only conPinuMl domesPic elecPions moniPoring NodyB HPs �rsP
observation experience was that of the presidential election on 9 October 2004, during which it
observed in 100 districts in both Afghanistan and Pakistan. Its second experience was observing
the 2005
NMPionMl AssemNly Mnd provinciMl council elecPions, during ROicO FEFA moniPored 217
districts, covering 65% of all polling centres.
FEFA OMs Mlso Neen one of POe feR elecPions-orienPed orgMnisMPions McPive in POe inPerim
period between the two rounds of Afghan elections (2004-05 and 2009-10) and has produced
numerous puNlicMPions on suNjecPs sucO Ms POe cMndidMPe vePPing Mnd POe PrMnspMrency of
political wealth.
Prior Po POe 200E presidenPiMl Mnd provinciMl council elecPions, FEFA RMs Mlso MNle Po conducP
compreOensive moniPoring of POe voPer regisPrMPion process (OcPoNer 2008–FeNruMry 200E) Mnd
reporPed numerous proNlems RiPO POis iPB On POe elecPion dMy iPself, FEFA conducPed counPryRide
observations. It has also reported on issues of re-counting and corruption on its website.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Government Media and Information Centre (GMIC)
www.gmic.gov.a
The Government Media and Information Centre (GMIC) was founded by presidential decree in
2007 as an Afghan-led entity to respond to the information needs of the Afghan public, media,
and other national and international stakeholders. The GMIC aims to build trust among the
Afghan public and other stakeholders through: provision of timely and accurate information,
continuous and consistent dissemination, facilitation of coordination and information sharing
among acting agencies in the Afghan government and independent media, and capacity building
for the government’s information and communication portals.
GMIC consists of two pillars: Programs and Administration. In Programs, three departments
serve the goal of the Centre. The Capacity Building Department builds capacity in the Afghan
governmenP’s communicMPions of�ces Ny creMPing Mnd conducPing educMPionMl McPiviPies Pied Po
their needs. The Media Relations Department develops and implements mechanisms to enhance
POe �oR of informMPion Po Mnd from POe AfgOMn puNlic Mnd oPOer sPMkeOoldersB TOe PuNlic OuPreMcO
Department—the awareness-raising unit within GMIC—develops nation-wide information collection
and dissemination networks through which the Afghan public can be informed about the progress
Mnd McPiviPies of POe governmenPB TOe AdminisPrMPion pillMr supporPs ProgrMms POrougO POe FinMnce,
Procurement, Human Resources, and Security units.
Hague Conference on Afghanistan
On 31 March 2009, the Netherlands hosted the “International Conference on Afghanistan: A
FompreOensive SPrMPegy in M RegionMl FonPexP” MP POe Jorld Forum, in TOe HMgueB TOe conference
NrougOP PogePOer OigO-rMnking of�ciMls from 72 counPries, reMf�rming POeir commiPmenP Po
AfgOMnisPMnB Hn POeir �nMl sPMPemenP, POe pMrPicipMnPs sPressed POe need for greMPer cooperMPion,
good governance, economic development, and strengthened security in Afghanistan.
Humanitarian Action Plan (HAP)
The Humanitarian Action Plan (HAP) outlines the humanitarian community’s plans and collective
sPrMPegy in AfgOMnisPMnB HAP is noP inPended Po Ne jusP M funding documenP, NuP M vMluMNle Pool for
identifying vulnerable populations in need of assistance. The
UniPed NMPions Of�ce of FoordinMPion
of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA) facilitates the HAP process with input from UN agencies, NGOs,
and the Afghan government.
TOe �rsP HAP RMs lMuncOed in JMnuMry 200E Ny 47 orgMnisMPions (37 NGOs Mnd eigOP UN Mgencies) in
consulPMPion RiPO POe AfgOMn governmenPB TOis mMrked POe �rsP Pime since 2002 POMP OumMniPMriMn
actors convened to develop a coherent plan to address the chronic needs of the Afghan people.
TOe HAP presenPed 112 projecP proposMls RiPO M PoPMl requesP for $604 millionB TOe projecPs Rere
organised under eight clusters: education, emergency shelter, emergency telecommunications,
food security and agriculture, health, nutrition, protection, and water and sanitation.
A to Z
TOe PlMn RMs revised in mid-200E Po requesP neMrly $666 million for 146 projecPs Ny 3E NGOs
and eight UN agencies. As of October 2009, the support provided by the international donor
communiPy Po POe HAP projecPs MmounPed Po $442 million (or MpproximMPely 66 percenP of POe
revised requiremenPs)B Of POis, MpproximMPely $1E million RMs provided Po NGOs ROile $437
million was provided to UN agencies. The food security cluster was 94% funded, while health and
nutrition only received 4% of the requested assistance.
The 2010 HAP addresses these funding challenges by encouraging more support to NGOs, as well
as by engaging both traditional donors focused on development in Afghanistan as well as non-
traditional donors to achieve more balanced funding throughout all the HAP clusters. This year,
4E OumMniPMriMn Mgencies conPriNuPed Po POe HAP, ROicO PoPMls $870 millionB OverMll, POe 2010
HAP shifts away from the humanitarian-development nexus and toward a focus on vulnerability
caused by a combination of extreme poverty, increasing insecurity, natural disasters, and weak
governMnceB TOe sPrMPegic oNjecPives of POe 2010 HAP Mre:
1B
PrepMredness for Mnd response Po con�icP Mnd OMzMrds
MiPigMPe POe effecPs of con�icPs Mnd OMzMrds for POe proPecPion of MffecPed populMPions
Improve access to and by vulnerable populations and provide targeted safety nets
Advocate for the protection of civilians and for the respect of international law and human
Ensure that humanitarian programming complements and strengthens the link to early
recovery Mnd developmenP MssisPMnce Ny gMp-�lling
Data collection and analysis
The Plan includes food assistance for 8.7 million people affected by high food prices and drought;
agricultural assistance for 290,000 vulnerable farming families; and targeted support in areas
such as health, water, sanitation, hygiene and education. It also aims to improve resilience to
natural disasters, and reduce risk from landmines.
Independent Administrative Reform and Civil Service
Commission (IARCSC)
www.iarcsc.gov.af
In May 2002, an independent
Civil Service Commission was established as required by the Bonn
Agreement to lead the government’s process for
Public Administration Reform (PAR, p. 65). Its
responsibilities were subsequently amended and extended by two presidential decrees in June
2003, and the Commission was renamed the Independent Administrative Reform and Civil Service
Commission (IARCSC).
The Commission’s work is aimed at building a public administration in Afghanistan that is sound,
functional, transparent, effective, accountable, responsible, apolitical and impartial.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
IARCSC’s strategic goals are to:
Draft policies and establish legal infrastructure to allow for administrative reform and
amendments to the salary grade system
Improve organisational structure
Carry out merit-based recruitment and appointment
Improve human resources management for organisational development, planning, and
evaluation, as well as capacity building
Evaluate the progress of implementing previous and existing reform processes and initiate the
next phase of change and development
The Commission is composed of: a Civil Services and Management Department (CSMD), a
Civil Service Secretariat (CSS), an Independent Appointments Board, an Independent Appeals
Board, and a Civil Service Institute (CSI). The CSMD is responsible for drafting and overseeing
the implementation of policies related to human resources, and training and development.
The CSS provides executive, communications and operations assistance to the Commission
Mnd is responsiNle for evMluMPing POe implemenPMPion of progrMmmesB TOe ProjecP Gesign Mnd
Development Unit within the CSMD supports the PAR process by recruiting international and
national professionals to advise in various ministries and other government agencies. The CSI
was founded in 2007 as a training source for civil servants throughout Afghanistan. Courses are
offered in management, information technology, and the English language on both national and
provincial levels.
TOe AppoinPmenPs BoMrd is responsiNle for MppoinPing senior-level civil service of�ciMls Mnd
supervising POe MppoinPmenP of junior-level of�ciMlsB TOe AppeMls BoMrd is POe forum POrougO ROicO
civil servants can lodge complaints, including those regarding decisions about appointments. Both
boards, though under the auspices of the IARCSC, are independent and function autonomously.
TOe Fommission currenPly OMs seven regionMl of�ces, 34 provinciMl of�ces, Mnd 27 PrMining
FinMnciMl Mnd PecOnicMl supporP Po POe HARFSF Mnd iPs iniPiMPives OMve come from UNGP, POe AsiMn
Development Bank, the World Bank, the European Union, USAID, the United Kingdom, South
KoreM, AusPrMliM, NorRMy, SRiPzerlMnd, GermMny, Mnd POe AfgOMnisPMn ReconsPrucPion TrusP Fund
(ARTF, pB 21)B
Independent Directorate of Local Governance (IDLG)
The Independent Directorate of Local Governance (IDLG) was established by presidential decree on
30 August 2007, with a mandate to improve governance and achieve stability at the sub-national
level. The IDLG is responsible for supervising provincial and district governors, provincial councils,
A to Z
and municipalities (except Kabul). Upon the establishment of other sub-national representative
bodies, these would also fall under the IDLG remit. After a second decree in May 2008, IDLG was
tasked with leading the process of creating a sub-national governance policy for Afghanistan,
which involves 23 ministries and government agencies.
The IDLG’s mission is “to consolidate peace and stability, achieve development and equitable
economic groRPO Mnd Po McOieve improvemenPs in service delivery POrougO jusP, democrMPic
processes and institutions of good governance at sub-national level thus improving the quality
of life of Afghan citizens.” The Directorate is responsible for an enormous range of functions and
activities, of which a primary task is leading the formulation and ongoing oversight of a coherent
overarching policy and legislative framework for sub-national governance. Its priorities, strategy
Mnd funcPions Mre ouPlined in: iPs SPrMPegic FrMmeRork, iPs Five YeMr SPrMPegic JorkplMn (covering
2008-2013), and the draft of the Sub-national Governance Policy (SNGP, drafted in late 2008).
HoRever, Ms of GecemNer 200E, POe policy OMd noP Neen �nMlised, or pMssed Ny FMNineP, Mnd
seems likely Po require furPOer clMri�cMPion Ny POe incoming FMNinePB
IDLG’s goals are:
1.
To ensure that Afghanistan’s framework for subnational governance upholds the principles of
good governance, including open, transparent, accountable, participative, effective, coherent
and inclusive governance based on consensus and rule of law at the sub-national level
To establish and strengthen government institutions at sub-national levels in order to ensure
people’s participation in governance and to achieve measurable improvements in the delivery
of services and the protection of rights
To create and support opportunities for citizens and stakeholders to participate in governance
at the sub-national level
To ensure that sub-national governance institutions play an active role in facilitating the
delivery of national activities and programmes aimed at improving the wellbeing of Afghans
TOe vision of POe HGIG Mlso includes M commiPmenP Po ensuring POMP Romen enjoy greMPer equiPy
in educMPion, poliPicMl pMrPicipMPion, Mnd jusPiceB
According to the IDLG’s second Annual Report (August 2009), achievements include:
The initial draft of the Sub-national Governance Policy (SNGP) was submitted to the Policy
Drafting Committee, a body comprising Cabinet members and the heads of directorates and
commissions. The SNGP will address weaknesses in the current local governance system, and
hopes to improve the roles, responsibilities and interactions of various actors in the provinces
PuNlic AdminisPrMPion Reform (PAR, pB 6D) RMs iniPiMPed in POe mMjoriPy of provinciMl Mnd disPricP
of�cesB TOe PAR process Mims Po PrMnsform puNlic insPiPuPions inPo modern, professionMlly-
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
The program document for the
PerformMnce-BMsed Governors Fund (PBGF) OMs Neen developed
in pMrPnersOip RiPO POe UNGP Mnd USAHGB TOe projecP is NudgePed for $83B6 millionB
Good GovernMnce for IocMl GevelopmenP (GOFORGOIG) progrMm RMs lMuncOed in 10
piloP provincesB GOFORFOIG is M performMnce meMsuremenP Mnd reporPing sysPem ROicO
uses indicators in seven categories: representation, participation, accountability, equity,
transparency, effectiveness and security.
As of December 2009, the
Afghanistan Stabilisation Programme (ASP) had completed 81
disPricP MdminisPrMPion of�ces, six provinciMl governor of�ces, 24 scOools, Mnd Pen vMrious Pypes
of infrastructure. ASP, established in 2004 and one of the Government’s National Priority
Programmes (see
NMPionMl GevelopmenP FrMmeRork, pB D6), is inPended Po sPrengPOen suN-
national-level governance by rebuilding essential infrastructure and development capacity
for local civil administration. The ASP intends on complete construction of all infrastructure
required by sub-national governance institutions by 2014.
The program document for the
Municipal Governance Support Programme has been completed
for M NudgeP of $180 millionB
The development of the Governor-Led Reconciliation Programme was launched to empower
provincial governors to lead in reconciliation processes.
PRT Coordination Working Group (WG) and the PRT Coordination Executive Steering
FommiPPee (ESF) Rere esPMNlisOed Po provide governmenP policy guidMnce Po PRTs Mnd HSAF
Seven conferences were held for 364 district governors to engage with the centre and orient
ANDS and the IDLG Strategic Workplan.
New governors were appointed in 15 provinces.
An anti-corruption strategy was formulated based on the National Anti-Corruption Strategy.
In 2010, the IDLG hopes to: implement substantive changes to the local governance system in
Afghanistan by establishing inter-ministerial committees to draft new laws and amend existing
ones, increase the scale and scope of capacity building, continue and expand PAR throughout
the provinces, establish a new pay and grading system in all administrative units, strengthen its
sysPem for moniPoring Mnd evMluMPion, Mnd commence POe piloP of POe PBGFB
Key partners to the IDLG include the
UNDP’s Afghanistan Sub-national Governance Programme
TOe AsiM FoundMPion, Mnd POe
USAID Capacity Development Programme (DGP).
www.iec.org.af
The Independent Election Commission (IEC) is the supreme authority responsible for the
preparation, organisation, conduct and oversight of elections and referenda in Afghanistan. The
A to Z
membership, organisation, responsibilities and functioning of the IEC are determined by the
Constitution and the Electoral Law (Elections in Afghanistan, p. 85). The IEC is independent from
other branches of government and administrative institutions. The functions of the IEC include:
establishing regulatory frameworks, supervising the Secretariat in the organisation and conduct
of elections, registration of candidates, resolving or referring complaints and disputes, inviting
domestic and international election monitors to observe election operations, and advising on
ROePOer POe elecPions Mre free Mnd fMirB HP Mlso cerPi�es Mnd Mnnounces elecPion resulPs Mnd
facilitates any transfers of power.
TOe HEF OMs M governing Nody RiPO M cOMirmMn, depuPy cOMirmMn Mnd �ve memNers (commissioners);
these positions are appointed by the President. The IEC Secretariat is its implementing arm and is
OeMded Ny M FOief ElecPorMl Of�cer (FEO) Mnd PRo depuPiesB TOe FEO is POe MccounPing of�cer Mnd
is responsiNle for ensuring ef�cienP mMnMgemenP of POe dMy-Po-dMy McPiviPies of POe FommissionB
After his election in October 2004, President
Hamid Karzai appointed the IEC members for a three-
yeMr periodB For iPs �rsP yeMr POe HEF coexisPed Mnd collMNorMPed RiPO iPs predecessor, POe
Electoral Management Body (JEMB), which completed its mandate with the holding of legislative
elections in September 2005. The JEMB had been established in July 2003 and had both Afghan
and international members. It had overall responsibility for the preparation, organisation, conduct
and oversight of the 2004 presidential and 2005 parliamentary elections. After these elections,
it was dissolved and all its responsibilities transferred to the IEC.
TOe AugusP 200E presidenPiMl Mnd provinciMl council elecPions Rere POe �rsP orgMnised primMrily Ny
the IEC, with technical assistance provided by the international community. Prior to the election,
a voter registration update was conducted from November 2008 to June 2009. During these
processes, POe HEF expMnded iPs �nMnciMl Mnd MdminisPrMPive cMpMciPies: of�ces Rere exPended
into most provinces; a public resource centre was established; and the IEC gained more capacity
to formulate policies and procedures, design and deliver training, and interpret legal complaints.
During the election period, the IEC also designed and implemented a comprehensive national
public outreach campaign, set up a national tally centre, managed an operations centre, and
MppoinPed Mnd OosPed POe ElecPorMl MediM FommissionB TOougO noP RiPOouP signi�cMnP proNlems,
the voter registration exercise and the 2009 election marked the development of the IEC into an
institution capable of organising large-scale logistical exercises.
The next milestone for the IEC will be the conduct of parliamentary and district council elections,
currently scheduled for September 2010.
HnPernMPionMl SecuriPy AssisPMnce Force (HSAF)
www.isaf.nato.int
TOe mission of POe HnPernMPionMl SecuriPy AssisPMnce Force (HSAF) is Po MssisP POe AfgOMn governmenP
in establishing and maintaining a safe and secure environment in Afghanistan, with the full
involvemenP of POe AfgOMn NMPionMl SecuriPy Forces (ANA, pB D, ANP, pB 6)B
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
HSAF RMs �rsP esPMNlisOed Ny
UN Security Council Resolution 1386 on 20 December 2001 as
envisaged in Annex I of the
Bonn Agreement and upon the invitation of the
Afghan Interim Authority
(AIA, p. 5). It is a UN-authorised multinational force, not a UN peacekeeping force, and the costs
of mMinPMining HSAF Mre Norne Ny iPs conPriNuPing nMPions rMPOer POMn Ny POe UNB
In August 2003, the
NorPO APlMnPic TreMPy OrgMnizMPion (NATO) Pook over leMdersOip of HSAF, POe
mission of which was then limited to Kabul. In October 2003, the UN Security Council authorised
POe expMnsion of POe NATO mission Neyond KMNulB UnPil FeNruMry 2007, leMdersOip roPMPed Mmong
pMrPicipMPing nMPions; POe �rsP HSAF missions Rere led Ny POe UniPed Kingdom, Turkey, GermMny
and the Netherlands. Each subsequent rotation is referred to by a new roman numeral. With the
implemenPMPion of HSAF X in FeNruMry 2007, HSAF RMs mMde M “composiPe OeMdquMrPers” rMPOer
POMn Neing PMsked Po M single counPryB TOis meMns POMP individuMl nMPions volunPeer Po �ll POeir
MlloPPed posiPions in POe RMy POey see �PB Hn 200E, US GenerMl
Stanley A. McChrystal became
commMnder of HSAF, replMcing US GenerMl
David D. McKiernan.
HSAF Mnd iPs operMPions Mre disPincP from POe US-led
FoMliPion Forces (FF, pB 2E), ROo Oelped
the Northern Alliance overthrow the Taliban and continue to operate in Afghanistan as part of
Operation Enduring
FreedomB HSAF RMs iniPiMlly responsiNle for securiPy only in KMNul, ROile FF
was in command of security in the rest of the country. Since 2003, however, the long-term goal
OMs Neen Po expMnd HSAF Mnd unify NoPO miliPMry forces under one cenPrMl commMndB RegionMl
commMnd of POe ProvinciMl ReconsPrucPion TeMms (PRTs, pB 64) RMs POus PrMnsferred Po HSAF during
POe period 2004-06B FomplePing POe geogrMpOicMl expMnsion of POe HSAF mission, commMnd of POe
�nMl, eMsPern quMrPer of POe counPry RMs OMnded over on D OcPoNer 2006, leMving HSAF in cOMrge
of Mll PRTs Mnd effecPively responsiNle for securiPy in Mll of AfgOMnisPMnB HSAF Mlso implemenPs POe
Operational Mentor and Liaison Team Programme, which embeds mentors in selected
kandaks
(battalions) of the
AfgOMn NMPionMl Army (pB D)B Hn AugusP 2008, HSAF PrMnsferred leMd securiPy
responsibility for Kabul to the
AfgOMnisPMn NMPionMl SecuriPy ForcesB
HSAF’s overMll sPrucPure consisPs of: PRo KMNul-NMsed OeMdquMrPers (FOMHSAF Mnd FOMHJF); POe
Air TMsk Force responsiNle for Mir operMPions; RegionMl FommMnds for eMcO of POe �ve regions
(FMpiPMl, NorPO, JesP, SouPO, EMsP); ForRMrd SupporP BMses; Mnd PRTsB TOe NorPO APlMnPic Founcil,
NATO’s decision-mMking Nody, provides poliPicMl guidMnce Po HSAF in consulPMPion RiPO non-NATO
nations contributing troops to the force.
Hn AugusP 200E, NATO Mllies Mgreed Po MdjusP POe HSAF Upper FommMnd sPrucPure Po Mlign RiPO POe
increMse in HSAF’s scope Mnd scMle of responsiNiliPiesB Hn NovemNer 200E, M neR inPermediMPe
OeMdquMrPers RMs esPMNlisOed Po NePPer sPreMmline HSAF efforPs Ny sepMrMPing POe sPrMPegic poliPicMl-
military and day-to-day functional operations. The new Upper Command structure consists of:
M OigOer HeMdquMrPers (FOMHSAF) commMnded Ny M 4-sPMr GenerMl (GenerMl McFOrysPMl), Mnd
M suNordinMPe 3-sPMr HeMdquMrPers (or HnPermediMPe HeMdquMrPers), cMlled HSAF JoinP FommMnd
(FOMHJF)B JOile FOMHSAF conPinues Po syncOronise HSAF’s operMPions RiPO POe Rork of AfgOMn
institutions and other international organisations, COMIJC will execute tactical operations and
assume responsibility over the Regional Commands and the PRTs. The Joint Command is headed
by Lieutenant General David M. Rodriguez.
A to Z
As of JMnuMry 2010, HSAF’s PoPMl sPrengPO RMs MpproximMPely 84,1D0 Proops, comprised of POe
following in the Regional Commands: 6,150 (Capital); 5,750 (North); 4,400 (West); 43,900
(South); and 23,950 (East). The 43 troop-contributing countries are: Albania, Armenia, Australia,
AusPriM, AzerNMijMn, Belgium, BosniM Mnd HerzegovinM, BulgMriM, FMnMdM, FroMPiM, FzecO RepuNlic,
GenmMrk, EsPoniM, FinlMnd, FrMnce, GeorgiM, GermMny, Greece, HungMry, HcelMnd, HrelMnd, HPMly,
Jordan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway,
Poland, Portugal, Romania, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Turkey, Ukraine, the
United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom, and the United States.
Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB)
RRRBMndsBgovBMfCMndsCjcmN
The Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB) is a high-level governing body established in
2006 to provide overall strategic coordination of the implementation of the Afghanistan Compact
(p. 12). The JCMB was formed by the government of Afghanistan and the international community
following the endorsement of the
Compact and the
Interim Afghanistan National Development
Strategy (see ANDS, p. 15) at the January 2006
London Conference (p. 51). It aims to ensure
greater coherence of efforts by the Afghan government and the international community to realise
the goals set forth in the Compact and the Declaration of the
Paris Conference (p. 61) held on 12
To provide high-level oversight of progress in the implementation of the political commitments
of the Afghanistan Compact
To provide direcPion Po Mddress signi�cMnP issues of coordinMPion, implemenPMPion, �nMncing
for the benchmarks, and timelines in the Compact, and any other obstacles or bottlenecks
idenPi�ed Ny POe governmenP or POe inPernMPionMl communiPy
To report on the implementation of the Compact to the President, the National Assembly, the
UN Secretary-General, donors, and the public
The JCMB is co-chaired by the UN Secretary-General’s
Special Representative for Afghanistan (see
UNAMA, p. 68) and the Chair of the Afghan government’s cabinet-level Coordinating Committee,
which is responsible for JCMB oversight and the implementation of the Afghanistan National
Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15). Along with the 12 representatives of this committee, the
JCMB is composed of 23 representatives of the international community who are selected based on
such criteria as the largest contribution of development aid and military troops as well as regional
represenPMPionB TOese include UNAMA, NATO (see HSAF, pB 4D), POe FomNined SecuriPy TrMnsiPion
FommMnd—AfgOMnisPMn (FoMliPion Forces, pB 2E), POe Jorld BMnk, POe AsiMn GevelopmenP BMnk,
donor governments, the European Union, and governments of neighbouring countries. The JCMB
meets up to four times per year, usually in Kabul but occasionally outside of Afghanistan.
The work of the JCMB is now facilitated by three standing committees covering security; governance,
human rights and rule of law; and economic and social development. These thematic groupings
correspond to the pillars of the ANDS. In carrying out its assessments, the JCMB considers inputs
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
from the standing committees, which consist of representatives of the Afghan Government and
relevant international partners, as well as ad hoc, expert task forces that are established by the
sPMnding commiPPees Po Mddress speci�c PecOnicMl issuesB As POe cenPrMl coordinMPion Nody on
security, reconstruction and development, several other coordination mechanisms—such as the
Policy Action Group (PAG, p. 62)—report occasionally to the JCMB. Under its original mandate,
the JCMB produced two semi-annual reports a year; this was later revised to one annual report
beginning in 2008. The JCMB also produces additional reports available to the public. Since its
inception, the JCMB has provided guidance for the development of the ANDS.
Hn line RiPO POe AfgOMnisPMn FompMcP, POe JFMB is consPiPuPed for M period of �ve yeMrs, from April
2006 to March 2011 (SY1385-89).
Justice Sector Reform (JSR)
JusPice SecPor Reform (JSR), one of POe �ve pillMrs of POe AfgOMn governmenP’s SecuriPy SecPor
Reform (SSR, pB 6D) sPrMPegy, involves M Ride rMnge of projecPs underPMken Ny Mn equMlly Ride
range of actors. Within the government of Afghanistan, the permanent institutions engaged with
Mnd suNjecP Po JSR iniPiMPives Mre POe
Supreme Court, the
Ministry of Justice, and the
Attorney
GenerMl’s Of�ceB MMin donors in POe jusPice secPor include HPMly, POe UniPed SPMPes, FMnMdM,
Norway, Germany and the United Kingdom. A number of UN agencies also contribute to JSR,
including UNAMA (pB 68), UNGP, UNOGF, UNHFEF Mnd UNHFEMB JSR includes Pop-doRn insPiPuPionMl
development and bottom-up public access initiatives, such as:
FonsPrucPion Mnd reconsPrucPion of infrMsPrucPure for jusPice insPiPuPions, Mnd cMpMciPy Nuilding
Mnd PrMining of jusPice-secPor employees
Defence lawyer training and courses at some universities
Drafting of legislation
Expansion of the provision of legal aid and public legal awareness campaigns
Jorking RiPO PrMdiPionMl jusPice mecOMnisms (primMrily locMl
and
) to ensure
that they conform to the norms of the national legal order and international human rights
standards
Coordination with other government priorities, such as
counter-narcotics (CN, p. 32), anti-
corruption, and land reform
Since 2001, achievements in JSR have included: the passage of several key laws; the training
of judges, judiciMl police, prosecuPors, Mnd defence lMRyers; Mnd POe consPrucPion of M numNer
of courPOouses, prosecuPors’ of�ces, prisons, Mnd oPOer jusPice-secPor insPiPuPionsB Beginning in
2004, the Italy-led
Provincial Justice Initiative trained Afghan trainers and deployed them around
the country to build legal capacity at the sub-national level. The
Independent National Legal
Training Centre opened in 2007 and is situated at
Kabul University. The Centre provides legal
PrMining for posP-grMduMPe sPudenPs, legMl professionMls, Mnd sPMff from AfgOMn jusPice insPiPuPions;
in 2008, iP opened AfgOMnisPMn’s �rsP full-service lMR liNrMryB
A to Z
During 2001-05, JSR was considered to lag behind reform in other sectors. By late 2007,
OoRever, POe jusPice secPor OMd McOieved M posiPion of leMdersOip in secPor reform in AfgOMnisPMnB
Commitment to JSR was revitalised with the establishment of the International Coordination
Group on Justice Reform in October 2006, the December 2006
Rule of Law Conference in Dubai,
and the July 2007 Rome Conference on Justice and Rule of Law in Afghanistan.
Participants at the Rome Conference—representatives of the Afghan government, donors, and the
inPernMPionMl communiPy—Mgreed Po M series of joinP goMls, underlying principles, Mnd key McPionsB
Implementation of key actions began following the conference; this included the establishment
of a
National Justice Programme, a
National Justice Sector Strategy, and a mechanism for pooled
donor funding of POe progrMmme, providing NoPO immediMPe supporP for sOorP-Perm projecPs Mnd
long-term, coordinated funding. Rome Conference participants also agreed to the establishment of
Mn AfgOMn-led moniPoring Mnd evMluMPion sysPem for POe jusPice secPor under POe
ANDS Secretariat
Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB, p. 47).
As part of the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15) process, each Afghan
jusPice insPiPuPion—POe Supreme FourP, POe MinisPry of JusPice, Mnd POe APPorney GenerMl’s Of�ce—
prepMred M �ve-yeMr sPrMPegy for reformB JiPO guidMnce Mnd PecOnicMl MssisPMnce provided Ny
UNAMA’s Rule of IMR of�ce, POese sPrMPegies Rere comNined Ny NovemNer 2007 inPo M jusPice
sector strategy widely viewed as the best-developed of the ANDS sector strategies. Both the
NMPionMl JusPice ProgrMmme Mnd SecPor SPrMPegy Rere �nMlised in MMrcO 2008B BMsed on POMP
documenP, POe ProjecP OversigOP FommiPPee (POF, composed of POe OigO-level AfgOMn governmenP
of�ciMls Mnd Mdvised Ny Mn inPernMPionMl NoMrd of donors) Mnd M ProgrMm SupporP UniP (PSU) Rere
established in July 2008; these are intended to replace the functions of the Consultative Group
(FG, see pB 30) deMling RiPO POe jusPice secPor, ROicO ceMsed Po exisP MfPer POe complePion of POe
ANDS process.
TOe AfgOMnisPMn JusPice SecPor Reform ProjecP (AJSRP) is currenPly Neing implemenPed under POe
guidance of the
Jorld BMnk Mnd �nMnced Ny POe
AfgOMnisPMn ReconsPrucPion TrusP Fund (ARTF,
pB 21); iP is POe �rsP jusPice secPor projecP implemenPed under POe FundB TOe AJSRP is designed
Po enOMnce POe cMpMciPy of POe AfgOMn jusPice insPiPuPions Po deliver legMl servicesB HP focuses
on enhancing: management of human resources and physical infrastructure, information, and
communication technology; legal aid and legal awareness; and support to the POC and PSU.
Other developments in this sector in 2009 include:
The establishment of the
AnPi-ForrupPion UniP in POe APPorney GenerMl’s Of�ce on 18 April 200E
to prosecute government corruption
The establishment of a criminal case management system to track criminal cases. A
memorandum of understanding was signed on 17 October 2009 by seven institutions—the
Supreme FourP, MinisPry of JusPice, APPorney GenerMl’s Of�ce,
Ministry of Interior,
HigO Of�ce
of Oversight,
National Directorate of Security, and
Ministry of Defence—to expand the system
nationwide
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
TOe MinisPry of JusPice expMnded iPs legMl Mid of�ces inPo 12 provinces RiPO MnoPOer four
IMR Mnd Order TrusP Fund for AfgOMnisPMn (IOTFA)
TOe IMR Mnd Order TrusP Fund for AfgOMnisPMn (IOTFA) RMs esPMNlisOed in 2002 Ms M funding
mechanism used by international donors to channel their contributions to
security sector reform
(SSR, p. 65) in Afghanistan, particularly the
Afghan National Police (ANP, p. 6), the salaries for which
Mre POe Fund’s lMrgesP ouPlMyB TOe
Ministry of Interior (MoI) is responsible for the implementation
of POe Fund, Mnd M MMnMgemenP SupporP UniP (MSU) RMs esPMNlisOed Po supporP POe MinisPry in
execuPing projecP McPiviPies POMP cMnnoP Ne OMndled Ny exisPing governmenP mecOMnismsB
IOTFA POMse V, ROicO NegMn on 1 SepPemNer 2008 RiPO M PoPMl NudgeP of MpproximMPely $D40
million, focuses on insPiPuPionMl developmenP of POe MoH Ny enOMncing iPs engMgemenP RiPO IOTFA
plMnning Mnd decision-mMking processesB Hn MddiPion, POe projecP inPends Po sPrengPOen puNlic
con�dence in POe ANP Po resPore sPMNiliPy Mnd mMinPMin lMR Mnd orderB IOTFA’s expendiPures Mre
prioritised as follows:
1B
Police force is supporPed Po perform POeir duPies effecPively Mnd ef�cienPly
FinMnciMl Mnd projecP mMnMgemenP cMpMciPy is NuilP RiPOin POe MoH
Police force is equipped with required equipment for improvements of their mobility and
responsiveness (i.e., vehicles and radio equipment)
Hmproved Rorking Mnd living condiPions of police conPriNuPing Po NePPer ef�ciency Mnd morMle
Improved capacity in police force with enhanced gender balance
Uniformed personnel of the
Central Prisons Department (CPD) are supported to perform their
joN effecPively Mnd ef�cienPly
TOe lMrgesP overMll donor since POe Fund’s incepPion OMs Neen POe EuropeMn Fommission; MP
presenP, JMpMn Mnd POe UniPed SPMPes Mre POe lMrgesPB IOTFA is led Ny M SPeering FommiPPee POMP
includes represenPMPives from POe MinisPry of FinMnce, MinisPry of JusPice, UNAMA (pB 68), Mnd
UNDP. UNDP regularly conducts monitoring and evaluation to oversee the quality, quantity and
Pimeliness of progress PoRMrd resulPs delivery Ms idenPi�ed in POe Fund’s ResulPs Mnd Resource
FrMmeRork Mnd AnnuMl PlMnB IOTFA POMse V is slMPed for complePion in AugusP 2010B
Laws in Afghanistan
FormMl sources of lMR in AfgOMnisPMn Mre: (1) HslMmic lMR, (2) POe 2004 FonsPiPuPion, (3) codes,
decrees and legislation, (4) international treaties and covenants, and (5) various types of regulations
and orders. No law can be contrary to the beliefs and provisions of Islam (pursuant to Article 3 of
POe FonsPiPuPion), Mnd mMny of POe counPry’s codes Mnd sPMPuPes re�ecP HslMmic lMR principlesB
There have been a number of constitutions in Afghanistan (1923, 1931, 1964, 1977, 1980,
1E87, 1EE0, 1EE2 Mnd 2004)B As elseROere, AfgOMn legislMPion musP noP Ne in con�icP RiPO POe
Constitution. New legislation and amendments to existing laws must be adopted by the National
A to Z
Assembly and signed by the President, after which they shall be published (in both Dari and Pashto)
in the
Of�ciMl GMzePPe
(OG) (
Rasmi Jaridah
) by the
Ministry of Justice (MoJ). Certain regulations
are required to be published in the OG, while regulations that affect only the internal operations
of a particular ministry need not be sent to the
National Assembly for adoption or to the MoJ
for publication. Since November 1963 the OG has been published in a continuously numbered
sequence. Before then individual laws were published in individual pamphlet form and keeping
PrMck of POem RMs dif�culPB OG noB 787 from 1EEE speci�es POe mMnner Mnd requiremenPs of
publication and adoption of legislative documents.
TOere is currenPly no uni�ed of�ciMl index of lMRs, nor Mny properly funcPioning sysPem of reporPing
court cases or decisions (even of the Supreme Court).
AfgOMnisPMn Rule of IMR ProjecP
(AROIP) scMnned M full seP of POe OG issues Mnd POese PGFs Mre currenPly MvMilMNle for doRnloMd
from POe MoJ ReNsiPe (in GMri Mnd PMsOPo only—RRRBmojBgovBMf)B TOere is Mlso M full-PexP seMrcOMNle
database of the OG laws (Dari and Pashto only) on the MoJ website. Regulations, rules, charters
Mnd decrees cover mMny imporPMnP legMl MreMs NuP Mre noP codi�ed or fully MssemNled MnyROere
(although many are published in the OG).
Many international organisations require translations of older or newer laws. Such translations
are currently available for some laws on
www.afghanistantranslation.co
. Some ministries
Mlso keep PGFs of relevMnP legislMPion on POeir ReNsiPe (eBgB, PMx lMRs on POe
MinisPry of FinMnce
website—www.mof.gov.af).
There is no established citation style for Afghan laws. To fully identify a law it is best to cite the OG
number as well as the date (preferably in both local and international date systems) e.g.,
Law of
Procurement
Of�ciMl GMzePPe
no. 865, 3 Aqrab SY1384 = 25 October 2005).
London Conferences
MfgOMnisPMnBOmgBgovBukCenCconference (2010)
On 31 JMnuMry–1 FeNruMry 2006, POe governmenP of POe UniPed Kingdom OosPed POe �rsP
Iondon Fonference on AfgOMnisPMn, M mMjor inPernMPionMl summiP co-cOMired Ny POe UN Mnd POe
Government of Afghanistan. The Conference had three aims: to formally launch the Afghanistan
Compact (p. 12), to allow the Afghan government to present the Interim Afghanistan National
Development Strategy (see ANDS, p. 15) to the international community, and to ensure that
the government of Afghanistan had adequate resources to meet its domestic ambitions and
international commitments. The Conference marked the completion of the Bonn process (p.
27) Mnd POe end of POe �rsP sPMge of AfgOMnisPMn’s posP-TMliNMn developmenP, ROicO sMR POe
reestablishment of key political institutions and a democratically-elected national government.
TOe Fonference Mlso MlloRed memNers of POe inPernMPionMl communiPy Po reMf�rm POeir poliPicMl
Mnd �nMnciMl commiPmenP Po AfgOMnisPMn’s reconsPrucPionB
A second London Conference on Afghanistan took place on 28 January 2010 with and was co-
hosted by President Hamid Karzai, UK Prime Minister Gordon Brown, and UN Secretary-General
Ban Ki-Moon. The Conference outcomes included plans to continue boosting Afghan security
forces and gradually hand over security responsibility province-by-province, empower Afghan anti-
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
corruption institutions and establish an independent Monitoring and Evaluation Mission, convene
a Grand Peace Jirga before the Kabul Conference scheduled for Spring 2010, and establish a
PeMce Mnd HnPegrMPion TrusP Fund Po �nMnce POe AfgOMn-led PeMce Mnd ReinPegrMPion ProgrMmme,
“to offer economic alternatives to those who renounce violence, cut links to terrorism and agree
to work within the democratic process.”
Micro�nMnce HnvesPmenP SupporP FMciliPy for
AfgOMnisPMn (MHSFA)
www.misfa.org.af
TOe Micro�nMnce HnvesPmenP SupporP FMciliPy for AfgOMnisPMn (MHSFA) RMs esPMNlisOed joinPly
by the Government of Afghanistan and the donor community in 2003. It provides funds for
micro�nMnce insPiPuPions (MFHs) POMP offer smMll loMns Mnd oPOer �nMnciMl services Po poor Mnd
vulnerMNle AfgOMnsB Micro�nMnce is M meMns of supporPing Mnd encourMging income-generMPing
activities among the very poor, who would not otherwise have access to economic opportunities
through reliable credit facilities.
MHSFA RMs regisPered Ms Mn independenP, nonpro�P insPiPuPion in MMrcO 2006 Mnd OMs Mn
independent board composed of representatives from the government and the private sector, as
Rell Ms inPernMPionMl micro�nMnce experPsB HP is POe �rsP micro�nMnce Mpex fMciliPy in AfgOMnisPMn,
pooling diverse donor funding mecOMnisms inPo sPreMmlined, �exiNle supporP Po MFHsB HP operMPes
with support from donors, international development agencies, and the Government of Afghanistan
POrougO POe AfgOMnisPMn ReconsPrucPion TrusP Fund (ARTF, pB 21)B
As of SepPemNer 200E, MHSFA OMs provided more POMn US$688 million in loMns Po iPs 16
implemenPing pMrPners, ROicO consisP of 14 MFHs, one NMnk, Mnd one crediP unionB TOese
implemenPing pMrPners provide M rMnge of micro�nMnce services: individuMl Mnd group lending,
village banking, and credit unions. All together they serve more than 432,000 Afghans in 27
provinces, 61% of ROom Mre RomenB TOe MverMge loMn size of micro�nMnce NorroRers is US$3D4
and the cumulative loan repayment rate is 94%. The sector employs more than 4,000 Afghans,
37% of whom are women.
MHSFA is in POe process of implemenPing reforms Mcross POe microcrediP secPor Po NMlMnce groRPO
Mnd porPfolio quMliPy oNjecPivesB
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)
RRRBunBorgCmillenniumgoMls
In 2004, Afghanistan’s transitional government declared its intention to achieve the Millennium
Development Goals (MDGs) established at the 2000 UN Millennium Summit. MDGs are intended
to act as a framework to guide the development of national policies and reconstruction priorities
around the world, with benchmarks set for 2015 and 2020. The MDGs are incorporated into the
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15) and the Afghanistan Compact (p. 12).
A to Z
1.
Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger
Achieve universal primary education
Promote gender equality and empower women
Reduce child mortality
Improve maternal health
FomNMP HHVCAHGS, mMlMriM Mnd oPOer diseMses
7.
Ensure environmental sustainability
Develop a global partnership for development
To this list, the Afghan government has added a ninth goal for its own development initiatives:
enhancing security.
In June 2005, the Afghan government held a conference in Kabul to discuss how to meet the MDG
benchmarks and determine MDG progress. The meeting resulted in the “Afghanistan’s 2020
Vision” reporP, in ROicO mosP of POe 201D PMrgePs Rere revised Po Ne meP Ny 2020, recognising
capacity constraints and security impediments on the country’s development.
Mine Action Programme for Afghanistan (MAPA)
www.macca.org.af
The Mine Action Programme for Afghanistan (MAPA), the world’s largest mine action programme,
was established in 1989 to make Afghanistan safe from the threat of mines and other explosive
remnants of war.
Oversight and coordination of MAPA is currently in transition. While previously the responsibility
of the UN-supported
Mine Action Coordination Centre for Afghanistan (MACCA), the programme is
gradually shifting toward national ownership. Both MACCA and the Government of Afghanistan’s
Department of Mine Clearance (DMC) work under the direction of the Security Pillar of the
Afghanistan National Development Strategy process (ANDS, p. 15) to develop strategy and
implement and monitor MAPA activities and targets. Although originally set up by
UN Of�ce for
the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA), MACCA and a number of MAPA implementing
partners are now funded by
UN Mine Action Service (UNMAS).
Together, MACCA and the DMC coordinate nationwide MAPA activities through seven area mine
action centres, in Kabul, Herat, Kandahar, Mazar-i-Sharif, Kunduz, Gardez and Jalalabad. These
regionMl of�ces, sPMffed enPirely Ny AfgOMns, Mre responsiNle for regionMl coordinMPion Mnd oversigOP
of mine action activities. MAPA implemen
ting partners are mostly national and international
NGOs that carry out activities such as mine clearance and survey, mine risk education, victim
assistance, capacity building, advocacy, monitoring, and training. In addition MACCA works closely
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
with the
Ministry of Labour, Social Affairs, Martyrs and Disabled and the
Ministry of Public Health
to advocate on behalf of persons with disabilities including landmine survivors.
Around 660 square kilometres of land is contaminated with anti-personnel or anti-tank mines
and other explosive remnants of war (ERW); 75% of this is located in only 12 of Afghanistan’s
34 provincesB From JMnuMry Po SepPemNer 200E, 40,034 MnPi-personnel mines, 4ED MnPi-PMnk
mines, and 904,914 ERW were destroyed. Led by the Ministry of Education, mine risk education
programmes continue around the country; between January and September 2009, this initiative
provided information to 832,728 people.
MAPA works to meet mine action benchmarks set by the
Afghanistan Compact (p. 12), which calls
for a 70% reduction in contaminated land area by March 2011, and the Ottawa Mine Ban Treaty,
ROicO requires complePe cleMrMnce Ny 2013B Unless POere is M signi�cMnP increMse in POe funding
to the programme in the next few years, current estimates suggest that these targets will not be
met.
National Area-Based Development Programme
RRRBmrrdBgovBMfCnMNdp
The National Area-Based Development Programme (NABDP) is a UNDP-supported programme
run by the
Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development (MRRD). NABDP was launched in
2002 Ms one of POe AfgOMn governmenP’s NMPionMl PrioriPy ProgrMmmes, de�ned in POe
GevelopmenP FrMmeRork (NGF, pB D6)B
TOe NABGP Mims Po promoPe urgenP recovery Mnd longer-Perm developmenP in idenPi�ed prioriPy
areas of rural development while building government capacity to lead and coordinate participatory
MpproMcOes Po developmenP Mcross POe counPryB AfPer complePion of iPs �rsP pOMse (2002 Po
2004-0D), NABGP POMse HH RMs lMuncOed in FeNruMry 2006 Mnd RMs inPended Po serve Ms M key
coordination mechanism for government and UN-supported rural development programmes. It
focused more on institutional development, capacity building, and intersectoral coordination at
the regional and provincial levels, as well as promotion of regional and local economic regeneration
The third and current phase, which began in July 2009, is based on the third pillar of the
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15): social and economic development. It
is currenPly NudgePed for $2E4 million unPil June 2014B
NABDP Phase III has three main components:
1.
IocMl GovernMnce Mnd GisPricP GevelopmenP AssemNlies (GGA) HnsPiPuPionMlisMPion
: FolloRing
the footsteps of Community Development Councils (see NSP, p. 58), the NABDP will continue
the institutionalisation of DDAs to achieve full national coverage.
A to Z
SusPMinMNle IiveliOoods POrougO RurMl HnfrMsPrucPure Services
: TOis componenP Mims Po �ll gMps
in physical infrastructure to promote agricultural productivity and rural economic development.
This includes farm-to-market roads, irrigation works, food storage facilities, and local markets.
Stabilisation through Enhanced Economic Livelihoods
: NABDP will contribute toward “a more
OolisPic resoluPion” in con�icP Mnd posP-con�icP environmenPs POrougO “innovMPive operMPing
plMPforms LROicO] encompMss M numNer of economic generMPion models Mnd scOemes Mll of
ROicO sOould OMve M sPMNilizing in�uence on locMl communiPiesB” TOis componenP Mlso promoPes
alternative livelihood (AL, p. 25) opportunities for farmers dependent on poppy cultivation.
National Budget
www.budgetmof.gov.af
Each year, the government of Afghanistan produces a national budget. This budget is an estimate
of POe cosP of providing services for POMP yeMr, Mnd speci�es OoR POese services Mre Po Ne pMid forB
TOe nMPionMl NudgeP for POe SY1388 (200E-10) �scMl yeMr is POe equivMlenP of MpproximMPely $7B7D
billion, which is being spent on a wide range of services including law and order, education, health
and welfare provision, and rural and urban development. The cost of this provision is met from the
proceeds of national taxation, charges for services provided, and money donated to Afghanistan
by the international community in the form of development grants and loans.
ExpendiPure is clMssi�ed Mccording Po iPs purposeB
Operating expenditure
is money spent on the day-
to-day running costs of the government such as the salaries of civil servants, teachers and policemen;
POe running cosPs of of�ces Mnd oPOer operMPionMl premises; Mnd POe purcOMse of equipmenP Mnd
machinery such as computers and vehicles. Most of this expenditure is funded from taxation and
oPOer domesPic sourcesB TOe NudgeP for operMPing expendiPure in SY1388 is $1B81 NillionB
Alongside the operating budget is the country’s
development budget
. This is money spent on
expanding and improving service provision to the Afghan people. Most of this expenditure is in the
form of developmenP projecPs—Nuilding neR scOools, consPrucPing neR roMds, insPMlling neR RMPer
supply and sanitation schemes, enhancing the capacity of human resources, etc. This budget
is funded by international donors who have committed money to assist Afghanistan to improve
internal security, raise the standard and coverage of public services, and stimulate the growth of
the private sector of the economy.
The development budget is divided into two parts. The
“core” development budget
consists of
development funding managed by the
MinisPry of FinMnce (MoF) POrougO POe governmenP’s oRn
MccounPing procedures—POe core developmenP NudgeP for SY1388 is $1B14 NillionB TOe
“external”
development budget
is money provided by donors that does not pass through government
procedures—POese funds Mre disPriNuPed direcPly Ny donors Po POeir conPrMcPing pMrPnersB For
SY1388, POe “exPernMl” developmenP NudgeP is $4B8 NillionB
Producing the annual budget is a lengthy and complex process. Under the Afghan Constitution (p.
E6), responsiNiliPy for mMnMging POis process is vesPed in POe MoFB TOe MnnuMl NudgeP prepMrMPion
cycle PMkes MNouP one yeMr Mnd MoF sePs Mnd moniPors POe PimePMNle POMP governs iPB
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Budgeting activity always starts from the national plan—the
Afghanistan National Development
SPrMPegy (ANGS, pB 1D)B TOis is M �ve-yeMr progrMmme sePPing ouP ROMP POe governmenP, RiPO POe
assistance of the donor community, wishes to achieve over that period, and specifying the main
priority areas. The cost of delivering the plan, and the amounts and sources of income required
Po fund iP, is projecPed in POe medium-Perm �nMnciMl Mnd NudgeP frMmeRork (MTBF), ROicO in Purn
informs the annual budget-setting process.
MoF sePs POe rules for POe prepMrMPion of POe MnnuMl NudgeP Ny issuing M series of NudgeP circulMrs
to line (i.e., service providing) ministries. These specify the budget rules and provide expenditure
ceilings for both operating and development budgets. The line ministries draw up their own
NudgeP proposMls ROicO POey suNmiP Po MoFB TOe NudgeP esPimMPes from Mll POe minisPries Mre POen
consolidated into the National Budget Document (NBD), which once approved by the Cabinet is
presented to Parliament. Parliament discusses the budget for up to 45 days, at the end of which
it “appropriates” (i.e., approves) the necessary funds.
Hn 200E, POe MoF inProduced M numNer of iniPiMPives Po improve nMPionMl NudgePing, Mnd supporP
the principles of good governance. Amongst these was the introduction of policy-based budgeting
linking minisPry spending direcPly Po ANGS requiremenPs in POe form of progrMm NudgePsB MoF OMs
also taken a number of steps to assist line ministries by providing technical support, simplifying
NudgeP procedures, Mnd MlloRing exPrM Pime for NudgeP prepMrMPionB TOe ulPimMPe oNjecPive is Po
enable line ministries to improve the quality and coverage of the services they provide to the
NMPionMl GevelopmenP FrMmeRork (NGF)
TOe NMPionMl GevelopmenP FrMmeRork (NGF) RMs drMRn up Ny POe
Afghan Interim Authority (AIA,
p. 56) in 2002 as a roadmap for the development and reconstruction process in Afghanistan.
HP idenPi�ed 16 NMPionMl GevelopmenP ProgrMmmes (NGPs) Mnd six cross-cuPPing issues under
three broad pillars: 1) human capital and social protection, 2) physical infrastructure, and 3) an
enMNling environmenP for developmenPB TOe NGF Mlso idenPi�ed 12 NMPionMl PrioriPy ProgrMmmes
(NPPs) POMP Rere meMnP Po Ne mMjor policy prioriPies for POe governmenPB
The 16 NDPs were overseen by corresponding
Consultative Groups (CGs, p. 30). These CGs
operMPed Ms M forum RiPOin ROicO POe dePMils of reconsPrucPion Mnd developmenP projecPs in eMcO
sector were designed and discussed. Each CG then implemented its sector’s plans by proposing
a Public Investment Programme (PIP) for the National Development
Budget (p. 56). In addition,
Advisory Groups existed for each of the six cross-cutting issues.
TOe NGF, under POe Muspices of POe
MinisPry of FinMnce, remMined POe primMry NMsis for governmenP
and donor planning until January 2006, when it was replaced by the Interim Afghanistan National
Development Strategy (see ANDS, p. 15).
A to Z
National Human Development Report (NHDR)
RRRBcpOdBMfCnOdrBOPm
National Human Development Reports (NHDRs) are based on the human develop
ment concept,
which emphasises the divers
ity of human needs, such as income, access to knowledge, nut
rition
and health, security, political and cultu
ral free
dom, and participation in the community. Since 1992,
more than 500 NHDRs have been produced, primarily by developing countries with UNDP support.
AfgOMnisPMn’s �rsP NHGR RMs releMsed in FeNruMry 200D, “SecuriPy RiPO M HumMn FMce,” ROicO
focused on the relationship between security and development. Produced by
Kabul University and
UNDP on behalf of the Afghan government, the report was based on a number of sectoral and
ground papers commissioned from national researchers.
The second Afghanistan NHDR, released in late 2007, “Bringing Modernity and Tradition,” was
produced by the UNDP-sponsored
Centre for Policy and Human Development (CPHD) at Kabul
University. It focused on the linkages between rule of law and human development, highlighting
key challenges to the expansion of the rule of law in Afghanistan and proposing approaches to
Nridge moderniPy Mnd PrMdiPion in POe seMrcO for sociMl jusPiceB
The third NHDR, again being prepared by the CPHD, is planned for release in 2010, and is
tentatively titled, “Water Security and Human Development in a Stabilising Society.” The report
places water at the heart of the development debate and highlights case studies that look at
vulnerable groups and areas with poor sanitation, such as rainfed farming communities in arid
NMPionMl Risk Mnd VulnerMNiliPy AssessmenP (NRVA)
www.nrva.cso.gov.af
TOe NMPionMl Risk Mnd VulnerMNiliPy AssessmenP (NRVA) is POe primMry insPrumenP POrougO ROicO
National Surveillance System (NSS, p. 59) Unit of the
Central Statistics Organisation (CSO, p.
28) gathers and analyses information about poverty, food security, and vulnerability of the Afghan
populMPionB TOe NRVA Mims Po provide Pimely, crediNle informMPion for use Ny POe governmenP Mnd
assistance actors in the design and implementation of social protection programmes, policies
and strategies, such as the
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15). It is the
only comprehensive, nationwide, multipurpose household survey in Afghanistan.
TOe �rsP NRVA RMs conducPed in 2003 in 32 provinces RiPO cooperMPion from POe Jorld Food
ProgrMmme Mnd POe VulnerMNiliPy AnMlysis UniP (VAU) of POe
Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and
GevelopmenP (MRRG)B TOe second NRVA RMs joinPly conducPed Ny FSO Mnd VAU in 200D in Mll 34
provinces, RiPO signi�cMnP improvemenPs in (1) quesPionnMire scope Po include remiPPMnces Mnd
reproduction and child health and (2) coverage of women, nomadic Kuchi, and large urban centres.
TOe FSO Mnd MRRG, RiPO cooperMPion from POe EuropeMn Fommission, releMsed POe �ndings from
POe 2007C8 NRVA in OcPoNer 200EB FompMred Po iPs predecessors, POe lMPesP NRVA RMs M sOifP
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
MRMy from sOorP-Perm dMPM collecPion Po M yeMr-round sPrMPegyB FieldRork RMs conducPed from
August 2007 to August 2008, which aimed to capture the seasonality of consumption to improve
POe quMliPy of collecPed dMPM, Mnd Po �eld M smMller group of cMrefully selecPed inPervieRersB TOe
assessment collected information on: population structure and change, labour force characteristics,
agriculture, poverty and equality, education, health, housing, position of women, and household
shocks and community preferences.
GMPM resulPs Mnd reporPs from NRVA McPiviPies Mre MvMilMNle on POe ReNsiPe of POe FSO (RRRB
csoBgovBMf)B Hn 2011, POe NRVA is expecPed Po cOMnge iPs nMme Po POe “HouseOold Hncome Mnd
Expenditure Survey” or “Living and Standards Survey,” with new indicators.
National Solidarity Programme (NSP)
www.nspafghanistan.org
TOe NMPionMl SolidMriPy ProgrMmme (NSP) RMs de�ned in POe
NMPionMl GevelopmenP FrMmeRork
(NGF, pB D6) Mnd is one of POe sPill-funcPioning, originMl NMPionMl PrioriPy ProgrMmmes (NPP)B TOe
NSP is intended to improve access of rural communities to social and productive infrastructure
and services and create a foundation for improved governance through:
Establishing a framework for village-level consultative decision-making and representative
local leadership as a basis for interaction within and between communities on the one hand,
and with the government and aid agencies on the other
Promoting local-level reconstruction, development, and capacity building
TOe NSP seeks Po MPPMin POese oNjecPives POrougO four core progrMm elemenPs: 1) fMciliPMPing
the creation of Community Development Councils (CDCs, representative decision-making bodies
elected by secret ballot in fair and open elections involving both male and female community
members); 2) helping the CDCs produce a Community Development Plan (CDP), which outlines
developmenP prioriPies Mnd proposes reconsPrucPion projecPs; 3) providing direcP Nlock grMnP
transfers to fund CDP priorities; and 4) linking CDCs to government agencies, NGOs, and donors
to improve access to services and resources. The programme is implemented by the communities
POemselves RiPO POe Oelp of NSP FMciliPMPing PMrPners (FPs), ROicO include one UN Mgency, one
privMPe �rm, Mnd 26 locMlCinPernMPionMl NGOs (Ms of NovemNer 200E)B
As of January 2010, NSP had facilitated the election of more than 22,200 CDCs and guided the
preparation of over 22,000 CDPs in 359 of Afghanistan’s 394 districts and provincial centres.
Since POe ProgrMmme’s incepPion, more POMn US$678 million in grMnPs OMve Neen disNursed Po
rurMl communiPies, neMrly 36,000 projecPs OMve Neen complePed, Mnd MnoPOer 13,D00 OMve Neen
MpprovedB TOe projecPs OMve Neen underPMken in POe MreMs of PrMnsporPMPion (2D% of projecPs),
water supply and sanitation (24%), irrigation (17%), power supply (13%), education (12%),
liveliOoods (D%), Mnd oPOer secPors (3%)B HumMn FMpiPMl GevelopmenP (HFG) projecPs MccounP for
1D% of projecPs Mnd 3% of grMnPsB Hn mMny remoPe pMrPs of POe counPry, NSP is POe only funcPioning
government development programme.
A to Z
The responsibility for overall management and supervision of the NSP lies with the Ministry of
Rural Rehabilitation and Development (MRRD); Management Support Consultants (MSC) assist
cerPMin depMrPmenPs, including FinMnce Mnd MMnMgemenP HnformMPion SysPemsB Hn MddiPion, M
World Bank task team has a supervisory function and a donor working group regularly liaises with
The original NSP was followed by a second phase (referred to as NSP II) launched in April
2007B NSP HH exPended POe progrMmme Po communiPies POMP Rere noP covered Ny POe �rsP pOMse
and currently closes in September 2011. NSP II aims to complete national roll-out of the
programme.
TOe AfgOMn GovernmenP, NSP donors, FMciliPMPing PMrPners, communiPy memNers, Mnd oPOer
programme stakeholders continue with preparation of a third phase of NSP. It is anticipated
that the third phase will provide repeater block grants to CDCs and support for maintaining the
institutional quality of CDCs.
Funding for POe NSP comes from POe Jorld BMnk, POe AfgOMnisPMn ReconsPrucPion TrusP Fund
(ARTF, pB 21), Mnd NilMPerMl donorsB FonPriNuPing governmenPs include AusPrMliM, FMnMdM, GenmMrk,
POe EuropeMn Fommission, FinlMnd, FrMnce, GermMny, HPMly, JMpMn, NeR ZeMlMnd, NorRMy, SpMin,
Sweden, Switzerland, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and the United States.
National Surveillance System (NSS)
RRRBmrrdBgovBMfCnss-vMu
TOe NMPionMl PoverPy, VulnerMNiliPy Mnd Food SecuriPy SurveillMnce SysPem, or POe NMPionMl
SurveillMnce SysPem (NSS) ProjecP, RMs designed Po Nring dMPM collecPion on food securiPy, poverPy,
Mnd vulnerMNiliPy under one umNrellMB TOe NSS is implemenPed Ny POe VulnerMNiliPy AnMlysis UniP
(VAU) of POe
Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development (MRRD) as well as the NSS Unit of
AcPiviPies NegMn in SepPemNer 2003, led Ny POe VAU in close collMNorMPion RiPO POe Jorld Food
Programme, the
Ministry of Public Health,
UNHFEF, Mnd POe MinisPry of AgriculPure, HrrigMPion Mnd
Livestock. In 2005, NSS partnered with the CSO, and an NSS unit was created within CSO to take
over
NMPionMl Risk Mnd VulnerMNiliPy AssessmenP (NRVA, pB D7) dMPM collecPionB
TOe oNjecPives of POe NSS ProjecP Mre Po generMPe informMPion POMP conPriNuPes Po improved policy
development and programming, and to ensure relevant government institutions have the capacity
Po implemenP NSS McPiviPies in POe fuPureB TOe ProjecP OMs four mMjor componenPs:
1B
BMseline moniPoring POrougO POe NiMnnuMl NRVA
Emergency needs assessments
An early warning and information system
ReseMrcO Mnd speci�c sPudies
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
NSS is working to develop methodologies that better satisfy the government’s need for information
in Pimes of McuPe crisis, sucO Ms eMrPOquMkes or severe �ooding, Mnd Po develop eMrly RMrning
systems and emergency assessment services.
For POe full PexP of POe NGO Fode of FonducP, see pB 141B
Since 2002 POere OMve Neen PRo mMjor iniPiMPives Po clMrify ROMP is, Mnd ROMP is noP, M nonpro�P
nongovernmental organisation (NGO), and to strengthen the accountability and transparency of
NGO McPiviPies in AfgOMnisPMnB TOe �rsP iniPiMPive RMs legislMPion Po dePermine ROMP Mn NGO is Mnd
what are permissible NGO activities, set criteria for the establishment and internal governance of
NGOs, clMrify reporPing requiremenPs for NGOs, enMNle pro�P-mMking Nodies currenPly regisPered Ms
NGOs to establish themselves as businesses, and enhance the transparency and accountability
of NGOs. The second initiative was an NGO Code of Conduct, designed by the NGO community
working in Afghanistan as a self-governing mechanism to ensure commitment to transparency,
accountability, and professional standards from all signatories.
In consultation with NGOs and with technical assistance from the International Centre for Not-for-
Pro�P IMR (HFNI), Mn iniPiMl drMfP for POe NGO legislMPion RMs presenPed Po POe
Ministry of Justice
in 2003B NGOs cMlled for POe Pimely �nMlisMPion of POe legislMPion MP POe AfgOMnisPMn GevelopmenP
ForM (AGF, pB 14) in NoPO April 2004 Mnd April 200D, Mnd POe NGO legislMPion RMs evenPuMlly pMssed
in June 200DB TOis legislMPion provided M meMns Ny ROicO nonpro�P NGOs cMn Ne differenPiMPed
from the many contractors registered as NGOs (between 2001 and 2004 around 2,400 entities
OMd regisPered RiPO POe governmenP Ms NGOs, despiPe POe lMck of Mny of�ciMl criPeriM for sucO M
SOorPly MfPer POe �rsP NGO legislMPion drMfP RMs prepMred for POe governmenP in July 2003, 120
NGOs participated in a workshop to discuss the content of the NGO Code of Conduct. The text of
POe Fode RMs joinPly drMfPed Ny POe four mMjor NGO coordinMPion Nodies in AfgOMnisPMn: Agency
Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief
(ACBAR, p. 23),
Afghan NGOs Coordinating Bureau (ANCB, p.
Southern and Western Afghanistan and Balochistan Association for Coordination (SWABAC, p.
67), and Afghan Women’s Network (AWN, p. 10). A Code of Conduct Secretariat was established
under POe Muspices of AFBAR Po coordinMPe Mnd �nMlise POe drMfP, ROicO RMs complePed in MMy
2004. The NGO community publicly launched the Afghanistan NGO Code of Conduct on 30 May
2005. In order to be a signatory to the Code of Conduct, NGOs are required to submit several
documents to prove their NGO status, including legal registration documentation, coordination
Nody memNersOip, �nMnciMl records, Mnd proof of reporPing Po POe relevMnP minisPryB TOe NGO
Code of Conduct has 100 Afghan and international signatories.
A to Z
Of�ce of AdminisPrMPive AffMirs Mnd Founcil of
MinisPers SecrePMriMP (OAACFMS)
RRRBpresidenPBgovBMfCProoP_engBMspx?id=171
TOe Of�ce of AdminisPrMPive AffMirs Mnd Founcil of MinisPers SecrePMriMP (OAA) is Mn execuPive-level
coordinating, facilitating and advising body that supports the President of Afghanistan in his role
Ms POe HeMd of SPMPe Mnd POe HeMd of GovernmenPCFOMirmMn of POe Founcil of MinisPersB OriginMlly
seP up in POe 1ED0s under King ZMOir SOMO, POe OAA’s sPrucPure RMs modi�ed in 2002; POe Founcil
of Ministers Secretariat and the Department of Monitoring and Evaluation were established as
two separate directorates in 2003 to ensure systematic support to the Council of Ministers (COM)
meetings. The OAA, as a hub for government institutions, mainly acts as the policy coordinator
NePReen POe POree pillMrs (execuPive, legislMPive Mnd judiciMry) of POe GovernmenP of AfgOMnisPMnB
Its other functions include monitoring the implementation of the Presidential decrees and the
decisions of POe Founcil of MinisPersB HP Mlso provides MdminisPrMPive, logisPicMl Mnd �nMnciMl
supporP Po POe of�ces of POe PresidenP, Vice PresidenPs, Mnd Advisors Po POe PresidenPB TOe OAA
also prepares the Government Achievement Report to the National Assembly at the end of each
�scMl yeMr Po meeP POe mMndMPe under ArPicle 7D, FlMuse 6 of POe FonsPiPuPionB OPOer funcPions
of the OAA include reviewing and analysing all proposals aiming to be submitted to the COM,
preparing agendas and minutes of Cabinet meetings, and facilitating the Council with required
tasks. The OAA facilitates convention of all the regular and emergency meetings of the Cabinet as
well as those of the economic, sociocultural and legal sub-committees.
Although an executive body, the OAA is designed to be impartial. It does not create policy, but rather
coordinMPes policy developmenPB TOe Of�ce Mnd SecrePMriMP revieR policies drMfPed Ny minisPries
and ensure that these comply with the
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15),
address cross-cutting initiatives, and contain a clear, accurate budget. Once the OAA approves the
drMfP policy, iP is pMssed on Po POe PresidenP Mnd FMNineP for �nMl revieR Mnd possiNle MpprovMlB Hf
a policy is approved, the OAA monitors and evaluates its implementation.
In 2008, assisted by other government agencies, the OAA organised many key events, meetings
and conferences, including the
Afghanistan-Pakistan Joint Peace Jirga and sessions related to the
Afghan government’s process of accountability to the nation. In 2009, the OAA provided advice
and expert observations on policies and proposals, conducted the SY1387 (April 2008–March
2009) accountability process, and published more than 60 publications about government
achievements in various sectors.
Paris Conference
www.diplomatie.gouv.fr and search “Paris Conference”
The International Conference in Support of Afghanistan, more widely known as the Paris Conference,
RMs Oeld on 12 June 2008 Mnd RMs co-cOMired Ny FrencO PresidenP NicolMs SMrkozy, AfgOMn
PresidenP HMmid KMrzMi, Mnd UN SecrePMry-GenerMl BMn Ki-MoonB TOis mMjor inPernMPionMl meePing
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
formally launched the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15). The conference
was intended to be a show of “partnership” from the Afghan government and the international
community “to work more closely together under Afghan leadership” to support the ANDS, as stated
in POe resulPing declMrMPionB ApproximMPely $20 Nillion RMs pledged Po �nMnce POe implemenPMPion
of the ANDS, including support for the preparation of elections in 2009 and 2010.
TOe declMrMPion from POe conference reMf�rmed POMP POe
Afghanistan Compact (p. 12) would remain
POe NMsis for POe developmenP of AfgOMnisPMn, Mnd iP speci�ed POe prioriPy MreMs of sPrengPOening
institutions and economic growth, particularly in agriculture and energy. The conference also
resulted in statements on a renewed commitment to strengthening the effectiveness and quality
of aid, as a shared responsibility. The international community agreed to provide increased
resources in a more consistent, coordinated way, while the Afghan government promised to step-
up economic and political reform.
Policy Action Group (PAG)
The Policy Action Group (PAG), a high-level task force and crisis management group, was
established in June 2006 by President
Hamid Karzai and then-Commander of the International
SecuriPy AssisPMnce Force (HSAF, pB 4D) GenerMl GMvid RicOMrds Po Mddress POe groRing POreMP of
insurgency in Afghanistan’s southern provinces.
The PAG aims to improve Afghanistan’s high-level capacity to manage crises, and to enhance the
coordination of security operations and other security-related matters between the Government
and the international community. The PAG meets monthly and includes: the National Security
Advisor (as chair); the Ministers of Defence, Interior, Rural Rehabilitation and Development,
Communications and Information Technology, Counter Narcotics, and Education; the Director
General of the Independent Directorate for Local Governance (IDLG, p. 42); top representatives
from the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA, p. 68), the International Security
AssisPMnce Force (HSAF, pB 4D), Mnd FSTF-A (see FoMliPion Forces, pB 2E); Mnd POe MmNMssMdors
of the United Kingdom, the United States, Australia, Canada, Denmark, and the Netherlands, in
addition to the EU Special Representative.
After the
Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB, p. 47), a high-level governing body, was
restructured in 2008, the PAG members agreed in October to use the JCMB Standing Committee
on Security to discuss policy issues, while the PAG would be used to discuss operational issues. It
was also agreed that the PAG’s work would include security issues related to the whole country.
Key achievements of the PAG
have
ncluded: the increased delivery of reconstruction assistance to
souPOern AfgOMnisPMn; developmenP of M joinP securiPy plMn for voPer regisPrMPion NePReen ANSF Mnd
the international military; and the establishment of the National Communications Coordination
FenPre, ROicO formed POe NMsis for improved informMPion �oR NePReen POe GovernmenP Mnd iPs
international partners. The new
Government Media and Information Centre (GMIC, p. 40) has
since taken over this role.
A to Z
Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP)
Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSPs) are designed to provide a framework of operation
for donors and governments of poor countries. To qualify for debt relief and other concessions,
loR-income counPries musP produce M PRSP for some donorsB TOe PRSP formMP is �exiNle, NuP iP is
based on a number of set principles. A PRSP should:
Be country driven and owned, with the input of civil society and the private sector
HMve resulPs orienPed Po Nene�P POe poor
Be comprehensive in recognising the multidimensional nature of poverty
Be partnership oriented (developed in cooperation with bilateral, multilateral and
nongovernmental actors)
Be based on a long-term perspective for poverty reduction
Interim PRSPs (I-PRSPs) are developed by countries that are not yet ready to develop a full PRSP.
At the Berlin Meeting (p. 26) in 2001, Afghanistan agreed to prepare a PRSP, with an I-PRSP due
in June 2005. At the April 2005
AfgOMnisPMn GevelopmenP Forum (AGF, pB 14), iP RMs decided POMP
the development of the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15) would meet the
benchmarks of a PRSP process. The Interim ANDS, which was launched in January 2006 after a
nine-month preparation period, moved the country toward the achievement of a full PRSP. The full
ANGS RMs �nMlised in April 2008 Mnd suNmiPPed Po POe Jorld BMnk Mnd POe HMF Ms AfgOMnisPMn’s
PRSP.
Provincial Development Plan (PDP)
RRRBMndsBgovBMfCMndsCMnds_docsCindexBMsp
Aimed at ensuring broad consensus on development priorities in Afghanistan, the creation of a
Provincial Development Plan for each of the country’s 34 provinces was initiated by the Afghanistan
National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15). The plans were the result of sub-national consultations
RiPO locMl communiPies orgMnised in every province Po idenPify prioriPies Mnd proposMls for projecPsB
The plans cover eight key sectors: infrastructure and natural resources, economic governance
and private sector development, agriculture and rural development, education, health, social
proPecPion, governMnce, securiPy, Mnd rule of lMRCOumMn rigOPsB SuNsequenP consulPMPions Rere
held with representatives from provincial administration, civil society, and donor organisations to
ensure the plans were aligned with the strategies of relevant government ministries. According
to the Independent Directorate
of Local Governance (IDLG, p. 42), the PDP process is among the
efforts made to have provincial planning and budgeting performed by the provinces, rather than
for the provinces (by central ministries in Kabul).
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT)
RRRBnMPoBinPCisMfCPopicsCprP
Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRT) are small teams of both military and civilian staff located
in bases; PRTs are intended to facilitate reconstruction and provide security for assistance efforts
MP POe provinciMl levelB TOe concepP RMs �rsP proposed Ny POe
FoMliPion Forces (FF, pB 2E) Mnd POe
United States embassy in mid-2002 during discussions about shifting from Operation Enduring
Freedom’s POMse HHH (comNMP pOMse) Po POMse HV (reconsPrucPion pOMse)B TOe esPMNlisOmenP of
PRTs RMs of�ciMlly Mnnounced Mnd endorsed Ny PresidenP KMrzMi in NovemNer 2002B
PRTs Rere originMlly esPMNlisOed Ny FoMliPion ForcesB TOe
HnPernMPionMl SecuriPy AssisPMnce Force
(HSAF, pB 4D), OoRever, NegMn PMking over Mnd esPMNlisOing neR PRTs in POe NorPO Mnd JesP of
AfgOMnisPMn in 2004, MfPer Mn OcPoNer 2003 UN SecuriPy Founcil resoluPion expMnded HSAF’s
mMndMPe Neyond KMNulB FommMnd of PRTs in POe SouPO Mnd EMsP RMs PrMnsferred Po HSAF in 2006,
leMving HSAF in cOMrge of Mll PRTs in AfgOMnisPMnB
TOe oNjecPive of PRTs, Ms seP forPO Ny POe PRT ExecuPive SPeering FommiPPee, is Po:
MssisP POe HslMmic RepuNlic of AfgOMnisPMn Po exPend iPs MuPOoriPy, in order Po fMciliPMPe POe
developmenP of M sPMNle Mnd secure environmenP in POe idenPi�ed MreMs of operMPions,
Mnd enMNle SSR LSecuriPy SecPor Reform] Mnd reconsPrucPion efforPsB
This broad mission statement is not backed by a detailed mandate, and there is no single PRT
model. While PRTs are led by individual lead nations, the military components of PRTs come under
POe commMnd of HSAF commMndersB TOe sPrucPure Mnd operMPion of PRTs Mre in�uenced Ny POe
situation in particular provinces as well as by the philosophies, caveats and instructions of troop-
Each PRT comprises an average of 100-200 staff. The military personnel provide protection for
POe civiliMn componenP, ROicO includes foreign MffMirs represenPMPives, developmenP of�cers,
and donors. Some PRTs also have agricultural and veterinary advisors, civilian police trainers,
governance advisors, development advisors, and counter-narcotic specialists. The coordination of
reconstruction and development activities is the responsibility of civilian PRT staff.
PRT activities are monitored and guided by a PRT Executive Steering Committee chaired by the
MinisPer of HnPerior Mnd co-cOMired Ny POe HSAF Mnd FF commMndersB TOe FommiPPee includes
represenPMPives from POe MinisPry of FinMnce, POe MinisPry of RurMl ReOMNiliPMPion Mnd GevelopmenP,
FoMliPion Forces, HSAF, UNAMA (pB 68), Mnd Proop-conPriNuPing counPriesB A PRT Rorking group
supports the work of the Steering Committee.
Some NGO actors are concerned that PRT involvement in humanitarian assistance blurs the
distinction between the military and aid sectors. Proponents counter that PRTs can enable
MssisPMnce projecPs Po Ne cMrried ouP in OigO-risk MreMs generMlly inMccessiNle Po Mid MgenciesB
A to Z
As of January 2010, there are 26 PRTs operating in the country.
Twelve are provided by the United
States, two by Germany, and one each by New Zealand, Turkey, Canada, the United Kingdom, the
Netherlands, Italy, Spain, Lithuania, Norway, Hungary, Sweden, and the Czech Republic.
Administration Reform (PAR)
TOe AfgOMn governmenP’s PuNlic AdminisPrMPion Reform (PAR) frMmeRork seeks Po creMPe Mn ef�cienP,
effective and transparent civil service in Afghanistan. Overseen
by the Independent Administrative
Reform and Civil Service Commission (IARCSC, p. 41) and the Independent Directorate of Local
Governance (IDLG, p. 42), PAR is one of the priorities laid out in the Afghanistan Compact (p. 12)
and the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15).
PAR aims to address a variety of problems, including: the fragmentation of government structures,
with many overlapping functions and a lack of coordination among agencies; the often tenuous
connection between the centre (Kabul) and the provinces; the unclear lines of accountability with
weak reinforcement mechanisms; the lack of experienced professional staff with the necessary
skills; the lack of robust procedures for recruitment and appointment on merit, which has led to
a high level of patronage-based appointments; the need for a pay and grading structure which
attracts, retains and motivates civil servants; poor physical infrastructure; and slow and outdated
administrative systems.
A central element of PAR has been the Priority Reform and Restructuring (PRR) initiative, aimed at
creating administrative capacity in ministries and giving targeted salary increases. PRR was also
designed to ensure consistency across ministries that are reforming with the help of different donors.
In 2005, the PAR programme was redesigned and a framework for SY1385-89 (2006-10) was
developed, shifting the focus away from piecemeal initiatives toward more comprehensive reform
involving whole ministries and other independent agencies that are allocated funds directly from
POe MinisPry of FinMnce (Mlso knoRn Ms primMry NudgeP uniPs); iP RMs Mlso inPended Po move POe
reforms from the centre to provinces and districts. This new version of the PAR programme was
reorgMnised inPo �ve pMrPs, Mlong funcPionMl Mnd progrMmmMPic POemes: 1) MdminisPrMPive reform,
2) salaries and incentives, 3) civil service management, 4) ensuring and expanding merit-based
For more informMPion on AfgOMnisPMn’s puNlic secPor, see pB 80B
Rome Conference on Justice and Rule of Law
www.rolafghanistan.esteri.it
See Justice Sector Reform, p. 48.
Security Sector Reform (SSR)
Poor security is one of the primary obstacles to the timely progress of reconstruction and
development activities in Afghanistan. The government’s framework for Security Sector Reform
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
(SSR) Mims Po Mddress POis proNlemB Announced MP POe FeNruMry 2003 Tokyo MeePing on POe
FonsolidMPion of PeMce in AfgOMnisPMn (pB 67), SSR OMs �ve pillMrs:
1.
The establishment of the Afghan National Army (ANA, p. 5)
The establishment of the Afghan National Police (ANP, p. 6)
Justice Sector Reform
Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration (DDR, p. 35)
Counter Narcotics (CN, p. 32)
Upon completion of the DDR process in June 2005, the Disbandment of Illegal Armed Groups
(DIAG, p. 35) commenced. DIAG
is designed to disarm and disband illegal armed groups operating
outside central government control.
With the exception of DDR, these pillars corresponded explicitly to the
reform and creation of
government ministries—the Ministry of Defence, the Ministry of Interior
, the Ministry of Justice,
Mnd POe MinisPry of FounPer NMrcoPicsB AP POe Bonn (pB 27) Mnd Tokyo (pB 67) meePings, �ve donor
counPries Mgreed Po eMcO PMke POe leMd on M speci�c SSR pillMr: POe UniPed SPMPes on POe ANA,
Germany on the ANP (a role later taken over by the European Union Police Mission in Afghanistan,
p. 38), Italy on JSR, Japan on DDR, and the United Kingdom on counter-narcotics. Originally
referred to as “lead donors,” these “key partners” were responsible for overseeing their particular
sectors, although they were not necessarily contributing the most funds; the “lead donor” or “key
partner” terminology is no longer used. Additional donors are involved to various degrees in each
area, and the United States is involved to some extent in all of them.
Since 2004, POe NMPionMl SecuriPy Founcil (NSF) Mnd POe Of�ce of POe NMPionMl SecuriPy Founcil
have been responsible for overall coordination of SSR activities and estab
lished two coordinating
committees, both of which included international representation: the Security Sector Reform
FoordinMPion FommiPPee Mnd POe SecuriPy FoordinMPion ForumB A neR SSR sPrMPegy RMs referred
Po in POe �nMl AfgOMnisPMn NMPionMl GevelopmenP SPrMPegy (ANGS, pB 1D), ROicO RMs Mpproved Ny
President Hamid Karzai in April 2008. However, unlike the ANDS, the national security policy and
SSR strategy are not publicly available.
In 2009, a non-state security force was created as a short-term solution until effective state
security forces are realised. The
Afghan Public Protection Program (APPP or AP3) is an Afghan-led
initiative that recruits and trains local people to serve as community guard forces in unsecured
regions. It is intended to bolster police as a tangible and immediate-improvement community
RMPcOCpolicing progrMmB OperMPed under POe MinisPry of POe HnPerior (MoH), iP is currenPly M piloP
program in Wardak Province, with plans for expansion in 2010. Some concerns have been raised
that the effort could undermine state authority and progress made in disarmament.
Hn OcPoNer 200E, POe UniPed SPMPes MuPOorised APPPCAP3 for POe 2010 �scMl yeMr under POe
National Defence Authorisation Act, and will require reporting on long-term plans for the program.
In the meantime, other police services are being developed as part of the security strategy,
including the Afghan Uniformed Police (AUP) and National Civil Order Police (ANCOP).
A to Z
Southern and Western Afghanistan and Balochistan
Association for Coordination (SWABAC)
The Southern and Western Afghanistan and Balochistan Association for Coordination (SWABAC) is
a coordination body for Afghan and international NGOs working in southern Afghanistan. Its head
of�ce is in KMndMOMr Mnd iP is currenPly in POe process opening M suN-of�ce in KMNulB
SWABAC was founded in September 1988 by 12 NGOs engaged in relief and rehabilitation work
with Afghan refugee villages in Balochistan and communities inside Afghanistan. Membership is
open to government-registered NGOs working in southern Afghanistan who show a dedication to
coordinMPion Mnd OMve proof of donor funding, OMve Mn orgMnisMPionMl pro�le, Mnd Mre cerPi�ed Ny
�ve oPOer NGOsB As of NovemNer 200E, SJABAF OMd 3D memNersB HP Oolds regulMr memNersOip
meetings, monthly general assembly meetings, and biweekly panel meetings for the advisory
committee, as well as meetings on an as-needed basis.
SJABAF’s McPiviPies fMll RiPOin POree mMjor cMPegories: coordinMPion, MdvocMcy, Mnd cMpMciPy-
building. SWABAC provides a forum for members to discuss their concerns about policy guidelines for
delivering assistance, resource management, and other operational issues, with the ultimate goal
of improving coordination among the assistance community in southern Afghanistan. SWABAC was
involved in drafting the
NGO Code of Conduct (p. 60) in cooperation with the Agency Coordinating
Body for Afghan Relief (ACBAR, p. 23), the Afghan NGO Coordination Bureau (ANCB, p. 9), and the
Afghan Women’s Network (AWN, p. 10). On behalf of its member NGOs and as a representative
of the southern region, SWABAC played a role in developing both the Agriculture and the Rural
Development sectors in the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15).
SJABAF is Mlso M memNer of POe AfgOMn Fivil SociePy Forum
OrgMnisMPion (AFSFO, pB 3) Mnd
is the lead agency for the Local Cooperation and Coordination Sector of Kandahar’s Provincial
Development Committee. The association’s funding sources include membership fees; its
moniPoring Mnd evMluMPion projecPs Mre funded Ny POe UniPed NMPionsB Hn POe fuPure, POe MssociMPion
plans to focus more on capacity building of civil society through workshops, training, and the
establishment of a resource centre. SWABAC is also in the process of applying for membership
HnPernMPionMl Founcil of VolunPMry Agencies (HFVA)B
Tokyo Meetings
RRRBmofMBgoBjpCregionCmiddle_eCMfgOMnisPMnCmin0201
The Tokyo Ministerial Meeting—formally known as the International Conference on Reconstruction
Assistance to Afghanistan—was a meeting of the Afghanistan Reconstruction Steering Group
(ARSG) POMP moNilised POe �rsP suNsPMnPiMl posP-TMliNMn donor commiPmenPs for POe reconsPrucPion
of Afghanistan. It took place on 21-22 January 2002, and was co-chaired by Japan, the United
States, the European Union, and Saudi Arabia. Ministers and representatives from 61 countries
and 21 international organisations attended. NGOs held a separate parallel meeting, the results
of which were reported to the plenary session of the Ministerial Meeting.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Discussions focused on a comprehensive framework for reconstruction over the longer term and
cosPed POe recovery needs of AfgOMnisPMn over POe folloRing Pen yeMrs MP US$1D NillionB TOis �gure
RMs increMsed Po US$27B4 Nillion in POe Securing AfgOMnisPMn’s FuPure reporP POMP resulPed from
the Berlin Meeting (p. 26) held in March 2004.
Hn FeNruMry 2003 MnoPOer meePing RMs Oeld in Tokyo: POe Tokyo Fonference on POe FonsolidMPion
of Peace in Afghanistan. It was held to discuss security reform in Afghanistan
and resulted in the
�ve-pillMr SecuriPy SecPor Reform (SSR, pB 6D) sPrMPegyB
United Nations Assistance Mission in
The United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) was established by UN Security
Council Resolution 1401 on 28 March 2002 following the Bonn Agreement of December 2001.
UNAMA is responsiNle for ful�lling POe UN’s oNligMPions in AfgOMnisPMn Ms originMlly ouPlined Ny POe
Bonn Agreement (p. 27) and for managing UN humanitarian relief, recovery and reconstruction
activities in coordination with the Afghan government.
UNAMA absorbed the two UN agencies that preceded it: the
Special Mission to Afghanistan
(UNSMA), a political mission that had begun in July 1996, and the
Of�ce for FoordinMPion of
Humanitarian Assistance to Afghanistan (UNOCHA), a relief and reconstruction mission that had
begun in January 1993. Prior to UNOCHA, the
UN Of�ce for POe FoordinMPion of HumMniPMriMn Mnd
Economic Assistance Programmes (UNOCA) coordinated reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan.
The chart on page 71 illustrates the evolution of UN coordination in Afghanistan.
UNAMA’s mandate has been extended six times by the
UN Security Council by: Resolution 1471
(March 2003), Resolution 1536 (March 2004), Resolution 1589 (March 2005), Resolution 1662
(March 2006), Resolution 1806 (March 2008), and Resolution 1868 (March 2009). Security
Council Resolution 1868 extended UNAMA’s mandate until March 2010 and recognised the
key role played by the UN in coordinating international efforts in Afghanistan and in supporting
the scheduled 2010 elections. It also instructs UNAMA to continue to: provide political and
sPrMPegic Mdvice for POe peMce process; provide good of�ces; MssisP POe AfgOMn governmenP in POe
implementation of the Afghanistan
Compact; promote human rights; provide technical assistance;
and continue to manage all UN humanitarian relief, recovery, reconstruction and development
activities in coordination with the Afghan government. Resolution 1868 also mandates for the
Secretary-General to report to the Council every three months with benchmarks on measuring
and tracking progress of UNAMA’s mandate.
UNAMA, the main point of contact for the entire UN system in Afghanistan, is the only agency
authorised to speak on behalf of the UN regarding political insecurity in the country. It is led by the
Special Representative of the UN Secretary-
General (SRSG); in Spring 2010, Staffan di Mistura of
SReden replMced KMi Eide in POe posPB TOe Of�ce of POe SRSG is responsiNle for policy guidMnce Mnd
A to Z
OigO-level decision-mMking, Mnd iP liMises RiPO POe Govern
menP, POe FoMliPion Forces (FF, pB 2E), Mnd
the International Security Assistance
Force (HSAF, pB 4D)B TOe SRSG OMs SpeciMl Advisers on OumMn
rights, gender, drugs, rule of law, police, military, demobilisation, and legal issues, as well as a
spokesperson who runs the Strategic Communication and Spokespersons Unit.
Two Deputy Special Representatives to the Secretary-General head the two pillars of UNAMA’s
operations: 1) Political Affairs, and 2) Relief, Recovery and Reconstruction. The UNAMA Chief
of Staff is responsible for integrating the two strands of the mission and providing support to
UNAMA’s 23 operMPionMl regionMl Mnd provinciMl of�ces in MreMs including KMNul, BMlkO, Kunduz,
GOor, HerMP, NMngMrOMr, BMmiyMn, PMkPiM, KOosP, Nimroz, BMdgOis, HerMP, FMryMN, BMdMkOsOMn,
GMikundi, KMndMOMr, SMr-i-Pul Mnd ZMNul, Ms Rell Ms liMison of�ces in TeOrMn Mnd HslMmMNMdB
In recent years UNAMA’s activities have included focus on: improving donor and government
coordination through the Joint Coordination and
Monitoring Board (JCMB, p. 47), the Policy Action
Group (PAG, pB 62), Mnd HSAF; con�icP resoluPion MP provinciMl levels; rMising POe issue of civiliMn
cMsuMlPies Mnd promoPing POe process of cMsuMlPy veri�cMPion; vePPing senior of�cers RiPOin POe
Afghan National Police (ANP, p. 6) for criminal and
human rights violations as part of pay and rank
reform; advocating for reform of the Ministry of Interior; and promoting the implementation of the
Afghan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 15).
In 2009, for the fourth year in a row, UNAMA took the lead in organising activities surrounding the
International Day of Peace as well as National Youth Day. The agency also worked closely with the
Independent Election Commission to provide assistance with the elections process (IEC, p. 44). The
ElecPorMl FomplMinPs Fommission (EFF, pB 36), POe Nody responsiNle for OeMring Mnd MdjudicMPing
elections-related complaints, has three international commissioners appointed by the SRSG.
UniPed NMPions GevelopmenP AssisPMnce FrMmeRork
(UNGAF)
TOe UniPed NMPions GevelopmenP AssisPMnce FrMmeRork (UNGAF) is M progrMmme-plMnning
framework for all UN agencies operating in Afghanistan. It is important to note that although the
UNGAF descriNes POe common response of POe UN sysPem MP counPry-level, iP does noP replMce
each agency’s individual programme.
Hn AfgOMnisPMn, POe �rsP UNGAF (2006-2008) revolved Mround four criPicMl MreMs of supporP Mnd
cooperation for the period: 1) governance, rule of law and human rights, 2) sustainable livelihoods,
3) health and education, and 4) environment and natural resources.
TOe second UNGAF, ROicO spMns from 2010-2013, RMs lMuncOed in OcPoNer 200EB TOe 33
memNers of POe UN FounPry TeMm joinPly Mnd exPensively consulPed nMPionMl Mnd inPernMPionMl
partners and prepared the framework to support the Afghan National Development Strategy
(ANGS, pB 1D)B TOe UNGAF comprises POree muPuMlly reinforcing prioriPies: 1) governMnce, peMce
and stability, 2) sustainable livelihoods: agriculture, food security and income opportunities, and
3) basic social services: health, education, water and sanitation.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
TOe �rsP prioriPy MreM, “good governMnce, peMce Mnd sPMNiliPy,” Rill
focus on strengthening people’s
PrusP in POe sPMPe, PMckling corrupPion, �gOPing impuniPy, enOMncing respecP for OumMn rigOPs,
Nuilding effecPive insPiPuPions, Mnd increMsing Mccess Po jusPiceB Under POis prioriPy MreM, POe UN
will strengthen national capacities and continue its engagement in demining, improved border
management, security sector reform (SSR, p. 65), strengthening the rule of law, and efforts to
curb the drug trade (Counter-Narcotics, p. 32).
Under the second priority area, “sustainable livelihoods,” the UN will attempt to improve and
diversify food at the household level, expand irrigation networks, provide better quality seeds, and
implement food security programmes. UN agencies will also support national capacity to address
natural disasters and manage natural resources in ways that reduce poverty and resolve disputes.
The “basic social services” priority area will complement the Government’s efforts to support literacy
and vocational training, primary and secondary schooling, and higher education. The UN Country Team
will also help to improve health systems and services, safe drinking water, sanitation, and healthier
lifestyles.
JiPO Mn overMll NudgeP esPimMPed MP Mround $4 Nillion, POe UN Mgencies Rill mMke M pMrPiculMr
efforP Po deliver more Mnd Po engMge joinPly in M feR under-served provinces, pulling PogePOer POeir
expertise and capacity. A
UN Fommon Fund Rill Ne esPMNlisOed Po moNilise resources, ensure
more equitable distribution of assistance, and encourage agencies to work together.
TOe 26 UN signMPories Po POe neR FrMmeRork Mre:
United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanista
Food Mnd AgriculPure OrgMnisMPion of POe UniPed NMPions (FAO)
United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-HABITAT)
International Labour Organisatio
(ILO)
International Organisation for Migratio
HnPernMPionMl MonePMry Fund (HMF)
UniPed NMPions Of�ce for POe FoordinMPion of HumMniPMriMn AffMirs (UNOFHA)
United Nations Development Programm
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)
UniPed NMPions EducMPionMl, ScienPi�c Mnd FulPurMl OrgMnisMPion (UNESFO)
UniPed NMPions PopulMPion Fun
(UNFPA)
Of�ce of POe UniPed NMPions HigO Fommissioner for Refugees (UNHFR)
UniPed NMPions FOildren’s Fund (UNHFEF)
United Nations Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO)
A to Z
UniPed NMPions GevelopmenP Fund for Jomen (UNHFEM)
United Nations Integrated Regional Information Network (UNIRIN)
Mine Action Coordination Centre of Afghanistan (MACCA)
UniPed NMPions Of�ce on Grugs Mnd Frim
Of�ce of POe HigO Fommissioner for HumMn RigOP
UniPed NMPions Of�ce for ProjecP Services (UNOPS)
Jorld Food ProgrMmme (JFP)
World Health Organisation (WHO)
World Bank (WB)
Asian Development Bank (ADB)
United Nations Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD)
UniPed NMPions JoinP ProgrMmme on HHVCAHGS (UNAHGS)
United Nations Coordination in Afghanistan, 1998-2010
Government
The Government of Afghanistan: Contents
Background
Government in Afghanistan
The Executive
Support to the National Assembly
Provincial Councils
The Judiciary
The Supreme Court
Courts of Appeal
Primary Courts
The Public Sector
Pay and grading
Organogram: Central Government of Afghanistan
Electoral system
VePPing Mnd complMinPs
Political parties
Elections 2009-2010
Introduction
Candidate nomination
VoPer regisPrMPion
Polling cenPres Mnd sPMf�ng
Election monitoring and observation
FrMud
Key actors in 2009-10
Timeline of key events: Elections 2009
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Background
FolloRing POe collMpse of POe TMliNMn regime MP POe end of 2001, AfgOMn fMcPionMl leMders cMme
together at a
UN-sponsored conference in Bonn, Germany, where the
Bonn Agreement (p. 27) was
signed. The Agreement appointed the Afghanistan Interim Administration and set out a timetable
for re-establishing permanent government institutions and “a broad-based, gender sensitive,
multi-ethnic and fully representative government” in Afghanistan
over the course of two and a half
years. The Emergency Loya Jirga (ELJ, p. 37) of June 2002 replaced the AIA with the Afghanistan
Transitional Authority (ATA), and elected Hamid Karzai as the Head of State—and temporary Head
of Government, in the absence of a legislature—of the Transitional Islamic State of Afghanistan.
In line with the Bonn timetable, a new Constitution (full text, p. 96) was debated and endorsed by
a Constitutional Loya Jirga (CLJ, p. 31), which ran from 14 December 2003 to 4 January 2004.
TOe FonsPiPuPion provides for Mn elecPed PresidenP, Mlong RiPO PRo nominMPed Vice PresidenPs,
and a National Assembly comprising two houses, the lower
Wolesi Jirga
(House of the People)
and the upper
Meshrano Jirga
(House of Elders). On the sub-national level, it provides for elected
ProvinciMl, GisPricP, VillMge Mnd MunicipMl Founcils, Ms Rell Ms Governors Mnd MMyors MppoinPed Ny
Hn Mn elecPion Oeld on E OcPoNer 2004, HMmid KMrzMi NecMme POe �rsP populMrly elecPed PresidenP
of Afghanistan, with 55% of the vote. He was sworn in on 7 December 2004, at which time
POe PrMnsiPionMl sPMPe of�ciMlly NecMme POe neR HslMmic RepuNlic of AfgOMnisPMnB IegislMPive
and Provincial and District Council elections were supposed to be held concurrently with the
Presidential election, but were postponed due to security and technical problems. Elections for
Wolesi Jirga
and Provincial Councils were eventually held on 18 September 2005. A second
set of Presidential and Provincial Council elections took place in 2009, a controversial process
POMP ended RiPO PresidenP KMrzMi Mssuming of�ce for Ois second PermB
Government in Afghanistan
The Executive
TOe execuPive NrMncO of AfgOMnisPMn’s cenPrMl governmenP is comprised of POe Of�ce of POe
PresidenP, PRo Vice PresidenPs, POe APPorney GenerMl, POe FMNineP comprised of 26 minisPers, Ms
well as several independent bodies and other central government agencies (see Organogram,
pB 84)B TOe PresidenP is direcPly elecPed for M �ve-yeMr period Mnd cMn serve M mMximum of PRo
terms. Candidates for the presidency name their two vice presidential candidates at the time of
nomination. The President is the Head of State, the Chair of the Cabinet, and the Commander-in-
Chief of the armed forces.
The overall
Of�ce of POe PresidenP consisPs of POe Of�ce of POe PresidenP iPself, POe SecuriPy Founcil,
POe Press Of�ce, Mnd POe Of�ce of AdminisPrMPive AffMirs (OAA, pB 61), ROicO provides MdminisPrMPive,
logisPicMl Mnd �nMnciMl supporP Po POe PresidenP, Vice PresidenPs, Mnd Mdvisors Po POe PresidenPB
The President nominates ministers, the
Attorney General, the Governor of
Da Afghanistan Bank (the
Government
central bank), the members of the
Supreme Court, the Head of the
National Security Directorate,
and the President of the
Red FrescenP SociePyB Nominees Mre POen suNjecP Po pMrliMmenPMry voPe,
Mnd if rejecPed Ny POe NMPionMl AssemNly, mMy noP Mssume of�ceB Of 24 minisPeriMl nominees
initially put forward by the President in December 2009, only 7 were accepted by the
Wolesi Jirga
Hn JMnuMry 2010, 10 of POe 17 replMcemenP nominees Rere rejecPedB According Po POe FonsPiPuPion,
Mll oPOer execuPive posPs, including POMP of POe Vice PresidenPs, POe MMyor of KMNul, Mnd POe OeMds
of various commissions, are appointed by the President and do not require the approval of the
National Assembly.
National
As provided by the 2004 Constitution, the National Assembly—commonly referred to as the
Parliament—consists of two houses, the lower
Wolesi Jirga
(House of the People) and the upper
Meshrano Jirga
(House of Elders)B TOe neR NMPionMl AssemNly convened for POe �rsP Pime in
December 2005, following the September 2005 parliamentary elections.
Members of the
Wolesi Jirga
Mre direcPly elecPed for �ve yeMrs Ny provinciMl consPiPuenciesB TOere
are currently 249 seats in the
Wolesi Jirga
; the Constitution stipulates that the maximum number
of seats is 250. Seats are distributed among the provinces according to population size (see
table on p. 86). The Constitution states that an average of two seats from each province, 68 in
total, are reserved for women. Ten seats are reserved for the Kuchi (nomad) population, three
of which must go to women. The provision for Kuchis has, however, been hotly contested among
Meshrano Jirga
has 102 members, selected by a mixture of Presidential appointments (one
third) and indirect elections following popular elections for the
Wolesi Jirga
and Provincial and
District Councils (two-thirds). The Constitution stipulates that members of the
Meshrano Jirga
are
elected and appointed as follows:
From Mmong POe memNers of eMcO ProvinciMl Founcil, POe respecPive council elecPs one person
for a period of four years
From Mmong POe GisPricP Founcils of eMcO province, POe respecPive councils elecP one person
for a period of three years
The President appoints the remaining one-third of the members, including two representatives of
POe disMNled Mnd PRo represenPMPives of KucOis, for M period of �ve yeMrsB Of POese presidenPiMl
appointees, 50% must be women.
While the Constitution has provisions for District Council elections, these have not been held to
date. A temporary solution was devised for the interim: Instead of one, each Provincial Council
elects two of its members to the
Meshrano Jirga
(one for four years and a second for three years
or until district elections are held), thereby maintaining the 2:1 ratio of elected to appointed
seMPsB Five yeMrs MfPer POe PemporMry soluPion RMs MdopPed, plMns Po Oold disPricP elecPions Mre
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
76
still unclear and they remain postponed. The temporary means of forming the
Meshrano Jirga
will
remain in place for the coming round of parliamentary elections, and will continue to function until
District Councils are formed.
Members of the National Assembly must be Afghan citizens. Candidates must be at least 25
years of age at the date of candidacy for the
Wolesi Jirga
, and at least 35 at the date of election or
appointment to the
Meshrano Jirga
. It is not possible to be a member of both the
Meshrano Jirga
Wolesi Jirga
The National Assembly convenes two ordinary sessions per year, and its term is nine months in
the year. Sessions are open to the public unless secrecy is requested by the Chairman of the
National Assembly or at least 10 members, and it is granted by the Assembly.
According to Article 90 of the Constitution, the National Assembly has the following authorities:
RMPi�cMPion, modi�cMPion or MNrogMPion of lMRs Mnd legislMPive decrees
Approval of plans for economic, social, cultural and technological development
Approval of state budget, permission for obtaining and granting loans
FreMPion, modi�cMPion Mnd MNrogMPion of MdminisPrMPive uniPs
RMPi�cMPion of inPernMPionMl PreMPies Mnd MgreemenPs, or MNrogMPion of POe memNersOip of
Afghanistan to them
Policies Mnd legislMPion cMn Ne iniPiMPed Ny POe Of�ce of POe PresidenP, individuMl minisPries, or POe
National Assembly, and become law after passing through both houses of the National Assembly
and being endorsed by the President. Article 94 of the Constitution states that:
Law is what both Houses of the National Assembly approve and the President endorses unless
this Constitution states otherwise
In case the President does not agree to what the National Assembly approves, he can send the
documenP NMck RiPO jusPi�MNle reMsons Po POe
Wolesi Jirga
within 15 days of its submission
With the passage of this period or in case the
Wolesi Jirga
approves a particular case again
RiPO M PRo-POird mMjoriPy voPe, POe Nill is considered endorsed Mnd enforced
Certain legislative documents (rules, directives and guidelines) can be decreed by individual
ministers. A proposed bill or signed decree should be passed by the National Assembly within one
month of its submission. There are 18 commissions in the
Wolesi Jirga
and 14 in the
The 2001
Bonn Agreement stated that the Constitution of 1964 and other existing laws (providing
they were not inconsistent with the Bonn Agreement or Afghanistan’s international legal
obligations) would constitute an interim legal framework until a new Constitution was passed. The
Government
77
new Constitution entered into force in 2004 and numerous decrees and laws have been enacted
according to its provisions. The department of the Ministry
of Justice responsible for drafting
legislation, the
Taqnin
, has drafted many laws that have replaced old legislation. Contradictory
legislation enacted by various former regimes remains, however, and harmonisation efforts
For more informMPion MNouP lMRs in AfgOMnisPMn, see pB D0
Support to the National Assembly
A number of international actors have provided technical support to the National Assembly,
including UNDP’s
SEAI (SupporP Po POe EsPMNlisOmenP of POe AfgOMn IegislMPure) projecP, ROicO
NegMn in FeNruMry 200D Mnd RMs exPended in MMrcO 2008 for M furPOer four yeMrsB TOis projecP
has provided assistance including legal support, information and communication technologies,
Mry ouP
reMcO Mnd puNlic MRMreness progrMmmes, projecP mMnMgemenP, Mnd speciMlised
PrMiningB More recenPly, SEAI OMs Neen involved RiPO encourMging poliPicMl pMrPyCissues-NMsed
group developmenP inside pMrliMmenPB Key McPors in POe projecP Mre FrMnce (POe leMd nMPion for
parliamentary support), UNDP, UNAMA (p. 68), and the Afghan government.
Other actors supporting the development of the National Assembly have included the Afghanistan
PMrliMmenPMry AssisPMnce ProjecP run Ny POe SPMPe UniversiPy of NeR York (SUNY) (APAP, pB 20),
International Republican Institute (IRI),
National Democratic Institute (NDI),
International
FoundMPion for ElecPorMl SysPems (HFES),
FriedricO-ENerP-SPifPung,
Provincial Councils
The 34 Provincial Councils have between 9 and 29 members depending on the size of the
province’s population, and are elected in a single provincial constituency. Candidates must reside
in the province in which they stand for election, and cannot stand simultaneously for both
Wolesi
and Provincial Council elections. The Election Law states that one-quarter of the seats on
a Provincial Council should be reserved for women. Two members from each Provincial Council
serve in the
Meshrano Jirga
(this will decrease to one member per Provincial Council if District
Councils are elected and formed). To date, two rounds of Provincial Council elections have taken
place, in 2005 and 2009, following the Constitutional requirement that they occur every four
years. Accordingly, the next elections for these provincial bodies will take place in 2013.
TOe 2007 ProvinciMl Founcil IMR is vMgue on POe Founcils’ responsiNiliPies, Mnd signi�cMnP confusion
remains about their exact role—while a mandate exists, it is ambiguous and does not allocate
them decision-making authority. Thus far, Provincial Council activities have included: electing
provincial representatives from their own membership to the
; participating in the
development of the provinces and improvement of administrative affairs; and advising provincial
administrations of issues such as development planning. Their role in a given province is often
dependent on the relationship between the Council and the Provincial Governor.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
District Councils
According to the Constitution, District Councils will have between 5 and 15 members depending
on the size of the district’s population, and be elected every three years. Candidates must reside
in the district in which they stand for election. If formed, they will elect one-third of the members
To date, however, elections for District Councils have not been held. There are a number of
reMsons for POisB FirsP, disPricP NoundMries in some MreMs OMve noP Neen con�rmed, Mnd POus iP is
noP possiNle Po cMlculMPe disPricP populMPions or judge OoR mMny GisPricP Founcil seMPs sOould Ne
allocated to these districts. This problem is compounded by the lack of an up-to-date census for
the country as a whole. Second, voter registration processes have not registered voters by district,
given the ambiguity of boundaries, and instead have only been by province. Thus, in order to
conduct District Council elections, another registration process would be required.
A Constitutional provision (Article 110) states that should a
Loya Jirga
need to be held (for
example, in order to change the Constitution, or discuss ”supreme interests of the country”),
it must be comprised of the National Assembly plus the chairpersons of Provincial and District
Councils. As such, the formation of District Councils would be necessary in the event that a
Loya
During 2009, District Council elections were mooted for 2010, alongside
Wolesi Jirga
elections,
although this is unlikely to occur.
TOe FonsPiPuPion Mlso cMlls for POe elecPion of VillMge Founcils, MunicipMl Founcils, Mnd MMyors
POrougO free, generMl, secreP Mnd direcP elecPionsB VillMge Founcils Mre Po Ne elecPed for POree
yeMrsB TOe Perms of MunicipMl Founcils Mnd MMyors Mre noP yeP speci�ed, Mnd POe mMndMPes of
VillMge Mnd MunicipMl Founcils Mre noP elMNorMPed in POe FonsPiPuPion or POe ElecPion IMRB ElecPions
for these bodies are unlikely to be held in the next several years.
Judiciary
TOe mMjor permMnenP jusPice insPiPuPions in AfgOMnisPMn Mre POe Supreme
FourP, POe Of�ce of
POe APPorney GenerMl, Mnd POe MinisPry of JusPiceB TOe jusPice secPor RMs OeMvily fMcPionMlised,
RiPO sPrMined relMPionsOips Mmong jusPice insPiPuPions, NuP in recenP yeMrs JusPice SecPor Reform
(JSR, pB 48) OMs MdvMnced signi�cMnPly, RiPO coordinMPed Mnd inPegrMPed MpproMcOes MdopPed
Mnd implemenPed Ny AfgOMn jusPice insPiPuPions, POe AfgOMn governmenP, Mnd POe inPernMPionMl
assistance community. This included the adoption of a National Justice Sector Strategy and
NMPionMl JusPice ProgrMm POMP encompMsses POe enPire jusPice secPorB
TOe 2004 FonsPiPuPion sPMPes: “TOe judiciMl NrMncO is Mn independenP orgMn of POe sPMPe of
POe HslMmic RepuNlic of AfgOMnisPMnB TOe judiciMl NrMncO consisPs of POe Supreme FourP
(SPerM
MMOkMmM),
High Courts, Appeal Courts, and Primary Courts, the structure and authorities of
ROicO Mre dePermined Ny lMRB” Hn June 200D, M neR lMR regulMPing POe judiciMry Mnd courPs RMs
Government
passed by the Cabinet. Until this point, the system had been governed by the 1990 Law of the
Jurisdiction and Organisation of the Courts of Afghanistan (
Of�ciMl GMzePPe
no. 63, SY1369). The
new law divides the courts into three tiers: the Supreme Court, the Courts of Appeal, and the
Primary Courts. It allows for travelling or mobile courts in the event that they are needed; these
must be approved by the President.
The Supreme Court has wide-ranging powers of interpretation: Its duties include the review of
laws, decrees, international treaties, and international covenants to ensure they comply with the
FonsPiPuPionB TOe Of�ce of POe APPorney GenerMl is Mn independenP Nody, pMrP of POe
Executive
branch, responsible for investigation and prosecution.
TOe reMcO of POe formMl jusPice sysPem vMries signi�cMnPly Mcross POe counPryB A lMrge proporPion
of disputes in Afghanistan are settled outside the formal court system—particularly, but not
exclusively, in rurMl MreMsB FommuniPy-NMsed jusPice mecOMnisms—
sOurMs, jirgMs
ofPen sePPle civil Mnd somePimes criminMl dispuPes using HslMmic Mnd cusPomMryCPriNMl lMRs of POMP
MreMB TOe jusPice sysPem is POerefore composed of NoPO formMl Mnd informMl mecOMnisms POMP
include civil lMR, HslMmic, Mnd cusPomMryCPriNMl lMRB MMny insPMnces Mre found in ROicO formMl
and informal mechanisms and actors engage with one another. There are common elements
among these systems with respect to issues such as land and property, but they can diverge quite
dramatically on criminal matters and the role and nature of punishment.
As speci�ed in POe Bonn AgreemenP, POe JudiciMl Reform Fommission (JRF) RMs esPMNlisOed in
NovemNer 2002 Po revieR Mnd reform POe frMgmenPed jusPice secPorB TOe JRF RMs PMsked RiPO
guiding POe pOysicMl Mnd sPrucPurMl resPorMPion of POe jusPice sysPem—NMlMncing modern Mnd HslMmic
law, addressing the plurality of legal organs, and clarifying the roles and reporting structures of
POe vMrious pMrPs of POe judiciMl NrMncOB TOe JRF RMs M PemporMry
institution, and by early 2005
iPs responsiNiliPies OMd devolved Po POe permMnenP jusPice insPiPuPionsB As pMrP of POe AfgOMnisPMn
NMPionMl GevelopmenP SPrMPegy (ANGS, pB 1D) process, nMPionMl-level coordinMPion of jusPice secPor
initiatives came under the responsibility of the Justice Sector Consultative Group. According to the
ANGS, POe NMPionMl JusPice ProgrMmme’s ProjecP OversigOP FommiPPee Mnd ProgrMm SupporP UniP
(see Justice Sector Reform, p. 48) are intended to take over these coordinating functions.
TOe FonsPiPuPion MlloRs for judges Po Ne PrMined in eiPOer civil or HslMmic lMRB SiPPing judges Mre noP
allowed to hold political party membership.
The Supreme Court
In accordance with the Constitution, the Supreme Court has nine members, appointed for ten-
year terms by the President, with the approval of the
Wolesi Jirga
. The President selects one of
the nine members to serve as Chief Justice. The Supreme Court
manages the personnel, budgets,
and policy decisions of the entire national, provincial and district court system.
The Supreme Court convenes regular sessions, at least once every 15 days, and additional
sessions can be convened by request. The presence of at least six members is needed for a
Supreme FourP quorum, Mnd decisions Mre mMde Ny mMjoriPy voPeB TOe Supreme FourP is divided
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
into four sub-courts or departments (
dewans
)—GenerMl FriminMl, PuNlicCNMPionMl SecuriPy, Fivil
and Public Rights, and Commercial—each headed by a Supreme Court Justice.
Nine new Supreme Court members were sworn in on 5 August 2006. The new Court is
characterised as moderate, technocratic and highly educated in comparison to its ultra-
conservative predecessor.
Courts of Appeal
Courts of Appeal are operational in all provinces (although a few in some provinces do not have
POe requisiPe numNer of judges Po OeMr MppeMl cMses)B TOey comprise POe FOief of POe FourP,
oPOer judiciMl memNers, Mnd OeMds of
dewans
. Courts of Appeal in more populous provinces have
�ve
dewans
—GenerMl FriminMl (ROicO Mlso deMls RiPO PrMf�c violMPions), PuNlic SecuriPy, Fivil Mnd
FMmily, PuNlic RigOPs, Mnd FommerciMlB TOose in less populous provinces OMve four
dewans
Primary Court, General Criminal, Civil, and Public Security. Only the Court of Appeal in Kabul has a
Juvenile FourP speciMlly creMPed Po OeMr cMses involving juveniles; OoRever, in mMny provinces POere
Mre judges experienced or PrMined Po deMl RiPO juvenile cMsesB TOe FourPs of AppeMl oversee POe
rulings and decisions of the Primary Courts in their respective province, and have the authority to
correcP, overPurn, Mmend, con�rm or repeMl POese rulings Mnd decisionsB TOey Mre Mlso responsiNle
for deciding on con�icPs of judiciMl jurisdicPionB
Primary Courts
At the district level, the City Primary Court (which is the primary court in the provincial capital)
consisPs of �ve
dewans
—GenerMl FriminMl, Fivil, PuNlic RigOPs, PuNlic SecuriPy, Mnd TrMf�cB PrimMry
Courts in all districts outside the provincial capital have three
dewans
—General Criminal, Public
Security, and Civil and Public Rights. Many districts do not currently have functional primary
courPs, mMinly due Po securiPy concernsB Hn mMny cMses, judges Oold primMry courP sessions in POe
provincial capital.
FriminMl cMses Mre iniPiMPed Ny POe ProsecuPor’s Of�ce �ling POem RiPO POe PrimMry FourP; civil rigOPs
cMses Mre �led RiPO Mn of�ce in POe MinisPry of JusPiceB TOereMfPer, M series of judiciMl sessions
may be held until a decision is reached by the Primary Court. Almost as a matter of customary
practice, most cases decided by the Primary Courts are appealed to the Courts of Appeal. When
MppeMls reMcO POe Supreme FourP, judges ofPen send POe cMse NMck Po POe PrimMry FourP for M
new hearing.
Public Sector
Structure
Afghanistan’s public sector consists of the central government, provinces, municipalities (urban
sub-units of provinces), and districts (rural sub-units of provinces), as well as state enterprises
(ROolly Mnd mMjoriPy oRned)B
State agencies, including central government ministries and
institutions, are considered to be primary budgetary units with their own discrete budgets.
Government
In theory, Afghanistan is a unitary state: All
political authority is vested in the government
in Kabul. The powers and responsibilities of
the provincial and district administrations are
determined (and therefore may be withdrawn)
by the central government. Though provinces
and districts are legally recognised units of sub-
national administration, they are not intended
to be autonomous in their policy decisions.
However, given the political and military strength
of some regional power-holders, the practical
reality is that certain provinces have considerable
decision-making authority.
The Constitution explicitly allows a measure of decentralisation by stating that “the government,
while preserving the principle of centralism—in accordance with the law—shall delegate certain
authorities to local administration units for the purpose of expediting and promoting economic,
social and cultural affairs, and increasing the participation of people in the development of the
nMPion” (ArPicle 137)B HP speci�es POMP M ProvinciMl Founcil RiPO elecPed memNers is Po Ne formed in
every province, Mnd POMP GisPricP Mnd VillMge Founcils Mre Po Ne elecPedB
The country’s 34 provinces are the basic units of local administration. The executive at the provincial
level is the Governor (
Wali
), who is appointed by the President. The provinces are not distinct
political entities and formally have a very modest role in decisions concerning their own structure,
recruitment of senior staff, and size and composition of work force. In effect, the administration
of eMcO province is M collecPion of NrMncOes of cenPrMl governmenP minisPriesB TOe mMjoriPy of
decisions on provinciMl sPMf�ng Mre mMde in KMNul Ny POe pMrenP minisPry, in negoPiMPion RiPO POe
Of�ce of AdminisPrMPive AffMirs (OAA, pB 61) Mnd RiPO oversigOP Ny POe OeMd of POe HndependenP
Administrative Reform and Civil Service Commission (IARCSC, p. 41). As of SY1386 (2007–08),
cerPMin key posPs Mlso require rMPi�cMPion Ny POe
Independent Appointments Board of the IARCSC.
A government body for sub-national administration, the Independent Directorate for Local
Governance (IDLG, p. 42), was created in August 2007. IDLG has a mandate to improve
governance
and achieve stability on the sub-national level, and is responsible for supervising Provincial and
District Governors, Provincial Councils, and municipalities (except Kabul Municipality).
Provinces are divided into districts
and municipalities. Administrative arrangements between the
province and its districts are similar to those in the relationship between the centre and the
provinceB TOe cenPrMl minisPry in KMNul dePermines disPricP senior sPMf�ng Mnd NudgeP MllocMPions,
OoRever, leMving provinciMl of�ciMls RiPO relMPively liPPle discrePion in POis regMrd, MP leMsP of�ciMllyB
MunicipMliPies Mre overseen Ny POe HGIG, in some provinces RiPO signi�cMnP in�uence Ny POe
GovernorB TOe HGIG Mpproves sPMf�ng numNers Mnd NudgePs in eMcO municipMliPy, even POougO
municipalities are entitled to collect and retain their own taxes. In some provinces, such as
Herat and Kandahar, rural municipalities also have a reporting relationship with the provincial
municipality, although this is contrary to the established government structure.
Legally recognised local government units
34 provinces
wolayat
Approximately 384 districts (a
woliswali
each province varies between 4 and
Provincial municipalities
sharwali
wolayat
)—in principle each province
Rural municipalities
sharwali
woliswali
most one rural municipality, but some
do not have any
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
FenPrMl governmenP minisPries Mnd insPiPuPions Mre primMry NudgeP uniPs RiPO speci�c NudgePs
determined by law; provincial departments of the central government ministries and some
independent units are secondary budget units—that is, they receive their allotments at the
discrePion of POeir minisPries Mnd relevMnP independenP MgenciesB TOere Mre no speci�c provinciMl
department budgets. Districts are tertiary budget units; their budget allocations depend on the
decisions made at the request of the relevant provincial-level departments of Kabul ministries and
other independent units. All revenues collected by provinces and districts are national revenues;
provinces Mre merely POe PMx collecPorsB Hn effecP, NoPO provinciMl Mnd disPricP sPMf�ng levels Mnd
budgets are determined based more on precedent than on rational planning. This system gives
Kabul considerable political authority over provincial expenditure policy, although Provincial and
District Governors have a certain amount of de facto authority.
SPMPe enPerprises reporP Po POe minisPry or depMrPmenP in POeir respecPive secPorB For exMmple, POe
head of a coal mine would report to the provincial Department of Mines as well as the Ministry of
Mines in Kabul. There are no provincially-owned enterprises.
Although they do not hold formal power, community
shuras
jirgMs
cMn Mlso Ne in�uenPiMl
local actors.
(best translated as local councils) are longstanding features of Afghan
political society. They are convened on an ad hoc basis and are rarely permanent bodies with
idenPi�MNle memNersB
(Islamic scholars)
and
of elders are usually found
at the provincial level, though there are often competing local and district
some of which
are run by unelected strongmen. As District Councils have not yet been elected, many district
administrators make use of
shuras
in their activities. Many districts are also effectively divided
into
qaryas
), which correspond to areas of shared resources.
In addition to the provincial and district administrative structures, historically there has been
M de�niPion of regions or zones (
hawzas
) in Afghanistan, primarily for military purposes. These
hawzas
have no legal standing as administrative units and, unlike provinces, districts and
municipalities, are not mentioned in the 1964 Constitution or the current 2004 Constitution.
AP Pimes, OoRever, POey OMve Neen used for MdminisPrMPive convenienceB FormMlly, POis zonMl
structure no longer exists, but some inter-provincial coordination and sectoral activities based
on zones continue.
The President is Commander-in-Chief of the Afghan National Army (ANA, p. 5). The ANA serves
under the Ministry of Defence while the Afghan National Police (ANP, p. 6) operates under the
authority of the Ministry of Interior.
Pay and grading
Every public employee has a grade—in Kabul, in the provinces, and at the district level. Two scales
apply throughout Afghanistan, one for permanent staff (
karmand
) and one for contract staff (
Karmand
are regular, permanent public employees, whereas
Mre (of�ciMlly) Oired on �xed-
term contracts. In practice, most
employees remain in government for many years and follow
a career path very similar to that of
karmand
staff. The two pay scales are almost identical.
Government
The key differences between
karmand
employees are:
Agir
employees are meant to occupy lower-skilled and manual labour posts (such as drivers,
cooks, painters, etc.)
Advancement through the grade (and pay) structure for many
positions is capped at a
particular level (for instance, drivers cannot be promoted beyond grade 1); however, higher-
employees can advance to the top of the scale (“over” grade)
Agir
employees are not entitled to receive a professional bonus in addition to their salary
Pay policy is set centrally for all public employees in Afghanistan. The pay system emphasises
rank-in-person arrangements (employees are promoted even if they remain in the same
position) rather than the more common rank-in-post arrangements (where promotion generally
comes RiPO M neR joN)B TOus, POrougO yeMrs of service Mnd regulMr promoPions (once every POree
years), staff in lower positions of authority can occupy a higher grade and earn a higher salary
than their managers. Different occupational groups have ceilings above which they cannot be
promoted.
The underlying pay scale, established by the 1970 Law on the Status and Condition of Government
Employees, and amended by the 1977 Decree No. 143, offers a reasonably well-structured scale
for base pay. The real salary scale for public employees is low—meal allowances (given equally to
all public employees) can account for over 90% of the monthly pay. Since 2004, the Independent
Administrative Reform and Civil Service Commission (IARCSC, p. 41) has been working to update
the government’s pay and grading structure, crucial to the government’s efforts to attract and
rePMin quMli�ed sPMff Mnd Po reduce incenPives for corrupPion RiPOin POe civil serviceB A neR Fivil
Service Law was passed in 2005, and in 2007 an eight-grade structure was designed, with new
pMy scMles MPPMcOed Po POese grMdes (RiPO M minimum sMlMry of US$100 Mnd mMximum of $6D0)B
HmplemenPMPion Rill Ne sequenced, re-grMding senior posiPions (GrMdes 1 Mnd 2) �rsP, folloRed Ny
junior grMdes on M minisPry-Ny-minisPry NMsisB
Pay and grading reform is one element of the IARCSC-led
Public Administration Reform
(PAR, p. 65) framework, which seeks to restructure the civil service and institute merit-
based, non-partisan recruitment. Practical reforms have taken place in several government
departments and agencies through a revised Priority Restructuring and Reform (PRR) process
that streamlines the work and structure of key departments, reduces costs, and improves
effectiveness.
The effectiveness of pay and grading reforms may be complicated by the so-called “second civil
service” consisPing of of�ciMls, Mdvisors Mnd sPMff of Mid conPrMcPors Mnd inPernMPionMl Mgencies,
most of whom receive much higher salaries.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Central Government of Afghanistan
December 2009 (This diagram is a guide only. Due to ongoing reforms, it may not be fully up-to-date.)
Government
Electoral system
In Afghanistan, suffrage is universal for male and female citizens 18 years of age and older. The
Constitution (p. 96) provides for the election of:
A PresidenP (Mlong RiPO PRo Vice PresidenPs)
A National Assembly (
Parliament) consisting of the
Wolesi Jirga
(House of the People) and the
(House of Elders)
Provincial Councils
Municipal Councils and Mayors
TOus fMr, elecPions OMve only Neen Oeld for POe �rsP POree cMPegoriesB
TOe PresidenP is elecPed Ny MNsoluPe mMjoriPy; if no cMndidMPe receives over D0% of POe voPes, M
run-off election is held between the top two candidates (although the run-off was cancelled in
2009 when a candidate withdrew). The next Presidential election is due to be held in 2014.
A revised version of the 2004 Election Law was approved by Presidential decree on 29 April 2005,
ending a long debate over the system for electing representatives to the
Wolesi Jirga
. The system
cOosen RMs POe unusuMl Single Non-TrMnsferMNle VoPe (SNTV)B Under SNTV, eMcO eligiNle AfgOMn
voter casts one vote for one individual in his or her multi-member constituency (province). The
principMl Nene�Ps of POe SNTV sysPem Mre POMP iP is eMsy Po explMin Po voPers Mnd simple Po counPB
It also ensures representation of independent candidates, which can be important in a country
suspicious of political parties.
On POe oPOer OMnd, SNTV encourMges personMliPy-driven poliPics Mnd undermines POe role of poliPicMl
parties and constituency platforms. Because all votes go to individuals, a party’s candidates may
Rin POe mMjoriPy of voPes in M province, NuP sPill receive only M minoriPy of POe seMPsB SNTV cMn Mlso
have a negative impact on the development of effective Parliamentary politics by encouraging
candidates to push local, ethnic or tribal issues rather than promoting a national agenda and
encouraging coalition building and cooperation between ethnic or regional groupings.
Election experts have debated whether other electoral models might be more appropriate for
AfgOMnisPMnB Some criPics of SNTV OMve Mrgued POMP Open IisP ProporPionMl RepresenPMPion Rould
be a better system, due to its transparent translation of votes into seats and its encouragement of
national-based, multi-ethnic parties. Another suggestion put forward by some Afghan Members of
PMrliMmenP in 2008 is POMP of M comNined SNTV Mnd pMrPy lisP sysPem, ROereNy POe role of poliPicMl
pMrPies is McknoRledged formMllyB TOis suggesPion RMs rejecPed Ny POe plenMry in POe �rsP insPMnce,
MlPOougO iP mMy Ne re�oMPedB
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
According to the Constitution, the Electoral Law cannot be changed within a year of the election
in ROicO iP Rould Ne implemenPedB Hn 2008 Mnd 200E, POe SNTV elecPorMl sysPem RMs deNMPed in
Wolesi Jirga,
Mnd oPOer opPions consideredB HP RMs decided, OoRever, POMP SNTV Rould Ne used
again in the 2009 Presidential and Provincial Council elections. Some minor changes have been
put forward in the revised Electoral Law, but due to delays in passing the revisions in Parliament,
largely as a result of controversy over reserved seats for Kuchis, any changes that are introduced
will not take effect in time for the scheduled September 2010
Wolesi Jirga
elections. As such,
it will be necessary for those providing technical assistance for the elections to work within the
existing system, at least in the short term.
Schedule of elections
The Constitution prescribes the following elections schedule:
Frequency
every 5 years
(Presidential appointees)
every 5 years
(Provincial Council representatives)
every 4 years
(District Council representatives)
every 3 years
Wolesi Jirga
every 5 years
Provincial Councils
every 4 years
every 3 years
every 3 years
Unspeci�ed
Mayoral
Unspeci�ed
This schedule thus determined that Presidential and Provincial Council elections would take place
Wolesi Jirga
elections should follow in 2010.
Wolesi Jirga
elections were postponed in January 2010 from May to September 2010,
and further revisions to the electoral calendar are possible, given the capacity constraints of the
HndependenP ElecPion Fommission (HEF, pB 44), POe OigO cosP Mnd dif�culPy of Oolding elecPions in
Afghanistan, the lack of security in some areas, the unclear mandates of some elected bodies,
and the political fallout from the disarrayed 2009 elections.
The Constitution states that
Wolesi Jirga
seats are to be distributed among the provinces according
Po populMPionB TOis provision OMs proved dif�culP NecMuse some disPricP Mnd provinciMl NoundMries
remain disputed and no authoritative population data is available. The last census in Afghanistan
was conducted in 1979 and was never completed. After several delays, a new national census
is now planned for 2011 (see CSO, p. 28). In preparation for it, a household listing survey was
conducted in 2004–05. Seat allocations for the 2005
Wolesi Jirga
elections were based on an
MverMge of POis recenP OouseOold lisPing Mnd POe 1E7E census �gures MdjusPed for populMPion
growth using an annual population growth rate of 1.92 percent.
Government
Province
Population
Wolesi Jirga
Provincial Council seats
Total
Women
Total
Women
TOTAL
21,677,700
249
124
412,400
748,000
1,052,500
Bamiyan
371,900
Daikundi
FMrMO
FMryMN
824,500
1,020,400
574,800
767,300
1,515,400
17
JMRzjMn
443,300
Kabul
3,013,200
Kandahar
971,400
Kapisa
478,100
Kunar
374,700
Kunduz
817,400
371,000
326,100
Nangarhar
1,237,800
Nimroz
135,900
Nuristan
Paktia
Paktika
362,100
PMnjsOir
127,900
Parwan
321,500
Sar-i-Pul
Takhar
811,700
Uruzgan
291,500
Wardak
Reserved for Kuchi
* PopulMPion �gures from POe FenPrMl SPMPisPics OrgMnisMPionB
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Vetting and complaints
Afghanistan’s Constitution states that members of the National Assembly “should not have been
convicted by a court for committing a crime against humanity, a crime, or sentenced to deprivation
of OisCOer civil rigOPsB” HoRever, Ms no one OMs Neen (or is likely Po Ne in POe neMr fuPure) prosecuPed
for crimes against humanity, this constitutional safeguard is currently unused.
TOe ElecPion IMR Mlso speci�es POMP cMndidMPes for POe
Wolesi Jirga
, Provincial Councils, and
District Councils shall not:
Pursue oNjecPives POMP Mre opposed Po POe principles of POe Ooly religion of HslMm Mnd POe Rord
Use force, or threaten with, or propagate the use of force
Incite ethnic, linguistic, regional or religious tension and discrimination
Create a real danger to the rights or freedoms of individuals or intentionally disrupt public
order and security
HMve non-of�ciMl miliPMry forces
Receive funds from foreign sources
Receive funds from internal illegal sources
JOen �lling in nominMPion pMpers, cMndidMPes sign M Fode of FonducPB Hn doing so, cMndidMPes
swear an oath that they have not been involved in any crimes or other activities that would
disqualify them from standing. If they are subsequently found guilty of a crime, they will have
broken the Code of Conduct and will be required to give up their seat.
The Electoral Complaints Commission (ECC, p. 36), supported by a small team of investigators, is
PMsked RiPO MdjudicMPing on complMinPs MNouP elecPorMl offences Mnd cOMllenges Po cMndidMPes’
eligiNiliPyB Hf POere is evidence of criminMl McPiviPy, POe EFF cMn impose RMrnings, �nes, or referrMl
Po POe puNlic prosecuPion of�ceB Hf POey dePermine POMP Mn elecPorMl offence OMs Neen commiPPed,
they can order recounts or a repeat voting.
Political parties
It is widely believed that in a democratic system, political parties are necessary for effective
representation of citizens’ interests and to advance and support policy creation and governance.
Many Afghans, however, have a negative view of political parties, which they associate with the
communisP pMrPies Mnd POe SovieP invMsion, Ms Rell Ms RiPO mujMOiddin fMcPions ROose in-�gOPing
caused much of the instability and bloodshed of the 1990s. Thus, Afghans generally do not trust
political parties but rather see them as pursuing policies that are in the interest of their particular
ethnic group, clan or tribe. One rationale for Afghanistan’s unusual choice of electoral system was
its emphasis on individual candidates rather than parties.
Government
Afghans also often associate political parties with militias, which previously acted with impunity
in AfgOMnisPMnB JOile mosP of POe mMjor pMrPies in AfgOMnisPMn once OMd close Pies Po miliPMry
groups (Mnd some sPill do), oPOer �edgling pMrPies OMve civiliMn rooPs Mnd democrMPic inPenPionsB
The Constitution and the Political Party Law clearly prohibit political parties from having military
wings, and a political party registration depart
ment was established in 2003 by the Ministry of
Justice to approve those parties that meet the criteria set out in the Constitution. As of January
2010, 110 parties had been approved and registered by the Ministry of Justice, and added to the
of�ciMl GMri lisP on POe MinisPry’s ReNsiPe (RRRBmojBgovBMfC?lMng=dM&p=lMNel1E — Mn incomplePe
EnglisO lisP is Mlso MvMilMNle: RRRBmojBgovBMfC?lMng=en&p=e16)B
For POe 200D elecPions, cMndidMPes Rere PecOnicMlly noP MlloRed Po indicMPe POeir poliPicMl pMrPy
Mf�liMPion on POe NMlloP (MlPOougO some did so regMrdless)B JOile POis mMde NMlloPs simpler, iP mMy
have prevented voters from knowing the alliances of those for whom they could vote. Before the
PresidenPiMl elecPions in 200E, POe HEF Mnnounced M regulMPion sPipulMPing POMP of�ciMlly regisPered
cMndidMPes Rere noR MlloRed Po include POeir pMrPy Mf�liMPion on POe NMlloPsB TOis regulMPion is
likely to stand for the upcoming
Wolesi Jirga
elections, although it could be changed by the IEC at
Mny Pime NecMuse iP is only M regulMPionB A provision requiring sPMPed pMrPy Mf�liMPion mMy emerge in
the revised Electoral Law, but this is unlikely to take effect before the coming round of elections.
Elections 2009-2010
Introduction
PresidenPiMl Mnd ProvinciMl Founcil elecPions Rere Oeld on 20 AugusP 200E, RiPO PurnouP of�ciMlly
recorded as 31.4% (after fraudulent ballots were excluded), down from an estimated 70% in
2004B FrMud Mnd insecuriPy comNined Po mire POe elecPions in conProversy, RiPO POe
Electoral
Complains Commission disqualifying enough ballots to reduce
Hamid Karzai’s total to below 50%
and thus force a run-off with the second-placed candidate, Dr Abdullah Abdullah. However, the
run-off vote was cancelled when Abdullah withdrew, and the IEC declared Karzai the winner. He
was inaugurated for his second term on 19 November 2009.
Results for Provincial Council elections were initially announced on 27 September, but were in many
cMses dispuPed Mnd for some provinces noP �nMlised unPil E GecemNer (MlPOougO dissMPisfMcPion
remMined in some MreMs MfPer POis Pime)B GespiPe Neing mucO loRer-pro�le inPernMPionMlly POMn POe
Presidential election, the Provincial Council elections were hotly contested and followed closely by
the public in many areas, largely due to their addressing of local issues.
In January 2010, the IEC rescheduled
Wolesi Jirga
elections from 22 May to 18 September
2010, citing a lack of funding and security concerns. Access to funding may further affect this
scOedule, Mnd OMs Neen jeopMrdised Ny donor demMnds for elecPorMl-sysPem reform (MlPOougO POe
IEC is an Afghan body, electoral funding in 2009 was provided almost entirely by the international
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Candidate nomination
The candidate nomination process for Presidential and Provincial Council can
didates ran from 25
April to 8 May 2009. After the IEC’s consideration of Presidential nominations, three candidates
Rere disquMli�ed, leMving M PoPMl of 41 cMndidMPes, including PRo RomenB TOis RMs M signi�cMnP
increase in candidates compared with 2004, when 18 candidates (including one woman)
conPesPed POe �nMl rMceB Hn PoPMl, 3,324 individuMls, including 342 Romen, nominMPed POem
selves
for a total of 420 seats in the Provincial Councils—a slight increase from 2005 numbers both in
total and number of women candidates. According to the IEC, this represented an increase in
female candidates across most provinces in the country.
The IEC and ECC had four weeks (9 May–12 June) to review the 3,368 Presidential and Provincial
Council candidates and respond to complaints. Candidates with links to armed groups, government
of�ciMls ROo fMiled Po resign POeir previous posPs, Mnd nominees ROo OMd forged signMPures on
their nomination forms were vetted. On 26 May, the IEC made available a provisional list of
candidates including challenges, corrections and appeals. Between 26 May and 8 June, the ECC
Oeld OeMrings Mnd cMme Po decisions concerning nominMPion cOMllengesB A �nMl lisP of con�rmed
candidates was made public on 12 June.
In provinces with a large number of candidates for the Provincial Council, as in 2005, the ballot
pMpers resemNled PMNloid neRspMpers, RiPO severMl pMges of cMndidMPesB For mMny, POis mMde POe
process of �nding cOosen cMndidMPes dif�culPB To mMke idenPi�cMPion eMsier POe HEF MgMin included
photos of the candidates and allocated “neutral” symbols. Nevertheless, in Kabul Province, with
D24 cMndidMPes on POe �nMl NMlloP, locMPing individuMls remMined Mn Mrduous processB
Explaining Afghanistan’s new democratic institutions, the election process, and voting rights is a
complex and challenging exercise, particularly in a country with limited infrastructure and many
remote villages, as well as low levels of literacy and formal education.
While efforts were made in 2004 and 2005 in the run up to the elections to promote civic education
Ny vMrious Mgencies, including POe HnPernMPionMl FoundMPion
for ElecPorMl SysPems (HFES) Mnd POe
AfgOMn Fivil SociePy Forum OrgMnisMPion (AFSFO, pB 3), very liPPle McPiviPy Pook plMce in POis regMrd
in the interim period between elections. Although
agencies including UNAMA (p. 68) and UNDP
ELECT (p. 37) supported civic education
programmes run by the IEC in the run-up to the 2009
polls, very little international funding was available for this kind of activity prior to October 2008.
This is partly a result of the late planning and organising of the elections themselves, and the late
sPMge Ny ROicO donor funding for POe elecPions POemselves OMd Neen con�rmedB
Voter registration
An enormous voter registration exercise was carried in the run-up to the 2005 Presidential
elections. Throughout the country, a total of 10,567,834 registration cards were issued between
1 December 2003 and 20 August 2004.
Government
Another round of voter registration was undertaken in preparation for the 2009 elections, as many
Afghans would have turned 18 years old since the last round of registration, some would have
returned from Iran, Pakistan or other countries in the ongoing repatriation efforts, and others who
had already registered may have moved provinces or lost their original cards. This process began
in October 2008 and was carried out in four consecutive phases. The phases were determined
Ny ReMPOer Mnd securiPy concerns in differenP provincesB TOe process RMs complePed in FeNruMry
200E, NuP RMs fMr from sPrMigOPforRMrdB According Po M reporP produced Ny moniPoring group Free
Mnd FMir ElecPions for
AfgOMnisPMn (FEFA, pB 3E), mulPiple insPMnces of proxy regisPrMPion, frMud,
Mnd underMge regisPrMPion, for exMmple, Pook plMceB HniPiMl HEF �gures for voPer regisPrMPion Rere
also questionable, with extremely high numbers of registered women in notably conservative
areas of the country, for instance.
In total, the IEC reported that 4,365,292 people had been registered to vote in 2008-09, in
addition to those who had registered prior to the 2004-05 elections.
Polling cenPres Mnd sPMf�ng
Before the 2009 elections there was a concern that decreasing security would prevent the
establishment of polling centres in a number of areas, particularly in the south and east of
POe counPry, POus disenfrMncOising M signi�cMnP numNer of peopleB Hn PoPMl, OoRever, POe HEF
reported having set up 28,000 polling stations in approximately 6,800 centres across the country
(compared with 30,000 in 5,000 centres in 2004), staffed by around 160,000 election workers.
36 million ballot papers were printed in total for both Presidential and Provincial Council elections.
A numNer of polling cenPres Rere neverPOeless closed in cerPMin insecure MreMsB FurPOermore,
over 440 cenPres Rere reporPedly ordered noP Po open on polling dMy Ny AfgOMn elecPion of�ciMls
due to fears of pre-planned fraud.
Other logistical problems reported by voters on polling day included intimidation (and in some
cases, attacks) by insurgent groups, shortage of ballot papers, dysfunctional hole-punches (used
to mark used voting cards), and indelible ink proving washable in practice.
Hn 200E, for POe �rsP Pime, NMlloPs Rere counPed MP polling sPMPions (insPeMd of MP provinciMl cenPres),
and initial results posted outside them.
Election monitoring and observation
Due to decreasing security conditions, the number of international election observation missions
(EOMs) in 200E RMs signi�cMnPly decreMsed from POMP in 2004B TOe NiggesP delegMPion of
observation staff was sent by the
European Union (EU), whose mission comprised 67 expert
analysts and 50 short-term observers at polling stations across the country. Whereas in 2004
OrgMnisMPion for SecuriPy Mnd FooperMPion in Europe (OSFE) senP 42 oNservers Po POe �eld,
in 2009 it provided an Election Support Team (EST) of 20 experts, which was based
in Kabul
with a mandate to support the government and international effort in producing a post-elections
report of recommendations. The
AsiMn NePRork for Free ElecPions (ANFREI), supporPed Ny POe
AsiM FoundMPion, OMd M mission of 20 long-Perm Mnd 30 sOorP-Perm oNservers, RiPO M core PeMm of
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
�ve experPsB Hn MddiPion, M smMll numNer of oNservMPion sPMff from diplomMPic missions Mnd oPOer
international agencies based in Afghanistan were deployed to polling centres.
Along with the problem of limited numbers of international observation staff was the issue of
their limited mobility. Most were largely unable to travel beyond provincial centres, and few even
ouPside KMNulB By conPrMsP, AfgOMnisPMn’s oRn elecPions moniPoring orgMnisMPion, POe Free Mnd
FMir ElecPion FoundMPion of AfgOMnisPMn (FEFA), RMs MNle Po conducP M compreOensive mission
on election day itself and during the voter registration process in previous months. As one of the
few elections-oriented organisations active in the interim period between the 2005 and 2009
elections, it had representatives in all provinces observing the polls.
Insecurity undermined the elections in 2009, despite the considerable measures taken to mitigate
its effects. An extra 26,000 troops were brought in to support the electoral effort, but an October
2009 report from the
International Crisis Group said that the weeks “before the August election
saw the worst levels of violence since the US-led intervention in 2001” and that at least four
Provincial Council candidates were also killed. In total, around 300 incidents were reported and
31 people killed pre-election and on election day itself. Partly as a result, voter turnout dropped
to 31% from over 70% in 2004.
AnoPOer effecP of POe dePeriorMPing securiPy environmenP since POe �rsP round of elecPions RMs POe
essential exclusion of potential voters living in insecure areas in Afghanistan. This was a concern
prior to the polls, and it appears to have been a valid one. Many of the areas deemed either
too insecure to even establish polling centres, or too insecure for established polling centres to
actually open on election day, were in the south and east of the country, in the Pashtun belt. The
inability of polling stations to open in insecure areas also facilitated much election-day fraud.
Fraud
The 2009 polls became infamous for widespread fraud. In October 2009, after receiving over 2,800
complaints, of which 726 were considered serious enough to affect the outcome of elections, the
ECC ordered a recount of 10% of randomly selected ballots. Overall, 18.8% of the total number of
NMlloPs cMsP Rere invMlidMPed Ny POe EFF, reducing vMlid voPer PurnouP from POe HEF’s iniPiMl �gure
of 5,662,758 (38.7%) to 4,597,727 (31.4%). These percentages are however based on the most
recenP voPer regisPrMPion �gures, ROicO, Mccording Po FEFA, Rere Mlso inMccurMPe Mnd conPMined
signi�cMnP levels of frMudB UlPimMPely, POe EFF invMlidMPed enougO voPes POMP M PresidenPiMl run-off
elecPion RMs cMlledB FrMud RMs Mlso idenPi�ed in ProvinciMl Founcil elecPions, NuP POis received less
attention from the ECC.
HP sOould Ne noPed POMP POere Rere Mlso signi�cMnP insPMnces of frMud reporPed in POe 2004
elections, but these did not receive nearly as much attention from the international community or
media. Indeed, for international donors, the issue of fraud in 2009 is considered severe enough
Po poPenPiMlly prevenP or delMy �nMnciMl supporP Po POe plMnned
Wolesi Jirga
elections in 2010.
Government
Key actors in 2009-10
The principle organiser of the elections was and will be the Afghan-led Independent Election
Commission (IEC, p. 44), supported by UNDP’s Enhancing Legal and Electoral Capacity for
Tomorrow (ELECT, p. 37). A critical role is also played by the Electoral Complaints Commission
Timeline of key events: Elections 2009
Date
Activity
21 April
18-24 April
Launch of candidate registration process
25 April–8 May
Nomination of candidates
9-15 May
Scrutiny of applications
16 May
NoPi�cMPion Po cMndidMPes of Mny de�ciencies in nominMPion MpplicMPions
17-22 May
Remedy of de�ciencies in nominMPion MpplicMPions
23-25 May
Preparation of preliminary list of candidates
26 May-1 June
Display of preliminary list of candidates plus challenges, corrections and
26 May–8 June
ECC informs IEC of decisions on nominations
HEF prepMres �nMl lisP of cMndidMPes
PuNlicMPion of �nMl lisP of cMndidMPes
15 June–15 July
Printing of ballot papers
16 June–18 August
Political campaign period
1 to 10 July
Recruitment of polling and counting staff
15 July
16 July
Ballot papers arrive in Kabul
20 July–20 August
20 August
Polling day
20 August
Retrieval of results from polling centres
26 August
FirsP pMrPiMl resulPs releMsed from 10% of polling sPMPions (KMrzMi 41%,
Abdullah 39%); IEC announces that partial results will be given continually
over the coming days
27 August
Second partial results released from 17% of polling stations (Karzai 45%,
Abdullah 35%)
29 August
Third partial results released from 35% of polling stations (Karzai 46.3%,
Abdullah 31.4%)
31 August
FourPO pMrPiMl resulPs releMsed from 48% of polling sPMPions (KMrzMi 4DBE%,
Abdullah 33.3%)
2 September
FifPO pMrPiMl resulPs releMsed from 60B3% of polling sPMPions (KMrzMi 47B3%,
Abdullah 32.6%)
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
94
6 September
Sixth partial results released from 74.2% of polling stations (Karzai 48.6%,
Abdullah 31.7%)
8 September
Seventh partial results released from 91.6% of polling stations (Karzai
54.1%, Abdullah 28.3%); ECC announces clear occurrence of fraud and
demands that polling stations be re-counted where more than 600 ballots
were cast and where 95% of the votes were cast for one candidate
12 September
Eighth partial results released from 92.8% of polling stations (Karzai
54.3%, Abdullah 28.1%)
16 September
HEF Mnnounces uncerPi�ed �nMl resulP: KMrzMi Rins ouPrigOP RiPO D4B6%
(ANdullMO 27B8%); resulP noP �nMl unPil con�rmed Ny EFF
5-11 October
ECC recount of random 10% of ballots
19 October
ECC recount results presented to IEC: Karzai with 48% of the vote, run-off
required
20 October
Karzai agrees to a run-off, set for 7 November
21 October
FinMl cerPi�ed resulPs Mnnounced Ny HEF (KMrzMi 48B7%, ANdullMO 30B6%)
24 October
Run-off campaign period opens
1 November
Abdullah withdraws from run-off
2 November
IEC cancels run-off, Karzai declared winner
19 November
Karzai inaugurated for second Presidential term
(Source:
UNDP ELECT, others)
95
Documents: Contents
Contents
Chapter One: The State
FOMpPer TRo: FundMmenPMl RigOPs Mnd GuPies of FiPizens
Chapter Three: The President
FOMpPer Four: TOe GovernmenP
FOMpPer Five: TOe NMPionMl AssemNly
Chapter Six: Loya Jirga
Chapter Seven: The Judiciary
Chapter Eight: The Administration
Chapter Nine: The State of Emergency
Chapter Ten: Amendments
Chapter Eleven: The Miscellaneous Provisions
Chapter Twelve: The Transitional Provisions
The Afghanistan Compact (2006)
Purpose
Governance, Rule of Law and Human Rights
Economic and Social Development
Counter-Narcotics: A Cross-Cutting Priority
Coordination and Monitoring
ANNEX H: BencOmMrks Mnd Timelines
ANNEX HH: Hmproving POe EffecPiveness of Aid Po AfgOMnisPMn
ANNEX HHH: FoordinMPion Mnd MoniPoring
ANNEX HV: PMrPicipMnPs MP POe Iondon Fonference on AfgOMnisPMn
Code of Conduct for NGOs engaged in Humanitarian Action, Reconstruction, and
Development in Afghanistan (2005)
NGO Mission Statement
Purpose of the Code
Code Observance
Becoming a Signatory to the Code of Conduct
Complaints
Jurisdiction of the Committee
The Unseating of a Committee Member
Compliance to the Code
Revision of Code
Annex: Historical Context
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
TOis is Mn unof�ciMl PrMnslMPion of POe 2004 FonsPiPuPion of AfgOMnisPMn; refer Po POe of�ciMl GMri Mnd
PMsOPo versions for MccurMcyB (Source: HGIO; Of�ce of POe PresidenP ReNsiPe: RRRBpresidenPBgovBMf)
Year 1382
In the Name of God, the Merciful, the Compassionate
Contents
Chapter One
The State

(21 Articles)
FOMpPer TRo
TOe FundMmenPMl RigOPs Mnd GuPies of FiPizens

(38 ArPicles)
Chapter Three

(11 Articles)
FOMpPer Four
TOe GovernmenP

(10 ArPicles)
FOMpPer Five

(2E ArPicles)
Chapter Six
The Loya Jirga

(6 Articles)
Chapter Seven
The Judiciary

(20 Articles)
Chapter Eight
The Administrative Division

(7 Articles)
Chapter Nine
The State of Emergency

(6 Articles)
Chapter Ten

(2 Articles)
Chapter Eleven
The Miscellaneous Provisions

(7 Articles)
Chapter Twelve
The Transitional Provisions

(5 Articles)
In the name of God, the Merciful, the Compassionate
Preamble
We the people of Afghanistan:
JiPO �rm fMiPO in God AlmigOPy Mnd relying on His lMRful mercy, Mnd Nelieving in POe sMcred
1.
ReMlising POe injusPice Mnd sOorPcoming of POe pMsP, Mnd POe numerous ProuNles imposed on
our country,
JOile McknoRledging POe sMcri�ces Mnd POe OisPoric sPruggles, rigOPful JiOMd Mnd jusP resisPMnce
of all people of Afghanistan and respecting the high position of the martyrs for freedom of the
country,
With the understanding that Afghanistan is a single and united country and belongs to all
ethnicities residing in this country,
97
Observing the United Nations Charter and respecting the Universal Declaration of Human
For sPrengPOening nMPionMl uniPy, sMfeguMrding independence, nMPionMl sovereignPy, Mnd
territorial integrity of the country,
For esPMNlisOing M governmenP NMsed on people’s Rill Mnd democrMcy,
7.
For creMPion of M civil sociePy free of oppression, MProciPy, discriminMPion, Mnd violence Mnd
NMsed on POe rule of lMR, sociMl jusPice, proPecPion of OumMn rigOPs, Mnd digniPy Mnd ensuring
For sPrengPOening POe poliPicMl, sociMl, economic, Mnd defensive insPiPuPions of POe counPry,
For ensuring M prosperous life Mnd sound environmenP for Mll POose residing in POis lMnd,
10.
FinMlly, for regMining AfgOMnisPMn’s deserved plMce in POe inPernMPionMl communiPy, OMve
11.
adopted this Constitution in accordance with historical, cultural, and social requirements of
the era, through our elected representatives in the
Loya Jirga
dated 14 Jaddi 1382 in the city
of Kabul.
Chapter One: The State
ArPicle 1

AfgOMnisPMn is Mn HslMmic RepuNlic, independenP, uniPMry Mnd indivisiNle sPMPeB
ArPicle 2

TOe religion of POe sPMPe of POe HslMmic RepuNlic of AfgOMnisPMn is POe sMcred
FolloRers of oPOer religions Mre free Po exercise POeir fMiPO Mnd perform POeir
religious rites within the limits of the provisions of law.
ArPicle 3
Hn AfgOMnisPMn no lMR cMn Ne conPrMry Po POe Neliefs Mnd provisions of POe sMcred
ArPicle 4
NMPionMl sovereignPy in AfgOMnisPMn Nelongs Po POe nMPion POMP exercises iP
directly or through its representatives.
TOe nMPion of AfgOMnisPMn consisPs of Mll individuMls ROo Mre POe ciPizens of
TOe nMPion of AfgOMnisPMn is comprised of PMsOPun, TMjik, HMzMrM, UzNek,
TurkmMn, BMlucO, PMsOMi, NurisPMni, AymMq, ArMN, QirgOiz, QizilNMsO, Gujur,
Brahwui and other ethnic groups.
TOe Rord AfgOMn Mpplies Po every ciPizen of AfgOMnisPMnB
No memNer of POe nMPion cMn Ne deprived of OisCOer ciPizensOip of
AffMirs relMPed Po ciPizensOip Mnd Msylum Mre regulMPed Ny lMRB
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
ArPicle D •

HmplemenPMPion of POe provisions of POis consPiPuPion Mnd oPOer lMRs, defending
independence, national sovereignty, territorial integrity, and ensuring the
security and defence capability of the country, are the basic duties of the
state.
ArPicle 6 •

TOe sPMPe is oNliged Po creMPe M prosperous Mnd progressive sociePy NMsed
on sociMl jusPice, proPecPion of OumMn digniPy, proPecPion of OumMn rigOPs,
realisation of democracy, and to ensure national unity and equality among all
ethnic groups and tribes and to provide for balanced development in all areas
of the country.
ArPicle 7
TOe sPMPe sOMll oNserve POe FOMrPer of POe UniPed NMPions, inPernMPionMl PreMPies,
international conventions that Afghanistan is a party to, and the Universal
TOe sPMPe prevenPs Mll Pypes of PerrorisP McPiviPies, culPivMPion Mnd smuggling of
narcotic drugs, and production and consumption of intoxicants (
ArPicle 8
TOe sPMPe regulMPes POe foreign policy of POe counPry on POe NMsis of preserving
the independence, national interests, territorial integrity, non-interference,
good neighbourliness, mutual respect, and equal rights.
ArPicle E
Mines Mnd oPOer underground resources Mnd culPurMl OeriPMges Mre POe
properties of the state.
ProPecPion, mMnMgemenP Mnd mode of proper uPilisMPion of POe puNlic properPies
shall be regulated by law.
ArPicle 10
TOe sPMPe encourMges Mnd proPecPs privMPe invesPmenPs Mnd enPerprises NMsed
on the market economy and guarantees their protection in accordance with the
provisions of law.
ArPicle 11
AffMirs relMPed Po domesPic Mnd exPernMl PrMde sOMll Ne regulMPed Ny lMR in
accordance with the needs of the national economy and the public interest.
ArPicle 12
GM AfgOMnisPMn BMnk is POe cenPrMl Mnd independenP NMnk of POe sPMPeB
HssuMnce of currency Mnd formulMPion Mnd implemenPMPion of monePMry policy
of the country are the mandates of the central bank in accordance with the
law.
TOe cenPrMl NMnk sOMll consulP POe economic commission of POe
Wolesi Jirga
in
matters related to printing of currency.
SPrucPure Mnd operMPion of POis NMnk sOMll Ne regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle 13

TOe sPMPe sOMll formulMPe Mnd implemenP effecPive progrMms for POe developmenP
of industries, growth of production, increasing of public living standards, and
supportive of craftsmanship.
99
ArPicle 14 •
TOe sPMPe sOMll design Mnd implemenP RiPOin iPs �nMnciMl resources effecPive
programs for the development of agriculture and animal husbandry, improving
the economic, social and living conditions of farmers, herders, settlement and
TOe sPMPe MdopPs necessMry meMsures for Oousing Mnd disPriNuPion of puNlic
esPMPes Po deserving ciPizens in MccordMnce RiPOin iPs �nMnciMl resources Mnd
the law.
ArPicle 1D •
TOe sPMPe is oNliged Po MdopP necessMry meMsures for sMfeguMrding Mnd
improving forests and the environment.
ArPicle 16•
From Mmong POe lMnguMges of PMsOPo, GMri, UzNeki, TurkmMni, BMlucOi, PMsOMi,
Nuristani, Pamiri and other languages spoken in the country, Pashto and Dari
Mre POe of�ciMl lMnguMges of POe sPMPeB
Hn MreMs ROere POe mMjoriPy of people speMk one of POe UzNeki, TurkmMni, BMlucOi,
Pashai, Nuristani and Pamiri languages, that language shall be recognised
Ms POird of�ciMl lMnguMge in MddiPion Po PMsOPo Mnd GMri, POe modMliPy of iPs
implementation shall be regulated by law.
TOe sPMPe MdopPs Mnd implemenPs effecPive plMns for sPrengPOening Mnd
developing all languages of Afghanistan.
PuNlicMPions Mnd mMss mediM Mre MlloRed in Mll lMnguMges spoken in POe
country.
TOe exisPing nMPionMl McMdemic Mnd MdminisPrMPive Perminology of POe counPry
shall be preserved.
ArPicle 17
TOe sPMPe sOMll MdopP necessMry meMsures for promoPion of educMPion in Mll
levels, development of religious education, and organising and improving the
conditions of mosques, madrasas and religious centres.
ArPicle 18
TOe cMlendMr of POe counPry sOMll Ne NMsed on POe migrMPion of POe PropOeP
TOe NMsis of Rork for sPMPe of�ces sOMll Ne POe solMr cMlendMrB
FridMys Mnd POe 28PO of AsMd Mnd POe 8PO of SMRr Mre puNlic OolidMysB
OPOer OolidMys sOMll Ne regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle 1E
TOe AfgOMn �Mg is mMde up of POree equMl pMrPs, RiPO NlMck, red Mnd green
colours juxPMposed from lefP Po rigOP perpendiculMrlyB
TOe RidPO of every coloured piece is equMl Po OMlf of iPs lengPOB TOe nMPionMl
insigniM is locMPed in POe cenPre of POe �MgB TOe nMPionMl insigniM of POe sPMPe of
Afghanistan is composed of
Mnd pulpiP in ROiPe colourB TRo �Mgs Mre
located on its two sides. In the upper-middle part of the insignia the sacred
phrase of “There is no God but Allah and Mohammad is his prophet, and Allah
is Great” is placed, along with a rising sun. The word “Afghanistan” and year
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
100
1298 (solar calendar) is located in the lower part of the insignia. The insignia is
encircled with two branches of wheat.
TOe lMR sOMll regulMPe POe use of nMPionMl �Mg Mnd emNlemB
ArPicle 20
TOe NMPionMl AnPOem of AfgOMnisPMn sOMll Ne in PMsOPo Mnd menPion “AllMOu
Akbar” and the names of the ethnic groups of Afghanistan.
ArPicle 21
TOe cMpiPMl of AfgOMnisPMn is POe ciPy of KMNulB
Chapter Two: Fundamental Rights and Du�es of Ci�zens
ArPicle 22
Any kind of discriminMPion Mnd privilege NePReen POe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn is
prohibited.
TOe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn—ROePOer RomMn or mMn—OMve equMl rigOPs Mnd
duties before the law
ArPicle 23
Iife is M gifP of God Mnd M nMPurMl rigOP of OumMn NeingsB No one sOMll Ne deprived
of this right except by the provision of law.
ArPicle 24
IiNerPy is POe nMPurMl rigOP of OumMn NeingsB TOis rigOP OMs no limiPs unless
affecting the rights of others and public interest, which are regulated by law.
IiNerPy Mnd digniPy of OumMn Neings Mre inviolMNleB
TOe sPMPe OMs POe duPy Po respecP Mnd proPecP POe liNerPy Mnd digniPy of OumMn
ArPicle 2D
Hnnocence is POe originMl sPMPeB
An Mccused is considered innocenP unPil convicPed Ny M �nMl decision of Mn
authorised court.
ArPicle 26
Frime is M personMl McPionB
TOe prosecuPion, MrresP, Mnd dePenPion of Mn Mccused Mnd POe execuPion of
penalty cannot affect another person.
ArPicle 27
No McP is considered M crime, unless dePermined Ny M lMR MdopPed prior Po POe
date the offence is committed.
No person cMn Ne pursued, MrresPed or dePMined NuP in MccordMnce RiPO POe
provisions of law.
No person cMn Ne punisOed NuP in MccordMnce RiPO POe decision of Mn MuPOorised
court and in conformity with the law adopted before the date of the offence.
ArPicle 28
No ciPizen of AfgOMnisPMn Mccused of M crime cMn Ne exPrMdiPed Po M foreign
state unless according to mutual agreement and international conventions that
101
No AfgOMn cMn Ne senPenced Po deprivMPion of ciPizensOip or Po exile inside POe
country or abroad.
ArPicle 2E
TorPure of OumMn Neings is proOiNiPedB
No person, even RiPO POe inPenPion of discovering POe PruPO, cMn resorP Po PorPure
or order the torture of another person who may be under prosecution, arrest,
detention or convicted to be punished.
PunisOmenP conPrMry Po OumMn inPegriPy is proOiNiPedB
ArPicle 30
Any sPMPemenP, confession or PesPimony oNPMined from Mn Mccused or of MnoPOer
person by means of compulsion, is invalid.
Fonfession Po M crime is M volunPMry Mdmission Nefore Mn MuPOorised courP Ny
an accused in a sound state of mind.
ArPicle 31
Every person upon MrresP cMn seek Mn MdvocMPe Po defend OisCOer rigOPs or Po
defend OisCOer cMse for ROicO OeCsOe is Mccused under POe lMRB
TOe Mccused upon MrresP OMs POe rigOP Po Ne informed of POe MPPriNuPed MccusMPion
and to be summoned to the court within the limits determined by law.
Hn criminMl cMses, POe sPMPe sOMll MppoinP Mn MdvocMPe for M desPiPuPeB
TOe con�denPiMliPy of orMl, RriPPen or PelepOonic communicMPions NePReen Mn
MdvocMPe Mnd OisCOer Mccused clienP Mre immune from invMsionB
TOe duPies Mnd MuPOoriPies of MdvocMPes sOMll Ne regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle 32
Being in deNP does noP limiP M person’s freedom or deprive OimCOer of liNerPyB
TOe mode Mnd meMns of recovering M deNP sOMll Ne regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle 33
TOe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn OMve POe rigOP Po elecP Mnd Ne elecPedB
IMR regulMPes POe condiPions Mnd meMns Po exercise POis rigOPB
ArPicle 34
Freedom of expression is inviolMNleB
Every AfgOMn OMs POe rigOP Po express POougOPs POrougO speecO, RriPing, or
illustration or other means by observing the provisions of this Constitution.
Every AfgOMn OMs POe rigOP Po prinP or puNlisO Popics RiPOouP prior suNmission Po
the state authorities in accordance with the law.
GirecPives relMPed Po prinPing Oouses, rMdio, Pelevision, POe press, Mnd oPOer
mass media, shall be regulated by law.
ArPicle 3D
TOe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn OMve POe rigOP Po form sociMl orgMnisMPions for POe
purpose of securing material or spiritual aims in accordance with the provisions
of law.
TOe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn OMve POe rigOP Po form poliPicMl pMrPies in MccordMnce
with the provisions of law, provided that:
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
102
The program and charter of the party are not contrary to the principles
1.
of sacred religion of Islam, and the provisions and values of this
TOe orgMnisMPionMl sPrucPure Mnd �nMnciMl sources of POe pMrPy Mre mMde
The party does not have military or paramilitary aims and structures.
TOe pMrPy sOould OMve no Mf�liMPion Po M foreign poliPicMl pMrPy or sourcesB
FormMPion Mnd funcPioning of M pMrPy NMsed on ePOniciPy, lMnguMge, religious
sect and region is not permissible.
A pMrPy seP up in MccordMnce RiPO provisions of POe lMR sOMll noP Ne dissolved
without lawful reasons and the decision of an authorised court.
ArPicle 36
TOe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn OMve POe rigOP Po unMrmed demonsPrMPions for
legitimate peaceful purposes in accordance with the law.
ArPicle 37 •
Fon�denPiMliPy Mnd freedom of correspondence Mnd communicMPion, ROePOer
in the form of letters or through telephone, telegraph and other means, are
immune from invasion.
TOe sPMPe does noP OMve POe rigOP Po inspecP personMl correspondence Mnd
communication unless authorised by the provisions of law.
ArPicle 38
A person’s residence is immune from invMsionB
OPOer POMn POe siPuMPions Mnd mePOods indicMPed in POe lMR, no one, including
the state, is allowed to enter or inspect a private residence without prior
permission of the resident or holding a court order.
Hn cMse of Mn evidenP crime, Mn of�ciMl in cOMrge of POe siPuMPion cMn enPer or
conduct a house search prior to the permission of the court.
TOe of�ciMl involved in POe siPuMPion is required Po oNPMin M suNsequenP courP
order for the house search within the period indicated by law.
ArPicle 3E
Every AfgOMn OMs POe rigOP Po PrMvel or sePPle in Mny pMrP of POe counPry excepP in
the regions forbidden by law.
Every AfgOMn OMs POe rigOP Po PrMvel MNroMd Mnd rePurn Oome in MccordMnce RiPO
the provisions of law.
TOe sPMPe sOMll proPecP POe rigOPs of POe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn MNroMdB
ArPicle 40
ProperPy is immune from invMsionB
No person sOMll Ne forNidden from Mcquiring Mnd mMking use of M properPy
except within the limits of law.
No person’s properPy sOMll Ne con�scMPed RiPOouP POe provisions of lMR Mnd POe
order of an authorised court.
103
AcquisiPion of M person’s properPy, in rePurn for M prior Mnd jusP compensMPion
within the bounds of law, is permitted only for securing public interests in
accordance with the provisions of law.
HnspecPion Mnd disclosure of M privMPe properPy Mre cMrried ouP only in MccordMnce
with the provisions of law.
ArPicle 41
Foreign individuMls do noP OMve POe rigOP Po oRn immovMNle properPy in
IeMse of immovMNle properPy for POe purpose of invesPmenP is permissiNle in
accordance with the law.
TOe sMle of esPMPes Po diplomMPic missions of foreign counPries Mnd Po POose
international agencies of which Afghanistan is a member is permissible in
accordance with the provisions of law.
ArPicle 42
Every AfgOMn is oNligMPed Po pMy PMxes Mnd duPies Po POe governmenP in
accordance with the provisions of law.
No PMxes Mnd duPies Mre enforced RiPOouP provisions of POe lMRB
TOe rMPe of PMxes Mnd duPies Mnd POe mePOod of pMymenPs Mre dePermined Ny
lMR on POe NMsis of oNserving sociMl jusPiceB
TOis provision is Mlso Mpplied Po foreign individuMls Mnd MgenciesB
Every kind of PMx, duPy Mnd income collecPed sOMll Ne delivered Po POe sPMPe MccounPB
ArPicle 43
EducMPion is POe rigOP of Mll ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn, ROicO sOMll Ne provided up
to the level of the Bachelors (
) free of charge by the state.
TOe sPMPe is oNliged Po devise Mnd implemenP effecPive progrMms for M NMlMnced
expansion of education all over Afghanistan, and to provide compulsory
intermediate level education. The state is also required to provide the
opportunity to teach native languages in the areas where they are spoken.
ArPicle 44
TOe sPMPe sOMll devise Mnd implemenP effecPive progrMms for NMlMncing Mnd
promoting education for women, improving of education of the nomads and
elimination of illiteracy in the country.
ArPicle 4D
TOe sPMPe sOMll devise Mnd implemenP M uni�ed educMPionMl curriculum NMsed
on the provisions of the sacred religion of Islam, national culture, and in
accordance with academic principles, and develop the curriculum of religious
suNjecPs on POe NMsis of POe HslMmic secPs exisPing in AfgOMnisPMnB
ArPicle 46 •
EsPMNlisOing Mnd operMPing OigOer, generMl Mnd vocMPionMl educMPion Mre duPies
of the state.
TOe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn Mlso cMn esPMNlisO OigOer, generMl, Mnd vocMPionMl
private educational institutions and literacy courses with the permission of the
state.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
104
TOe sPMPe cMn Mlso permiP foreign persons Po seP up OigOer, generMl Mnd
vocational educational private institutes in accordance with the law.
TOe condiPions for Mdmission Po sPMPe OigOer educMPion insPiPuPions Mnd oPOer
related matters to be regulated by the law.
ArPicle 47
TOe sPMPe sOMll devise effecPive progrMms for POe promoPion of science, culPure,
literature and the arts.
TOe sPMPe guMrMnPees POe rigOPs of MuPOors, invenPors, Mnd discoverers Mnd
encourMges Mnd supporPs scienPi�c reseMrcOes in Mll MreMs Mnd puNlicises POe
effective use of their results in accordance with the law.
ArPicle 48
Jork is POe rigOP of every AfgOMnB
Jorking Oours, pMid OolidMys, rigOPs of employer Mnd employee Mnd oPOer
related affairs are regulated by law.
FOoice of occupMPion Mnd crMfP is free RiPOin POe limiPs of lMRB
ArPicle 4E
Forced lMNour is forNiddenB
AcPive pMrPicipMPion in Pimes of RMr, cMlMmiPy, Mnd oPOer siPuMPions POreMPening
lives and public welfare is a national duty of every Afghan.
FOildren sOMll noP Ne suNjecPed Po forced lMNourB
ArPicle D0
TOe sPMPe is oNliged Po MdopP necessMry meMsures for creMPion of M sProng Mnd
sound administration and realisation of reforms in the administration system
of the country.
GovernmenP of�ces Mre Nound Po cMrry POeir Rork RiPO full neuPrMliPy Mnd in
compliance with the provisions of law.
TOe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn OMve POe rigOP of Mccess Po informMPion from
governmenP of�ces in MccordMnce RiPO POe provisions of lMRB TOis rigOP OMs no
limits, unless in violation of the rights of the others.
TOe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn Mre employed for sPMPe services on POe NMsis of
quMli�cMPion RiPOouP Mny kind of discriminMPion Mnd in MccordMnce RiPO POe
law.
ArPicle D1
Any person suffering undue OMrm Ny governmenP McPion is enPiPled Po
compensation, which he can claim by appealing to court.
JiPO POe excepPion of siPuMPions sPMPed in POe lMR, POe sPMPe cMnnoP clMim iPs
right without the order of an authorised court.
ArPicle D2
TOe sPMPe is oNliged Po provide free meMns of prevenPive OeMlPO cMre Mnd
medical treatment, and proper health facilities to all citizens of Afghanistan in
accordance with the law.
TOe sPMPe encourMges Mnd proPecPs POe esPMNlisOmenP Mnd expMnsion of privMPe
medical services and health centres in accordance with law.
105
TOe sPMPe in order Po promoPe pOysicMl educMPion Mnd improve nMPionMl Mnd
local sports adopts necessary measures.
ArPicle D3
TOe sPMPe PMkes necessMry meMsures for regulMPing medicMl services Mnd
�nMnciMl supporP Po descendMnPs of mMrPyred Mnd losP, re-inPegrMPion of disMNled
and handicapped individuals and their active participation in the society in
accordance with the law.
TOe sPMPe guMrMnPees POe rigOPs of pensioners Mnd renders necessMry MssisPMnce
to needy elders, women without caretakers, disabled and handicapped
individuals and needy orphans in accordance with the law.
ArPicle D4
FMmily is M fundMmenPMl uniP of sociePy Mnd is supporPed Ny POe sPMPeB
TOe sPMPe MdopPs necessMry meMsures Po ensure pOysicMl Mnd psycOologicMl
well being of family, especially of child and mother, upbringing of children
and the elimination of traditions contrary to the principles of sacred religion
of Islam.
ArPicle DD
TOe defence of POe counPry is POe responsiNiliPy of Mll ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMnB
TOe condiPions for miliPMry service Mre regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle D6
ONserving POe provisions of POe FonsPiPuPion, oNeying POe lMRs, Mnd MdOering Po
public law and order are the duties of all people of Afghanistan.
HgnorMnce MNouP POe provisions of lMR is noP considered Mn excuseB
ArPicle D7
TOe sPMPe guMrMnPees POe rigOPs Mnd liNerPies of POe foreign ciPizens residing in
Afghanistan in accordance with the law. These people are obliged to observe
the laws of the state of Afghanistan in accordance with International Law.
ArPicle D8
TOe SPMPe, for POe purpose of moniPoring POe oNservMPion of OumMn rigOPs in
Afghanistan, and their promotion and protection, shall establish the Independent
Any person in cMse of M violMPion of OisCOer rigOPs cMn reporP POeir complMinP Po
TOe Fommission cMn refer cMses of violMPions of POe OumMn rigOPs of persons Po
the legal authorities, and assist them in defending their rights.
SPrucPure Mnd mode of funcPion of POis Fommission Rill Ne regulMPed Ny
law.
ArPicle DE
No one cMn misuse POe rigOPs Mnd freedoms under POis FonsPiPuPion MgMinsP
independence, territorial integrity, sovereignty and national unity.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
106
Chapter Three: The President
ArPicle 60 •
TOe PresidenP is POe OeMd of sPMPe of POe HslMmic RepuNlic of AfgOMnisPMn, Mnd
conducPs MuPOoriPy in execuPive, legislMPive, Mnd judiciMl NrMncOes in MccordMnce
with the provisions of this Constitution.
TOe PresidenP sOMll OMve �rsP Mnd second Vice PresidenPsB
TOe cMndidMPe Po POe Presidency on Ois or Oer cMndidMcy sOMll Mlso declMre POe
nMmes of POe Vice PresidenPs Po POe nMPionB
TOe FirsP Vice PresidenP in POe MNsence, resignMPion, or deMPO of POe PresidenP,
acts in accordance with the provisions of this Constitution.
Hn POe MNsence of POe FirsP Vice PresidenP, POe Second Vice PresidenP sOMll McP
in accordance with the provisions of this Constitution.
ArPicle 61
TOe PresidenP is elecPed Ny receiving more POMn D0% of POe voPes cMsP POrougO
free, general, secret, and direct voting.
TOe presidenPiMl Perm expires on POe �rsP of JMRzM of POe �fPO yeMr MfPer POe
ElecPions for POe neR PresidenP Mre Oeld POirPy Po sixPy dMys Nefore POe end of POe
presidential term.
Hf none of POe cMndidMPes succeeds Po receive more POMn D0% of POe voPes in POe
�rsP round, M run-off elecPion sOMll Ne Oeld RiPOin PRo ReeksB
Hn POis round, only POe PRo cMndidMPes RiPO POe OigOesP numNer of voPes Rill
participate.
Hn POe run-off, POe cMndidMPe ROo gePs POe mMjoriPy of POe voPes sOMll Ne elecPed
Hn cMse of deMPO of one of POe cMndidMPes during POe �rsP or second round, MfPer
the elections or prior to the announcement of the results of elections, new
elections shall be held in accordance with the provisions of law.
ArPicle 62
PresidenPiMl cMndidMPes sOould posses POe folloRing quMli�cMPions:
Should be citizen of Afghanistan, Muslim and born of Afghan parents, and
1.
should not have citizenship of another country.
On POe dMy of Necoming M cMndidMPe, OisCOer Mge sOould noP Ne less POMn
forty years.
Should not have been convicted of crimes against humanity, a criminal act,
or deprivation of civil rights by a court.
No one cMn Ne elecPed Ms presidenP for more POMn PRo PermsB
TOe provision of POis MrPicle Mpplies Po POe Vice PresidenPs Ms RellB
ArPicle 63
TOe PresidenP-elecP, prior Po resumpPion of OisCOer duPies, performs POe folloRing
oath in accordance with the rules of procedures prescribed by law:
107

Hn POe nMme of AllMO, POe Merciful, POe FompMssionMPe; Hn POe nMme of God
Almighty, in the presence of you representatives of the nation of Afghanistan,
H sReMr Po oNey Mnd sMfeguMrd POe provisions of POe sMcred religion of HslMm,
to observe the Constitution and other laws of Afghanistan and supervise their
implemenPMPion; Po sMfeguMrd POe independence, nMPionMl sovereignPy, Mnd POe
territorial integrity of Afghanistan and the fundamental rights and interests of
the people of Afghanistan, and with the assistance of God and the support of
the nation, to make great and sincere efforts for the happiness and progress
of POe people of AfgOMnisPMnB
ArPicle 64
TOe poRer Mnd duPies of POe PresidenP Mre Ms folloRs:
Supervising the implementation of the Constitution
1.
Determining the fundamental policies of the state with the approval of the
Being the Commander-in-Chief of the armed forces of Afghanistan
GeclMrMPion of RMr Mnd ceMse�re RiPO POe con�rmMPion of POe NMPionMl
Assembly
Taking the required decision to defend the territorial integrity and protect
Sending contingents of the armed forces to foreign countries with the
Convening the
7.
Loya Jirga
except in the situation stated in Article 68 of this
GeclMring POe sPMPe of emergency Mnd ending iP RiPO POe con�rmMPion of POe
Loya Jirga
AccepPing resignMPion of POe Vice PresidenPs
10.
Appointing Ministers, the Attorney General, the Governor of the Central
11.
Bank, Head of the National Security Directorate and the President of the
AfgOMn Red FrescenP SociePy RiPO POe con�rmMPion of POe
Wolesi Jirga
Appointing the head and members of the Supreme Court with the
Wolesi Jirga
AppoinPing, rePiring Mnd MccepPing POe resignMPion of Mnd dismissing judges,
13.
of�cers of POe Mrmed forces, police, nMPionMl securiPy, Mnd OigO-rMnking
of�ciMls in MccordMnce RiPO POe lMR
Appointing heads of the diplomatic missions of Afghanistan in foreign
14.
countries and international organisations
Accepting the credentials of diplomatic missions in Afghanistan
15.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
108
Signing laws and legislative decrees
16.
Issuing credential letters for the conclusion of bilateral and international
17.
treaties in accordance with the provisions of law
Reducing and pardoning penalties in accordance with the law
18.
Issuing medals and honorary titles in accordance with the provisions of law
19.
Establishing commissions for the improvement of the administrative
condition of the country, in accordance with the law
Exercising other authorities in accordance with the provisions of this
21.
ArPicle 6D
TOe PresidenP cMn cMll for M referendum on imporPMnP nMPionMl poliPicMl, sociMl
FMlling for M referendum sOMll noP Ne conPrMry Po POe provisions of POis FonsPiPuPion
or for amending it.
ArPicle 66
TOe PresidenP PMkes inPo considerMPion POe supreme inPeresPs of POe people of
Afghanistan while enforcing the powers stated in this Constitution.
TOe PresidenP cMnnoP sell or NesPoR sPMPe properPies RiPOouP POe provisions of lMRB
TOe PresidenP cMnnoP McP NMsed on linguisPic, ePOnic, religious, poliPicMl, Mnd
regionMl considerMPions during OisCOer Perm in of�ceB
ArPicle 67
Hn cMse of resignMPion, impeMcOmenP, or deMPO of POe PresidenP, or of M serious
illness POMP could Oinder POe performMnce of duPies, POe FirsP Vice PresidenP
underPMkes OisCOer duPies Mnd MuPOoriPiesB
TOe PresidenP suNmiPs OisCOer resignMPion personMlly Po POe NMPionMl
Assembly.
Serious illness sOMll Ne proved Ny Mn MuPOorised medicMl commiPPee MppoinPed
by the Supreme Court.
Hn POis cMse, Mn elecPion for M neR PresidenP sOMll Ne Oeld RiPOin POe period of
three months in accordance with Article 61 of this Constitution.
Guring POe Pime ROen POe FirsP Vice PresidenP McPs Ms POe inPerim PresidenP, OeC
she cannot perform the following:
1.
Dismissal of Ministers
Call for a referendum
Guring POis period POe Vice PresidenPs cMn nominMPe POemselves Ms cMndidMPes
for the post of President in accordance with the provisions of this constitution.
Hn POe MNsence of POe PresidenP, POe duPies of POe FirsP Vice PresidenP sOMll Ne
determined by the President.
109
ArPicle 68
Hn cMse of resignMPion or deMPO of one of POe Vice PresidenPs, MnoPOer person
sOMll replMce OimCOer Ny POe proposMl of POe PresidenP Mnd MpprovMl of POe
Wolesi Jirga
Hn cMse of POe simulPMneous deMPO of POe PresidenP Mnd POe FirsP Vice PresidenP,
in Purn POe Second Vice PresidenP, POe FOMir of POe
Meshrano Jirga
and in the
absence of the chair of the
Meshrano Jirga
, the Chair of the
Wolesi Jirga
, and in
the absence of the Chair of the
Wolesi Jirga
, POe Foreign MinisPer sOMll perform
the duties of the President in accordance with Article 67 of this Constitution.
ArPicle 6E
TOe PresidenP is responsiNle Po POe nMPion Mnd POe
Wolesi Jirga
according to this
Article.
AccusMPions of crimes MgMinsP OumMniPy, nMPionMl PreMson or crime cMn Ne
levelled against the President by one-third of the members of the Wolesi Jirga.
Hf PRo POirds of POe
Wolesi Jirga
votes for charges to be brought forth, the
Wolesi
shall convene a
Loya Jirga
within one month. If the
Loya Jirga
approves the
MccusMPion Ny M PRo-POirds mMjoriPy of voPes POe PresidenP is POen dismissed, Mnd
the case is referred to a special court. The special court shall be composed of
three members of the
Wolesi Jirga
, and three members of the Supreme Court
appointed by the
Loya Jirga
and the Chair of the
Meshrano Jirga
TOe lMRsuiP is conducPed Ny M person MppoinPed Ny POe
Loya Jirga
Hn POis siPuMPion, POe provisions of ArPicle 67 of POis FonsPiPuPion Mre MppliedB
ArPicle 70
TOe sMlMry Mnd expendiPures of POe PresidenP Mre regulMPed Ny lMRB
AfPer expirMPion of POeir Perm, POe PresidenP is enPiPled Po POe �nMnciMl Nene�Ps
of POe presidency for POe resP of OisCOer life in MccordMnce RiPO POe lMR excepP
Chapter Four: The Government
ArPicle 71
TOe governmenP consisPs of POe MinisPers ROo Rork under POe FOMirmMnsOip of
TOe numNer of MinisPers Mnd POeir duPies sOMll Ne regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle 72
A person ROo is MppoinPed Ms M MinisPer sOould OMve POe folloRing
quMli�cMPions:
Must have only the citizenship of Afghanistan. Should a nominee for a
ministerial post also hold the citizenship of another country, the
Wolesi
sOMll OMve POe rigOP Po con�rm or rejecP Ois or Oer nominMPionB
Should have higher education, work experience and good reputation.
HisCOer Mge sOould noP Ne less POMn POirPy-�veB
Should not have been convicted of crimes against humanity, a criminal act,
7.
or deprived of civil rights by a court.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
110
ArPicle 73
TOe MinisPers cMn Ne MppoinPed from RiPOin Mnd RiPOouP POe NMPionMl AssemNlyB
Hf M memNer of POe NMPionMl AssemNly is MppoinPed Ms M minisPer, OeCsOe loses
OisCOer memNersOip in POe NMPionMl AssemNly, Mnd is replMced Ny MnoPOer
person in accordance with the provisions of law.
ArPicle 74
Prior Po PMking of�ce, POe MinisPer sOMll perform POe folloRing oMPO in POe

Hn POe nMme of AllMO, POe merciful Mnd compMssionMPe: H sReMr in POe nMme
of God AlmigOPy Po supporP POe provisions of POe sMcred religion of HslMm,
follow the Constitution and other laws of Afghanistan, protect the rights of
citizens, and safeguard the independence, territorial integrity and national
unity of Afghanistan, and consider God Almighty present in performing all my
responsiNiliPies, Mnd OonesPly perform POe duPies Mssigned Po meB
ArPicle 7D
TOe governmenP sOMll OMve POe folloRing duPies:
ExecuPe POe provisions of POis FonsPiPuPion, oPOer lMRs, Mnd �nMl orders of
the courts
Protect the independence, defend the territorial integrity, and safeguard
the interests and dignity of Afghanistan in the international community
Maintenance of public law and order and elimination of administrative
10.
PrepMre POe NudgeP, regulMPe �nMnciMl MffMirs Mnd proPecP puNlic ReMlPO
11.
Devise and implement programs for social, cultural, economic, and
technological progress
ReporP Po POe NMPionMl AssemNly MP POe end of POe �scMl yeMr MNouP POe
13.
PMsks MccomplisOed Mnd MNouP POe mMin plMns for POe neR �scMl yeMr
Perform other duties as recognised by this Constitution and other laws to
14.
be duties of the government.
ArPicle 76
Hn order Po implemenP POe mMin policies of POe counPry Mnd regulMPion of iPs
duties, the government shall devise and approve regulations. These regulations
should not be contradictory to the text and spirit of any law.
ArPicle 77
As OeMds of MdminisPrMPive uniPs Mnd memNers of POe governmenP, POe MinisPers
perform their duties within the limits determined by this Constitution and other
laws.
TOe MinisPers Mre responsiNle Po POe PresidenP Mnd POe
Wolesi Jirga
for their
particular duties.
ArPicle 78
Hf M MinisPer is Mccused of crime MgMinsP OumMniPy, nMPionMl PreMson or M criminMl
act, the case shall be referred to a special court in accordance with Article 134
111
ArPicle 7E
Hn cMses of recess of POe
Wolesi Jirga
, the government can adopt legislation
in an emergency situation on matters other than those related to budget and
�nMnciMl MffMirsB
TOe legislMPive decrees Necome lMRs MfPer POey Mre signed Ny POe PresidenPB TOe
legislative decrees should be submitted to the National Assembly in the course
of POirPy dMys Neginning from POe �rsP session of POe NMPionMl AssemNlyB
Hn cMse of rejecPion Ny POe NMPionMl AssemNly, POe legislMPions Necome voidB
ArPicle 80
MinisPers during POe course of POeir Rork cMnnoP use POeir posPs for linguisPic,
regional, ethnic, religious and partisan purposes.

Chapter Five: The Na�onal Assembly
ArPicle 81

TOe NMPionMl AssemNly of POe HslMmic RepuNlic of AfgOMnisPMn, Ms POe OigOesP
legislative organ, is the manifestation of the will of its people and represents
Every memNer of POe NMPionMl AssemNly PMkes inPo judgmenP POe generMl RelfMre
and supreme interests of all people of Afghanistan at the time of casting their
vote.
ArPicle 82
TOe NMPionMl AssemNly consisPs of PRo Oouses:
Wolesi Jirga
(the House of
People) and
(House of Elders).
No one cMn Necome M memNer of NoPO Oouses simulPMneouslyB
ArPicle 83
MemNers of POe
Wolesi Jirga
are elected by the people through free, general,
secret and direct elections.
TOeir mMndMPe ends on POe 1sP of SMrMPMn of POe �fPO yeMr MfPer POe elecPions
and the new assembly starts its work.
TOe elecPion of POe memNers of POe
Wolesi Jirga
shall be held 30 to 60 days
before the expiry of the term of the
Wolesi Jirga
TOe numNer of memNers of POe
Wolesi Jirga
, proportionate to the population of
eMcO region, sOMll Ne noP more POMn PRo Oundred Mnd �fPyB
ElecPorMl consPiPuency Mnd oPOer relMPed issues sOMll Ne dePermined Ny elecPion
laws.
Hn POe ElecPion IMR, meMsures sOould Ne MdopPed so POe elecPion sysPem sOMll
provide generMl Mnd jusP represenPMPion for Mll POe people of POe counPry Mnd
based on the population, from each province on average at least two female
delegates shall have membership to the
Wolesi Jirga
ArPicle 84
MemNers of POe
are elected and appointed as follows:
From Mmong POe memNers of eMcO ProvinciMl Founcil, POe respecPive council
1.
elects one person for a period of four years.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
112
From Mmong POe GisPricP Founcils of eMcO province, POe respecPive councils
elect one person for a period of three years.
The President from among experts and experienced personalities — including
two representatives of the disabled and impaired and two representatives
from the Nomads — appoints the remaining one-third of the members for a
period of �ve yeMrsB
TOe presidenP MppoinPs D0 percenP of POese people from Mmong RomenB
A person ROo is MppoinPed Ms M memNer of POe
Meshrano Jirga
shall relinquish
POeir memNersOip in POe respecPive council, Mnd MnoPOer person replMces OimC
her in accordance with the law.
ArPicle 8D
A person ROo is nominMPed or MppoinPed Ms M memNer of POe NMPionMl AssemNly
sOould OMve POe folloRing quMli�cMPions in MddiPion Po POose considered Ny
voters:
Should be a citizen of Afghanistan, or has obtained citizenship of the state
1.
of Afghanistan at least ten years before becoming a candidate or being
appointed.
Should not have been convicted by a court for committing a crime against
OumMniPy, M crime, or senPenced Po deprivMPion of OisCOer civil rigOPsB
Members of
Wolesi Jirga
sOould Ne MP leMsP PRenPy-�ve yeMrs old MP POe dMPe
of candidacy and members of the
Meshrano Jirga
should be at least thirty-
�ve yeMrs old MP POe dMPe of cMndidMcy or MppoinPmenPB
ArPicle 86
FredenPiMls of memNers of POe NMPionMl AssemNly Mre revieRed Ny POe
Independent Election Commission in accordance with the law.
ArPicle 87
Hn POe Neginning of POe legislMPive period, eMcO one of POe PRo Oouses elecPs one
of its members as the Chairperson for one legislative period, and two people
Ms POe �rsP Mnd second Vice FOMirperson, Mnd PRo people Ms POe SecrePMry Mnd
Assistant Secretary for a period of one year.
TOese individuMls consPiPuPe POe BureMu in POeir respecPive OousesB
TOe duPies of POe BureMu Mre dePermined in POe regulMPions perPMining Po POe
internal duties of each house.
ArPicle 88
EMcO Oouse of POe NMPionMl AssemNly sePs up commissions Po sPudy POe Popics
under discussion in accordance with its internal regulations.
ArPicle 8E
Wolesi Jirga
has the authority to set up a special commission if one-third
of its members put forward a proposal to inquire about and study government
TOe composiPion Mnd procedure of POis commission is speci�ed in POe inPernMl
Wolesi Jirga
113
ArPicle E0
TOe NMPionMl AssemNly OMs POe folloRing MuPOoriPies:
RMPi�cMPion, modi�cMPion, or MNrogMPion of lMRs Mnd or legislMPive decrees
1.
Approval of plans for economic, social, cultural, and technological
development
Approval of state budget, permission for obtaining and granting loans
FreMPion, modi�cMPion, Mnd or MNrogMPion of MdminisPrMPive uniPs
RMPi�cMPion of inPernMPionMl PreMPies Mnd MgreemenPs, or MNrogMPion of POe
membership of Afghanistan to them
ArPicle E1
Wolesi Jirga
has the following special authorities:
Geciding on inPerrogMPion of M MinisPers in MccordMnce RiPO POe provisions of
Article 92 of this Constitution.
TMking decisions MNouP POe SPMPe’s developmenP progrMms Mnd POe SPMPe
budget.
ApprovMl or rejecPion of POe MppoinPmenPs Mccording Po POe provisions of POis
ArPicle E2
Wolesi Jirga
, based on a proposal by twenty percent of its members, can
interrogate a Minister.
Hf POe responses given Mre noP sMPisfMcPory,
Wolesi Jirga
shall consider a vote of
TOe voPe of no con�dence on M MinisPer sOMll Ne expliciP, direcP, Mnd on POe
NMsis of Rell-founded reMsonsB TOis voPe sOould Ne Mpproved Ny M mMjoriPy of Mll
members of the
Wolesi Jirga
ArPicle E3
Any commission of NoPO Houses of POe NMPionMl AssemNly cMn quesPion eMcO of
POe MinisPers MNouP speci�c PopicsB
TOe person quesPioned cMn provide verNMl or RriPPen responseB
ArPicle E4
IMR is ROMP NoPO Houses of POe NMPionMl AssemNly Mpprove Mnd POe PresidenP
endorses unless this Constitution states otherwise.

Hn cMse POe PresidenP does noP Mgree Po ROMP POe NMPionMl AssemNly Mpproves,
Oe cMn send POe documenP NMck RiPO jusPi�MNle reMsons Po POe
Wolesi Jirga
RiPOin �fPeen dMys of iPs suNmissionB JiPO POe pMssMge of POis period or in cMse
Wolesi Jirga
Mpproves M pMrPiculMr cMse MgMin RiPO M mMjoriPy of PRo-POirds
votes, the bill is considered endorsed and enforced.
ArPicle ED
ProposMl for POe promulgMPion of M lMR cMn Ne iniPiMPed Ny POe governmenP, or
memNers of POe NMPionMl AssemNly, Mnd in POe domMin of regulMPing judiciMl
affairs through the Supreme Court by the government. Proposals for drafting
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
114
POe NudgeP Mnd �nMnciMl MffMirs lMRs sOMll Ne mMde only Ny POe GovernmenPB
ArPicle E6
Hf M proposMl for POe promulgMPion of lMR includes imposiPion of neR PMxes or
reduction in State incomes, it is included in the working agenda on condition
that an alternative source is also envisioned.
ArPicle E7
ProposMls for promulgMPion of lMR iniPiMPed Ny POe governmenP Mre suNmiPPed
�rsP Po POe
Wolesi Jirga
Wolesi Jirga
Mpproves or rejecPs Ms M ROole POe proposMl for promulgMPion
of lMR including NudgeP Mnd �nMnciMl MffMirs Mnd POe proposMl of PMking or giving
a loan after discussion.
Wolesi Jirga
cannot delay the proposal more than one month.
TOe proposed drMfP of lMR is suNmiPPed Po POe
Meshrano Jirga
, after its approval
by the
Wolesi Jirga
decides on POe drMfP RiPOin M period of �fPeen dMysB
TOe NMPionMl AssemNly sOMll give prioriPy Po POe promulgMPion of lMRs, PreMPies,
and development plans of the government that require urgent consideration
and decision as per the request of the government.
Hf M proposMl for promulgMPion of lMR is iniPiMPed Ny Pen memNers of one of POe
PRo Houses Mnd POen Mpproved Ny one �fPO memNers of POe respecPive Oouses,
it can be admitted to the agenda of the respective houses.
ArPicle E8
TOe sPMPe NudgeP Mnd developmenP plMn of POe governmenP is suNmiPPed POrougO
along with advisory comments to the
Wolesi Jirga
TOe decision of POe
Wolesi Jirga
, irrespective of the consent of the
is enforceable after it is signed by the President.
Hf for some reMson POe NudgeP is noP Mpproved Nefore POe Neginning of POe neR
�scMl yeMr, POe NudgeP of POe yeMr Nefore is Mpplied unPil POe MpprovMl of POe neR
budget.
TOe governmenP is oNligMPed Po give Po POe
Wolesi Jirga
the budget of the new
�scMl yeMr Mnd M Nrief MccounP of POe currenP yeMr’s NudgeP RiPOin POe fourPO
quMrPer of POe �scMl yeMrB
TOe de�niPe MccounP of POe previous �scMl yeMr sOMll Ne suNmiPPed Ny POe
government to the
Wolesi Jirga
within six months of the new year, in accordance
with the provisions of law.
Wolesi Jirga
cannot delay the approval of the budget for more than one
month or permission to give or take a loan for more than 15 days.
Hf during POis period POe
Wolesi Jirga
does not take any decision with regards to
taking or giving a loan, the proposal will be considered as approved.
ArPicle EE
Hf, during M session of POe NMPionMl AssemNly, POe MnnuMl NudgeP or M
developmental plan or an issue related to public security, territorial integrity, and
115
the country’s independence is under discussion, the session of the Assembly
cannot end before the approval of the matter.
ArPicle 100•
Hn cMse POe decision of one Oouse is rejecPed Ny MnoPOer Oouse, M comNined
committee composed of equal members of each house is formed to resolve the
TOe decision of POe commiPPee is enforced MfPer iPs MpprovMl Ny POe PresidenPB
Hn cMse POe comNined commiPPee cMnnoP solve POe disMgreemenP, POe defeMPed
resolution is considered void.

Hn POis cMse POe
Wolesi Jirga
can approve it at the next session of the
Wolesi
Ny M PRo-POirds mMjoriPy voPe of iPs Mll memNersB

TOis MpprovMl is Mssumed Ms enforceMNle, MfPer iP is signed Ny POe PresidenP,
without submission to the
ArPicle 101•
No memNer of POe NMPionMl AssemNly is legMlly prosecuPMNle for expressing Ois
COer vieRs ROile performing POeir duPyB
ArPicle 102•
JOen M memNer of POe NMPionMl AssemNly is Mccused of M crime, POe lMR
enforcement authority informs the house of which the accused is member
about the case, and the accused member can be prosecuted.
Hn cMse of Mn evidenP crime, POe lMR enforcemenP MuPOoriPy cMn legMlly pursue
and arrest the accused without the permission of the house of which the
accused is a member.
Hn NoPO cMses, ROen legMl prosecuPion requires dePenPion of POe Mccused, lMR
enforcement authorities are obligated to inform the respective house about the
case immediately.
Hf POe MccusMPion PMkes plMce ROen POe NMPionMl AssemNly is in recess, POe
permission of arrest is obtained from the administrative board of the respective
Oouse Mnd POe decision of POis NoMrd is presenPed Po POe �rsP session of POe
aforementioned house for a decision.
ArPicle 103•
TOe MinisPers cMn pMrPicipMPe in POe sessions of eMcO one of POe PRo Oouses of
the National Assembly.
EMcO Oouse of POe NMPionMl AssemNly cMn demMnd POe pMrPicipMPion of MinisPers
to take part in its session.
ArPicle 104•
BoPO Oouses of POe NMPionMl AssemNly Oold POeir sessions sepMrMPely MP POe

Under POe folloRing circumsPMnces, NoPO Oouses cMn Oold joinP sessions:
When the legislative session or the annual session is inaugurated by the
1.
When it is deemed necessary by the President.
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116
Hn POis cMse, POe OeMd of POe
Wolesi Jirga
cOMirs POe joinP session of POe NMPionMl
Assembly.
ArPicle 10D•
TOe sessions of POe NMPionMl AssemNly Mre open unless POe FOMirmMn of POe
assembly, or at least ten members of the National Assembly, request secrecy
and the assembly accepts this request.
No one sOMll enPer POe Nuilding of POe NMPionMl AssemNly Ny forceB
ArPicle 106•
TOe quorum of POe sessions of eMcO Oouse of POe NMPionMl AssemNly for voPing
is complePe RiPO POe presence of POe mMjoriPy of POe memNers, Mnd iPs decisions
Mre PMken RiPO POe mMjoriPy of POe memNers presenP, unless POis FonsPiPuPion
states otherwise.
ArPicle 107•
TOe NMPionMl AssemNly convenes PRo ordinMry sessions eMcO yeMrB
TOe Perm of POe NMPionMl AssemNly in eMcO yeMr is nine monPOsB JOen necessMry,
the Assembly can extend this period.
ExPrMordinMry sessions of POe AssemNly during recess cMn PMke plMce Ny POe
order of the President.
ArPicle 108•
Hn cMses of deMPO, resignMPion Mnd dismissMl of M memNer of POe NMPionMl
AssemNly, MndCor disMNiliPy or OMndicMp, ROicO prevenPs performMnce of duPies
permanently, election in the related constituency is held for a new representative
for the rest of the legislative period, in accordance with the law.
MMPPers involving POe presence or MNsence of memNers of POe NMPionMl AssemNly
are regulated according to internal rules.
ArPicle 10E•
ProposMls for MmendmenPs of POe elecPorMl lMR cMnnoP Ne included in POe
working agenda of the Assembly during the last year of the legislative period.
Chapter Six: Loya Jirga
ArPicle 110•
Loya Jirga
is the highest manifestation of the people of Afghanistan.
Loya Jirga
consists of the following:
Members of the National Assembly
1.
Chairpersons of the Provincial and District Councils
TOe MinisPers, FOief JusPice Mnd memNers of POe Supreme FourP Mnd POe
Attorney General can participate in the sessions of the
Loya Jirga
without the
right to vote.
ArPicle 111 •
Loya Jirga
shall be convened in the following situations:
To PMke decisions on issues relMPed Po independence, nMPionMl sovereignPy,
territorial integrity, and supreme interests of the country
117
To Mmend POe provisions of POis FonsPiPuPion
To prosecuPe POe PresidenP in MccordMnce RiPO POe provisions of ArPicle 6E of
ArPicle 112•
Loya Jirga
in iPs �rsP session elecPs from Mmong iPs memNers M FOMirperson,
a Deputy Chair, a Secretary and an Assistant Secretary.
ArPicle 113•
TOe quorum of POe
Loya Jirga
for voPing is complePed Ny POe mMjoriPy of
members.
TOe decisions of POe
Loya Jirga
Mre PMken Ny M mMjoriPy of POe presenP memNers
except in cases explicitly stated in this Constitution.
ArPicle 114•
Loya Jirga
are open except when one-fourth of its members
demand their secrecy, and the
Loya Jirga
ArPicle 11D•
Guring POe session of M
Loya Jirga
, the provision of Articles 101 and 102 of this
Constitution are applied on its members.
Chapter Seven: The Judiciary
ArPicle 116•
TOe judiciMl NrMncO is Mn independenP orgMn of POe sPMPe of POe HslMmic RepuNlic
TOe judiciMl NrMncO consisPs of POe Supreme FourP (
Stera Mahkama
), High
Courts, Appeal Courts, and Primary Courts, the structure and authorities of
ROicO Mre dePermined Ny lMRB TOe Supreme FourP sOMll Ne POe OigOesP judiciMl
orgMn, OeMding POe judiciMl poRer of POe HslMmic RepuNlic of AfgOMnisPMnB
ArPicle 117•
TOe Supreme FourP is composed of nine memNers ROo Mre MppoinPed Ny POe
PresidenP for M period of Pen yeMrs RiPO POe con�rmMPion of POe
Wolesi Jirga
with
oNservMnce of POe provisions of POe �nMl clMuse of ArPicle D0 Mnd ArPicle 118 of
this Constitution. In the beginning the appointment will be as such:
TOree memNers Mre MppoinPed for M period of four yeMrs, POree memNers for
seven years and three members for ten years.
IMPer MppoinPmenPs Rill Ne for M period of Pen yeMrsB
TOe MppoinPmenP of memNers for M second Perm is noP permissiNleB
TOe PresidenP MppoinPs one of iPs memNers Ms POe HeMd of POe Supreme
Court.
MemNers in no RMy cMn Ne dismissed from POeir service unPil POe end of POeir
term, except circumstances stated in Article 127 of this Constitution.
ArPicle 118•
A memNer of POe Supreme FourP sOould OMve POe folloRing quMli�cMPions:
The age of the Head of the Supreme Court and its members should not be
1.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
118
lower than forty at the time of appointment
SOould OMve OigOer educMPion in lMR or in HslMmic jurisprudence, Mnd enougO
experPise Mnd experience in POe judiciMl sysPem of AfgOMnisPMn
SOould enjoy OigO ePOics Mnd good repuPMPion
Should not have been convicted of crimes against humanity, crimes, or
sentenced to deprivation of civil rights by a court
SOould noP Ne M memNer of Mny poliPicMl pMrPy during POe Perm of of�ciMl duPyB
ArPicle 11E•
MemNers of POe Supreme FourP PMke POe folloRing oMPO in POe presence of POe
President before occupying the post:

Hn POe nMme AllMO, POe Merciful Mnd POe FompMssionMPe: H sReMr in POe nMme
of God AlmigOPy Po supporP jusPice Mnd rigOPeousness in MccordMnce RiPO POe
provisions of POe sMcred religion of HslMm Mnd POe provisions of POis FonsPiPuPion
Mnd oPOer lMRs of AfgOMnisPMn, Mnd Po execuPe POe duPy of Neing M judge RiPO
uPmosP OonesPy, rigOPeousness Mnd nonpMrPisMnsOipB
ArPicle 120•
TOe MuPOoriPy of POe judiciMl orgMn is Po MPPend Po Mll lMRsuiPs in ROicO reMl
individuals or incorporated bodies including the state stand before it as plaintiff
or defendant and in its presence is expressed in accordance with provisions of
the law.
ArPicle 121•
TOe Supreme FourP on POe requesP of POe GovernmenP or POe FourPs sOMll revieR
laws, legislative decrees, international treaties and international covenants
for their compliance with the Constitution and provide their interpretation in
accordance with the law.
ArPicle 122•
No lMR, under Mny circumsPMnce, cMn PrMnsfer M cMse from POe jurisdicPion of POe
judiciMl NrMncO Po MnoPOer orgMn Ms OMs Neen dePermined in POis FonsPiPuPionB
TOis provision does noP Mpply Po esPMNlisOing speciMl FourPs sPMPed in ArPicles 6E,
78 and 127 of this Constitution and military courts in matters relating to them.
TOe sPrucPure Mnd MuPOoriPy of POese courPs Mre regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle 123•
JiPO oNservMnce of POe provisions of POis FonsPiPuPion, POe rules relMPed Po POe
sPrucPure, MuPOoriPy, Mnd performMnce of POe courPs, Mnd POe duPies of judges
are regulated by law.
ArPicle 124 •
OPOer of�ciMls Mnd MdminisPrMPive personnel of POe judiciMl NrMncO Mre suNjecP
Po POe provisions of POe lMRs relMPed Po POe of�ciMls Mnd oPOer MdminisPrMPive
personnel of the state, but their appointment, dismissal, promotion, pension,
rewards and punishments are regulated by the Supreme Court in accordance
with the law.
119
ArPicle 12D •
TOe NudgeP of POe judiciMl NrMncO is prepMred Ny POe Supreme FourP in
consultation with the government and presented by the government to the
National Assembly as part of the state budget.
HmplemenPMPion of POe NudgeP of POe judiciMl NrMncO is POe MuPOoriPy of POe
Supreme Court.
ArPicle 126•
MemNers of POe Supreme FourP enjoy of�ciMl �nMnciMl Nene�Ps for POe resP of
their lives provided they do not occupy state or political positions.
ArPicle 127•
JOen more POMn one-POird of POe memNers of POe
Wolesi Jirga
demand the
trial of the Chief Justice, or a member of the Supreme Court due to a crime
committed during the performance of duty, and the
Wolesi Jirga
approves of
POis demMnd Ny M mMjoriPy of PRo-POirds voPes, POe Mccused is dismissed from
their post and the case is referred to a special court.
TOe sePPing up of POe courP Mnd POe procedures of PriMl Mre regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle 128 •
Hn POe courPs of AfgOMnisPMn, PriMls Mre open Mnd everyone is enPiPled Po MPPend
trials in accordance with the law.
TOe courP, in siPuMPions, ROicO Mre sPMPed in POe lMR or in siPuMPions in ROicO
the secrecy of the trial is deemed necessary, can conduct the trial behind
closed doors, but the announcement of the court decision should be open in
ArPicle 12E•
TOe courP is oNliged Po sPMPe POe reMsons for POe decisions iP issuesB
All �nMl decisions of POe courPs Mre enforceMNle, excepP for cMpiPMl punisOmenP,
which is conditional upon approval of the President.
ArPicle 130•
JOile processing cMses, POe courPs Mpply POe provisions of POis FonsPiPuPion Mnd
other laws.
JOen POere is no provision in POe FonsPiPuPion or oPOer lMRs regMrding ruling on
an issue, the courts’ decisions shall be within the limits of this Constitution in
Mccord RiPO POe HMnM� jurisprudence Mnd in M RMy Po serve jusPice in POe NesP
possible manner.
ArPicle 131•
TOe FourPs sOMll Mpply POe SOiM scOool of lMR in cMses deMling RiPO personMl mMPPers
involving the followers of the Shia Sect in accordance with the provisions of law.
Hn oPOer cMses, if no clMri�cMPion Ny POis consPiPuPion Mnd oPOer lMRs exisP, courPs
will resolve the matter according to laws of this Sect.
ArPicle 132•
Judges Mre MppoinPed RiPO POe recommendMPion of POe Supreme FourP Mnd
approval of the President.
TOe MppoinPmenP, PrMnsfer, promoPion, punisOmenP, Mnd proposMl Po rePire judges
are within the authority of the Supreme Court in accordance with the law.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
TOe Supreme FourP sOMll esPMNlisO POe GenerMl AdminisPrMPion Of�ce of JudiciMl
PoRer for POe purpose of NePPer MrrMngemenP of POe MdminisPrMPion Mnd judiciMl
affairs and insuring the required improvements.
ArPicle 133•
JOen M judge is Mccused of OMving commiPPed M crime, POe Supreme FourP sOMll
inquire MNouP POe cMse involving POe judge in MccordMnce RiPO POe lMRB
AfPer lisPening Po POe defence, ROen POe Supreme FourP regMrds POe MccusMPion
Po Ne vMlid, iP sOMll presenP M proposMl MNouP POe judge’s dismissMl Po POe
AfPer PresidenPiMl MpprovMl, POe Mccused judge sOMll Ne dismissed from duPy,
and punished in accordance with the provisions of the law.
ArPicle 134•
Giscovery of crimes is POe duPy of POe police Mnd invesPigMPion Mnd prosecuPion Mre
conducPed Ny POe Of�ce of POe APPorney GenerMl in MccordMnce RiPO POe provisions of
the law.
TOe Of�ce of POe APPorney GenerMl is pMrP POe ExecuPive NrMncO, Mnd is independenP
in its performance.
TOe sPrucPure, MuPOoriPy Mnd McPiviPies of POe Of�ce of POe APPorney GenerMl Mre
regulated by law.
Giscovery Mnd invesPigMPion of crimes relMPed Po POe Mrmed forces, police, Mnd
nMPionMl securiPy of�ciMls Mre regulMPed Ny M speciMl lMRB
ArPicle 13D•
Hf pMrPies involved in M cMse do noP knoR POe lMnguMge in ROicO POe PriMl is
conducted, they have the right to understand the material and documents
related to the case through an interpreter and the right to speak in their mother
language in the court.
Chapter Eight: The Administra�on
ArPicle 136•
TOe AdminisPrMPion of POe HslMmic RepuNlic of AfgOMnisPMn sOMll Ne NMsed on
central and local administrative units in accordance with the law.
TOe cenPrMl MdminisPrMPion is divided inPo M numNer of MdminisPrMPive uniPs,
each of which shall be headed by a Minister.
TOe locMl MdminisPrMPive uniP is M provinceB
TOe numNer, MreM, pMrPs, Mnd sPrucPures of POe provinces Mnd POe relMPed
administrations are regulated by law on the basis of population, social and
ArPicle 137•
TOe governmenP, ROile preserving POe principle of cenPrMlism, sOMll delegMPe
certain authorities to local administration units for the purpose of expediting
and promoting economic, social, and cultural affairs, and increasing the
participation of people in the development of the nation.
121
ArPicle 138•
Hn every province M ProvinciMl Founcil is Po Ne formedB
MemNers of POe ProvinciMl Founcil Mre elecPed in proporPion Po POe populMPion
by free, direct, secret and general elections by the residents of the province for
a period of four years in accordance with the law.
TOe ProvinciMl Founcil elecPs one of iPs memNers Ms FOMirmMnB
ArPicle 13E•
TOe ProvinciMl Founcil PMkes pMrP in securing POe developmenPMl PMrgePs of POe
state and improving its affairs in a way stated in the law, and gives advice on
important issues falling within the domain of the province.
ProvinciMl Founcils perform POeir duPies in cooperMPion RiPO POe provinciMl
ArPicle 140•
Hn order Po orgMnise McPiviPies involving people Mnd provide POem RiPO POe
opportunity to actively participate in the local administration, Councils are
established in districts and villages in accordance with the provisions of the law.
MemNers of POese councils Mre elecPed Ny POe locMl people POrougO, free,
general, secret and direct elections for a period of three years.
TOe pMrPicipMPion of nomMds in POese councils is regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle 141•
MunicipMliPies sOMll Ne seP up in order Po MdminisPer ciPy MffMirsB
TOe MMyor Mnd memNers of POe MunicipMl Founcils Mre elecPed Ny free, generMl,
secret, and direct elections.
TOe MffMirs relMPed Po municipMliPies Mre regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle 142•
For POe purpose of POe implemenPMPion of POe provisions, Mnd ensuring POe vMlues
of this Constitution, the State shall establish the required departments.
Chapter Nine: The State of Emergency
ArPicle 143•
Hf due Po RMr, POreMP of RMr, serious reNellion, nMPurMl disMsPers, or siPuMPions
similar to these, protecting the nation’s independence or survival becomes
impossible by following the provision of this Constitution, the President in
con�rmMPion RiPO POe NMPionMl AssemNly sOMll declMre M sPMPe of emergency in
some or all parts of the country.
Hf POe sPMPe of emergency conPinues for more POMn PRo monPOs, POe MgreemenP
of the National Assembly is required for its extension.
ArPicle 144•
Guring POe sPMPe of emergency, POe PresidenP, RiPO POe consulPMPions of OeMds of
the National Assembly and the Supreme Court, can transfer some authorities
of the National Assembly to the government.
ArPicle 14D•
Guring POe sPMPe of emergency, POe PresidenP, RiPO POe consenP of POe OeMds of
the National Assembly and the Supreme Court, can suspend the validity of the
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
following Articles or can place restrictions on them:
Clause two of Article 27
1.
Article 36
Clause two of Article 37
Clause two of Article 38.
ArPicle 146•
Guring POe sPMPe of emergency, POe FonsPiPuPion cMnnoP Ne MmendedB
ArPicle 147•
Hf POe PresidenPiMl Perm of of�ce Mnd or POe legislMPive period expire during M
state of emergency, the new elections shall be postponed, and the presidency,
and the legislative period shall be extended for up to four months.
Hf POe sPMPe of emergency conPinues for more POMn four monPOs, M
Loya Jirga
shall be called by the President for further decisions.
FolloRing POe PerminMPion of sPMPe of emergency, elecPions sOould Ne Oeld RiPOin
two months.
ArPicle 148•
AfPer POe end of POe sPMPe of emergency, POe meMsures MdopPed on POe NMsis
of Articles 144 and 145 of this Constitution shall be considered invalid
immediately.
Chapter Ten: Amendments
ArPicle 14E•
TOe provisions of MdOerence Po POe provisions of POe sMcred religion of HslMm
and the regime of an Islamic Republic cannot be amended.
TOe MmendmenP of POe fundMmenPMl rigOPs of POe people Mre permiPPed only in
order to make them more effective.
Fonsidering neR experiences Mnd requiremenPs of POe Pime, oPOer conPenPs of
this Constitution can be amended by the proposal of the President or by the
mMjoriPy of memNers of POe NMPionMl AssemNly in MccordMnce RiPO POe provisions
of Articles 67 and 146 of this Constitution.
ArPicle 1D0•
Hn order Po implemenP proposMls regMrding Mmending POe FonsPiPuPion, M
commission composed of members of the government, National Assembly, and
the Supreme Court, would be established by a Presidential decree, and the
commission shall prepare a draft of the amendments.

For MpprovMl of POe MmendmenPs, M
Loya Jirga
shall be convened by the decree of
the President in accordance with the provisions of the Chapter on the
Loya Jirga
JOen POe
Loya Jirga
Mpproves Mn MmendmenP Ny M mMjoriPy of PRo-POirds of iPs
members, it shall be enforced after endorsement by the President.
123
Chapter Eleven: The Miscellaneous Provisions
ArPicle 1D1•
TOe PresidenP, Vice PresidenPs, MinisPers, HeMd Mnd MemNers of POe Supreme
Court, Attorney General, Head of the Central Bank, National Security Directorate,
Governors Mnd MMyors cMnnoP engMge in Mny pro�PMNle Nusiness conPrMcPs RiPO
POe governmenP during POeir Perm of of�ceB
ArPicle 1D2•
TOe PresidenP, Vice PresidenPs, MinisPers, HeMds Mnd MemNers of POe NMPionMl
Assembly, Head and members of the Supreme Court, Attorney General and
judges, cMnnoP underPMke oPOer joNs during POeir Perms of of�ceB
ArPicle 1D3•
Judges, APPorneys, Mnd Of�cers of POe Armed Forces Mnd Police, Mnd memNers
of National Security, cannot be members of political parties during their terms
ArPicle 1D4•
TOe ReMlPO of POe PresidenP, Vice PresidenPs, MinisPers, memNers of POe
Supreme FourP Mnd POe APPorney GenerMl Nefore Mnd MfPer POeir Perm of of�ce
should be registered and monitored by an organ to be set by law.
ArPicle 1DD•
AppropriMPe sMlMries sOMll Ne pMid Po POe Vice PresidenPs, MinisPers, FOMirs Mnd
members of the National Assembly, the Supreme Court, Attorney General and
Judges in accordance with the provisions of law.
ArPicle 1D6•
TOe HndependenP ElecPorMl Fommission sOMll Ne seP up for POe orgMnisMPion Mnd
supervision of any election and for holding a referendum within the country
based on the provisions of the law.
ArPicle 1D7•
TOe HndependenP Fommission for POe Supervision of POe HmplemenPMPion of POe
Constitution will be established by the provisions of the law.
MemNers of POis Fommission sOMll Ne MppoinPed Ny POe PresidenP RiPO POe
Wolesi Jirga
Chapter Twelve: The Transi�onal Provisions
ArPicle 1D8•
TOe PiPle of POe FMPOer of POe NMPion Mnd POe privileges grMnPed Ny POe Emergency
IoyM JirgM of 1381 (2002) Po His MMjesPy MoOMmmMd ZMOir SOMO Former King
of Afghanistan are preserved for him during his lifetime, in accordance with the
provisions of this Constitution.
ArPicle 1DE•
TOe period, folloRing POe MdopPion of POis FonsPiPuPion, unPil POe dMPe of
inauguration of the National Assembly, is deemed as transitional period.
Guring POe PrMnsiPionMl period, POe TrMnsiPionMl HslMmic SPMPe of AfgOMnisPMn
shall carry out the following tasks:
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
124
Issue legislative decrees related to the elections of the President, National
1.
Issue decrees regarding the structure and authorities of the courts and
basic administration structures within a period of less than one year
TMke necessMry meMsures for reform of execuPive Mnd judiciMl MffMirs
Adopt necessary measures for preparing the ground for enforcement of the
provisions of this Constitution.
ArPicle 160•
TOe �rsP elecPed PresidenP sOMll PMke up OisCOer duPies MfPer POirPy dMys of POe
announcement of the elections in accordance with this Constitution.
Every efforP sOMll Ne mMde Po Oold POe �rsP presidenPiMl elecPions Mnd POe
parliamentary elections at the same time.
UnPil POe esPMNlisOmenP of POe NMPionMl AssemNly, POe poRers of POis MssemNly
outlined in this Constitution will be held by the government, and the interim
Supreme Court shall be established by Presidential Decree.
ArPicle 161•
TOe NMPionMl AssemNly Rill exercise iPs poRers immediMPely MfPer iPs
establishment in accordance with this Constitution.
TOe GovernmenP Mnd POe Supreme FourP sOMll Ne esPMNlisOed RiPOin POirPy dMys
of POe �rsP session of POe
Wolesi Jirga
TOe PresidenP of POe TrMnsiPionMl HslMmic SPMPe of AfgOMnisPMn sOMll conPinue Ois
duPies unPil POe elecPed PresidenP OMs PMken of�ceB
TOe execuPive Mnd judiciMl orgMns of POe sPMPe in MccordMnce RiPO provisions of
Clause 4 of Article 159 of this constitution shall continue their duties, until the
formation of the Government and the Supreme Court.
TOe decrees enforced from POe Neginning of POe inPerim period sOMll Ne
suNmiPPed Po POe �rsP session of POe NMPionMl AssemNlyB
TOese decrees Mre enforceMNle unPil POey Mre Mnnulled Ny POe NMPionMl
Assembly.
ArPicle 162•
TOis FonsPiPuPion is enforced upon iPs MpprovMl Ny POe
Loya Jirga
, and will be
signed and announced by the President of the Transitional Islamic State of
Upon POe enforcemenP of POis FonsPiPuPion, lMRs Mnd decrees conPrMry Po POe
provisions of it are invalid.
Documents: Afghanistan Compact
Afghanistan Compact (2006)
For more informMPion on POe AfgOMnisPMn FompMcP, see pMge 11B
Preamble
The Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and the international community:
GePermined Po sPrengPOen POeir pMrPnersOip Po improve POe lives of AfgOMn people, Mnd Po
conPriNuPe Po nMPionMl, regionMl Mnd gloNMl peMce Mnd securiPy;
Af�rming POeir sOMred commiPmenP Po conPinue, in POe spiriP of POe Bonn, Tokyo Mnd Berlin
conferences, to work toward a stable and prosperous Afghanistan, with good governance
and human rights protection for all under the rule of law, and to maintain and strengthen that
commiPmenP over POe Perm of POis FompMcP Mnd Neyond;
Recognising POe courMge Mnd dePerminMPion of AfgOMns ROo, Ny defying violenP exPremism
and hardship, have laid the foundations for a democratic, peaceful, pluralistic and prosperous
sPMPe NMsed on POe principles of HslMm;
NoPing POe full implemenPMPion of POe Bonn AgreemenP POrougO POe MdopPion of M neR
consPiPuPion in JMnuMry 2004, Mnd POe Oolding of presidenPiMl elecPions in OcPoNer 2004 Mnd
NMPionMl AssemNly Mnd ProvinciMl Founcil elecPions in SepPemNer 200D, ROicO OMve enMNled
AfgOMnisPMn Po regMin iPs rigOPful plMce in POe inPernMPionMl communiPy;
Mindful POMP AfgOMnisPMn’s PrMnsiPion Po peMce Mnd sPMNiliPy is noP yeP Mssured, Mnd POMP sProng
inPernMPionMl engMgemenP Rill conPinue Po Ne required Po Mddress remMining cOMllenges;
Resolved Po overcome POe legMcy of con�icP in AfgOMnisPMn Ny sePPing condiPions for susPMinMNle
economic groRPO Mnd developmenP; sPrengPOening sPMPe insPiPuPions Mnd civil sociePy; removing
remMining PerrorisP POreMPs; meePing POe cOMllenge of counPer nMrcoPics; reNuilding cMpMciPy
Mnd infrMsPrucPure; reducing poverPy; Mnd meePing NMsic OumMn needs;
Have agreed to this Afghanistan Compact.
The Afghan Government has articulated its overarching goals for the well-being of its people in the
“AfgOMnisPMn Millennium GevelopmenP GoMls FounPry ReporP 200D — Vision 2020”B FonsisPenP
RiPO POose goMls, POis FompMcP idenPi�es POree criPicMl Mnd inPerdependenP MreMs or pillMrs of
McPiviPy for POe �ve yeMrs from POe MdopPion of POis FompMcP:
Security;
Governance, Rule of Law and Human Rights; and
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Economic and Social Development.
A further vital and cross-cutting area of work is eliminating the narcotics industry, which remains
a formidable threat to the people and state of Afghanistan, the region and beyond.
The Afghan Government hereby commits itself to realising this shared vision of the future; the
international community, in turn, commits itself to provide resources and support to realise
that vision. Annex I of this Compact sets out detailed outcomes, benchmarks and timelines for
delivery, consistent with the high-level goals set by the Afghanistan National Development Strategy
(ANDS). The Government and international community also commit themselves to improve the
effectiveness and accountability of international assistance as set forth in Annex II.
Principles of Coopera�on
As the Afghan Government and the international community embark on the implementation of
this Compact, they will:
Respect the pluralistic culture, values and history of Afghanistan, based on Islam;
Work on the basis of partnership between the Afghan Government, with its sovereign
responsibilities, and the international community, with a central and impartial coordinating
role for the United Nations;
Engage further the deep-seated traditions of participation and aspiration to ownership of the
Pursue �scMl, insPiPuPionMl Mnd environmenPMl susPMinMNiliPy;
Build lasting Afghan capacity and effective state and civil society institutions, with particular
emphasis on building up human capacities of men and women alike;
Ensure balanced and fair allocation of domestic and international resources in order to offer
all parts of the country tangible prospects of well-being;
Recognise in all policies and programmes that men and women have equal rights and
Promote regional cooperation; and
Combat corruption and ensure public transparency and accountability.
Genuine security remains a fundamental prerequisite for achieving stability and development in
Afghanistan. Security cannot be provided by military means alone. It requires good governance,
jusPice Mnd POe rule of lMR, reinforced Ny reconsPrucPion Mnd developmenPB JiPO POe supporP of POe
international community, the Afghan Government will consolidate peace by disbanding all illegal
armed groups. The Afghan Government and the international community will create a secure
environment by strengthening Afghan institutions to meet the security needs of the country in a
�scMlly susPMinMNle mMnnerB
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127
To POMP end, POe NATO-led HnPernMPionMl SecuriPy AssisPMnce Force (HSAF), POe US-led OperMPion
Enduring Freedom (OEF) Mnd pMrPner nMPions involved in securiPy secPor reform Rill conPinue Po
provide strong support to the Afghan Government in establishing and sustaining security and
sPMNiliPy in AfgOMnisPMn, suNjecP Po pMrPicipMPing sPMPes’ nMPionMl MpprovMl proceduresB TOey Rill
continue to strengthen and develop the capacity of the national security forces to ensure that
POey Necome fully funcPionMlB All OEF counPer-Perrorism operMPions Rill Ne conducPed in close
coordinMPion RiPO POe AfgOMn GovernmenP Mnd HSAFB HSAF Rill conPinue Po expMnd iPs presence
throughout Afghanistan, including through Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs), and will
continue to promote stability and support security sector reforms in its areas of operation.
Full respecP for AfgOMnisPMn’s sovereignPy Mnd sPrengPOening diMlogue Mnd cooperMPion NePReen
Afghanistan and its neighbours constitute an essential guarantee of stability in Afghanistan and the
regionB TOe inPernMPionMl communiPy Rill supporP concrePe con�dence-Nuilding meMsures Po POis endB
Governance, Rule of Law and Human Rights
Democratic governance and the protection of human rights constitute the cornerstone of
sustainable political progress in Afghanistan. The Afghan Government will rapidly expand
its capacity to provide basic services to the population throughout the country. It will recruit
competent and credible professionals to public service on the basis of merit; establish a more
effective, accountable and transparent administration at all levels of Government; and implement
meMsurMNle improvemenPs in �gOPing corrupPion, upOolding jusPice Mnd POe rule of lMR Mnd
promoting respect for the human rights of all Afghans.
The Afghan Government will give priority to the coordinated establishment in each province
of funcPionMl insPiPuPions—including civil MdminisPrMPion, police, prisons Mnd judiciMryB TOese
institutions will have appropriate legal frameworks and appointment procedures; trained staff;
and adequate remuneration, infrastructure and auditing capacity. The Government will establish
M �scMlly Mnd insPiPuPionMlly susPMinMNle MdminisPrMPion for fuPure elecPions under POe supervision
Reforming POe jusPice sysPem Rill Ne M prioriPy for POe AfgOMn GovernmenP Mnd POe inPernMPionMl
communiPyB TOe Mim Rill Ne Po ensure equMl, fMir Mnd PrMnspMrenP Mccess Po jusPice for Mll NMsed
upon written codes with fair trials and enforceable verdicts. Measures will include: completing
legislMPive reforms for POe puNlic Ms Rell Ms POe privMPe secPor; Nuilding POe cMpMciPy of judiciMl
institutions and personnel; promoting human rights and legal awareness; and rehabilitating
TOe AfgOMn GovernmenP Mnd POe inPernMPionMl communiPy reMf�rm POeir commiPmenP Po POe
protection and promotion of rights provided for in the Afghan constitution and under applicable
international law, including the international human rights covenants and other instruments
to which Afghanistan is party. With a view to rebuilding trust among those whose lives were
shattered by war, reinforcing a shared sense of citizenship and a culture of tolerance, pluralism
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
and observance of the rule of law, the Afghan Government with the support of the international
community will implement the Action Plan on Peace, Justice and Reconciliation.
Economic and Social Development
The Afghan Government with the support of the international community will pursue high rates of
sustainable economic growth with the aim of reducing hunger, poverty and unemployment. It will
promoPe POe role Mnd poPenPiMl of POe privMPe secPor, Mlongside POose of POe puNlic Mnd non-pro�P
sectors; curb the narcotics industry; ensure macroeconomic stability; restore and promote the
development of the country’s human, social and physical capital, thereby establishing a sound
basis for a new generation of leaders and professionals; strengthen civil society; and complete the
reintegration of returnees, internally displaced persons and ex-combatants.
Public investments will be structured around the six sectors of the pillar on economic and social
development of the Afghanistan National Development Strategy:
Infrastructure and natural resources;
Agriculture and rural development;
Social protection; and
Economic governance and private sector development.
Hn eMcO of POese MreMs, POe oNjecPive Rill Ne Po McOieve meMsurMNle resulPs PoRMrds POe goMl of
equitable economic growth that reduces poverty, expands employment and enterprise creation,
enhances opportunities in the region and improves the well-being of all Afghans.
Counter-Narco�cs: A Cross-Cu�ng Priority
Meeting the threat that the narcotics industry poses to national, regional and international
security as well as the development and governance of the country and the well-being of Afghans
will be a priority for the Government and the international community. The aim will be to achieve
M susPMined Mnd signi�cMnP reducPion in POe producPion Mnd PrMf�cking of nMrcoPics RiPO M vieR
to complete elimination. Essential elements include improved interdiction, law enforcement and
judiciMl cMpMciPy Nuilding; enOMnced cooperMPion Mmong AfgOMnisPMn, neigONouring counPries
and the international community on disrupting the drugs trade; wider provision of economic
alternatives for farmers and labourers in the context of comprehensive rural development; and
building national and provincial counter-narcotics institutions. It will also be crucial to enforce a
zero-PolerMnce policy PoRMrds of�ciMl corrupPion; Po pursue erMdicMPion Ms MppropriMPe; Po reinforce
Documents: Afghanistan Compact
the message that producing or trading opiates is both immoral and a violation of Islamic law; and
to reduce the demand for the illicit use of opiates.
Coordina�on and Monitoring
The Afghan Government and the international community are establishing a Joint Coordination
and Monitoring Board for the implementation of the political commitments that comprise this
Compact. As detailed in Annex III, this Board will be co-chaired by the Afghan Government and the
United Nations and will be supported by a small secretariat. It will ensure greater coherence of
efforts by the Afghan Government and international community to implement the Compact and
provide regular and timely public reports on its execution.
ANNEX I: Benchmarks and Timelines
The Afghan Government, with the support of the international community, is committed to
McOieving POe folloRing NencOmMrks in MccordMnce RiPO POe Pimelines speci�edB
HnPernMPionMl SecuriPy Forces
Through end-2010, with the support of and in close coordination with the Afghan Government, the
NATO-led HnPernMPionMl SecuriPy AssisPMnce Force (HSAF), OperMPion Enduring Freedom (OEF) Mnd
their respective Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs) will promote security and stability in all
regions of Afghanistan, including by strengthening Afghan capabilities.
AfgOMn NMPionMl Army
By end-2010: A nationally respected, professional, ethnically balanced Afghan National Army
will be fully established that is democratically accountable, organized, trained and equipped
to meet the security needs of the country and increasingly funded from Government revenue,
commensurate with the nation’s economic capacity; the international community will continue to
support Afghanistan in expanding the ANA towards the ceiling of 70,000 personnel articulated in
POe Bonn PMlks; Mnd POe pMce of expMnsion is Po Ne MdjusPed on POe NMsis of periodic joinP quMliPy
assessments by the Afghan Government and the international community against agreed criteria
which take into account prevailing conditions.
AfgOMn NMPionMl Mnd Border Police
By end-2010, a fully constituted, professional, functional and ethnically balanced Afghan National
Police and Afghan Border Police with a combined force of up to 62,000 will be able to meet the
securiPy needs of POe counPry effecPively Mnd Rill Ne increMsingly �scMlly susPMinMNleB
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130
GisNMndmenP of HllegMl Armed Groups
All illegal armed groups will be disbanded by end-2007 in all provinces.
FounPer-NMrcoPics
By end-2010, the Government will strengthen its law enforcement capacity at both central and
provincial levels, resulting in a substantial annual increase in the amount of drugs seized or
destroyed and processing facilities dismantled, and in effective measures, including targeted
eradication as appropriate, that contribute to the elimination of poppy cultivation.
By end-2010, the Government and neighbouring and regional governments will work together
to increase coordination and mutual sharing of intelligence, with the goal of an increase in the
seizure and destruction of drugs being smuggled across Afghanistan’s borders and effective
McPion MgMinsP drug PrMf�ckersB
Mine Action and Ammunition
By end-2010, in line with Afghanistan’s Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and Afghanistan’s
Ottawa Convention obligations, the land area contaminated by mines and unexploded ordnance
will be reduced by 70%; all stockpiled anti-personnel mines will be located and destroyed by end-
2007; and by end-2010, all unsafe, unserviceable and surplus ammunition will be destroyed.
Governance, Human Rights and Rule of Law
Public Administrative Reform
By end-2010: Government machinery (including the number of ministries) will be restructured and
rMPionMlised Po ensure M �scMlly susPMinMNle puNlic MdminisPrMPion; POe civil service commission
Rill Ne sPrengPOened; Mnd civil service funcPions Rill Ne reformed Po re�ecP core funcPions Mnd
A clear and transparent national appointments mechanism will be established within 6 months,
applied within 12 months and fully implemented within 24 months for all senior level appointments
Po POe cenPrMl governmenP Mnd POe judiciMry, Ms Rell Ms for provinciMl governors, cOiefs of police,
district administrators and provincial heads of security.
By end-2006 a review of the number of administrative units and their boundaries will be undertaken
RiPO POe Mim of conPriNuPing Po �scMl susPMinMNiliPyB
By end-2010, in furtherance of the work of the civil service commission, merit-based appointments,
vetting procedures and performance-based reviews will be undertaken for civil service positions
MP Mll levels of governmenP, including cenPrMl governmenP, POe judiciMry Mnd police, Mnd requisiPe
support will be provided to build the capacity of the civil service to function effectively. Annual performance-
based reviews will be undertaken for all senior staff (grade 2 and above) starting by end-2007.
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131
Anti-Corruption
TOe UN FonvenPion MgMinsP ForrupPion Rill Ne rMPi�ed Ny end-2006, nMPionMl legislMPion MdMpPed Mccordingly
by end-2007 and a monitoring mechanism to oversee implementation will be in place by end-2008.
The Census and Statistics
The census enumeration will be completed by end-2008 and the complete results published.
Reliable statistical baselines will be established for all quantitative benchmarks by mid-2007 and
statistical capacity built to track progress against them.
NMPionMl AssemNly
The National Assembly will be provided with technical and administrative support by mid-2006 to
ful�l effecPively iPs consPiPuPionMlly mMndMPed rolesB
The Afghanistan Independent Election Commission will have the high integrity, capacity and
resources Po underPMke elecPions in Mn increMsingly �scMlly susPMinMNle mMnner Ny end-2008, RiPO
the Government of Afghanistan contributing to the extent possible to the cost of future elections
from its own resources. A permanent civil and voter registry with a single national identity document
will be established by end-2009.
By end-2010: the National Action Plan for Women in Afghanistan will be fully implemented; and, in
line with Afghanistan’s MDGs, female participation in all Afghan governance institutions, including
elected and appointed bodies and the civil service, will be strengthened.
Rule of Law
By end-2010, the legal framework required under the constitution, including civil, criminal and
commerciMl lMR, Rill Ne puP in plMce, disPriNuPed Po Mll judiciMl Mnd legislMPive insPiPuPions Mnd mMde
available to the public.
By end-2010, funcPioning insPiPuPions of jusPice Rill Ne fully operMPionMl in eMcO province of AfgOMnisPMn,
and the average time to resolve contract disputes will be reduced as much as possible.
A review and reform of oversight procedures relating to corruption, lack of due process and
miscMrriMge of jusPice Rill Ne iniPiMPed Ny end-2006 Mnd fully implemenPed Ny end-2010; Ny end-
2010, reforms will strengthen the professionalism, credibility and integrity of key institutions of
POe jusPice sysPem (POe MinisPry of JusPice, POe JudiciMry, POe APPorney GenerMl’s of�ce, POe MinisPry
of Interior and the National Directorate of Security).
By end-2010, jusPice infrMsPrucPure Rill Ne reOMNiliPMPed; Mnd prisons Rill OMve sepMrMPe fMciliPies
for Romen Mnd juvenilesB
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132
Land Registration
A process for registration of land in all administrative units and the registration of titles will be
sPMrPed for Mll mMjor urNMn MreMs Ny end-2006 Mnd Mll oPOer MreMs Ny end-2008B A fMir sysPem for
settlement of land disputes will be in place by end-2007. Registration for rural land will be under
way by end-2007.
FounPer NMrcoPics
By end-2010, POe GovernmenP Rill increMse POe numNer of MrresPs Mnd prosecuPions of PrMf�ckers
Mnd corrupP of�ciMls Mnd Rill improve iPs informMPion NMse concerning POose involved in POe
drugs trade, with a view to enhancing the selection system for national and sub-national public
appointments, as part of the appointments mechanism mentioned earlier in this annex.
By end-2010: The Government’s capacity to comply with and report on its human rights treaty
obligations will be strengthened; Government security and law enforcement agencies will adopt
corrective measures including codes of conduct and procedures aimed at preventing arbitrary
arrest and detention, torture, extortion and illegal expropriation of property with a view to the
elimination of these practices; the exercise of freedom of expression, including freedom of media,
will be strengthened; human rights awareness will be included in education curricula and promoted
Mmong legislMPors, judiciMl personnel Mnd oPOer GovernmenP Mgencies, communiPies Mnd POe
public; human rights monitoring will be carried out by the Government and independently by the
Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHRC), and the UN will track the effectiveness of
meMsures Mimed MP POe proPecPion of OumMn rigOPs; POe AHHRF Rill Ne supporPed in POe ful�lmenP of
iPs oNjecPives RiPO regMrd Po moniPoring, invesPigMPion, proPecPion Mnd promoPion of OumMn rigOPsB
The implementation of the Action Plan on Peace, Justice and Reconciliation will be completed by
Economic and Social Development
Infrastructure and Natural Resources
Roads
Afghanistan will have a fully upgraded and maintained ring road, as well as roads connecting
POe ring roMd Po neigONouring counPries Ny end-2008 Mnd M �scMlly susPMinMNle sysPem for roMd
maintenance by end-2007.
Air Transport
By end-2010: Kabul International Airport and Herat Airport will achieve full International Civil
Aviation Organisation compliance; Mazar-i-Sharif, Jalalabad and Kandahar will be upgraded
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133
RiPO runRMy repMirs, Mir nMvigMPion, �re Mnd rescue Mnd communicMPions equipmenP; seven oPOer
domestic airports will be upgraded to facilitate domestic air transportation; and air transport
services and costs will be increasingly competitive with international market standards and rates.
By end-2010: electricity will reach at least 65% of households and 90% of non-residential
esPMNlisOmenPs in mMjor urNMn MreMs Mnd MP leMsP 2D% of OouseOolds in rurMl MreMs; MP leMsP 7D%
of the costs will be recovered from users connected to the national power grid. A strategy for the
development and the use of renewable energies will be developed by end-2007.
Mining Mnd NMPurMl Resources
An enMNling regulMPory environmenP for pro�PMNle exPrMcPion of AfgOMnisPMn’s minerMl Mnd nMPurMl
resources will be created by end-2006, and by end-2010 the investment environment and infrastructure
will be enhanced in order to attract domestic and foreign direct investment in this area.
Water Resource Management
Sustainable water resource management strategies and plans covering irrigation and drinking
water supply will be developed by end-2006, and irrigation investments will result in at least 30%
of water coming from large waterworks by end-2010.
UrNMn GevelopmenP
By end-2010: Municipal governments will have strengthened capacity to manage urban
developmenP Mnd Po ensure POMP municipMl services Mre delivered effecPively, ef�cienPly Mnd
transparently; in line with Afghanistan’s MDGs, investment in water supply and sanitation will
ensure POMP D0% of OouseOolds in KMNul Mnd 30% of OouseOolds in oPOer mMjor urNMn MreMs Rill
have access to piped water.
Environment
In line with Afghanistan’s MDGs, environmental regulatory frameworks and management services
will be established for the protection of air and water quality, waste management and pollution
control, and natural resource policies will be developed and implementation started at all levels
of government as well as the community level, by end-2007.
Primary and Secondary Education
By end-2010: in line with Afghanistan’s MDGs, net enrolment in primary school for girls and boys
will be at least 60% and 75% respectively; a new curriculum will be operational in all secondary
schools; female teachers will be increased by 50%; 70% of Afghanistan’s teachers will have
passed a competency test; and a system for assessing learning achievement such as a national
testing system for students will be in place.
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134
By end 2010: enrolment of students to universities will be 100,000 with at least 35% female
students; and the curriculum in Afghanistan’s public universities will be revised to meet the
development needs of the country and private sector growth.
Skills GevelopmenP
A human resource study will be completed by end-2006, and 150,000 men and women will be
trained in marketable skills through public and private means by end-2010.
A comprehensive inventory of Afghan cultural treasures will be compiled by end-2007. Measures
will be taken to revive the Afghan cultural heritage, to stop the illegal removal of cultural material
and to restore damaged monuments and artefacts by end-2010.
HeMlPO Mnd NuPriPion
By end-2010, in line with Afghanistan’s MDGs, the Basic Package of Health Services will be
extended to cover at least 90% of the population; maternal mortality will be reduced by 15%; and
full immunisation coverage for infants under 5 for vaccine-preventable diseases will be achieved
and their mortality rates reduced by 20%.
Agriculture and Rural Development
Agriculture and Livestock
By end-2010: The necessary institutional, regulatory and incentive framework to increase
production and productivity will be established to create an enabling environment for legal
agriculture and agriculture-based rural industries, and public investment in agriculture will
increase by 30 percent; particular consideration will be given to perennial horticulture, animal
OeMlPO Mnd food securiPy Ny insPiPuPing speciMlised supporP Mgencies Mnd �nMnciMl service delivery
mechanisms, supporting farmers’ associations, branding national products, disseminating timely
price and weather-related information and statistics, providing strategic research and technical
assistance and securing access to irrigation and water management systems.
FompreOensive RurMl GevelopmenP
By end-2010: RurMl developmenP Rill Ne enOMnced compreOensively for POe Nene�P of 1E million
people in over 38,000 villages; this will be achieved through the election of at least a further
14,000 voluntary community development councils in all remaining villages, promoting local
governance and community empowerment; access to safe drinking water will be extended to 90%
of villages and sanitation to 50%; road connectivity will reach 40% of all villages, increasing access
Po mMrkePs, employmenP Mnd sociMl services; 47% of villMges Rill Nene�P from smMll-scMle irrigMPion;
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135
800,000 OouseOolds (22% of Mll AfgOMnisPMn’s OouseOolds) Rill Nene�P from improved Mccess Po
�nMnciMl services; Mnd liveliOoods of MP leMsP 1D% of POe rurMl populMPion Rill Ne supporPed POrougO
the provision of 91 million labour days.
FounPer-NMrcoPics
By end-2010, the Government will design and implement programmes to achieve a sustained
annual reduction in the amount of land under poppy and other drug cultivation by the strengthening
Mnd diversi�cMPion of liciP liveliOoods Mnd oPOer counPer nMrcoPics meMsures, Ms pMrP of POe
overall goal of a decrease in the absolute and relative size of the drug economy in line with the
Government’s MDG target.
Social Protection
Poverty Reduction
By end-2010, in line RiPO AfgOMnisPMn’s MGGs, POe proporPion of people living on less POMn US$1
a day will decrease by 3% per year and the proportion of people who suffer from hunger will
decrease by 5% per year.
HumMniPMriMn Mnd GisMsPer Response
By end-2010, an effective system of disaster preparedness and response will be in place.
By end-2010, increased assistance will be provided to meet the special needs of all disabled
people, including their integration in society through opportunities for education and gainful
employment.
EmploymenP of YouPO Mnd GemoNilised Soldiers
By end-2010, employment opportunities for youth and demobilised soldiers will be increased
through special programmes.
Refugees Mnd HGPs
By end-2010, all refugees opting to return and internally displaced persons will be provided
assistance for rehabilitation and integration in their local communities; their integration will be
supported by national development programmes, particularly in key areas of return.
Vulnerable Women
By end-2010, the number of female-headed households that are chronically poor will be reduced
by 20%, and their employment rates will be increased by 20%.
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136
FounPer NMrcoPics
By end-2010, the Government will implement programmes to reduce the demand for narcotics
and provide improved treatment for drug users.
Economic Governance and Private Sector Development
By end-2007, POe GovernmenP Rill ensure improved PrMnspMrenP �nMnciMl mMnMgemenP MP
POe cenPrMl Mnd provinciMl levels POrougO esPMNlisOing Mnd meePing NencOmMrks for �nMnciMl
management agreed with and monitored by the international community, including those in the
MnPicipMPed PoverPy ReducPion GroRPO FMciliPy (PRGF)B Hn Purn, Mnd in line RiPO improved governmenP
accountability, donors will make more effort to increase the share of total external assistance to
Afghanistan that goes to the core budget.
GomesPic Revenues
Afghanistan’s total domestic budgetary revenue — equivalent to 4.5% of estimated legal GDP in
1383 (2004C0D) — Rill sPeMdily increMse Mnd reMcO 8% of GGP Ny 138E (2010C11)B TOe rMPio of
revenue to estimated total recurrent expenditures, including estimated recurrent expenditures in
POe core Mnd exPernMl developmenP NudgePs, is projecPed Po rise from 28% in 1383 (2004C0D) Po
an estimated 58% in 1389, resulting in a continuing need, in accord with the principles in Annex II,
for (1) external assistance to the core budget and (2) increasing cost-effectiveness of assistance
that funds recurrent expenditure though the external development budget.
PrivMPe SecPor GevelopmenP Mnd TrMde
All legislMPion, regulMPions Mnd procedures relMPed Po invesPmenP Rill Ne simpli�ed Mnd OMrmonised
by end-2006 and implemented by end-2007. New business organisation laws will be tabled in
the National Assembly by end-2006. The Government’s strategy for divestment of state-owned
enterprises will be implemented by end-2009.
Financial Services and Markets
Internationally accepted prudential regulations will be developed for all core sectors of banking and
non-NMnk �nMnciMl insPiPuPions Ny end-2007B TOe NMnking supervision funcPion of GM AfgOMnisPMn
Bank will be further strengthened by end-2007. Re-structuring of state-owned commercial banks
will be complete by end-2007. State-owned banks that have not been re-licensed will be liquidated
by end-2006.
Regional Cooperation
By end-2010: Afghanistan and its neighbours will achieve lower transit times through Afghanistan
by means of cooperative border management and other multilateral or bilateral trade and transit
agreements; Afghanistan will increase the amount of electricity available through bilateral power
purchase; and Afghanistan, its neighbours and countries in the region will reach agreements to
Documents: Afghanistan Compact
137
enable Afghanistan to import skilled labour, and to enable Afghans to seek work in the region and
ANNEX II: Improving the E�ec�veness of Aid to Afghanistan
TOe inPernMPionMl communiPy OMs mMde M signi�cMnP invesPmenP in POe fuPure of M democrMPic
sPMPe of AfgOMnisPMn since GecemNer 2001B TOis FompMcP is Mn Mf�rmMPion of POMP commiPmenPB
The Afghan Government and the international community are further committed to improving the
effectiveness of the aid being provided to Afghanistan in accordance with the Paris Declaration
on Aid Effectiveness (2005), recognising the special needs of Afghanistan and their implications
for donor support.
Consistent with the Paris Declaration and the principles of cooperation of this Compact, the
Government and the international community providing assistance to Afghanistan agree that the
principles for improving the effectiveness of aid to Afghanistan under this Compact are:
Leadership of the Afghan Government in setting its development priorities and strategies and,
within them, the support needs of the country and the coordination of donor assistance;
Transparency and accountability on the part of both the Government and the donors of the
international assistance being provided to Afghanistan.
Under these principles and towards the goal of improving the effectiveness of aid to Afghanistan,
the Government will:
Provide a prioritised and detailed Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS) with
indicators for monitoring results, including those for Afghanistan’s Millennium Development
Improve its abilities to generate domestic revenues through, inter alia, customs duties and
taxes; and to achieve cost recovery from public utilities and transportation;
Agree RiPO donors, inPernMPionMl �nMnciMl insPiPuPions Mnd UniPed NMPions Mgencies on POe
benchmarks for aid channelled through the Government’s core budget and for the utilisation
of such aid; and monitor performance against those benchmarks; and
Provide regular reporting on the use of donor assistance and performance against the
benchmarks of this compact to the National Assembly, the donor community through the
AfgOMnisPMn GevelopmenP Forum Mnd POe puNlic MP lMrgeB
The donors will:
Provide assistance within the framework of the Afghanistan National Development Strategy;
progrMmmes Mnd projecPs Rill Ne coordinMPed RiPO GovernmenP in order Po focus on prioriPies,
eliminate duplication and rationalise donor activities to maximise cost-effectiveness;
Increasingly provide more predictable and multiyear funding commitments or indications of
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138
multiyear support to Afghanistan to enable the Government to plan better the implementation
of its National Development Strategy and provide untied aid whenever possible;
Increase the proportion of donor assistance channelled directly through the core budget, as
agreed bilaterally between the Government and each donor, as well as through other more
predictable core budget funding modalities in which the Afghan Government participates,
sucO Ms POe AfgOMnisPMn ReconsPrucPion TrusP Fund (ARTF), POe IMR Mnd Order TrusP Fund for
AfgOMnisPMn (IOTFA) Mnd POe FounPer NMrcoPics TrusP Fund (FNTF);
Provide assistance for the development of public expenditure management systems that are
essential for improving transparency and accountability in the utilisation of donor resources
and countering corruption;
Recognise that, because of the need to build Afghan capacity, donor assistance provided
through the external budget will be designed in such a manner as to build this capacity in the
GovernmenP Ms Rell Ms POe privMPe secPor Mnd non-pro�P secPor;
Ensure that development policies, including salary policies, strengthen national institutions that
are sustainable in the medium to long term for delivery of programmes by the Government;
For Mid noP cOMnnelled POrougO POe core NudgeP, endeMvour Po:
Harmonise the delivery of technical assistance in line with Government needs to focus
Reduce POe exPernMl mMnMgemenP Mnd overOeMd cosPs of projecPs Ny promoPing POe
Afghan private sector in their management and delivery;
HncreMsingly use AfgOMn nMPionMl implemenPMPion pMrPners Mnd equMlly quMli�ed locMl
and expatriate Afghans;
Increase procurement within Afghanistan of supplies for civilian and military activities;
Use AfgOMn mMPeriMls in POe implemenPMPion of projecPs, in pMrPiculMr for infrMsPrucPure;
Within the principles of international competitive bidding, promote the participation in the
bidding process of the Afghan private sector and South-South cooperation in order to overcome
capacity constraints and to lower costs of delivery;
Provide Pimely, PrMnspMrenP Mnd compreOensive informMPion on foreign Mid �oRs, including
levels of pledges, commitments and disbursements in a format that will enable the Afghan
Government to plan its own activities and present comprehensive budget reports to the National
Assembly; this covers the nature and amount of assistance being provided to Afghanistan
through the core and external budgets; and
For exPernMl NudgeP MssisPMnce, Mlso reporP Po POe GovernmenP on: POe uPilisMPion of funds; iPs
ef�ciency, quMliPy Mnd effecPiveness; Mnd POe resulPs McOievedB
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139
These mutual commitments are intended to ensure that the donor assistance being provided
Po AfgOMnisPMn is used ef�cienPly Mnd effecPively, POMP POere is increMsed PrMnspMrency Mnd
accountability, and that both Afghans and the taxpayers in donor countries are receiving value
for money.
ANNEX III: Coordina�on and Monitoring
The Afghan Government and the international community recognise that the success of the
AfgOMnisPMn FompMcP requires sProng poliPicMl, securiPy Mnd �nMnciMl commiPmenP Po McOieve
the benchmarks within the agreed timelines. Equally, the success of the Compact relies on an
effective coordination and monitoring mechanism.
To this end, and in addition to existing sectoral coordination mechanisms, the Afghan Government
and the international community are establishing a Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board
RiPO POe pMrPicipMPion of senior AfgOMn GovernmenP of�ciMls MppoinPed Ny POe PresidenP Mnd
representatives of the international community. The Board will be co-chaired by a senior Afghan
GovernmenP of�ciMl MppoinPed Ny POe PresidenP Mnd Ny POe SpeciMl RepresenPMPive of POe UN
Secretary-General for Afghanistan. Its purpose would be to ensure overall strategic coordination
of the implementation of the Compact.
The Board will have a small secretariat staffed by the Afghan Government and the United Nations.
It will be supported by technical experts, as needed. The Board will hold periodic meetings and
special sessions as required to review the implementation of this Compact and suggest corrective
action, as appropriate.
Afghan state institutions and sectoral coordination mechanisms involved in the implementation
of the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS) will provide inputs to the Board with
regard to the implementation of the Compact. In addition, in carrying out its assessments, the
Board will consider inputs from the international community, including United Nations agencies,
inPernMPionMl �nMnciMl insPiPuPions, donors, inPernMPionMl securiPy forces Mnd relevMnP non-
governmental organisations and civil society representatives.
Periodic progress reports on the implementation of the Compact prepared by the Joint Coordination
and Monitoring Board will be made public.
ANNEX IV: Par�cipants at the 2006 London Conference on Afghanistan
Participating Countries
Australia
Austria
Czech Republic
Denmark
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
140
FrMnce
Germany
Hungary
Jordan
Kazakhstan
Korea (Republic of)
Kuwait
Kyrgyzstan
Luxembourg
Malaysia
Netherlands
New Zealand
Norway
Pakistan
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Russia
Sweden
TMjikisPMn
Turkey
Turkmenistan
United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom (co-Chair)
United States of America
AgM KOMn FoundMPion
Asian Development Bank
European Commission
European Union
Islamic Development Bank
HnPernMPionMl MonePMry Fund
North Atlantic Treaty Organisation
Organisation of Islamic Conference
United Nations (co-Chair)
World Bank
Participating Organisations
Observers
Croatia
Estonia
Organisation for Security and Cooperation in
Europe
Slovakia
Slovenia
141
Code of Conduct for NGOs engaged in Humanitarian
Action,
Reconstruction, and Development in
For more informMPion on POe NGO Fode of FonducP, see pB 60B
Preamble
Afghanistan is at a unique point in its history and has the opportunity to move towards
long-term stability, economic prosperity and respect for human rights;
NGOs are civil society actors and a strong civil society is essential to the development
and functioning of a stable Afghan nation and state;
NGOs are committed to the development of Afghanistan and Afghan capacity;
the development of a new Constitution and a legislative structure for Afghanistan provide
M conPexP in ROicO MccounPMNle Mnd responsiNle NeOMviour cMn �ourisO Mnd Ne recognised;
NGOs, as civil society organisations and emergency and development programme
implementers, continue to make important contributions with and for the Afghan people;
the nature and roles of NGOs are not well understood, leading to accusations that NGOs
misuse funds and are wasteful and self-serving;
vMrious “for-pro�P” Mnd poliPicMl McPors misuse POe NGO umNrellM Po promoPe POeir
commercial or political interests;
NGOs continue to face demands that pull them in many different directions and may
threaten their capacity and their independence as civil society actors; and
Codes of Conduct are a mechanism by which NGOs can ensure higher standards –
including greater transparency and accountability,
Je, POe MccrediPed represenPMPives of NGOs in AfgOMnisPMn, OereNy volunPMrily Mf�x our signMPures
to this Code of Conduct and commit our organisations to upholding the Principles of Conduct in
De�ni�ons
The Code of Conduct
is a set of shared norms, principles and values that aims to enhance the
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
142
Non-governmental organisations
Mre volunPMry, noP-for-pro�P, non-pMrPisMn Mnd independenP
organisations or associations engaged in serving the public good. NGOs may be national as
well as international; secular as well as “faith-based”; and of membership and non-membership
categories
Voluntary
denotes free will on the part of the NGO as well as community partners.
NoP-for-pro�P
meMns POMP Mn NGO cMnnoP disPriNuPe iPs MssePs, eMrnings or pro�Ps Ms sucO Po Mny
person. However, there may be paid employees or activities generating revenue which will be used
solely for the stated purposes of the organisation.
Non-partisan and independent
indicates that the NGO is controlled and directed by its governing
body, in keeping with its mandate and not by any other power or group.
Signatories
are NGOs whose duly accredited representative has signed and accepted this Code
refers to all signatories to the Code of Conduct.
Civil society
includes all formal and informal groups and associations that are not of the public
and business sectors. NGOs are a part of civil society.
Gender equality
means that the different behaviour, aspirations, needs and rights of women
and men are considered, valued and favoured equally. It does not mean that women and men
have to become the same, but that their rights, responsibilities and opportunities will not depend
on whether they are born male or female.
Gender equity
means fairness of treatment for women and men, according to their respective
needs. This may include equal treatment or treatment that is different but which is considered
equivMlenP in Perms of rigOPs, Nene�Ps, oNligMPions Mnd opporPuniPiesB
Capacity building
is the process by which individuals, groups, organisations, institutions and
societies increase their abilities to:
perform core funcPions, solve proNlems, de�ne Mnd McOieve oNjecPives; Mnd
2 understand and deal with their development needs in a broad context and in a sustainable
manner.
Humanitarian action
includes those activities taken to prevent and alleviate human suffering
Mrising ouP of con�icP, crisis Mnd cMlMmiPy, including Mny siPuMPion involving:
1 dMmMge Po or loss of lives of non-comNMPMnPs in M con�icP siPuMPion; or
2 pMPPerns of (gross) OumMn rigOPs or OumMniPMriMn lMR violMPions MgMinsP civiliMns in con�icP
143
NGO Mission Statement
Our general mission as NGOs operating in Afghanistan is to address humanitarian, reconstruction
and sustainable development needs in Afghanistan, with a special focus on the rights of those
who are disadvantaged and vulnerable. We work in partnership with each other, the government,
donors and communities.
The Code of Conduct will promote:
improved understanding of NGOs, their purposes and their accomplishments among the
general public, government, donors and the media;
transparency, accountability and good management practices in the operation of NGOs by
voluntary self-regulation; and
improved quality of services provided by NGOs by raising standards of conduct.
1 Our organisations are people-centered
1B1
Focus on POe people Re serve: Our primMry loyMlPy, MccounPMNiliPy Mnd responsiNiliPy is Po
the people we serve. Our programmes are designed and developed in response to the
1.2
Self-reliance and ownership: We seek to help people and communities to solve their own
problems. We encourage and enable the development of self-reliance and advance the
right of people to fully participate in decisions that affect their lives.
1B3
HumMn rigOPs: Je endeMvour Po respecP, proPecP Mnd promoPe POe ful�lmenP of POe OumMn
rights and obligations of all Afghans in accordance with international law.
1.4
Trust: We work to build the trust of the communities with which we work.
1.5
Participation and non-discrimination: We involve men, women, youth and children of our
target communities to the greatest possible extent, engaging them in the conception,
implemenPMPion Mnd evMluMPion of projecPs Mnd progrMmmesB Je sPrive Po ensure POe
participation of marginalised groups in communities where we work.
1.6
Respect for local values: We respect the dignity and identity of the individual, and
acknowledge indigenous knowledge, culture, religious faith and values. This does not
mean that we support practices that undermine the human rights of any individual or
group.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
144
2 Our organisations are committed to sustainable positive impact
2.1
Effectiveness: We are committed to effectiveness and to maximising the positive impact
of our programmes. We avoid duplication of services.
Sustainability: Whenever possible, our programmes seek durable solutions that are cost
effective, that build Afghan ownership and capacity, and that are driven by the long-term
development goals of communities.
Environmental impact: We exercise a responsible and responsive approach to the care
of the physical, natural environment and to the proper management of Afghanistan’s
ecosystems in all our activities.
Monitoring and evaluation: We monitor and evaluate the impact of our programmes and
sOMre �ndings RiPO relevMnP sPMkeOolders, including POe communiPies Re serve, donors,
government and the general public.
3 Our organisations are committed to transparency and accountability
3.1
We are transparent and accountable in our dealings with the government and community
partners, the public, donors and other interested parties.
AccounPMNiliPy: Je develop Mnd mMinPMin sound �nMnciMl policies, MudiPs, Mnd sysPems in
order to manage our accounts. We conform to the constitution, laws, rules and regulations
of the government of Afghanistan and where necessary, lobby for policy change. We are
truthful and honest in all matters related to raising, using and accounting for funds.
Je mMinPMin sound �nMnciMl, MccounPing, procuremenP, PrMnsporP Mnd MdminisPrMPive
systems that ensure the use of resources in accordance with intended purposes.
Transparency: We disseminate information on our goals and activities to interested
sPMkeOoldersB Je mMinPMin Mnd mMke MvMilMNle �nMnciMl Mnd McPiviPy reporPs upon requesP
by relevant and interested parties. We use all available opportunities to inform the public
about our work and about the origin and the use of our resources.
4 Our organisations are committed to good internal governance
4.1
Governing documentation: We have written constitutions or memorandums of association
POMP cleMrly de�ne our missions, our oNjecPives Mnd our orgMnisMPionMl sPrucPuresB
Equal opportunity: We develop and apply written policies, rules and procedures that
Mf�rm our commiPmenP Po equMl opporPuniPies in our employmenP prMcPices Mnd in POe
promotion of staff.
Employment practices: We apply hiring and termination practices that respect the
freedom of choice of individuals and the human resource needs of other stakeholders.
Je offer posiPions NMsed on meriP, pMy MppropriMPe sMlMries, MllocMPe joN responsiNiliPies
145
according to individual capacities, and demand adequate notice from employees and
provide adequate notice for terminations without cause.
No con�icPs of inPeresP: All our orgMnisMPionMl PrMnsMcPions Mre free of con�icPs of personMl
and professional interest. The services of board members shall be given freely and
voluntarily, other than reimbursements for essential costs incurred during service.
5 Our organisations are committed to honesty, integrity and cost effectiveness
5.1
Honesty: We are truthful in all our professional activities.
Integrity: We refrain from internal and external practices that undermine the ethical
integrity of our organisations. We do not engage in theft, corrupt practices, nepotism,
bribery or trade in illicit substances. We accept funds and donations only from sources
ROose Mims Mre consisPenP RiPO our mission, oNjecPives Mnd cMpMciPy, Mnd ROicO do noP
undermine our independence and identity.
Cost effectiveness: We utilise the resources available to our organisations in order to
pursue our missions Mnd sPrMPegic oNjecPives in cosP-effecPive RMysB Je sPrive Po minimise
waste and unnecessary expense, and to direct all possible resources to the people we
serve.
6 Our organisations are committed to diversity, fairness, non-discrimination
MgMinsP mMrginMlised groups Mnd Po Mf�rmMPive McPion
6B1
GiversiPy: Je seek Po OMve M Rorkforce POMP MppropriMPely re�ecPs POe gender, ePOnic,
geographic and religious diversity of Afghanistan and of the areas where we work.
Equity: We seek to advance greater balance and to promote equity in all internal relations
as well as equitable access to opportunities within our organisations. We seek to include
the underserved, the vulnerable, the disabled and other marginalised groups in all our
initiatives.
Gender equity: We consider and value equally the different behaviour, aspirations, needs
and rights of women and men. This may include equal treatment or treatment that is
differenP NuP ROicO is considered equivMlenP in Perms of rigOPs, Nene�Ps, oNligMPions Mnd
opportunities. Their rights, responsibilities and opportunities do not depend on whether
they are born male or female.
Non-discrimination against marginalised groups: Our human resource policies and
practices promote non-discriminatory recruitment, hiring, training and working practices,
Af�rmMPive McPion: Je sPrive Po increMse POe represenPMPion of under-represenPed groups
in senior decision-mMking posiPions MP OeMdquMrPers, in POe �eld, in NoMrds Mnd in Mdvisory
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
146
groups. We seek to include the underserved, the vulnerable, the marginalised and the
disabled in all our initiatives. We endeavour to strengthen the position of Afghan women
both within and outside our organisations.
7 Our organisations are committed to building Afghan capacity
7.1
Capacity building: We take every appropriate opportunity to help build Afghan capacity
to understand needs, establish priorities and take effective action so that ultimately
humanitarian, development and reconstruction needs are met by Afghans.
7B2
FonsulPMPion: Je design Mnd implemenP projecPs in consulPMPion RiPO locMl communiPies
and the government because we are committed to the long-term sustainable development
7B3
SusPMinMNiliPy: Je design Mnd fMciliPMPe projecPs so POMP services mMy Ne PMken over Ny
target communities or by government bodies to enhance sustainability.
7.4
Human resources: In line with our policy of commitment to capacity building, we give
priority to Afghan nationals in our recruitment, hiring and training practices.
7.5
Physical and technical resources: We maximise the utilisation of locally available physical
and technical resources, where appropriate.
7.6
Appropriate technologies: We promote the use of appropriate technologies that can be
owned and maintained by communities.
8 Our organisations are committed to independence
8.1
Independence: We formulate our own policies, programs, and implementation strategies.
We do not allow ourselves to be used to implement programs or gather information of
a political, military or economically sensitive nature for governments or other bodies
that may serve purposes other than those directly consistent with our humanitarian or
development missions.
Autonomy: We strive to maintain our autonomy according to Afghan and international
law, and to resist the imposition of conditionalities that may compromise our missions
9 In humanitarian emergency contexts, we adhere to the following additional
9.1
Impartiality:
We provide aid on the basis of need alone. We provide support regardless of
POe rMce, religion, ePOniciPy, gender, or nMPionMliPy Mnd poliPicMl Mf�liMPion of POe recipienPsB
We do not tie the promise, delivery or distribution of humanitarian assistance to the
embracing or acceptance of a particular political or religious creed.
147
Neutrality: We do not promote partisan national or international political agendas. We do
noP cOoose sides NePReen pMrPies Po M con�icPB
Application of SPHERE: We are knowledgeable about the SPHERE Humanitarian Charter
and Minimum Standards in Disaster Response, and seek to apply these standards
and the SPHERE indicators in the implementation, monitoring and evaluation of our
OumMniPMriMn projecPs Mnd progrMmsB
Code Observance
The Code Observance Committee
The Code Observance Committee (hereafter called “the Committee”) shall be the
body ultimately responsible for promoting observance of the code.
Composition of the Committee
The Committee shall have seven members.
TOe Agency FoordinMPion Body For AfgOMn Relief (“AFBAR”), POe AfgOMn NGOs’
Coordinating Bureau (ANCB), and the South-West Afghanistan and Balochistan
Association for Coordination (SWABAC) will each nominate two representatives to the
Committee.
The Afghan Women’s Network (AWN) will nominate one member to the committee.
TOe Perm of of�ce of memNers of POe FommiPPee sOMll Ne one yeMrB
A member can only serve for three consecutive terms.
The Committee shall select a Chair and a Secretary from among its members.
FuncPions of POe FommiPPee
The Committee shall act as guardian of the Code of Conduct.
The Committee shall ensure understanding, trust and co-operation between the
Public, the Government, the donors, the NGO sector itself and community partners.
The Committee shall meet twice a year to consider:
Petitions by NGOs to become Code signatories. The Committee will permit NGOs to
sign the Code only upon such NGOs furnishing the appropriate documentation as
listed in Clause 14 below.
Petitions or complaints related to the nonobservance of the Code by an NGO. The
petition may be received from government, a donor, a community partner, the public
or another NGO.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
148
The Committee shall nominate a Secretary who will manage the administrative
responsibilities of the Committee. Among other things, the Committee Secretary
Receive all requests from NGOs to become Code signatories.
MMinPMin �les of puNlic documenPs of signMPories, Mnd mMke POose �les MvMilMNle Po
key stakeholders upon request.
Request a signatory to provide a written report when implicated in alleged breach of
Ensure that a signatory receives a copy of the complaint registered against it by the
person or group of persons who lodged the compliant.
The Committee shall be engaged in awareness raising about the Code of Conduct
enshrined herein involving Signatories.
Becoming a Signatory to the Code of Conduct
To become a signatory to the Code of Conduct an NGO must submit to the secretary in writing:
Legal registration
: A copy of the NGO’s legal registration with the Government of
Operational experience
: A signed sPMPemenP on of�ciMl sPMPionMry Mf�rming POMP POe
NGO has been operational for at least one year;
Coordination Body Membership
: A lePPer Mf�rming POe NGO’s currenP memNersOip in
one or more of the following coordination bodies: ACBAR, ANCB, or SWABAC;
Governance Documentation
: A copy of the NGO’s written constitution or memorandum
of MssociMPion POMP cleMrly de�ne POe NGO’s mission, oNjecPives Mnd orgMnizMPionMl
Financial Documentation
: A copy of Mn MudiPed �nMnciMl reporP for iPs mosP recenP
�scMl yeMr; Mnd
Operational Documentation
: A copy of its annual report for its most recent year of
operMPionsB For inPernMPionMl NGOs, M copy of POe gloNMl MnnuMl reporP Rill suf�ceB
Completed Survey of Accomplishments
: A completed survey of accomplishments
allowing the Secretariat to monitor and communicate the combined accomplishments
Mandatory Government Reports
: Copies of semi-annual reports required by the
Ministry of Planning.
149
Complaints
Any one person or group of persons mMy �le M complMinP or pePiPion (supporPed Ny evidence) RiPO
the Secretary of the Committee. A written compliant shall include the following:
The name and address of the complainant;
TOe nMme Mnd Mddress of POe NGO or of�ciMl MgMinsP ROom POe pePiPion is lodged;
The circumstances in which the breach or violation of the Code is alleged to have
been committed; and
Where possible, a reference to the Standard of Conduct that was allegedly
TOe SecrePMry sOMll open M �le MfPer receiving M fully documenPed complMinP Mnd sOMll immediMPely
share a copy of the complaint with all members of the Observance Committee.
Jurisdic�on of the Commi�ee
The Committee shall hear and decide on all instances involving the violation or breach of the Code
of FonducP Ny Mny signMPory or Mny oPOer McPing for MndCor on NeOMlf of M signMPoryB
When a complaint is made under Clause 16 hereof, the Committee may either dismiss the case
ROere no NreMcO of POe Fode is esPMNlisOed or noPify POe signMPory or of�ciMl MgMinsP ROom POe
complaint is made.
Hn Mn insPMnce of M signi�cMnP NreMcO or violMPion of POe SPMndMrds of FonducP, POe FommiPPee
FMll M meePing of POe Mccused signMPory MndCor of�ciMl of POe Mgency Mnd POe person
or group of persons who lodged the compliant in order to discuss the case. This can
take place either at the regularly scheduled semi-annual meeting of the Committee,
or in the case of a grievous violation of the code, an extraordinary meeting can be
RequesP Mny signMPory MndCor Of�ciMl Po provide evidence on POe cMse under
JOen POe FommiPPee �nds POMP POe signMPory or iPs employee OMs violMPed POe Fode, iP sOMll PMke
one or more of the following measures:
Provide the necessary education for compliance;
Call on another signatory to assist in the education process;
Advise POe signMPory in violMPion Po PMke correcPive meMsures MgMinsP POe NGO of�ciMl
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
150
or employee who is directly responsible for the breach of the Code;
Admonish the signatory;
Suspend or cancel the signature of the NGO to the code.
The Unsea�ng of a Commi�ee Member
A Committee member shall not take part in any deliberation or decision making process where he
or she has an interest in the case presented to the Committee.
Scope of Applica�on
The Principles of Conduct shall apply to all NGO signatories to this Code of Conduct working in
TOe Principles of FonducP sOMll Mpply Po Mll of�ciMls Mnd employees ROo McP for MndCor on NeOMlf
of NGOs which have agreed to abide by this Code.
Compliance to the Code
All signMPories Mnd Mll individuMls or groups ROo McP for MndCor on NeOMlf of POe signMPories sOMll
observe, respect and uphold the standards of this Code.
To POMP end, every signMPory sOMll ensure POMP Mll iPs of�ciMls Mnd employees Mre MdequMPely
acquainted with the standards of the Code and work by them.
Revision of Code
Revision of the Code will require the approval of two-thirds of the representatives of the signatory
The Committee may from time to time review and recommend changes to the Code to the
Coordination bodies.
Annex: Historical Context
Since the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979, national and international NGOs have played
a crucial role in providing assistance to people in rural and urban communities throughout the
country and to people in refugee camps in Pakistan.
1979-88
: Immediately following the Soviet invasion, NGOs began programs to address the food,
shelter and health care needs of Afghan refugees in Pakistan. In the early 1980s NGOs initiated
151
cross-border programs into Afghanistan to address the basic health and livelihood needs of those
Afghans in areas not under Soviet control. Cross-border programs working inside Afghanistan
included educMPion Ny 1E84 Mnd MgriculPurMl Mnd infrMsPrucPure projecPs commenced in 1E86B
TOrougOouP POis period, “cMsO-for-food” projecPs sougOP Po give AfgOMns in resisPMnce-Oeld MreMs
the resources they needed to remain inside Afghanistan. During the 1980s many NGOs were also
engaged in advocacy efforts to raise awareness in Western capitals about the plight of Afghans as
both victims of military aggression and refugees.
: By the late 1980s, NGOs had begun to implement development activities — using
development principles in a context of “chronic emergency” and political and security instability
— in addition to providing emergency assistance. The changed political context and increase in
resources for Afghanistan in the late 1980s led to a number of developments in the NGO sector.
The number of Afghan NGOs grew rapidly, support for Afghan capacity building increased, and
several NGO coordination bodies were formed, which focused on strengthening the accountability,
standards, and professionalism of the NGO community and on coordinating to increase impact
and reduce duplication of activities. During this period, many Afghan NGOs, and thousands
of Afghans, built their professional skills in NGO-led training institutions with support from
international NGOs.
1996-2001
: In the Taliban period, from 1996 to 2001, despite political restrictions, improved
security in many parts of the country enabled agencies to work directly with local communities
in remote rural areas. NGOs continued to coordinate closely with UN and donor agencies in
establishing programming priorities and setting out agreed principles for the promotion of coherent
and well-focused assistance to Afghans. The efforts of around twenty, mostly NGO organisations,
Po develop Mn improved seP of leMrning sPMndMrds for AfgOMn cOildren, Pypi�ed POe cooperMPive
approach during this period.
The severe drought from 1997-2001 exacerbated humanitarian need for many rural communities
and forced new waves of displacement into urban areas, internal camps and refugee camps in
Pakistan and Iran. While NGOs expanded their emergency activities to help these populations,
they also continued their development programs.
Late 2001-present
: FolloRing POe evenPs of SepPemNer 11 2001, POe Rorking environmenP for
NGOs in Afghanistan changed dramatically. In 2002, the return to Afghanistan of large numbers
of refugees from neighboring countries required new emergency shelter and feeding programmes.
FolloRing POe fMll of POe TMliNMn, NGOs OMve, in coordinMPion RiPO POe PrMnsiPionMl AfgOMn MuPOoriPies,
increasingly sought to balance their emergency response work with longer-term reconstruction
and development initiatives. The advent of an internationally recognised Transitional Islamic State
of Afghanistan has provided NGOs the opportunity to rearticulate the role of humanitarian actors,
not as service contractors, but rather as mission-driven civil society organisations.
153
TOis yeMr, for POe �rsP Pime, mMps for POe
A Po Z Guide Po AfgOMnisPMn AssisPMnce
have been provided
Ny POe AfgOMn Geodesy Mnd FMrPogrMpOy HeMd Of�ce (AGFHO, pB 4)B TOese mMps Mre only MvMilMNle
in the hardcopy version of the guide.

Afghanistan’s Administrative Divisions
Map 2 (reverse side):
Afghanistan Physical Map

Afghanistan Land Cover Map
Map 4 (reverse side):
Afghanistan Population Distribution Map

Afghanistan Mineral Resources Map

Map 6 (reverse side):
Afghanistan Soil Types Map
Map 7:

Kabul City
Map 8 (reverse side):
Herat City
Map 9 (reverse side):
Jalalabad
Map 10:

Kandahar City
Map 11:

Mazar-i-Sharif
155
acts: Contents
Abou
Kabul Province
Badakhshan Province
Badghis Province
Baghlan Province
Balkh Province
Bamiyan Province
Daikundi Province
FMrMO Province
FMryMN Province
Ghazni Province
Ghor Province
Helmand Province
Herat Province
JMRzjMn Province
Kandahar Province
Kapisa Province
Khost Province
Kunar Province
Kunduz Province
Laghman Province
Logar Province
Nangarhar Province
Nimroz Province
Nuristan Province
Paktia Province
Paktika Province
PMnjsOir Province
Parwan Province
Samangan Province
Sar-i-Pul Province
Takhar Province
Uruzgan Province
Wardak Province
Zabul Province
Pakistan
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
156
About this section
This section includes contact information for the assistance community, government agencies,
and foreign missions in Afghanistan. It does not generally include private companies.
The information in this directory was updated between October 2009 and January 2010.
However, addresses, phone numbers, and email contacts constantly change as organisations
relocate and staff turn over. The accuracy of this list relies on the voluntary contributions of the
organisations listed, which are encouraged to send any additions or changes to areu@areu.org.af.
Organisations can also request that their addresses be omitted.
All orgMnisMPions’ conPMcP dePMils Mre lisPed Ny provinceB KMNul Province is lisPed �rsP, RiPO POe
remaining provinces following in alphabetical order. Afghanistan-related contacts in Pakistan are
listed at the end. Within each section, contacts are listed alphabetically by the full title of the
No distinction is made between mobile, satellite and digital phone lines. Afghan numbers
beginning with 070 or 079 indicate mobile lines, 0088 indicate satellite lines, and all others
indicate digital or ground lines. Numbers in Pakistan (beginning with 0092) are listed as dialled
from Afghanistan. When calling Afghanistan from other countries, the country code is +93 and the
beginning zero should be dropped.
Contacts: Kabul Province
157
Kabul Province

Arman FM Limited
Hs 3, St.12
Wazir Akbar Khan
(PO Box 1045)

0798 139 530
0799 321 010
FMx:

001 86D 342 D771

info@arman.fm
Web:

www.arman.fm
MMnMger, Of�ce of POe FEO: Yosuf MoOseni

Abdul Haq Foundation
Charahi Torabaz Khan (corner
of FloRer SPreeP, 3rd �oor)
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 202 170
0799 301 408
0700 602 182
abdulhaqfoundation@hotmail.com
Web:

www.abdulhaq.org
Executive Director: Nasrullah Baryalai Arsalaie
ASA

Academy of Sciences of

Afghanistan
Charahi Shirpoor
Shahr-i-Naw

020 210 2921
020 210 2919
020 210 3116
afghanistanacademy@yahoo.com
Deputy for Human Science Section:
AOAD

Accessibility Organization for
Afghan Disabled
Hs. 223, Namayeshgah St,
Opp. Kabul Nandari, District 8

0773 302 222
0700 157 417

Web:

Executive Director: Abdul Khaliq Zazai
ACF

Action Contre La Faim
Herati Mosque Street (near to
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
158

MMNrMr_kMNul@yMOooBcomBMu
MMNrMrBjMlMlMNMd@gmMilBcom
Web:

www.aabrar.org
Executive Director: Abdul Baseer Toryalai
AC

Afghan Center
Hs. 1441, 3rd St. (behind Soria
Karte Char

0752 001 799
0700 274 514

baidariwal@yahoo.com
acafghanistan@yahoo.com
JeN:

RRRBMriseprojecPBorg

www.afghancenter.org
Deputy Country Director:
FMzel MuOMmmMd BMidMriRMl
ACSOR

Afghan Center for

Socioeconomic & Opinion

Research
HsB 112, Iucky Five SP, HMji
Yaqoob Saqare, District 10
Shahr-i-Naw

0799 328 714
0799 620 639
matthew.warshaw@acsor-surveys.com
will.hayes@d3systems.com
Web:

www.acsor-surveys.com
Managing Director: Matt Warshaw
ACSFO

Afghan Civil Society Forum
Organization
Hs. 48, Shahr-Ara-Watt (Opp.
Malalai Maternity Hospital)
Shahr-i-Naw

0752 023 787
0202 201 061
0700 277 284
0799 337 828

info@acsf.af
JeN:

RRRBMcsfBMf C RRRBMcsf-rcBcom
MMnMging GirecPor: Aziz RM�ee
ACDO


Development Organization
OppB TMjRMr SulPMn HigO

Charrah-i-Sarsabzi

0700 281 991

acdo1232003@yahoo.com
Executive Director: Gul Waiz Kazar
ACC

Afghan Conservation Corps
Karte Char

0700 201 126
0798 846 906

Web:

www.unops.org
NMPionMl ProjecP MMnMger: NoorullMO MMlung
AGHCO


FoordinMPion Of�ce
Hs. 21242, St. 33, Charahi
PMnjsMd FMmily, PMrP 3
(PO Box 994)

0700 224 891
0799 338 316
0700 277 766
0799 330 072

MgOco_kNl@yMOooBcom
MgOco_kNl@OoPmMilBcom
GirecPor:
SMyed FMzlullMO JMOidi
AGCHO


FMrPogrMpOy HeMd Of�ce
Pashtunistan Watt

0700 258 608

fMizm_2006@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.agcho.org
Chief of Customer Service:
FMiz MoOMmmMd AskMrzMdM


Development Services
Hs. 72, Zafar Khan Watt,

FOMRke QMlMi FMPullMO
Contacts: Kabul Province
159
Shahr-i-Naw, (PO Box 53)

0700 284 275
0700 300 417

fareed@ahds.org
Web:

www.ahds.org
GepuPy GirecPor:
MoOMmmMd FMreed

Afghan Institute of Learning
Baharestan, next to Mir Ahmad
Mosque)
Karte Parwan

0700 284 326
0700 293 579
0700 167 135

Mil_McMssP@yMOooBcom
Mil_kMNul@yMOooBcom
JeN:

RRRBcreMPingOopeBorgCMNouPMil
President Executive Director: Sakena Yacoobi

Afghan Institute of

Management, Training and
Enhancement of Indigenous
Capacities
Kot-i-Sangi

0799 190 015
0700 155 410
0772 010 001
FMx:

07D2 023 E86

aimteic@yahoo.com
azimq@hotmail.com
Deputy Director:

Afghan Institute of Training
and Management
St. 1, Karte Char

0799 334 370
0700 078 937
0700 252 117

aitm786@yahoo.com
Managing Director: Sardar Mohammad Samoon

Afghan Landmine Survivors’
Organization
Hs. 11, St.12 (near MTN

Antenna)
QMlMi FMPullMO

0799 316 253
0799 353 669

sulimanaminy@gmail.com
Web:
www.afghanlandminesurvivors.org
Executive Director: Suliaman Aminy

Center
Hs. 21, Charahi Shaheed

District 10
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 238 955
0799 333 888
0799 829 808

bkverma100@hotmail.com
Web:

www.ainaworld.org
FounPry GirecPor:
BrMjesO VermM

HsB 1, SPB 3, QMlMi FMPullMO
(PO Box 981)

0799 333 621
0700 200 266

Web:

www.ancb.org
Executive Director: Ahmad Shah Habib
AOHREP


Human Rights &

Environmental Protection
Behind Sayed Jamaludin

School, Karte Char

0799 234 026

aohrep@yahoo.com
Director:
Abdul Rahman Hotaki
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
160
ARC

Afghan Relief Committee
Hs. 1, St.1 Behind Zirat Shah

0700 287 606

arckabul@hotmail.com
ATC

Afghan Technical Consultants
Hs. 8, Lane 3 on left, St. 13
(opp. Turkmenistan Embassy)
Wazir Akbar Khan

0700 278 261
0202 500 411
0776 665 550

MPc_kMNul@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.atcafghanistan.org
Director:
Kefayatullah Eblagh
ATCE

Afghan Turk Cag Education
Next to Shah Do Shamshera
Mosque, Cinema Pamir

0700 285 511
0700 218 255
0700 272 999
0202 100 722
FMx:

00E3 202 100 722

info@atce.edu.af
Deputy Director:
Halil Unal
AWSE

Afghan Women Services and
Education Organization
Behind Block 1, Airport
Blocks, SPreeP of FirsP
Department of National

Security (next to Malang Dar
Maltoon), Bibi Mahro
(AJSE PosP in AFBAR Of�ce)

0799 326 132
0799 188 762

MRse_g@yMOooBcom
MROcM_g06@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.awse.org.af
Executive Director: Gulsoom Satarzai
AWN

Afghan Women’s Network
Karte Parwan

0700 286 598
0799 689 079

awn.kabul@gmail.com
Web:

www.afghanwomensnetwork.org
Acting Director:
AWNF

Afghan Women’s New

Foundation
Apt. 29, Block 20, Macrorayon 4
Macrorayon

0700 203 161
0700 182 713

eslom_2006@yMOooBcom
GirecPor:
FMridM SOerzoy
AWEC

Afghan Women’s Educational
Center
Hs. 1228 (opp. Ministry of

Karte Char

0700 263 794

sM�@MRecBinfo
hr.admin@awec.info
Web:

www.awec.info
GirecPor:
AWRC

Afghan Women’s Resource
Dainow Dibori, St. 3, Silo (in front
of Ariana Kabul Hotel), near to
RMiyMsMP ARdMP MMOMjrin
(PO Box 362)

0700 280 179
0799 203 056
0752 012 958

awrc.kabul@ceretechs.com
MRrcB�nMnce@cerePecOsBcom
Web:

www.awrc.org.af
Country Representative: Maryam Rahmani
Contacts: Kabul Province
161

Hs. 94, Hesa-i-Do, Main Road
Karte Parwan
(PO Box 6066)

0799 310 498
0797 104 247
0799 309 373
0088 21 684 400 140

ffstocker@afghanaid.org.uk
afghanaid@ceretechs.com
Web:

www.afghanaid.org.uk
MMnMging GirecPor: FMrOMnM FMruqi-SPocker

Afghanistan Bureau for

Reconstruction
Hs. 2608, St. 11
Taimani

0700 291 104
0752 019 642

abr.kabul@gmail.com
MNr_kMNul1@yMOooBcom
Director:
ACKU

Afghanistan Centre at Kabul
University
Kabul University Central

Library
(PO Box 335)

0700 898 434
0700 281 415

shakib@ackuaf.org
shaakib@yahoo.com
Web:

www.ackuaf.org
Director:

ACCI


Commerce and Industries
Chamane Hozori (next to Kabul
Nandary)
(PO Box 233)

0799 462 388
0799 810 184
0700 236 677
0752 025 854

info@acci.org.af
Web:

www.acci.org.af

ACSS

Afghanistan Civil Service

Support
FirsP SPreeP, HMji YMqooN

Square

Web:

www.usaidacss.org
Chief of Party:
Mark Grubb
ACSP

Afghanistan Country Stability
HQ HSAF GFOS SPMNiliPy AFSP
Great Massoud Road

0799 512 147
0706 006 184

necmi.koksal@hq.isaf.nato.int
ACSP Deputy Team Leader: Necmi Koksal
ADA

Afghan Development

Association
Hs. 264 & 265, Kabul River
Bank’s Road, Pul-i-Surkh
Karte Char
(PO Box 199)

0795 404 433
0799 566 902
0700 202 601
FMx:

001 30E4 0D6 414

sayed.hassan@ada.org.af
Web:

www.ada.org.af
Managing Director: Sayed Hassan
AHRO

Organization
Hs. 41, St. 10, Paikob-i-Naswar
QMlMi FMPullMO

0700 203 866
0799 672 404

ahro98@yahoo.com
ahro.lal@gmail.com
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
162
Web:

www.ahro.af

Association
Hs. 1, St. 1, Beside Madina
BMzMMr, QMlMi FMPullMO

0700 223 595
0799 721 469
0700 203 250

rqarizada@yahoo.com
Web:

www.aiba.af
Rohullah Qarizada
AIHRC


Human Rights Commission
Pul-i-Surkh
Karte Seh, (PO Box 829)

0202 500 676
0794 631 816
FMx:

00E3 202 D00 677

mahmodi@aihrc.org.af
aihrc@aihrc.org.af
Web:

www.aihrc.org.af
Executive Director: Mohammad Musa Mahmodi

Afghanistan Information

Management Services
Hs. 1070, St. 15 (1st sub-

street on left side)
Wazir Akbar Khan
(PO Box 5906)

0799 117 565
0786 011 556
0700 248 827

info@aims.org.af
Web:

www.aims.org.af
Executive Director: Nick Martyn
AISA

Afghanistan Investment

Support Agency
OppB MinisPry of Foreign AffMirs
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt

0700 288 304
0799 336 526
0202 103 408
0202 103 404

Web:

www.aisa.org.af

Main Road
Kolola Poshta

Web:

www.afghanistan-libre.org

Afghanistan Navid Sehat

Organization
Hs. 756, St. 14
Karte Seh

0798 174 915
0799 074 048
0799 418 313

payeshco@gmail.com
wood2samt@yahoo.com
Web:

www.anso.af
Administrator:
Ali Jafari

AfgOMnisPMn NGO SMfePy Of�ce
Kabul

0797 165 017
0799 325 349
0088 21 667 881 671

director@afgnso.org
Web:

www.afgnso.org
Director:
APAP

Afghanistan Parliamentary
Assistance Project
Hs. 537 B, St. 8, Shura Street,
(next to Parliament), Darulaman
Road, District 6
Karte Seh

0202 500 940
0795 975 919
Contacts: Kabul Province
163
0799 490 989

walterguevara@sunyaf.org
info@sunyaf.org
Web:

www.sunyaf.org

Afghanistan Rehabilitation
and Reconstruction Agency
Falah
Hs. 840, St. 7
QMlMi FMPullMO
(PO Box 289)

0777 698 069
0797 228 904

arrafafg@yahoo.com
Abdul Wadood Hazeq

Justice Foundation
Main Road (next to Russian
Karte Seh
(PO Box 560)

0707 446 724
0700 193 540

MrsjfBfoundMPion@gmMilBcom
MjmMlsolMmMl@yMOooBcom
ExecuPive GirecPor: AjmMl SolMmMl

Afghanistan Rural

Development and

Peace Organization
Shirpoor Main Road
(PO Box 445)

0777 154 948
0700 193 540

ardp.org@gmail.com
Contact Person:
Silab Waziri

Afghanistan Rural Enterprise
Development Program
MRRD Compound,
Karte Seh

0752 022 310
0773 624 214
0797 284 458

jMvMidBzeerMk@mrrdBgovBMf
ghizaal.haress@mrrd.gov.af
Executive Director: Ahmed Javaid Zeerak
ATD

Behind Kardan University
Parwan Do

0708 954 626

afgtimes@yahoo.com
saboorsareer01@yahoo.com
Contact Person:
Abdul Saboor Sareer
AWC

Afghanistan Women Council
HsB 61, Burj-i-BMrq SPop
Kolola Poshta
(PO Box 1913)

0799 888 118
0700 049 980
FMx:

00E3 202 201 62D

awcafgh@yahoo.com
Web:
www.afghanistanwomencouncil.org
FOMirperson:
FMPMnM HsOMq GMilMni
Afghanistan’s Children, A New
Approach
Ministry of Women’s Affairs
Shahr-i-Naw
(PO Box 1827)

0700 277 280
0700 243 591

aschiana@yahoo.com.au
Web:

www.aschaina.com
Director:

Mohammad Yousuf

Afghans4Tomorrow
Gozarga Road (opp. Previous

0796 934 674
0799 311 172

afghansfortomorrow@gmail.com

Web:

www.afghans4tomorrow.com
Country Director: Ahmad Zekria Ahmadzai
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
164

Aga Khan Development

Network
Hs. 297, St. 17
Wazir Akbar Khan

0799 300 082
0799 259 259

MlyBmMRji@MkdnBorg
info.info@akdn.org
Web:

www.akdn.org
ResidenP RepresenPMPive: Ali MMRji

Aga Khan Education Services
Hs. 648, St. 9-B, Shirpoor

District 10
Shahr-i-Naw

0799 431 362

hassam.farhadi@akdn.org
Web:

www.akdn.org
HumMn Resource Mnd IogisPic CAdmin Of�cer:
HMssMmuddin FMrOMdi

Aga Khan Foundation
Hs. 43, St. 13, Main Road
Wazir Akbar Khan
(PO Box 5753)

0799 731 508

kevin.moorhead@akdn.org
Web:

www.akdn.org

Kevin Moorhead

Aga Khan Health Services
Hs. 648, St. 9-B Shirpoor,

District 10
Shahr-i-Naw
(PO Box 5753)

0799 419 599
0799 330 558

nayamat.shah@akdn-afg.org
masrooruddin.mansoor@akdn.org
Web:

www.akdn.org
Country Programme Director: Nayamat Shah
AKTC

Aga Khan Trust for Culture
SMljoqi Mosque)
Darulaman Road
(PO Box 5805)

0793 666 222

jolyonBleslie@MkdnBorg
maiwandi@hotmail.com
JeN:
RRRBMkdnBorgCMfgOMnisPMn_culPurMl_
development.asp

Jolyon Leslie

Agence France Presse
(PO Box 710)

0700 282 666
0799 215 027

afpkabul@afp.com
Web:

www.afp.com
AFP KMNul BureMu FOief: Iynne O’Gonnell
ACBAR

Agency Coordinating Body for
Afghan Relief
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 284 323

pc@acbar.org
mhmayar@yahoo.com
Web:

www.acbar.org
Director:
Laurent Saillard
AADA

Agency for Assistance and
Development of Afghanistan
Hs. 192, Charahi Pul-i-Surkh
Karte Seh
(PO Box 2006)

0799 478 617
0786 611 325

aada.kabul@gmail.com
Web:

www.aada.org.af
Director of Programs: Abdurrahman Shahab

Agency for Rehabilitation

and Energy Conservation in
Afghanistan
Contacts: Kabul Province
165
FMculPy) GisPricP 3

0799 328 618
0700 289 631
0777 207 879
0799 307 147

khialshaharea@yahoo.com
Managing Director: Khial Shah
ACTED

Agency for Technical

Cooperation and Development
Hs. 403, Daqiqi Watt
Taimani
Road
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 282 539
0799 611 775
0700 202 806
0088 21 650 601 460

kabul@acted.org
ziggy.garewal@acted.org
Web:

www.acted.org
Country Director: Ziggy Garewal

Agency French Development
Hs. 45, Lane 4, St.15
Wazir Akbar Khan

0797 323 235

Web:

www.afd.fr
FounPry GirecPor:
GerMld VuilleMmin
ACT

Agency of Consultancy for

Training
Hs.3, St. 3, Qalai Wazir, District 5

0799 362 953
0777 362 953
0700 281 495
0799 326 594

McP_Mfg@yMOooBcom
alamgul@brain.net.pk
Managing Director: Alamgul Ahmadi

Aide Médicale Internationale
Hs. 43, St. 1, Part 1
Karte Parwan
(PO Box 747)

0779 900 781

kabul.hom@amifrance.org
Web:

www.amifrance.org
Head of Mission: Karine Betemps

Butcher Street
(next to Koshi Aqiq)
Shahr-i-Naw

Hs. 1057, St. 4
QMlMi FMPullMO

0799 888 111
0799 888 666

edavin@altaiconsulting.com
info@altaiconsulting.com
Web:

www.altaiconsulting.com
Founding GirecPor: Eric GMvin
ABCNews
American Broadcasting

Company News
Hs. 1024, St.15, Lane 6, on
left side, Shirpoor
Shahr-i-Naw

0799 569 692
0796 630 380
0700 300 456

Web:

www.abcnews.com

American Institute of

Afghanistan Studies
Hs. 142 (1st House on left),
Kolola Poshta Rd., St. 1 (on
the left), Ansari Square
Shahr-i-Naw
(PO Box 1708)

0700 252 251
0700 022 578
0708 324 209
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
166

rohullahamin@yahoo.com
JeN:

RRRBNuBeduCMiMs
Administrative Manager: Rohullah Amin
AUAF

American University of

Afghanistan
Darulaman Road
Sanatorium
(PO Box 458)

0797 200 400

0799 541 983

info@auaf.edu.af
Web:

www.auaf.edu.af

Amitié Franco-Afghane
SPB 7, QMlMi FMPullMO
(PO Box 1216)

0794 915 512

afrane.kaboul@gmail.com
Web:

www.afrane.asso.fr
Development Unit, General
Directorate of Budget
MinisPry of FinMnce
Pashtunistan Watt

0799 053 657
0700 182 623

waissian@gmail.com
info@ands.gov.af
Web:

www.ands.gov.af
Director, General Directorate of Budget:
Wahidullah Waissi

3rd Floor, AzMdi PrinPing Press
Building, Macrorayon 2
Macrorayon

0202 301 342

EdiPor-in-FOief:
FMizullMO MuOPMj

Ansar Relief Institute
NexP Po HFRF HeMd Of�ce (MfPer
FOMrMOi HMji YMqooN)
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 290 427
0700 224 442
0098 511 606 5321

Web:

www.emdadari.com
ExPernMl RelMPions Of�cer: RezM SMdodini

Salang Watt
(PO Box767)

0787 430 615
0773 343 250
0786 209 772

d-siawash@yahoo.com
Web:

www.armaghan-e-melli.af
License Holder, Chief Editor:
Mohammad Dauod Siawash

Armanshahr Foundation/

HsB D, SPB 2, QMlMi FMPullMO

0700 233 802
0799 367 277
armanshahrfoundation@gmail.com
Deputy Director, Communications:
TAF

The Asia Foundation
HsB 48 & D0, SPB 1, HMji YMqooN
Square,
Shahr-i-Naw
(PO Box 175)

0799 335 453
0752 024 196
0799 600 711
0088 21 644 446 184

taf@ag.asiafound.org
taf@asiafound.org
Contacts: Kabul Province
167
Web:

www.asiafoundation.org
RepresenPMPive:
George VMrugOese

Asian Development Bank
HsB 126, SPB 2, HMji YMqooN
Square,
Shahr-i-Naw
(PO Box 3070)

0799 020 462

csteffensen@adb.org
JeN:

RRRBMdNBorgCMfgOMnisPMn
Country Director:
Craig M. Steffensen

Associated Press
Hs. 1, St. 15, Lane 7
Wazir Akbar Khan

0700 224 432
0796 756 244
FMx:

0202 302 878

apkabul@ap.org
rfaiez@ap.org
Web:

www.ap.org
RMOim FMiez
AGEF
Association of Experts in
Development Cooperation
HsB ED, EsPgMOe Burj-i-BMrq,
Kolola Pushta

0799 300 501
0799 000 501
0799 300 527

dadm@afghanistan.agef.net
Web:

www.agef.net
FounPry GirecPor:
FrMnk SMlis
AGO

APPorney GenerMl’s Of�ce
Taimani Watt, District 10
QMlMi FMPullMO

0202 200 017
0700 290 940
FMx:

00E3 7D2 023 421

I_sMrMnRMl@yMOooBcom
Attorney General:
Mohammad Ishaq Alako
Aumo Rehabilitation and
Development
St. 4 (opp. Petrol Pump)
Taimani

0700 277 377
0700 290 861

engnMzer_Mrd@yMOooBcom
Director:
Bakhtar Development
Network
St. 1, Baharistan
Karte Parwan
(PO Box 1664)

0799 007 564

info.kabul@bdn.org.af
Web:

www.bdn.org.af

Bakhtar News Agency
Ministry of Culture and
Information

0202 101 304

bashirshabir@yahoo.com
Web:

www.bakhtarnews.com.af
BRAC
Bangladesh Rural
Advancement Committee
Karte Parwan

0700 288 300

fazlul1957@yahoo.com
fazlul.h@brac.net
Web:

www.bracafg.org
Regional Manager: Mohammad Anwar Hossain
Basic Education & Employable
Skill Training
Charahe Spin Kalai, Imam
RezM MMsjid SPreeP

0799 113 901
0700 606 463
0708 247 155
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
168

Web:

www.bestafg.com
Country Director:

BBC World Service
Hs. 24, Park Western Rd.
Shahr-i-Naw
(PO Box 1)

0700 274 470
0795 695 811
0088 21 621 790 380

babrak.ehsas@bbc.co.uk
Web:

www.bbcpersian.com

www.bbcpashto.com
BBC-AEP

BBC Afghan Education Project
HsB 271, SPB1, QMlMi NMjMrOM

0700285240

sOM�qOMkimi@OoPmMilBcom
GirecPor:


BBC News
Hs. 526 , St. 13, Lane 2 (right)
Wazir Akbar Khan

0799 606 064
0799 341 917
0797 472 174


martin.patience@bbc.co.uk
mahfouz.zubaide@bbc.co.uk
Web:

www.bbcnews.co.uk
Martin Patience

Hs. 15-17(behind Nadirya High
Karte Parwan

0790 000 130
0790 000 150

PonyBjones@NriPisOcouncilBorg
info.afghanistan@britishcouncil.org
JeN:
RRRBNriPisOcouncilBorgCMfgOMnisPMn
Director:
Tony Jones
Building Education Support
Systems for Teachers
Hs. 5, St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan

0707 825 266

Web:

www.caii.com
Chief of Party:
Julio Ramirez-De-Arellano

Canadian Program Support
Hs. 730, St. 5 & 6 on the left
Wazir Akbar Khan

0752 040 767
0202 302 914

info@cpsu.org.af
Web:

www.cpsu.org.af
Director:
CW4WAfghan
Canadian Women4women in
Afghanistan
Pul-i-Surkh (opp. Khandahri
Mosque), District 3
Karte Seh

0700 294 394
0798 2379 39
0772 394 004

rMouf_MOmMdi2003@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.cw4wafghan.ca
Programs Coordinator:
CARE

CARE International
FOMrMOi HMji YMqooN, PMrk
Road (next to Hanzala
Mosque)
Shahr-i-Naw
(PO Box 433)

0202 201 098
0202 201 101
Contacts: Kabul Province
169
0700 224 607
0087 07 62 212 630
FMx:

0202 203 610

kassenberg@care.org
Web:

www.care.org.af
Country Director:
Lex Kassenberg
CAF

Care of Afghan Families
HsB 4E7, SPB D7 (oppB HMji
Abdul Matin Mosque), District
4, Zone 2, Charahei Hesse Dow
Karte Parwan
(PO Box 5822)

0799 011 052
0700 292 184
0799 311 619

Web:

www.caf.org.af
General Director:

Caritas Germany
QMlMi FMPullMO

0707 934 480
0798 250 735
0700 014 632

Web:

www.caritas-international.de
Country Representative: Marianne Huber
Catholic Organization for
Relief and Development Aid
Hs. 338, Alberoni Watt (behind
District 10
QMlMi FMPullMO

0700 223 436
0799 313 859
0088 21 651 100 144

maiwand.farhat@cordaid.net
Web:

www.cordaid.nl
Country Representative: Rohullah Amin

Catholic Relief Services
Hs. 805, Junction of the Main Rd
& St. 8, District 10,
Taimani

0795 797 102

rohullah@asia.crs.org
qhaiderzai@asia.crs.org
Web:

www.crs.org
Country Representative: Matthew McGorry
CCAA
Center for Contemporary Arts
Sorya High School Street, near
to Rabia Balkhi School
Karte Char, (PO Box 11)

0700 029 194

info@ccaa.org.af
r_omMrzMd@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.ccaa.org.af
Director:

Rahraw Omarzad
Center for International
Private Enterprise
Karte Char

0700 250 361

rhabib@cipe.org
JeN:

RRRBcipeBorgBMfCRRRBcipeBorg
Admin & IT Manager: Riza Habib
Center for Policy and Human
Development
Kabul University

0708 815 971
0798 238 595

khwaga.kakar@undp.org
fazel.stanekzai@undp.org
Web:

www.cphd.af
ProjecP FoordinMPor: KORMgM KMkMr
CAWC
Central Afghanistan Welfare
Committee
Borj-i- BMrq Bus SPop, GOulMm
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
170
Kolola Poshta

0799 301 802
0752 021 729
0700 279 306

cawckabul@yahoo.com
nikahmadi64@hotmail.com
Director:

Central Statistics Organization
Between Arian Hotel and
Ansari Watt

0776 432 149
0202 100 329
0775 447 101

ghafoori@cso.gov.af
MfgOMn_cso@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.cso.gov.af
President General: Abdul Rahman Ghafoori

Hs. 29, Muslim Street
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 224 434
0700 277 113
0700 275 751

barrysalaam@hotmail.com
info@awanama.com
General Director:
Barry Salaam

Hs. 112, Butcher St., next to
District 10
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 220 222
0774 786 080

cOerMgO_dMily@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.cheraghdaily.af
Director:
Katrine Wada

CHF International
Hs. 1064, Abu Raihan Al-
Berooni Wat (opp. Attorney
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 380 580
0700 273 214

sM�ulllMOBsi�@misfMBorgBMf
sBsi�7D@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.chfhq.org
MMnMging GirecPor: SM�ullMO Si�
CFA

ChildFund Afghanistan
Hs. 115 (opp. Sayed
Karte Char
(PO Box 5264)

0799 758 399
0798 205 952
0752 021 205

kabul@cfafghanistan.org
Web:

www.childfund.org
Country Director:

Charahi Taimani, Opp. Aga
Sayedd Nadiri House

0772 026 040

cdcic@ceretechs.com
omcic@ceretechs.com
Web:

www.childrenincrisis.org.uk
Country Director:
Timor Shah Adib
CA

QMlMi FMPullMO
PO Box 5894

0752 001 610
0799 565 799
0088 216 5110 0730

ca-advocacy@io-global.com
ca-advocacy@web-sat.com
Web:

www.christian-aid.org
AdvocMcy Of�cer:
SulPMn MMqsood FMzel
CWS
Church World Service
Hs. 61, Abu Hanifa Road
(beside Sharwali blocks)
Contacts: Kabul Province
171
Kolola Poshta

0700 274 377
0752 014 303
FMx:

07D2 014 303

marvin@cyber.net.pk
Web:

www.cwspa.org
General Representative: Marvin Parvez
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
172
Street, Darulaman Road
Karte Seh
(PO Box 13032)

0799 136 296
0700 278 891
0798 037 183
0088 21 684 441 448

kanishka.nawabi@cpau.rog.af
Web:

www.cpau.org.af
Managing Director: Kanishka Nawabi
Great Massoud Road

0202 104 751
Contact person:

Coordination of Afghan Relief
Hs. 373, St. 5 (opp. Abdul Ali
Karte Seh

0700 280 727
0700 280 726
0700 280 725

coMr_kNl@yMOooBcom
coarkbl@neda.com
Web:

www.coar.org.af
Managing Director: Haleem Haleem
Sangkasha Mosque)
Karte Parwan

0700 291 722
0775 838 129
0700 298 639
0088 21 664 443 261

OMmidsMljuqi@cOM-nePBorg
admin@cha-net.org
Web:

www.cha-net.org
GirecPor:

Counter Narcotics Trust Fund
4PO Floor BMnMyi Building
Macrorayon 3

0700 292 161

haleem.wahidi@gmail.com
JeN:

RRRBmcnBgovBMfCcnPf
Director:
Abdul Aleem Wahidi

Counterpart International
Wazir Akbar Khan

0700 154 933

info@counterpart-afg.org
counterpart.ipacs@gmail.com
Web:

www.counterpart-afg.org

Country Development Unit
Hs. 17 (behind Moshe Zelda
Market, Pop. Cinema Barikot)
(PO Box 5510)

0700 276 411
0700 244 314
0700 244 299
0799 234 465

cduafghan@yahoo.com
Web:

www.cduafghan.org
Director:
Abdul Qader
COYCA
Cultural Organization of Youth

0799 174 419
0777 174 419
0786 177 221

mz_meONooN@yMOooBcom
Director:
DAB

Ibn-Sina Watt

020 210 0303
020 210 0302
020 210 0301
FMx:

020 2100 30D
Contacts: Kabul Province
173
governorBof�ce@cenPrMlNMnkBgovBMf
fdgovernerBof�ce@cenPrMlNMnkBgovBMf
Web:

www.centralbank.gov.af
Governor:
ANdul QMdeer FiPrMP
DAARTT
Danish Assistance to Afghan
Rehabilitation and Technical
Training
QMlMi FMPullMO
(PO Box 1699)

0752 004 414

daartt@daartt.org
westergaard@daartt.org
Web:

www.daartt.org
ProgrMmme MMnMger: Ognjen PredjM
DACAAR
Danish Committee for Aid to
Afghan Refugees
St. 12, Paikob-i-Naswar
Wazirabad,
QMlMi FMPullMO
(PO Box 208)

0700 288 232
0202 201 750
FMx:

0202 201 D20

dacaar@dacaar.org
akbari@dacaar.org
Web:

www.dacaar.org
Director:

Danish Demining Group
Hs. 64, St. 3
Karte Char

0797 058 482
0798 179 638

pm.afghanistan@drc.dk
vivian.veromaa@drc.dk
Web:

www.drc.dk
Proramme Manager: Southern Craib

Delegation of the European
Ministry
of Interior Affairs)
Shahr-i-Naw

0799 095 004
0202 101 692
0032 24 730 045
FMx:

0032 22 473 0046
delegation-afghanistan@ec.europa.eu
Web:

www.delafg.ec.europa.eu
HeMd of GelegMPion: HMnsjörg KrePscOmer
Department for International
Development (United Kingdom)
British Embassy, St. 15

Roundabout
Wazir Akbar Khan
(PO Box 334)

0799 401 322
0797 222 003

m-Oollis@d�dBgovBuk
z-puyM@d�dBgovBuk
JeN:

RRRBd�dBgovBuk
HeMd of Of�ce GFHG AfgOMnisPMn: MMrsOMll EllioPP
DAO

Development and Ability

Organization
Hs. 924, St. 11
Taimani

0700 600 960
0700 175 759

director@daoafghanistan.org
Web:

www.daoafghanistan.org
GirecPor:
DCA

Dutch Committee for

Afghanistan
Hs. 10, St. 1, Baharistan
Power Station Bus Stop, Next
to British Consulate
Karte Parwan

0799 375 552
0202 200 643

Nriscoe_rMymond@yMOooBcoBuk
dr.moeen@dca-af.org
Country Programme Director: Raymond Briscoe
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
174
Education Training Center
for Poor Women and Girls of
Ministry of Higher Education

0700 276 065
0799 323 309

ecR_MfgOMnisPMn@yMOooBcom
Mrezo_qMniO@yMOooBcom
Director:
Malika Qanih

Education University - Kabul
Afshar St. (Next to Police

Academy), District 5
0700 640 640

muslim780@hotmail.com


rezvMni_222@yMOooBcom
Editor:

Sayed Mohammed Ali Rezvani

Hs. 1&3, Taimani Watt (Main Rd)
QMlMi FMPullMO

0794 551 146
0700 200 135

bart.degroof@diplobel.fed.be
kabul@diplobel.fed.be
JeN:

RRRBdiplomMPieBNeCkMNul
Head of the Representation: Bart de Groof

St. 15 (Shirpoor St.)
Wazir Akbar Khan

0700 278 789
0202 102 148
FMx:

00E3 202 101 08E

bgembkabul@yahoo.com
VMlery ArzOenPinski

Hs. 256, St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan
(PO Box 2052)

0799 742 800

kabul@international.gc.ca
Web:

www.afghanistan.gc.ca
William Crosbie

Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt

0202 102 545
0202 102 728
FMx:

0202 102 728

cOinMemN_Mf@mfMBgovBcn

Embassy of Denmark
Wazir Akbar Khan

FMx:


JeN:

RRRBMmNkMNulBumBdkCen
Reimer Reinholdt Nielsen

St. 15, Wazir Akbar Khan

075 202 1901
075 202 1903
FMx:

020 210 4064

egypP_kMNul@mfMBgovBeg
Chargé d’Affaires: Karim Sharaf

Hs. 39, Ln. 1, St. 10
Wazir Akbar Khan

0700 284 034
0202 103 051
FMx:

003D 8E 160 D81 D04

sMnomMPBkMN@forminB�
JeN:

RRRB�nlMndBorgBMf

Embassy of France
Shirpoor Avenue
Contacts: Kabul Province
175
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 284 032
0799 215 053
0799 617 262
chancellerie.kaboul-amba@diplomatie.gouv.fr
Web:

www.ambafrance-af.org
Jean de Ponton d’Amécourt

Embassy of Germany
Mena 6, Wazir Akbar Khan
(PO Box 83)

0202 101 512

0202 102 239
FMx:

004E 30D 000 717 D10

zreg@kabu.auswaertigs-amt.de
Web:

www.kabul.diplo.de
Werner Hans Lauk

Embassy of Hungary
cCo EmNMssy of GermMny
Mena 6, Wazir Akbar Khan
(PO Box 83)

0797 035 375
0088 21 651 204 035
FMx:

004E 228 177 D18


Malalai Watt
Shahr-i-Naw

020 220 0185
0087 376 309 5560
FMx:

00E3 202 203 818
embassy@ildembassy-kabul.com

amb.kabul@mea.gov.in
Web:

meakabul.nic.in
Jayant Prasad

Malalai Watt
Shahr-i-Naw
(PO Box 532)

0202 201 066
FMx:

0202 201 73D

kabul.kbri@deplu.go.id
Erman Hidayat

Peace Avenue
Charahi Shirpoor

0202 101 391
0202 101 392
0202 101 393
0202 101 395
FMx:

0202 101 3E6

iranembassy-kbl@yahoo.com
FedM Hossien MMliki JMfMri

Great Massoud Road

0202 103 144
0700 028 942
075 202 307

ambasciata.kabul@esteri.it
connazionali.ambkabul@esteri.it

St. 15, Wazir Akbar Khan

0700 224 451
0799 363 827
0087 376 285 3777
FMx:

0087 376 121 8272

Shigeyuki Hiroki

Embassy of Kazakhstan
Hs. 11, Gandhi St.
Wazir Akbar Khan

0700 083 663
0797 403 900

kazembaf@asdc.kz
Agybay Smagulov

Embassy of the Netherlands
Hs. 2 & 3, St. 4, Ghiassudeen Watt
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
176
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 286 641
0700 286 645
0798 715 509

kab@minbuza.nl
Web:

www.minbuza.nl
TBFB de ZRMMn

Embassy of Pakistan
HsB 10, NMjMP JMPP RoMd (oppB
Wazir Akbar Khan

0202 300 911
0202 300 913

parepkabul@yahoo.com
JeN:

RRRBmofMBgovBpkCMfgOMnisPMn

Embassy of Russia
Old Russian Embassy

0700 298 277

rusembafg@multinet.af
Zamir Kabulov

OppB HSAF, SOMsO GMrMk

0202 102 064
0799 349 198

ksM_kNmN@OoPmMilBcom
FOMrgé d’AffMirs:
FMleO Al SMNeOi

Embassy of South Korea
Hs. 34, St. 10-B
Wazir Akbar Khan

0700 280 188
0700 280 189
020 210 2481

khlee95@mofat.go.kr
kabul@mofat.go.kr
Song, Woong- Yeob

Lane 3 (right), Shirpoor

0202 203 787
0798 210 817
0799 077 718

sabersayeed@gmail.com
emb.kabul@maec.es
Jose Turpin

Embassy of Sweden
Hs. 70, Ln. 1, St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan

0707 186 773
0799 300 061
0202 104 912
ambassaden.kabul@foreign.ministry.se
maria.martignier@foreign.ministry.se
Web:

www.swedenabroad.se

Maria Martignier

Embassy of Tajikistan


kMNulPj@PojikisPMnBcom

Embassy of Turkey
Hs. 134
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt

0202 101 581
0202 103 253
0799 335 303

kabil.be@mfa.gov.tr
kacar33@gmail.com
Basat Ozturk

Embassy of Turkmenistan
Hs. 280, Ln.3, St.13
Wazir Akbar Khan

0700 285 801
0700 287 548

tembkabul@gmail.com
MovlMmov APMdjMn

Embassy of the United Arab
Emirates
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt

0202 102 389
Contacts: Kabul Province
177
0700 278 342
FMx:

00E3 202 104 D7D

uaemkbl@hotmail.com
Juma Alkabi

Embassy of the United

Off St. 15, Roundabout
Wazir Akbar Khan
(PO Box 334)

0700 102 273
0700 102 000
0087 37 62 854 939
FMx:

00E3 70 010 22D0
britishembassy.kabul@fco.gov.uk
Web:
www.ukinafghanistan.fco.gov.uk
Mark Sedwill

Embassy of the United States
Great Massoud Road

0700 108 001
0700 108 002
0700 201 908
0700 108 377

usconsulkabul@state.gov
Web:

www.kabul.usembassy.gov

Embassy of the United States
of America - Public Affairs
Great Massoud Road

0700 108 278
0700 108 277

mansoorsx@state.gov
Web:

www.kabul.usembassy.gov

In front of Habibia High School
(second street on right)
Karte Seh

020 250 0431
079 815 2483

sOokirjon74@rMmNlerBru
mirsobit54@mai.ru
Parviz M. Aliev

PMrk RoMd (oppB FloRer SPreeP)
Shahr-i-Naw

0799 565 966


emergency@emergency.it
Web:

www.emergency.it

Enfants du Monde – Droits de
L’Homme
SMrMk SMloon FMPOM KOMni,
Karte Char

0799 339 969

nMPof�cerBMfgOMnisPMn@emdOBorg

mhamed.sarwary@yahoo.com
Web:

www.emdh.org
Mohammad Hamed Sarwary

Eqtedaremelli Weekly
Hs. 2, Wakil Samad St (on the
lefP), OppB MMsjid OmMr JMn
Kandahari

0799 348 791
0799 211 341

eqtedaremelli@yahoo.com
alirezvani2006@yahoo.com
Web:

www.eqmweekly.com.af
Editor:

Sayed Mohammad Ali Rezvani

Equal Access
QMlMi FMPullMO

0700 297 447
0777 297 447

afahim@equalaccess.af
fahim001@gmail.com
Web:

www.equalaccess.org
FounPry GirecPor:
ANdullMO FMOim

European Commission

HumMniPMriMn Aid Of�ce
Hs. 103, Abu Hanifa Lane
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
178
Kolola Poshta

0700 282 318
0799 282 318
0700 297 504
0087 17 63 085 358
FMx:

0087 36 24 08D 683

program@echo-kabul.org
JeN:

RRRBecBeuropMBeuCecOo

European Union Police


Jalalabad Road, Macrorayan 3

0700 037 120

0793 990 193


KMi ViPPrup
EPAA

Export Promotion Agency of
Afghanistan
Karte Char

0752 024 550
0778 902 306

pakeezah.feroz@epaa.org.af
info@epaa.org.af
Web:

www.epaa.org.af

Ahmad Jawed
FAER
Farhat Architecture and
Engineering Rehabilitation
Hs. 422, Opp. Milli Market,
Near Murwareed Restaurant
Kolola Poshta

0700 278 784
0799 318 198
0777318198

faer@hotmail.com
fearwz@mail.ru
Director:
Wakeel Azizi
FOCUS

FOCUS Humanitarian

HsB 42, SPB 2, QMlMi FMPullMO

0799 345 001
0799 345 009
nashir.karmali@focushumanitarian.org
noor.kashani@focushumanitarian.org
JeN:

RRRBMkdnBorgCfocus
ExecuPive Of�cer: NMsOir KMrmMli
FAO
Food and Agriculture
Organization of the United
cCo MinisPry of AgriculPure Mnd
Irrigation and Livestock (opp.
Kabul University)

0700 288 154
0700 295 711
0799 668 336
0088 21 651 121 284
FMx:

UNGP fMx 0087 376 346 8836

tekeste.tekie@fao.rog
fao-af@fao.org
Web:

www.fao.org
Representative:
Tekeste Ghebray Tekie

Foundation for Culture and
Civil Society

Archives), Salang Watt
(PO Box 5965)

0700 276 637
0700 278 905
0799 243 587
FMx:

00E3 7D2 023 D78

Pimor_OMkimyMr@yMOooBcom
mir_joyendM@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.afghanfccs.org
Director:
Mir Ahmad Joyenda
FINCA

Foundation for International
Hs. 1132, St. 4
Shirpoor

0799 209 822

sMyedMlem_sOMO@yMOooBcom
Contacts: Kabul Province
179
Web:

www.villagebanking.org
Country Director:
Tariq Balooch

Friedrich-Ebert Foundation
Charahi Ansari, Yaftali St.

Behind Setarah Hotel
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 280 441
0799 338 094

info@fes.org.af
Web:

www.fes.org.af
Director:
Friends for Rehabilitation
and Integrating Emergency
National Development

0799 420 919
0088 21 684 448 715

mujPMNMzMOir@yMOooBcom
lolengecom@yahoo.com
ExecuPive GirecPor: MujPMNM ZMOir
FNAW

Funders’ Network for Afghan
Women

0708 299 592
info@funders-afghan-women.org
Web:
www.funders-afghan-women.org
Coordinator:
Lauryn Oates
FGA

Future Generations

Afghanistan
Hs. 1649 (near to District 3
Police Station), Karte Char
(PO Box 290)

0799 686 618

Web:

www.future.org
Country Director:
GAF


Foundation
Shahr-i-Naw

gMf_kMNul@yMOooBcom

German Development Service
HsB33C10

0700 205 797
0787 889 200
0799 055 106

dedafg@web.de
dedafg-oa4@web.de
Web:

www.afghanistan.ded.de
Country Director:
Jan Rogge
GTZ
Gesellschaft für Technische
Technical Cooperation)

0799 310 353
0706 720 221

JeN:

RRRBgPzBdeCMfgOMnisPMn
Country Director:
GTZ/BEP
GTZ-Basic Education Program
Karte Seh

0752 001 243
0799 312 481
0088 21 621 129 857
FMx:

07D2 001 243

michael.hirth@gtz.de
emMdudienBRejdMn@gPzBde
Web:

www.gtz.de
Head of Program: Michael Hirth

Ghazni Rural Support Program
Hs. 208, St. 3-T, Pul-i-Surkh
Karte Seh

0799 320 584
0799 024 061
0798 020 071
0798 020 071

e_zeerMk@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.grsp.af
Director:
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
180
Global Hope Network
International
Darulaman Road
Ayub Khan Mina
(PO Box 3023)

0752 003 296
0778 439 295

Web:

www.ghni.org
Director:
Patricia Lightbourne

Global Partners

0795 533 431

rgrif�n@gloNMlpMrPnerscMBorg
Web:

www.globapartners.org
GPFA

Global Partnership for Afghanistan
Hs. 128, St. 15, Ln. 2 (on the left)
Wazir Akbar Khan

0799 652 659
0799 187 241
0798 288 621

rhardister@gpfa.org
zzamani@gpfa.org
Web:

www.gpfa.org
Exuctive Director: Roger Hardister
GPA

Global Point Afghanistan
District 13

0799 373 957

gpM_org@yMOooBcom
ramzanzaib2002@yahoo.com
Web:
www.globalpointafghanistan.org

Global Rights - Partners for
Hs. 200, St. 3, Charah-i-Ansari
(across from German Clinic)
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 269 035
0797 753 955
0202 203 767
0700 070 148

wazhmaf@globalrights.org
Web:

www.globalrights.org
Country Director:
Phyllis Cox

Goethe-Institute
Wazir Akbar Khan

0700 274 906
0799 327 850
0202 105 200
FMx:

004E 37 381 2E6 0D2

info@kabul.goethe.org
JeN:

RRRBgoePOeBdeCkMNul
Director:
Rita Sachse-Toussaint

Hs. 29, Muslim St, Shahr-i-Naw

0700 224 434
0700 277 113
0700 275 751

barrysalaam@hotmail.com
info@awanama.com
Web:
www.gma.com.af

www.awanama.com
General Director: Barry Salaam

Good Neighbors International
Afghanistan
Hs. 164, St. 1, Baharistan
Karte Parwan, (PO Box 5774)

0799 355 392

tasachol@goodneighbors.org
Web:

www.goodneighbors.org

Government Media and

Information Center
HsB 106, neMr Po HSAF HQ, Se

0202 302 817

info@gmic.gov.af
Director:
Abdul Hakim Ashir
Contacts: Kabul Province
181

Hs. 481, St. 7, District 6
Karte Seh
(PO Box 394)

0796 189 014
0700 204 238
0787 597 017
afghanistan@hagarinternational.org

info@hagar.af
Web:

www.hagar.af
Country Representative: Myriam Geach
The HALO Trust International
Sari Kotali, District 17
(PO Box 3036)

0700 152 356
0799 351 541
0700 276 051
0087 37 61 931 817
FMx:

0087 37 61 E31 818

Web:

www.halotrust.org
FounPry GirecPor:
FMrid HomMyoun

Handicap International
QMlMi FMPullMO

0799 149 642
0799 209 983
0787 710 547
0088 21 621 014 051

mfaizi@hiafgha.org
Web:
www.handicap-international.org
Country Director:
Alexandra Carrie
Newsletter (Artibat NGO)
Stop of Karte Char, near to Shir

0700 224 558
077 639 3202

yonos_MkOPMr@yMOooBcom
ertebatteam@yahoo.com
Director:

Mohammad Yonus Akhtar
HDCAW
Health and Development
Center for Afghan Women
Behind Morwarid Wedding Hall
Parwan Seh

0708 220 600
0700 498 979
0797 474 857

hdcaw1994@yahoo.com
hdcaw1994@gmail.com
ExecuPive GirecPor: QudsiM MMjeedyMr
HealthNet–Transcultural
Psychosocial Organization
Hs. 3, St. 1, Opp. Kandahari
Mosque, Behind Bakhtar
University
Karte Char

0799 332 096
0202 501 195
0700 286 197

Oom_On_Ppo@yMOooBcom
fMyeq_sM�@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.healthnettpo.org
ANdul MMjeed Siddiqi

Heinrich Böll Stiftung
HsB 2D, SPB1, on POe �rsP lMne
QMlMi FMPullMO

0700 295 972

bente.scheller@hbfasia.org
of�cekMNul@ONfMsiMBorg
Web:

www.boell-afghanistan.org
Country Representative: Bente Scheller
HTAC

Rokhshana High School)
Karte Seh

0799 619 647
0700 296 462
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
182

yousuf@htac.org
Web:

www.htac.org
Country Directer:
Mohammad Yousf Jabarkhail
HAFO

Helping Afghan Farmers

Organization
Hs. 211, Rahman Watt, Pul-i-
Surkh, Karte Seh

0700 279 752
0700 280 326
0786 500 799

hafo.kabul@yahoo.com
hafo99@yahoo.com
Web:

www.hafo-int.org
Director:
Jawad Jawed
HEWAD
HEWAD Reconstruction,
Assistance Committee
Hs. 118, St. 1 (left side)
TMimMni ProjecP
(PO Box 5138)

0799 323 920
0700 632 330
0700 670 710

OeRMd_Mf@yMOooBcom
OeRMd_KMNul@yMOooBcom
Director:
HRRAC
Human Rights Research and
Advocacy Consortium
HsB 108, SPB 2, QMlMi FMPullMO

0752 017 744
0752 017 733
nasrat.esmaty@afghanadvocacy.org.af

hrrac@afghanadvocacy.org.af
Web:

www.afghanadvocacy.org.af
FonsulPMnPCFommunicMPion-PuNlicMPions Of�cer:
HAWCA
Humanitarian Assistance for
the Women and Children of
Hs.1137, P-Silo Pump Street,
Kushal Khan
(PO Box 1261)

0797 075 976
0708 216 566
0799 490 674

hawca@hawca.org
selaykhan@gmail.com
Web:

www.hawca.org
Director:
Selay Ghaffar
Programme for Afghanistan


0799 687 925

drfaizmatif@yahoo.com
OperMPions GirecPor: GrB FMiz
IARCSC
Independent Administrative
Reform and Civil Service
Prime Minister’s Compound
(in fronP of MinisPry of Foreign
Affairs)
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt
(PO Box 5241)

0202 103 963
0799 095 561
0202 102 364
0700 184 306
FMx:

0202 103 D18

ahmad.mushahed@csc.gov.af
rahela.seddiqi@csc.gov.af
Web:

www.iarcsc.gov.af
IDLG

Independent Directorate of
Local Governance
Aryana Square (beside Italian

0799 300 019
0202 104 703


barna.karimi@gmail.com
obaid.ekhlas@idlg.gov.af
Contacts: Kabul Province
183
Web:

www.idlg.gov.af
Executive Assistant: Obaidullah Ekhlas
IHSAN

Services Association
Hs. 44 &45, St. 2, Taimani
ProjecP, TMimMni

0799 328 597
0700 283 813

iOsMn_org@OoPmMilBcom

Institute for War & Peace

Reporting
Opp. Salim Karwan Plaza
West of Salim Karwan Square
Lane 2 on left

0700 025 635

noorrahman@iwpr.net
Web:

www.iwpr.net
ProgrMmme FinMnce MMnMger:
Integrated Regional
Information Networks
(Humanitarian News &
UNOFHA Of�ce, SOMOr-i-NMR

0700 281 124
0799 182 821
0088 216 8980 0043

akmal@irinnews.org
feroz@irinnews.org
JeN:

RRRBirinneRsBorgCMsiM-counPryB

aspx?country=afg
Humanitarian Reporter: Akmal Dawi
IWA

Integrity Watch Afghanistan
Kolola Poshta

0797 105 906
0707 683 787

lorenzo.delesgues@iwaweb.org
yama.torabi@gmail.com
Web:

www.iwaweb.org
Director:
Intercooperation (IC) / Swiss
Foundation for Development
and International Cooperation
Hs. 5, St. 2, Kolola Poshta Rd.
Charah-i-Ansari, Shahr-i-Naw

0798 261 715
0798 699 606
0798 206 206
afghanistan@intercooperation.net
mujiNBMfg@inPercooperMPionBorgBpk
Web:

www.intercooperation.ch
FounPry RepresenPMPive: MujiNur RMOmMn
International Assistance
Hs. 472, St. 7
Karte Seh
(PO Box 625)

0202 501 185
0700 394 390

Web:

www.iam-afghanistan.org
ExecuPive GirecPor: Girk RB FrMns
ICARDA
International Center for
Agricultural Research in the
Dry Areas
Near Electricity Tower), Part 1
Karte Parwan
(PO Box 1355)

0700 195 523
0799 216 325
0799 216 324

jBrizvi@cgiMrBorg
s.gilani@cgiar.org
Web:

www.icarda.org
Country Manager:
Javed Rizvi
International Center
for Human Rights and
Democratic Development
Hs. 113, St, 2, on the right,
Burj-i-BMrq Bus SPop
Kolola Poshta
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
184

0796 138 721
0752 041 216
0799 829 326
0088 16 32 515 370
FMx:

0088 16 32 D1D 371

amoballegh@dd-rd.af
info@dd-rd.af
Web:

www.dd-rd.af
Acting Country Director: Zia Moballegh
ICRC
International Committee of
the Red Cross
FOMrMOi HMji YMqooN
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 279 078
0799 550 055
0700 297 777
0088 21 651 101 288
FMx:

0087 37 62 730 E41

kabul.kab@icrc.org
com.kab@icrc.org
Web:

www.icrc.org
Head of Delegation: Reto Stocker

International Crisis Group
Kolola Poshta

0799 458 757
0799 660 990
0799 412 743

crondeaux@crisisgroup.org
sdarwish@crisisgroup.org
Web:

www.crisisgroup.org
Candace Rondeaux
IDLO
International Development
Law Organization
Hs. 1063, St. 15, Lane 2

on the left, Shirpoor
Wazir Akbar Khan

0799 274 262
0799 737 959
0799 432 016
0799 737 959

Web:

www.idlo.int
Program Manager: Shafeek Seddiq
IFRC
International Federation of
Red Cross and Red Crescent
Societies
FoCARFS, QMrgOM RdB, GisPricP D
Afshar, (PO Box 3039)

0700 274 887
0700 303 597

phillip.charlesworth@ifrc.org
sayed.omershah@ifrc.org
Web:

www.arcs.org.af
Head of Delegation: Phillip Charlesworth
International Foundation for
Electoral Systems
Hs. 302, Golayee Koloop-i-

Askari, District 9

0795 640 676
0700 215 170

ckaplan@ifes.org
wshadman@ifes.org
Web:

www.ifes.org
Deputy Chief of Party: Constance Kaplan

International Foundation of
Main Street, Near to Power
Station Bus Stop
Kolola Poshta

0700 605 705
0700 293 916

Web:

www.ifhope.org

International Islamic Relief
Agency
Hs. 57, Shah-i Babo Jan Lane
(near Sitara Hotel)
Shahr-i-Naw

0799 328 729
Contacts: Kabul Province
185
0088 21 689 800 758

isrM_Mfg@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.isra-relief.org
Country Director:
Abdul Aziz Abbakar
ILO

International Labour

Organization
UNDP Compound (Opp. Turkish
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt

020 212 4502
0797 187 335
070 7421 692
0088 21 684 440 738
0088 21 621 206 599
FMx:

0087 37 63 468 836

anahita.ilokabul@undp.org
International Maize and
Wheat Improvement Center
Hs. 157, Ln. 3, off Muhhaiudin
St., west of Baharistan Park
Karte Parwan
(PO Box 5291)

0752 022 335

m.osmanzai@cgiar.org
Country Coordinator: Mahmood Osmanzai

International Medical Corps
Hs. 1, St. A (next to Sitara High

0777 343 905
0700 288 229
nmohammad@imcworldwide.org
nMik_moOMmmMd1@OoPmMilBcom
Web:

www.imcworldwide.org
Country Operations Manager:

International Monetary Fund
Hs. 144, St. 14
Wazir Akbar Khan

0799 749 608

kabdallah@imf.org
Web:

www.imf.org
Resident Representative: K. Wabel Abdallah

International Organization for
Migration
Hs. 1093, Ansari Watt (behind
Shahr-i-Naw

0707 185 063
0202 201 022
0700 185 960

idavalos@iom.int
JeN:

RRRBiomBinPCMfgOMnisPMn
Senior OperMPions Of�cer: Jose-HvMn GMvMlos

International Relief and

Development
Ln. 7, St. 15, Wazir Akbar Khan

0796 110 026

rdcd@ird-af.org
Web:

www.ird.org
Country Director:
IRC

International Rescue

Committee
Hs. 61, Kochi Afghana, District 9

0793 400 801
0793 400 802
0793 400 838

nerys.bannister@theirc.org
luan.meraku@theirc.org
Web:

www.theirc.org
Deputy Director:
Nerys Bannister

Internews Afghanistan
Hs. 143, St. 1 on left, Ansari
Square, Kolola Poshta Rd.
Shahr-i-Naw

0797 534 336
0700 291 564

canderson@internews.org
info@internews.af
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
186
Web:

www.internews.org
Country Director:
Charmaine Anderson
Organization
Part 2, Karte Parwan, near
MMrsOMll FMOim’s House,
Ally Lal Agha

0799 806 945

afghanistan@intersos.org
Web:

www.intersos.org
Lodovico Mariani
ISAF

ISAF Joint Command Public
AffMirs Of�ce, HSAF HQ

Great Massoud Road

0799 513 999
0701 132 000
ijcBmediM@MfgOMnBsRMBMrmyBmil
jcmediMopsnu@Mpod-kMiMBisMfBnMPoBinP
HSAF

HSAF PuNlic AffMirs Of�ce

HSAF HQ, GreMP MMssoud RoMd

0799 512 286
0799 512 287
0799 51 2 010

presof�ce@isMf-OqBnMPoBinP
Web:

www.isaf.nato.int

Islah Daily Government
Macrorayon Azadi Printing

Press, Macrorayon

Islamic Relief – Afghanistan
HsB 1082, SPB J, QMlMi FMPullMO

0786 226 633
0700 278 097

info@irafg.org
Web:

www.islamic-relief.com

www.irafghanistan.org
Country Director:

JMpMn FenPer for Fon�icP

Prevention
QMlMi FMPullMO

0799 029 684
0087 376 305 2650

kMNul@jccpBgrBjp
JeN:

RRRBjccpBgrBjp
Representative:
Hayashi Yutaka

Hs. 61, St. 3
QMlMi FMPullMO

0700 280 921
0088 21 655 523 097
0088 21 689 85 2 012

PMmMri@jen-npoBorg
kMNul�n@jen-npoBorg
JeN:

RRRBjen-npoBorg
KiyoPMkM TMmMri
JICA

Japan International

Cooperation Agency
Hs. 179, Main Shash Darak
Street (behind Ministry of
Defence),
(PO Box 461)

0795 975 692
0700 216 937

nMjiNullMOkoOisPMniBMn@jicMBgoBjp
JeN:

RRRBjicMBgoBjp
Resident Representative: Hanazato Nobuhiko
Japanese International
Friendship and Welfare
Foundation
Near Russian Embassy

Darulaman Road
Ayub Khan Mina

0700 276 765
0707 653 591

jiff_kNl@yMOooBcom
Director:

Akbar Ahmadyar
JOpiego, Mn Mf�liMPe of POe
Johns Hopkins University
Hs. 113 , St. 3, beside the
Contacts: Kabul Province
187
Ansari Watt,
Shahr-i-Naw

0799 779 448
0799 878 691

dNyrd@jOpiegoBneP
nMnsMri@jOpiegoBneP
JeN:

RRRBjOpiegoBneP
Jhpiego Country Director and HSSP Chief of Party:
Denise Byrd

Johanniter International

Hs. 115, Street 2 (Near

Karte Seh

0797 138 908
sMrderBjMOMngir@POejoOMnniPerBorg
Country Director:
Sarder Jahangir

School of Public Health
Hs. 111, St. 3,
Ansari Watt
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 059 152

JeN:

RRRBjOspOBedu
Director:
Kayhan Natiq
KCSS

Kabul Center for Strategic

Studies
Pul-i-Surkh
Karte Seh

0793 505 141
0752 091 364

research@kabulcenter.org
rahmani@kabulcenter.org

malikpour@kabulcenter.org
Web:

www.kabulcenter.org
Executive Director: Waliullah Rahmani

Kabul Municipality
Opp. Ministry of Education

Zernegar Park

020 210 1350
Mayor:

Mohammad Yonus Nawandish

Kabul Public Library

0202 103 288
Deputy Director:
A.H. Nabizada
KT

Kabul Times
Macrorayon Azadi Printing

Macrorayon
Editor-in-Chief:
Abdullah Haq Walla

Kabul University

0202 500 245
0799 733 856
0799 143 352
FMx:


chancellor@ku.edu.af
Web:

www.ku.edu.af

Kabul Weekly
SPB 2, HMji YMqooN SquMre (on
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 269 638

zMliq_s@yMOooBcom
Senior Reporter:
KfW-GDB
KfW German Development

0799 020 991
0700 274 456
0700 281 447
0700 274 457

kfwkabul@gmx.de
michael.gruber@kfw.de
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
188
Web:

www.kfw.de
Country Director:

Kherad Foundation
OppB Noorin TV, SPB 4 Silo
(PO Box 4021)

077 39 75 944
077 807 3190

kOerMd_foundMPion@yMOooBcom
Director:

Mohammad Hussain Alavi
TKG/DHSA
The Killid Group/Development
and Humanitarian Services for
Hs. 442, St. 6, Chardehi Watt
Near to Uzbakha Mosque
Karte Seh

0773 333 600
0799 329 832

shahir.zahine@killid.com
JeN:

RRRBkillidBcomCRRRBdOsMBMf
Director General: Shahir Ahmad Zahine

Konrad Adenauer Foundation
Hs. 291, St. 10
Wazir Akbar Khan

0799 347260
0700 224 800

kas.kabul@ceretechs.com
Web:

www.kas.de
Director:
KOICA

Korea International

Cooperation Agency
Hs. 525, St. 11
Wazir Akbar Khan

0700 276 772
0700 157 989
FMx:

0202 302 E37

sbkim@koica.go.kr
ezat@koica.go.kr
Web:

www.koica.go.kr
Resident Representative: Kim, Seung-Beom
LOTFA

Law and Order Trust Fund for
Afghanistan
Inside Ministry of Interior (MoI)
Shahr-i-Naw

0202 203 245
0700 277 084

sandeep.kumar@undp.org
Web:

www.undp.org.af
ProjecP MMnMger:
SMndeep KumMr
LCSAWC

Legal & Cultural Services for
Afghan Women & Children
International Airport Street
Qalai Wakil Clinic Rd.
Bibi Mahro

0700 222 042

parwanma@yahoo.com
Director:
Parwanma Yousof

Lemar TV Limited
Wazir Akbar Khan (PO Box 225)

0798 136 980
0799 321 010
0799 306 284
FMx:

00E7 144 2E0 E64

info@lemar.tv
Web:

www.lemar.tv
MMnMger, Of�ce of POe FEO: Yosuf MoOseni

Leprosy Control Organization
Hs. 151, St. 4 (behind

Karte Parwan
(PO Box 6057)

0700 283 956
0772 024 271

lepcokabul@yahoo.com
Admin Manager:
Mohammad Jawad Ahmadi
LGDP
Local Governance &
Community Development
Project (ARD/USAID)
Hs. 103, St. 3, Main Road
Contacts: Kabul Province
189

0797 165 207

mnia@ardinc.com.af
Web:

www.ardinc.com
Human Resources & Administration Manager:

Salang Watt, next to Rahim
Gardizy Company

0774 406 025
0786 272736


mMlMlMi_mMgMzine@yMOooBcom
GirecPor:

Management Sciences for
Health (Tech Serve)
Ayub Khan Mina

0700 269 559

hburhani@msh.org
JeN:

RRRBmsOBorgCMfgOMnisPMn
Executive Assistant to the Chief of Party:
Muhammad Haroon Burhani

Marie Stopes International
Hs. 193, Karti Char Main
Street (opp. District 3 Police
Karte Char

0799 329 092
0799 372 597
0799 568 383

Web:

www.mariestopes.org
FounPry GirecPor:
FMrOMd JMveed

Hs. 3, St. 2, District 10 (Behind
Taimani
(PO Box 5951)

0700 296 778
0799 337 581
0700 093 125
0088 21 651 139 402

cd-afg@medair.org
basemgr-kabul@medair.org
Web:

www.medair.org
Country Director:

Medecins du Monde – France
Karte Seh
(PO Box 224)

0700 282 412
0799 203 821
Web:

www.medecinsdumonde.org
General Director:
MESAA
Medi Educational Support
Association for Afghanistan
cCo JHFF MedicMl FenPer
(near to Russian Embassy)
Ayub Khan Mina

0700 292 095

mesMM_Mfg@yMOooBcom
Director:
Zabiullah Ahmadyar

Hs. 60, Jami Watt (behind
District 10 Police Station, next
to Nawrooz Zada Co.)

Shahr-i-Naw
Phone: 0700 211 456
0088 21 684 442 908
hameer-rasuli@medicamondiale.org

mm_MfgOMnisPMn@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.medicamondiale.org
Director:

Medical Emergency Relief

International

Taimani

0799 651 622
0700 280 252

The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
190
Web:

www.merlin.org.uk
Country Director:
MRCA

Medical Refresher Courses for
Afghans
Hs. 94, East Street Park

Baharistan, Karte Parwan

0700 281 698

kMNulBof�ce@mrcM-MssoBorg
Web:

www.mrca-asso.org
Country Director:
Sayed Ashrafuddin Aini
MEDA
Mennonites Economic
Development Associates
QMlMi FMPullMO

0799 419 712
0700 295 103
0700 184 502
0799 419 624

csobrevega@meda.org
csobrevega@meda.org.af
Web:

www.meda.org
Country Manager: Catherine Sobrevega

Mercy Corps
HsB3E, SPB 2 (HMji ANdul
Ghafoor House)
QMlMi FMPullMO
(PO Box 838)

0706 340 752
0799 218 894
0799 399 582

cmulligan@af.mercycorps.org
jserMm@MfBmercycorpsBorg
Web:

www.mercycorps.org
Country Director:
MHSFA
Micro�nMnce HnvesPmenP
Support Facility for
Hs. 195, Esmat Muslim Street
Shahr-i-Naw

0799 499 505
0700 295 474

info@misfa.org.af
sultan.massoodi@misfa.org.af
Web:

www.misfa.org.af
MMnMging GirecPor: KMPrin FMkiri
MCPA

Agency
Hs. 1, Ln. 1 on the right from
Pul-i-Mahmood Khan to

MPPiqulMO@mcpM_nePBorg
GirecPor:
HMji APPiqullMO

Mine Detection and Dog

JesP of MMrMnjMn Hill, OppB
KMNul ElecPriciPy Of�ce
Macrorayan 1
(PO Box 2001)

0700 222 899
0700 222 877
0752 021 808
FMx:

00E3 202 300 13D

mdcafghan@hotmail.com
mdcafghan@yahoo.com
Web:

www.mdcafghan.org
Director:
MAG

Mines Advisory Group
Near Ghazi Olympic Stadium

0796 011 736
dave.turner@maginternational.org
Web:

www.maginternational.org
Contact Person:
Dave Turner

Ministry of Agriculture,

Irrigation and Livestock
Opp. Kabul University, District 3
(PO Box 10004)

0752 014 482

0752 044 317
Contacts: Kabul Province
191
0202 500 315
0700 898 989
0202 500 146
FMx:

0202 D00 31D

info@mail.gov.af
asad.takkal@mail.gov.af
Web:

www.mail.gov.af
Minister:

MoBNTA
Ministry of Border, Nations
and Tribal Affairs
Airport Rd. (Near Supreme
Court), District 9
Macrorayan 3

0778 517 503
0700 476 052
0700 212 448

Ministry of Commerce and
Industry
Darulaman Road, Shora St.

0799 302 311
0700 203 870

hamid.rahimi@commerce.gov.af
Web:

www.commerce.gov.af

Ministry of Communications
Muhammad Jan Khan Watt,
3rd �B of 18-sPory MMin BldgB,
Mohammad Jan Khan Watt
(PO Box 5428)

0202 101 113
0202 101 157
0752 090 906


contact@moc.gov.af
Web:

www.mcit.gov.af
Minister:
Amirzai Sangeen

Ministry of Counter Narcotics
Jalalabad Main Road (near the
TrMf�c GepMrPmenP), BMnMyee
Macrorayan 3

0798 242 837
0798 982 531
0700 480 513

spokesman@mcn.gov.af
zulmMy_k@mcnBgovBMf
Web:

www.mcn.gov.af
Minister:

Ministry of Culture and

Information
Behind Ministry of

Minister:

Sayed Makhdum Rahin

Ministry of Defence
Opp. Presidential Palace

District 2, Pashtunistan Watt

0202 100 457
0202 104 200
0700 268 888

info@mod.gov.af
Web:

www.mod.gov.af
Minister:
Abdul Raheem Wardak

Ministry of Economy
MinisPry of Foreign AffMirs)
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt

0700 263 748
0202 100 394
FMx:

0202 100 328

MOmMdkOMlid_rO@yMOooBcom
Minister:
Abdul Hadi Arghandiwal

Ministry of Education
Mohammad Jan Khan Watt

0796 800 200
0798 801 066
0202 103 418

sifat.rahimee@moe.gov.af
attaullah.wahidyar@moe.gov.af
MinisPer:
GOulMm FMrooq JMrdMk
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
192

Ministry of Energy and Water
Darulaman Road, Sanatoriam
(in front of Kabul Museum),

0700 400 400
0799 333 468
0752 023 394

fouziM_Mmin2003@yMOooBcom

Ministry of Finance
Charahi Pashtunistan, District 2
Pashtunistan Watt

0752 004 199
FMx:

0202 103 280

info@mof.gov.af
Web:

www.mof.gov.af

www.customs.gov.af

www.budgetmof.gov.af
Minister:
Omar Zakhilwal
MFA

Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt

0700 104 202
0700 104 005
020 210 0366
FMx:

001 866 8E0 EE88

contact@afghanistan-mfa.net
Web:

www.afghanistan-mfa.net
Minister:
Zalmay Rassoul
Ministry of Guidance,
Pilgrimage and Pious (Ministry
of Haj and Religious Affairs)
FOMrMOi HMji YMqooN
(opp. District 10 of Police
Department)
Shahr-i-Naw

0202 201 339
0202 201 338
0799 302 193
0700 231 116

jMvedNMkOsOi@yMOooBcom
Minister:

Mohammad Yusuf Niazi

Ministry of Higher Education
Kabul University, District 3
Karte Char

0700 634 444

Web:

www.mohe.gov.af

Ministry of Interior
Malalai Watt, Shahr-i-Naw

0202 201 340
0202 200 165

rahman.zaher@moi.gov.af
Web:

www.moi.gov.af
Minister:
Mohamad Hanif Atmar

Ministry of Justice
Charahi Pashtunistan, District 2
Pashtunistan Watt

0202 100 320
0202 100 322
0202 100 321

info@mojBgovBMf
JeN:

RRRBmojBgovBMf
Minister:
MoLSAMD
Ministry of Labor, Social
Affairs, Martyrs and Disabled
Opp. of 1st Macrorayon Market

075 20 03 698
075 20 14 152
077 43 86 795

info@molsamd.gov.af
admin@molsamd.gov.af
JeN: RRRBmolsMmdBgovBMfCMNouP-minisPryBpOp

Ministry of Mines
Hn fronP of FinMnce MinisPry,
Charahi Pashtunistan, District 2
Pashtunistan Watt

0202 100 309
FMx:

00E3 202 E34 364

Contacts: Kabul Province
193
info@mom.gov.af
Web:

www.mom.gov.af
Minister:
Wahidullah Sharani

Ministry of Public Health
Near US Embassy, District 10

0202 301 377
0202 301 529
0202 301 374

mopO_minisPer@yMOooBcom
info@moph.gov.af
Web:

www.moph.gov.af

Ministry of Public Works
St. 1, Old Macrorayon, District 9
Macrorayan 1

0202 300 374
0700 066 217
0799 311 875

mMjiN_mdMrd@yMOooBcom

Ministry of Refugees and

Repatriates Affairs
BeOind JMngMlMk FMcPory

District 7, Waisalabad
(PO Box 5806)

0700 278 234
0700 285 091
0700 786 000

info@morr.gov.af
Web:

www.morr.gov.af
Ministry of Rural
Rehabilitation and
Development
Compound, Nila Bagh Rd.
Tashkilat St.

0700 234 629

info@mrrd.gov.af
Web:

www.mrrd.gov.af
Minister:
Jarullah Mansoory
MoTCA

Ministry of Transportation and
Civil Aviation
OppB HSAF HeMdquMrPers, nexP
Po NMPionMl TV Mnd RMdio
Ansari Watt
(PO Box 165)

0202 101 032
0799 807 241
0202 101 031

fMrOMd_przd@yMOooBcom

Ministry of Urban

Development

Macrorayan 3

0700 282 072
0799 790 960

moud@moud.gov.af
Web:

www.moud.gov.af
MoWA

Ministry of Women’s Affairs
Next to Cinema Zainab
Shahr-i-Naw

0202 201 378
0752 004 543

ministrymowa@hotmail.com
info@mowa.gov.af
Web:

www.mowa.gov.af
Développement des
Economies Rurales en
Aghanistan
Hs. 113, St 7
QMlMi FMPullMO

0700 281 869
0798 018 616
0088 21 621 164 067

countrydirector@madera-afgha.org
Web:

www.madera-asso.org
Country Director:
Pascal Arthaud
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
194

SPB 3, QMlMi FMPullMO
(PO Box 3114 Shahr-i-Naw
PosP Of�ce)

0799 297 562
0799 844 434
0708 749 422
0088 21 654 209 781

cofa.afg@missioneast.org
Web:

www.miseast.org
Country Director:
Namik Heydarov

Mobile Mini Circus for Children
right after Habibia High School
(NeOind KOojM MullM Mosque)
Karte Seh

0700 229 975
0700 280 140
0700 291 120
0700 229 987

circus@afghanmmcc.org
Web:

www.afghanmmcc.org
Co-Directors:
David Mason and

Contacts: Kabul Province
195
0700 276 440
0700 279 339
0087 376 264 0225
FMx:

0087 077 226 0438

nytkabul@yahoo.com
abdulwaheedwafa@yahoo.com
Web:

www.nytimes.com
ANdul JMOeed JMfM

Noor Educational Center
HsB2DE, SPB 4, OppB SABA TV
Channel, Karte Seh

0799 337 667
0799 824 570

nec_en2001@yMOooBcom
jMmilM_MfgOMni@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.nec.org.af
Director:

SPB 2, TMimMni ProjecP

noor.org.af@gmail.com
radfar.noor.org@gmail.com
General Manager: Ahmad Shabir Radfar
NAC
Norwegian Afghanistan
Committee
Hs. 148, St. 3, Nawai Watt
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 284 525
0202 201 696

nacdirector@neda.af
Country Director:
NRC

Norwegian Refugee Council
Hs. 127 (in front of

FommunicMPion Of�ce), GisPricP 3
Karte Char, (PO Box 5830)

0700 228 509
0796 982 007
0700 082 007
0088 21 621 362 146

sa@nrcafpk.org
pd@nrcafpk.org

haroon5552001@yahoo.com
Web:

www.ozone-afghan.gov.af
HMroon AOmMd HMleemzMi
RTA

National Radio Television of
Afghanistan
OppB HSAF HeMdquMrPers, nexP
to Ministry of Transportation
Ansari Watt
(PO Box 544, Kabul Main Post

0202 102 487
0799 749 602
0700 277 519

rPM_Mfg@yMOooBcom
hanifsherzad@yahoo.com
Web:

www.rta.org.af
Director of Planning & International Relations:
Hanif Sherzad

National Rural Access

Program
Block 1, 4PO Floor, MinisPry of
Public Works, Macrorayon 1
Macrorayon

0202 301 871

info@nrap.org
Web:

www.nrap.gov.af
Coordinator:
Abdul Sattar Salim
NATO

NATO Senior Civilian

RepresenPMPive’s Of�ce
HSAF HeMdquMrPers
Great Massoud Road

0799 511 262
0799 511 255
0799 511 263

natoscr@yahoo.com
luksikm@isaf-hq.nato.int
Senior Civilian Representative: Minister Hikmet
NYT

The New York Times
Wazir Akbar Khan

0202 101 088
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
196
Web:

www.nrc.no
Country Director:
Charlotte Esther Olsen
Nye

Nye Express Of�ce
Hs. 444, St. 6, near to
Uzbakha Mosque,
Karte Seh

0700 201701
0778 284 888
0786 980 980
yMrmoOMmmMd_MPMyee@yMOooBcom

jMRMd1383@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.nyeexpress.com
Operations Manager: Yarmohammad Atayee
OAACFMS
Of�ce of AdminisPrMPive
Affairs & Council of Ministers
Secretariat
Marble Palace, (PO Box 4)

0202 101 751
0202 101 771-79
FMx:

0202 100 331

info@oaa.gov.af
Web:

www.oaa.gov.af
GepB GirB GenerMl – ProgrMms: FMrOMdullMO FMrOMd

Of�ce of POe EuropeMn Union
Special Representative
Hs. 45 and 47, St. 3, Charahi
HMji YMqooN (oppB FARE

International), Shahr-i-Naw

0700 279 204
0799 300 104
0700 293 841

eusrkabul@yahoo.fr
rplellig@gmail.com
Contacts: Kabul Province
197

0799 109 769
0700 212 653
008737 62 945 671

oxfamkbl@oxfam.org.uk
gommer@oxfam.org.uk
Web:

www.oxfam.org.uk
Country Director:

Oxfam Novib
HsB 1141, SPB D, QMlMi FMPullMO
(PO Box 681)

0796 010 045

shah.liton@oxfamnovib.nl
Web:

www.oxfamnovib.nl
Country Programme Manager: Shah Liton

Paiwaston
HsB 1, SPB 3, FMPemM RdB
QMlMi FMPullMO

0700 278 221
Afghan Nongovernmental


PAN

Pajhwok Afghan News
HsB130C138, SPB 8, Moy

Taimani, (PO Box 3129)

0202 201 814
0796 129 669
0700 225 375
0088 21 621 198 7446
FMx:

0202 201 813

neRs@pMjORokBcom
mMrkePing@pMjORokBcom
JeN:

RRRBpMjORokBcom
Director & Editor-in-Chief: Danish Karokhel

Partners for Social

Development
Unchi Bagh Banan (in
Dasht-i-Barchi

0700 285 122
0799 329 113
0799 503 047

psdkabul@gmx.net
sameem@qta.paknet.com.pk
Director:
Mr Abdulhai
PACTEC

Partners in Aviation and

Communications Technology
St.15 , Ln.1, 12th house on the
right, Wazir Akbar Khan

0700 282 679
0799 300 837
FMx:

0088 21 6D4 261 044

bookingkbl@pactec.net
Web:

www.pactec.org
FligOP ScOeduling MMnMger: FMrMidoon NMsimi

Partners in Revitalization and
HsB 300 (Burje BMrq Bus SPop)
Kolola Poshta

0700 280 995
0799 391 820
0799 419 700
0202 200 012
FMx:

00E3 202 200 012

prbkabul@hotmail.com
kabul@prb.org.af
Web:

www.prb.org.af
ProgrMmme MgrBCAcPing GirecPor: Noor HussMin
PECA

Partnership for Education of
Children in Afghanistan
Karte Char

0796 934 674
0774 400 012

santwana@hotmail.com
masoodnekyar@yahoo.com
Web:

www.afghanmodelschool.org
VolunPeer ExecB GirecPor: SMnPRMnM GMsgupPM

PMrRMz Micro�nMnce HnsPiPuPion
HMjMry JM NMjMry IMne (neMr Po
St. 1,
Karte Char
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
198

0700 234 848
0798 235 962

mMmMn_seddiqi@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.parwaz.org

Patta Khazana
Karte Parwan (Opp. to Naderia
(PO Box 6047)

0799 307 854
0202 202 407

pMPPM_kOMzMnM@yMOooBcom
s_MlekozMi2003@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.pattakhazana.tk
Director:
Sohaila Alekozai

People in Need
Hs. 61, St. 2, Part 2
Karte Parwan

0799 398 805
0799 696 639
0708 883 608

jMnBsPepMn@peopleinneedBcz
Web:

www.peopleinneed.cz
Jan Stepan
PARSA
Physiotherapy and
Rehabilitation Support for
Kabul Marastun Compound,
Afshar Road

0799 020 588
0700 284 286
0798 154 366

mgustav@mac.com
yMsinfMrid_2006@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.afghanistan-parsa.org
FounPry GirecPor:
YMsin FMrid
Polish Humanitarian
Hs. 521, St. 8
Taimani

0797 472 536
0799 599 039
0796 338 449

Web:

www.pah.org.pl
Acting Country Director: Magdalena Babul

Polish Medical Mission
Taimani

0799 008 199
0799 008 177

michalmartin@yahoo.com
Michal Matusiewicz

Polytechnic University - Kabul
Afshar St., Karte Mamorin


0752 001 933
0202 201 114
0700 276 803
Director:

Gul Khana Palace

0202 141 135
0700 222 323

president@afghanistangov.org
waheed.omer@gmic.gov.af
Web:

www.president.gov.af
Hamid Karzai

Wazir Akbar Khan
(PO Box 225)

0798 136 980
0799 321 010
0799 306 284
FMx:

00E7 144 2E0 E64

info@quqnoos.com
Web:

www.quqnoos.com
MMnMger, Of�ce of POe FEO: Yosuf MoOseni
Contacts: Kabul Province
199

Hs. 442, St. 6, Chardehi Watt
near to Uzbekha Mosque
Karte Seh

0799 329 832
0771 088 888

n.ayubi@killid.com

info@thekillidgroup.com
Web:

www.killid.com
NMjiNM AyuNi

Radio Liberty/Radio Free

Europe
Hs. 26, Ln. 4 on the right, St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan
(PO Box 1471)

0700 295 871
0202 102 719

mudaqiqa@rferl.org
Web:

www.rferl.org
Bearue Chife:

Rain Bow Organisation

Darulaman (opp. Ministry of

Energy and Water)

Sanatoryam

0777 206 353

Director:


Rebuilding Agricultural Market
in Afghanistan
Ministry of Agriculture and

Irrigation, Karte Sakhi

0799 211 206

ssultani@ramp-af.com
Web:

www.ramp-af.com
FOief of PMrPy:
Iouis FMoro
RAFA

Reconstruction Authority for
Afghanistan
Hs. 305, St. 4, Taimani

0700 277 124

rMfM_org@yMOooBcom
Director:
Abdurrashid Ghaiasi
RCSA

Regional Studies Center of
Afghanistan
FinMl Bus SPop of KMNul

University

0799 814 022
0752 011 250

aanawid@yahoo.com
a.naveed@rscaf.org
Web:

www.rscaf.org

Relief International
St. 5, District 10
QMlMi FMPullMO

077 728 7655

marco.aviotti@ri.org
Web:

www.ri.org
Country Director: Marco Aviotti
Renewable Energies,
Environment and Solidarities
Group


0799 182 809
0799 118 304
0088 21 66 72 25 997

Web:

www.geres.eu
FounPry GirecPor:
JeMn FrMncois OspiPMl

Reuters News Agency
Hs. 125, St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan

0700 275 943
0799 335 285

reutersinkabul@hotmail.com
sayed.salahuddin@thomsonreuters.com
Web:

www.reuters.com
Senior Correspondent: Sayed Salahuddin
RoP

Roots of Peace
Karte Char Rd. (near
Technique Bus Stop)
Karte Char
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance

0794 677 212
0799 403 248
0799 313 547

zach@rootsofpeace.org
gary@rootsofpeace.org
Web:

www.rootsofpeace.org
Country Director: Zach Lea
Norway

Royal Norwegian Embassy
Hs. 3, Ln. 4 on the right, St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan

0701 105 000
0799 837 956
0087 07 62 596 925
FMx:

0701 10D 0E0

emb.kabul@mfa.no
Web:

www.norway.org.af
Rural Rehabilitation

Association for Afghanistan
Ariana Radio & Television
Network), District 7
Ayub Khan Mina

075 201 454
0707 104 882

nporraa@hotmail.com
Admin Manager:
Mohammad Arif Yousufzai
SW

Salam Watandar
Hs. 99, Sherkat Bus Station
neMr Po AriMnM TV

0797 253 846
0786 947 784

masood.farivar@internews.af
Web:

www.salamwatandar.com
GenerMl MMnMger: MMsood FMrivMr

Sanayee Development

Organization
SPB E, QMlMi FMPullMO
(PO Box 73)

0700 220 638
0202 201 693
0795 759 833

dMlili_kMNul@OoPmMilBcom
sdfkabul@ceretechs.com
Web:

www.sanayee.org.af
Executive Director: Raz Mohammad Dalili
SGAA


Hs. 434, St. 6, Karte Seh

0700 285 056
0799 338 973
0797 070 987

sgaakabul@yahoo.com
sgaakabul2@yahoo.com
Web:
www.sandygallsafghanistanappeal.org

Save the Children Japan
cCo SMve POe FOildren USA
(Sherkat Bus Stop, Darulaman
Ayub Khan Mina

0799 830 145
0700 279 425
020 220 2948
0097 37 63 088 241
scjBMdmkMNul@sMvecOildrenBorBjp
JeN:

RRRBsMvecOildrenBorBjp
Country Representative: Miho Wada

Save the Children Sweden-
Norway
Hs. 134, Chaharahi Shaheed
(close to British Cemetery)
District 10
Shahr-i-Naw

0798 454 510
0798 454 501
0798 454 500
afghanistan@sca.savethechildren.se
fMzelBjMlil@scMBsMvePOecOildrenBse
JeN:

RRRBrNBseCeng
Country Director:
Poul Brandrup
Contacts: Kabul Province
201

Save the Children UK
Hs. 346, Nahr Darsan Street
(NeOind HMjMr NMjMri FMcPory)
Karte Char

0799 339 592
0700 267 416

Web:

www.savethechildren.org.uk
AOmMd Feroz YusufzMi
SC-USA

Save the Children USA
Sherkat Bus Stop, Darulaman
Ayub Khan Mina
(PO Box 642)

0797 595 991
0799 803 165

dskinner@savechildren.org

afco@savechildren.org
Web:

www.savethechildren.org
Country Director:
David Skinner
SERVE

Serve Afghanistan
Nahre Darsun, Cinema Barikot
St, Karte Char
(PO Box 4015)

0799 327 714

0799 653 015

0700 280 506

director@serveafghanistan.org
info@serveafghanistan.org
Web:

www.serveafghanistan.org
Executive Director: Stephen E. Craig
Services for Humanitarian
Assistance and Development
Of�ce 407, 4PO Floor, NMjeeN
Zarab Market
Quaimarkaz

0700 470 770
0799 371 710

aminzay@shade.org.af
Web:

www.shade.org.af
Director:
Bakhtar Aminzay
SVA

Shanti Volunteer Association
Shahr-i-Naw

icOikMRM@svMBorBjp
JeN:

RRRBjcMBMpcBorgCsvMCenglisO

Shelter for Life International
Wazir Akbar Khan

0202 230 2847

jengRMll@sOelPerBorg
arshad@shelter.org
Web:

www.shelter.org
Country Director:
Jon Engwall

Shelter Now International
HsB 488, SPB 4, QMlMi FMPullMO
(PO Box 5648)

0700 279 814
0799 272 922

kabul@shelter-afghanistan.de
Web:

www.shelter.de
Director:
John River

Pul-i-Surkh (near Omar Jan
Kandahari Mosque), Karte Seh

0799 328 901
0799 335 115
0799 409 544

shuhadakabul@hotmail.com
rnaveed@shuhada.org
Web:

www.shuhada.org.af
Executive Director: Mr Naveed
Development Program
(PO Box 601)

0706 272 491

Web:

www.shdp.org.af
General Director:

Social Research Institute
Kote Sangi (next to Shahin
Restaurant)
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance

0797 389 526
0799 301 248

sociMl_reseMrcOes@yMOooBcom
Director:
SPACH
Society for the Preservation

0700 285 859

info@spach.info
anarodriguez@spach.info
Web:

www.spach.info
Programme Coordinator: Ana Rosa Rodriguez
SAB
Hs. 150, St. 1, Hisae-i-Du
Karte Parwan

0799 193 486
0797 194 916
FMx:

0032 42 37E 331

sMNsMdmof�cer@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.assosab.be
Senior Admin of�cer: JMRMd RMsooly
SA

Hs. 41, St. 12 (near Pai Kuba
NMsRMr), QMlMi FMPullMO

0799 303 633
0774 045 144
0777 607 732
afg.cdm@solidarites-afghanistan.org
afg.adm.coo@solidarites-afghanistan.org
Web:

www.solidarites.org
Country Director:
Hassan El Sayed
SAF

Solidarity for Afghan Families
Old Taimani Square
(PO Box 6084)

0799 042 611
0777 042 611
0700 042 611

sMf_MfgOMnisPMn@yMOooBcom
generMl_direcPor@sMfBorgBMf
Web:

www.saf.org.af
General Director:
Abdul Basir Mansoor
SAFMA

South Asian Free Media

Association
Darulaman Rd, Istgah Sherkat,
Opp. Kabul Dubai Wedding
Karte Seh

0700 650 951
0700 802 003
0700 214 748
0752 024 107

Web:

www.southasianmedia.net
President of Afghanistan Chapter:
Ehsanullah Aryanzai

SOZO International
Taimani
(PO Box 5110)

0752 001 120
0799 021 766
0700 278 633

wakil@sozointernational.org
khan@sozointernational.org
Web:

www.sozointernational.org
National Director: Abdul Wakil Mehrabanzada
Development Organization

Education Department)
Karte Char

0700 236 483
0700 294 193
0700 223 095
0798 012 572

sPep_kMNul@yMOooBcom
maroofbehzad@yahoo.com
General Director:
Contacts: Kabul Province

Supreme Court
9, Great Massoud Road

0202 300 361
0700 210 936
FMx:


afgcourt@hotmail.com
Web:

www.supremecourt.gov.af
Abdul Salam Azimi
SCA

Swedish Committee for

Afghanistan
Jalalabad Main Rd., Paktia Kot,
left side, 8 km from Charahi
Abdul Haq,
(PO Box 5017)

020 232 015 1
020 232 0152
075 202 3567
FMx:

00E3 020 232 01D6

anders.fange@sca.org.af
Web:

www.swedishcommittee.org
FounPry GirecPor:
Anders Fänge
SIDA
Swedish International
Development Cooperation
Agency
Hs. 70, Ln. 1, St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan

0202 104 912
0798 444 002
0700 166 944
sara.gustafsson@foreign.ministry.se
ambassaden.kabul@foreign.ministry.se
JeN:
RRRBsidMBse C RRRBsRedenMNroMdBcom
Counsellor and Country Manager for Development:
Swiss Agency for Development
Hs. 486, Lane. 3, St. 13
Wazir Akbar Khan

0202 301 565
0700 274 902
0799 203 475
0700 284 703
FMx:


kabul@sdc.net
sayed.qasim@sdc.net
Web:

www.sdc.org.af
Country Director:

Hs. 485 & 486, St. 13, Ln. 3
(right), Wazir Akbar Khan

0700 274 902
0799 203 475
0202 301 565
0700 295 390
FMx:


willi.graf@sdc.net)
kabul@sdc.net
Web:

www.sdc.org.af
Country Director:

Swiss Peace
Hs. 45 (opp. Malalai Maternity
Shahrara Watt

Terre des Hommes
St. 5 (next to Kabul London
MMrkeP), QMlMi FMPullMO

0700 379 990
0797 477 027
0700 277 202
0202 201 290

tdhkabul@tdhafghanistan.org
marcel.reymond@tdh.ch
Web:

www.tdhafghanistan.org
Country Delegate: Marcel Reymond
TCOW

The Children of War
QMlMi FMPullMO

0700 011 819

info@thechildrenofwar.org
Web:

www.thechildrenofwar.org
Interim President: Tamer Ali
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
TIO

HsB 40, SPB 2, QMlMi FMPullMO
(PO Box 5934)

0700 203 527

info@tlo-afghanistan.org
massod.karokhail@tlo-afghanisan.org
Web:

www.tlo-afghanistan.org
Director:
TAIO
Today Afghanistan
International Organization
Shahr-i-Naw

stanagull@yahoo.com
NMjimuOMmmMdMyuN@OoPmMilBcom
TSCO/SFRRD
Tolo Service & Cultural
Foundation for Remote Rustic
Development
Behind Agriculture Ministry,
Opp. German psychotherapy
Karte Sakhi
(PO Box 1590)

0799 301 247
0778 823 705
0707 593 727

Psco_org@yMOooBcom
ahmadshahir.zia@gmail.com
Program Manager:
Mohammad Mohsin Zia Ayoubi

Tolo TV Limited
Wazir Akbar Khan
(PO Box 225)

0798 136 980
0799 321 010
0799 306 284
FMx:

00E71 44 2E 0E 64

info@tolo.tv
sales@tolo.tv
Web:

www.tolo.tv
MMnMger, Of�ce of POe FEO: Yosuf MoOseni
Training Human Rights
Association for Afghan
Women
Apt. 1, Block 103, Macrorayon 2
Macrorayon, (PO Box 125)

0700 202 422
0700 286 774
0700 202 421
0202 302 724

rosOMn_sirrMn@yMOooBcom
rMinNoR_mMlMl@yMOooBcoBin
Director:
Roshan Sirran
Trocaire

Trocaire (Caritas Ireland)
Hs. 34, St. 4, District 10
Taimani

0797 209 676
0088 21 652 019 725

mgray@trocaire.ie
Web:

www.trocaire.org
Country Representative: Matthew E. Gray

Turquoise Mountain Foundation
Part 2, Karte Parwan (behind
former British Embassy)
Karte Parwan

0798 182 028
0799 143 362
0798 149 173
0088 21 655 522 508
reception@turquoisemountain.org

contact@turquoisemountain.org
Web:

www.turquoisemountain.org
Director of Community Dev.: William Beharrell
UARA

United Agency for the

Rehabilitation of Afghanistan
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 224 952

United Methodist Committee
on Relief
SPB D, QMlMi FMPullMO

0799 278 763
0798 121 137
Contacts: Kabul Province
0787 756 836

admin@umcor-afghanistan.org
tomvincent@umcor-afghanistan.org
JeN:

RRRBneRBgNgm-umcBorgCumcor
United Nations Human

Settlements Programme
Hs. 235, St. 8, Taimani

0700 282 464
0795 974 047
michael.slingsby@unhabitat-afg.org
hashmat.sayedi@unhabitat-afg.org
Web:

www.unhabitat-afg.org
Country Representative: Michael slingsby

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
UNAMA Compound B, Charah-i-
Zambaq, Peace Avenue
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt
(PO Box 3205)

0790 006 121
001 212 963 6121
0039 08 31 246 121
FMx:

003E 08 31 246 3D3

unama-spokesman@un.org
Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org

Strategic Communication and

Spokesperson Unit

United Nations Children’s Fund
UNOCA Compound, Jalalabad Rd.
Pul-i-Charkhi
(PO Box 54)

0790 507 001
0790 507 002
0790 507 003
0087 076 4042 530
FMx:

0087 076 404 2D30

kabul@unicef.org
Web:

www.unicef.org
Representative:

United Nations Department of
Safety and Security
UNOCA Compound

United Nations Development
Fund for Women
Shahr-i- Naw (Opp. Turkish
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt
(PO Box 5)

0796 094 960
0796 590 689
0202 124 706
0087 37 63 467 625
FMx:

0087 37 63 468 836

registry.unifem.af@unifem.org
nazia.noor@unifem.org
Web:

www.afghanistan.unifem.org

United Nations Development
Programme
UNDP Compound (Opp. Turkish
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt
(PO Box 5)

0202 124 000
0202 124 100
0700 281 593
FMx:

0087 37 63 468 836

mMnojBNMsnyMP@undpBorg
registry.af@undp.org
Web:

www.undp.org.af
PuNlic HnformMPion & AdvocMcy Of�cer:
FezeO Hosseini
United Nations Educational,
Hs. 1143, Central Square

Shirpoor

0700 283 008
0796 647 626
0773 030 330
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
FMx:

0083 776 346 8836

c.gyeltshen@unesco.org
s.aoyagi@unesco.org
JeN:

RRRBunescoBorgCkMNul
Director:
Shigeru Aoyagi

United Nations Environment
Programme
Room No. 32, UNOPS Building
UNOCA compound
Jalalabad Road

0799 208 721
0799 131 618
0700 052 816

belinda.bowling@unep.org
JeN:
RRRBunepBorgCcon�icPsMnddisMsPers
Afghanistan Programme Manager:
Belinda Bowling

United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees
Hs. 41, Peace Avenue
Shahr-i-Naw, (PO Box 3232)

0700 279 210
0700 279 231
0708 288 247
0202 200 381C2
FMx:

0041 227 3E7 D01

macleod@unhcr.org
cogan@unhcr.org
Web:

www.unhcr.org

United Nations Humanitarian
Air Services
St. 15, Ln. 3 (left side)
Shirpoor

0797 662 130
0797 662 025
0797 662 032

unhas-afg.reservation@wfp.org
khalilullah.kakar@wfp.org
Air TrMnsporP Of�cer: AlvMro GMrofMli

United Nations Industrial

Development Organisation
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt

0202 124 135
0799 306 311
0700 808 404
FMx:

0087 376 346 8836

Web:

www.unido.org
HeMd of OperMPion: FMkOruddin Azizi
UNMACA
United Nations Mine Action
Coordination Centre for
By Alfalah Bank
Shahr-i-Naw, (PO Box 520)

0777 966 371
0777 966 372

rM�ullMOBMlkozMi@mMccMBorgBMf
Web:

www.macca.org.af
PuNlic HnformMPion Of�cer: RM�ullMO AlkozMi
UniPed NMPions Of�ce for
Project Services
Operations Center (AGOC)
UNOCA compound
Jalalabad Road
(PO Box 1772)

0799 257 584
FMx:

0700 667 788

kirkb@unops.org
JeN:

RRRBunopsBorgCMgoc
Country Director:
Bruce McCarron

UniPed NMPions Of�ce on Grugs
and Crime
Hs. 257, St. 149, District 4,
Zone 1 Kolola Poshta
(PO Box 5)

0798 416 3 25
0796 728 167
FMx:

0043 12 606 074 743
Contacts: Kabul Province
207

fo.afghanistan@unodc.org
Web:

www.unodc.org
Special Advisor to the SRSG on Counter Narcotics,
RepresenPMPive AfgOMnisPMn FounPry Of�ce: JeMn-
Luc Lemahieu
UNFPA

United Nations Population
Fund Afghanistan
UNOCA Compound
Jalalabad Road
(PO Box 16030)

0707 119 999
0700 263 100
0700 181 149

Web:

www.afghanistan.unfpa.org
Representative:
United Nations Security

Coordinator
UNDP Compound (Opp. Turkish
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt


United Nations Volunteers
UNDP Compound (Opp. Turkish
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt

0700 282 521
0202 124 303
0700 282 520

information@unvolunteers.org
stuart.moran@undp.org
Web:

www.unv.org
Director:
Stuart Moran

United Nations World Health
Organization
UNOCA Compound, Jalalabad Rd.
Pul-i-Charkhi

0700 279 010
0799 761 066
0700 281 116

registry@afg.emro.who.int
reception@afg.emro.who.int
JeN:

RRRBemroBROoBinPCMfgOMnisPMn
USAID

US Agency for International
Development
Of�ce of ProgrMm Mnd ProjecP
GevelopmenP FAFÉ (Fompound
Across From US EmNMssy)
Great Massoud Road

0701 080 01
0799 187 544
FMx:

001 202 216 6488

uperwaiz@usaid.gov
kabulaidproginfounit@usaid.gov
Web:

www.afghanistan.usaid.gov
USFOR-A

US Forces Afghanistan
Between Amani High School
Mnd JFP Fompound
Shahr-i-Naw

0799 51 2919
0707 355 965

usfor-a-mediarelations@afghan.swa.army.mil

US Forces AfgOMnisPMn PuNlic

AffMirs Of�ce

US Geological Survey (Agro-
Meteorology Project)
USGS Building (between Pul-
Abdul Haq)

0786 700 411
0777 217 771

fahimzaheer@gmail.com
fahimzaheer@yahoo.com
Web:

www.usgs.org
MoOMmmMd FMOim ZMOeer
VAWR

Voice of Afghan Woman Radio
Next to Rahim Gardizi Limited
Salang Watt
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance

0700 275 089

jmujMOed@yMOooBcom
jMmilM_mujMOed@yMOooBcom
GirecPor GenerMl: JMmilM MujMOed
VOA Ashna
Voice of America, Ashna TV &
Radio/Afghanistan
Hs. 26, St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan
(PO Box 214)

0752 004 166
0799 774 477
0700 277 198
0088 21 689 850 499
FMx:

0042 221 121 E13

eshinwari@yahoo.com
eshinwari@hotmail.com
Web:

www.voanews.com
Coordinator:
Mohammad Ekram Shinwari
VoF

Voice of Freedom (Radio and
Newspaper)
HSAF HeMdquMrPers (neMr Po US
Great Massoud Road

0799 156 238
0799 511 320

gierlingerg@isaf-hq.nato.int
Web:

www.sada-i-azadi.net
Media Director:
Gernot Gierlinger
WCH

War Child Holland
SPB 8, QMlMi FMPullMO
(PO Box 3211)

0799 333 010

info.kabul@warchild.nl
Web:

www.warchild.nl
Country Director:
WADAN
The Welfare Association
for the Development of
(PO Box 10043)

0799 889 928
0752 015 178

niazi@wadan.org
info@wadan.org
Web:

www.wadan.org
Program Manager: Inayatullah Niazi
GAA

Welthungerhilfe/German

AgroAction
Hs. 9, St. 3, Taimani Rd.
Taimani

0799 887 739

jMmesBcurPis@RelPOungerOilfeBde
Web:

www.welthungerhilfe.de
Country Director:
James Curtis
WCS

Wildlife Conservation Society
St. 3 (2nd house on left),
Charrahi Ansari, Kolola Poshta
Kolola Poshta

0798 981 967
0088 21 655 582 607
FMx:

0203 1D3 4D6
Web:

www.wcs.org

psmallwood@wcs.org
Country Director:
Peter Smallwood
WCLRF

Women and Children Legal
Research Foundation
St. 5 (in front of Armaghan
Training Center), west side of
Kabul University,

0700 649 191
0700 076 557
0752 002 614

wclrf@yahoo.com
RMzOmM_Mmiry@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.wclrf.org.af
Media & Public Relations Program Manager:
Wazhma Abdulrahimzay
WAA

Women Assistance

Association
Contacts: Kabul Province
Shahr-i-Naw

0799 354 350
0799 328 734

waakbl@hotmail.com
waa.afg@gmail.com
GirecPor:
FMOimM KMkMr

Women for Women

International
Hs. 171, St. 4
QMlMi FMPullMO

0700 206 803
0700 206 790

snoori@womenforwomen.org
afghanistan@womenforwomen.org
Web:

www.womenforwomen.org
Country Director:
Sweeta Noori

Women Mirror
Hs. 186, St. 12
Wazir Akbar Khan
Director:
Shokria Barikzay

Women, Peace and Governance
Muslim St. (opp. Bakhtar News
& neMr Po MinisPry of HMj)
District 10,
Shahr-i-Naw

0796 095 451
0707 106 043

theresa.delangis@unifem.org
asya.tawqeer@unifem.org
Web:

www.afghanistan.unifem.org
Unit Manager:

The World Bank
Hs. 19, St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan

0700 276 002
0700 240 924
0700 280 800

nkrafft@worldbank.org
azia@worldbank.org
Web:

www.worldbank.org.af
Country Director:
Nicholas J. Krafft

The World Food Programme
St. 4, Koshani Watt (behind
Kabul Bank)
Shahr-i-Naw
(PO Box 1093)

0797 662 000-04
0797 662 116
FMx:

0087 37 63 08E D61

wfp.kabul@wfp.org
JeN:

RRRBRfpBorgCMfgOMnisPMn
Country Director:
Stefano Porretti
YAAR

Youth Assembly for Afghan
Rehabilitation
Hs. 144, St. 8
Taimani
(PO Box 5980)

Zardozi - Markets for Afghan
Artisans
St. beside Insaf Hotel, MOI Rd.

0799 195 623
0700 287 963
0799 336 691

kjR@NrMinBnePBcom
marzardozi@gmail.com
Web:

www.afghanartisans.com
Director Programmes: Kerry Jane Wilson
ZOA

ZOA Refugee Care, Northern
Afghanistan
Hs. 266, St. 2 (next to Ahmad
Jam Mosque), District 3
Karte Char
(PO Box 1515)

0799 582 812
0700 239 825
0799 373 759

Country Director:
Joop Teeuwen
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
210
Badakhshan Province

FMizMNMd FiPy
(PO Box 6066, Karte Parwan
PosP Of�ce)

0795 194 664
0775 422 802
0799 276 354
0088 21 684 400 143-44

bdkproad@afghanaid.org.uk
Web:

www.afghanaid.org.uk
Provincial Programme Manager: Habibullah
AHRO

Organization
Contacts: Badakhshan Province
211

International Assistance Mission
FMizMNMd
(PO Box 626, Kabul)

0707 747 710

rtl.faizabad@iamafg.org
Web:

www.iam-afghanistan.org
Regional Manager: John Meyers
Shahr-i-Naw, District 5

0799 336 644
0775 951 071
0088 21 651 121 096

badakshan-afg@medair.org
Web:

www.medair.org

Mercy Corps
New City, Part 1, District 5
St. 2, Muhibullah Bay House
FMizMNMd

0796 297 606

0799 558 542

0795 380 781

nirmalbeura@af.mercycorps.org
Program Manager: Nirmal Beura

Sarak-i-Do Ab, Baharak

0088 21 654 202 970

Web:

www.miseast.org
Programme Coordinator: Ulla Mogensen

Ahmad Maghaza Street
NeR FMizMNMd

0799 300 554

Web:

www.miseast.org
Province Programme Manager: Aziz Baig
NAC

Norwegian Afghanistan

Committee

Keshim Bazaar

Concern Worldwide
Bank Street across from
Badakhshan Provincial
FMizMNMd

0795 760 551

azima.roya@concern.net
Web:

www.concern.net
Programme Coordinator: Azima Roya
CCA

Cooperation Center for

Afghanistan
FMizMNMd

0088 21 621 138 244

MOmMdi_MN@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.cca.org.af
CPAU

Cooperation for Peace and
Hesa-i-Awal, Subdistrict 5 (next
to Afghan Red Crescent)
SOMOr-i-NMR, FMizMNMd

0756 310 578
Web:

www.cpau.org.af
FonPMcP Person:
HMji QudrMPullMO GurkOMni
GTZ/BEPA
Gesellschaft für Technische
Technical Cooperation) - Basic
Education Program
TTF FMizMNMd, TurgMni ScOool
FMizMNMd Old FiPy, FMizMNMd

0799 028 316

Hamidullah11@yahoo.com
Web:

www.gtz.de

HealthNet–Transcultural

Psychosocial Organization
HMji ZMdM ApMrPmenP, FlB 3 RmB
27, Sang-i-Mahar area
SOMOr-i-NMR, FMizMNMd
Web:

www.healthnettpo.org
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
212

0522 811 818

0707 403 876

Orphan Refugees and Aid

International
Gaz Khan (village of around 20
houses), Walkan District
(PO Box 594)
FMizMNMd

0799 331 930

director@oracentralasia.org
Web:

www.oracentralasia.org
ProjecP IeMder:
Alex GuncMn
Across de Afghanistan Bank
PMrP 1, SOMOr-i-NMR, FMizMNMd

0756 310 653
0700 294 365
0799 073 626
0087 37 62 279 436

nsahar@oxfam.org.uk
Web:

www.oxfam.org.uk
Programme Coordinator: Nasima Sahar

Partners in Revitalization and
SOMOr-i-NMR, FMizMNMd

0756 310 699
Web:

www.prb.org.af
Admin Of�cer:
ANdul SMNor

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
Shahr-i-Naw, District 5, Rabani
House, FMizMNMd
(PO Box 3205)

0799 822 337

Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org

United Nations Children’s Fund
FMizMNMd

0798 507 384

kabul@unicef.org
Web:

www.unicef.org

UniPed NMPions Of�ce on Grugs
and Crime
FMizMNMd

0799 438 332

alem.yaqobi@unodc.org
Web:

www.unodc.org
Provincial Coordinator: Mohammad Alem Yaqobi
WADAN
The Welfare Association
for the Development of
Hs. 2, Uzbaks Street
Shahr-i-Naw

0708 887 594
Web:

www.wadan.org
Coordinator:
Abdul Shakoor

World Health Organization
SOMOr-i- NMR, FMizMNMd

0799 322 134

mazarin@afg.emro.who.int
JeN:

RRRBemroBROoBinPCMfgOMnisPMn
National Health Coordinator:
Sayed Mazari Nasiri
Baghdis Province
BRAC
Bangladesh Rural

Advancement Committee
QMlM-i-NMR

0799 591 035

NrMcnsp_NMdgOis@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.bracafg.org
Provincial Manager: Ahmed Sohail Noori
United Nations Assistance
FonPMcPs: BMgOdisCBMgOlMn Provinces
213
Qala-i-Naw
(PO Box 3205)

0799 772 587

OMideryj@unBorg
Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org
JumM KOMn HMidery
Baghlan Province
ADA

Afghan Development

Association
Hs. 3, Bandar-i-Share Kohna,
on left side of main road to

0799 428 636

Web:

www.ada.org.af
Provincial Manager: Samay Gul
AHRO

Organization

0772 880 089

oNMid_MOMdi@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.ahro.af

Aga Khan Education Services
Hs. 384, St. 1, Silo, District 2

0795 294 114

sayed.qubad@akdn.org
Web:

www.akdn.org
RegionMl AdminB Of�cer:
Sayed Kai Qubad Rahguzer

Aga Khan Foundation
Shash Sad Koti, Zer-i-Mada

0799 396 364

altafali.attash@akdn.org
Web:

www.akdn.org
Regional Programme Manager: Jalaluddin Dashti
ACTED

Agency for Technical

Cooperation and Development
Shirdad House, 3rd Region
Shashsad Kotee

0700 010 147

ahmad.talib@acted.org
Web:

www.acted.org
Ahmad Talib Shinwari

Baghlan Institute of Higher
Education

0755 910 292
0700 037 997
Director:

Bakhtar Development

Network
Near Police Station 4

0700 216 507
0700 238 778

Web:

www.bdn.org.af
ProgrMmme MMnMger: SMyed NMjiNullMO SMyedi
BRAC

Bangladesh Rural

Advancement Committee
Dosatkoti

0700 731 501
Web:

www.bracafg.org
CFA

ChildFund Afghanistan
Beside Club-i-Madan, Region 3

0700 747 117
0774 258 020
Web:

www.childfund.org
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
214
CCA

Cooperation Center for

Afghanistan
NeMr AgOM KOMn FoundMPion

0088 21 621 138 244

ccakabul@hotmail.com
Web:

www.cca.org.af

Country Development Unit

0707 440 200
Web:

www.cduafghan.org

Emergency Programme of the
Italian Cooperation
Bagh-i-Qahwakhana (near the
FourP Of�ce)

0700 287 100
0700 286 272
0088 21 633 324 414


Foundation for Culture and
Civil Society

0088 21 633 352 799
FMx:

MfgOMn_foundMPion@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.afghanfccs.org

Ghazni Rural Support Program
Hs. 1, St. 1, District 3

077 515 6620

grspbaghlan@gmail.com
Web:

www.grsp.af

Provincial Rd., Area 3, Shash
Sad Koti (side of Bandedou

0797 192 158

venczel.zoltan@gmail.com
Web:

www.hbaid.org
ProgrMm GirecPor: ZolPMn Venczel

Mercy Corps (FIRUP)



0706 410 388

0796 190 878

0700 300 581

hmaad@af.mercycorps.org
Program Manager: Husnel Maad

Mercy Corps (NEW IDEA)

St. 10, Naw Abad, 600 Kuti
District 3


0706 490 447

0798 531 081

mngujo@MfBmercycorpsBorg
ProgrMm MMnMger: MMngome Ngujo

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
Bagh-i-Qahwa Khana
beside the river
(PO Box 3205)

0700 222 763

dimitrovb@un.org
Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org
BojidMr GimiProv
Balkh Province
ActionAid
Hs. 30, Pul-i-Hawaiee Street
Pul-i-Hawaiee, Mazar-i-Sharif

0798 025 308
0797 035 038
0778 874 537

bashir.noori@actionaid.org
ayesh.alam@actionaid.org
Web:

www.actionaidafg.org
Provincial Manager: Abdul Bashir.Noori
FonPMcPs: BMgOlMnCBMlkO Provinces
215

Afghan Amputee Bicyclists for
Rehabilitation and Recreation
Mazar-i-Sharif City

0774 799 600


farid.aabrar@gmail.com
Web:

www.aabrar.org
ACSFO

Afghan Civil Society Forum
Organization
Karte Sina, Main Street,
behind Sun Petrol
Mazar-i-Sharif

0793 559 425
0787 610 683
JeN:

RRRBMcsfBMfCRRRBMcsf-rcBcom
Regional Manager: Haris Jahangir

Afghan Landmine Survivors’
Organization
HsB 10, POe �rsP lMne MfPer
the Police Station, Karte
Shafakhana, Alkuzay Square
Mazar-i-Sharif

0775 027 080
0773 58 543
E-mail: info@afghanlandminesurvivors.org
MlsoBmzrof�ce@fgOMnlMndminesurvivorsBorg
Web:
www.afghanlandminesurvivors.org
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
216

0799 404 617

north@afgnso.org
Web:

www.afgnso.org
Northern Region Safety Advisor:
Elizabeth Detwiler
Afghanistan’s Children, A New
Approach
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 509 402

aschianamazar@yahoo.com.au
Web:

www.aschaina.com
Coordinator:
ACBAR

Agency Coordinating Body for
Afghan Relief
Darwaz-i-Jamhoriate, Kocha-i-
Aka Yassin
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 500 499
0700 504 466

qadri@acbar.org
acbarmazar@yahoo.com
Web:

www.acbar.org
Abdul Raouf Qaderi
Agency for Rehabilitation
and Energy Conservation in
cCo AFBAR MMzMr-i-SOMrif Field
Of�ce, GMrRMzM-i-JMmOoriMPe,
Kocha-i-Aka Yassin
Mazar-i-Sharif
ACTED

Agency for Technical

Cooperation and Development
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 501 310

mazar@acted.org
Web:

www.acted.org
Sayeed Zaman Hashami

Bakhtar Development

Network
Passport St., District 3
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 260 619
0799 217 125
0700 238 778
0799 112 813

Web:

www.bdn.org.af
ProjecP MMnMger: MoOMmmMd NMjiN BMleegO

Balkh University
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 517 255
BRAC
Bangladesh Rural
Advancement Committee
Chilmetra St., Dokan-e-

Kamar, Guzare Marmul
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 428 095

moffazzol@yahoo.com
Web:

www.bracafg.org
Regional Manager: Mohammad Mofazzol Hossain
CAFE

Central Asian Free Exchange
Guzar-i-Marmol (Opp. Mosque 1)
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 509 252
0799 239 988

robgraves@mail.com
Web:

www.cafengo.org
Regional Director: Rob Graves
CCA

Cooperation Center for

Afghanistan
NeMr HFRF Of�ce, KMrPe BokOdi
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 500 373

ccM_mMzMr-i-sOMrif@OoPmMilBcom
Web:

www.cca.org.af
Regional Manager: Masuma Wasiq
Contacts: Balkh Province
217

Coordination of Afghan Relief
Mastofyat St. (beside
mosque)
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 520 986

coMr_mMzMr@yMOooBcom
coMr_kNl@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.coar.org.af
ProjecP MMnMger: GOulMm NMNi Sediqi

Hs. 2664, St. 3, Darwazi

JMmOoriMP, FMrdMRsi PMrk
Mazar-i-Sharif

0799 104 830
0089 21 651 134 074

mazar@cha-net.org
Web:

www.cha-net.org
MoOMmmMd RMsOid SMkMndMri
DACAAR

Danish Committee for Aid to
Afghan Refugees
Opp. the Mosque, Marmul

Street, District 1
Mazar-i-Sharif

0799 100 612

mazar@dacaar.org
Web:

www.dacaar.org
Water & Sanitation Programme Provincial
Manager: Abdul Matin

Danish Demining Group
Tafausat, in front of Kamgar
Mazar-i-Sharif

0799 313 447

zMOirudin_1E63@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.drc.dk
SiPe OperMPion Of�cer: ZMOirudin
DCA
Dutch Committee for

Qabela Parween Street, behind
Tafahossat
Mazar-i-Sharif
(PO Box 1107)

0799 188 187

mdarwish@dca-af.org

Regional Programme Manager (Technical):
Miralam Darwish
FAO
Food and Agriculture
Organization of the United
Department of Agriculture, in
front of Kefayat Hotel
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 284 431
0700 500 782
0799 863 201

ahmadzia.aria@fao.org
faoaf-mazar@fao.org
Web:

www.fao.org
GTZ/ BEPA
Gesellschaft für Technische
Technical Cooperation) - Basic
Education Program
SPreeP SOMrsOMrM, HMji
Boribyee Market

0799 096 925

dMvidBmMjed@gPzBde
Web:

www.gtz.de
GMvid MMjed
HealthNet–Transcultural

Psychosocial Organization
East of Bakhter Lycee, St. 2
Mazar-i-Sharif

0799 206 579
0778 766 818


mirwaisbeheshti@yahoo.com
Web:

www.healthnettpo.org
Contact Person:
Mirwais Beheshti
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
218
IARCSC
Independent Administrative
Reform and Civil Services
In front of Balkh University,
located in Tafahusat
Mazar-i-Sharif

0799 404 845
Web:

www.iarcsc.go.af
Director:
Abdurahman Rasekh

International Assistance Mission
Koche-i-Marmol (behind

Sultan Marzia High School)
Mazar-i-Sharif
(PO Box 625, Kabul)

0796 199 622
0700 504 393

rtl.balkh@iamafg.org
Web:

www.iam-afghanistan.org
Regional Manager: Rita Reading
IFRC
International Federation of
Red Cross and Red Crescent
Societies
ARCS Compound, District 10
Karte Ariana, Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 501 995

mohammad.wahid@ifrc.org
Web:

www.arcs.org.af
MoOMmmMd JMOid

Islamic Relief–Afghanistan
Hawayee, in front of Salman
FMrs Mosque
Mazar-i-Sharif

0774 582 048

Web:

www.islamic-relief.com

www.irafghanistan.org
ProgrMm Of�cer:
JDAI

Joint Development Associates
International
HsB 2, KMO ForusOi SPB
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 506 035
0088 21 621 276 131
0099 89 71 305 971

Programme Coordinator: Mark J. Henning
TKG/DHSA
The Killid Group/Development
and Humanitarian Services for
Afghanistan
Mazar-i-Sharif Hotel)
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 508 237
0799 807 571


dOsM_mMzMr@yMOooBcom
abdulbari.hamidi@yahoo.com
JeN:

RRRBdOsMBMf C RRRBkillidBcom
ANdul BMri HMmidi

Leprosy Control Organization
SPB 3, NMRsOMd ProjecP
Mazar-i-Sharif
(PO Box 6057)

0799 184 297
0771 151 010

lepcomazar@yahoo.com
HMNiNy

Marie Stopes International
Mazar-i-Sharif

0787 889 503
Web:

www.mariestopes.org

cCo UNHFR MMzMr, SPB 2 of
Karte Shafakhana (behind the
vegetable market)
Mazar-i-Sharif
0793 200 551

0797 203 866
E-mail: sshahdadi@medicamondiale.org
Contacts: Balkh Province
219
Web:

www.medicamondiale.org
AdminisPrMPor:

Mercy Corps

Clinic Sokhta, District 8, Karte

BukOdi, neMr Po HFRF of�ce

Mazar-i-Sharif

0799 292 934

0706 340 747

0798 747 154

asuzanna@af.mercycorps.org
Web:

www.mercycorps.org
Program Manager: Anna Suzanna
Programme (Provincial
Karte Bukhdi, behind Red

Cross Gudams
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 505 339
0799 263 600
0778 267 595

eng_OumMyoon@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.nspafghanistan.org
Provincial Manager: Mohammad Humayoon
NRC

Norwegian Refugee Council
Old Jail Rd., behind Marko Polo
HoPel, oppB JFP
Mazar-i-Sharif

0795 123 263
0799 229 716
0708 312 494
0088 21 644 413 842

icla.pcaf1@nrcafpk.org
msebrahimi@nrcafpk.org
Web:

www.nrc.no
ProjecP FoordinMPor: Prudence Acirokop

Partners for Social

Development
Hs. 276, Guzar-i-Mirza Qasim
(lefP side SPB of Foreign AffMirs
Department) District 3
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 505 128
0799 254 938

psdmazar@hotmail.com
Programme Manager: Zabehullah Sultani

Partners in Revitalization and
Takhnikum,
Mazar-i-Sharif

0799 448 328

eng.assadullah@yahoo.com
Web:

www.prb.org.af
Contact Person:

Peace Winds Japan
Mazar-i-Sharif

meet@peace-winds.org
JeN:

RRRBpeMce-RindsBorgCen
FounPry RepresenPMPive: TePsuyM Myojo

People in Need
Kochi Baba Qamber 82
Mazar-i-Sharif

0795 590 401

Web:

www.peopleinneed.cz
Guzar-i-Bagh Mirza Qasim,
Mazar-i-Sharif

0502 041 041
0774 419 700


info@killid.com
Web:

www.killid.com
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
RAFA

Reconstruction Authority for
Afghanistan
cCo AFBAR MMzMr-i-SOMrif Field
Darwaza-i-Jamhoriat, Kocha-i-
Aka Yassin, Mazar-i-Sharif
(PO Box 1515, Central Post
Box Of�ce)
Rural Rehabilitation

Association for Afghanistan
St. 4, Sayed Abad Rd., Karte
Moula Ali, Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 500 441
0799 152 036

npomazar@hotmail.com

Sanayee Development

Organization
Hs.16, Darwazai Jamhori,

across from Maulana Hospital
Mazar-i-Sharif

0799 237 607

Web:

www.sanayee.org.af
MoOMmmMd RM�q BromMnd

Save the Children UK
Mandawi, Karti Mamorin
District 2, in front of Dr
Sowaida’s House
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 500 637
0700 510 623

scukmzr@psh.paknet.com.pk
mMnisOjMin@gMRMNBcom
Web:

www.savethechildren.org.uk
Programme Manager: Manish
SC-USA

Save the Children USA
Mazar-i-Sharif

0799 057 805

mtamim@savechildren.org
Web:

www.savethechildren.org
SrB Admin Of�cer:
MoOMmmMd TMmim
SCA

Swedish Committee for

Afghanistan
Hs. 722, St. 2, Karte Mamorin
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 299 306
0700 510 765
0088 21 6 54 250 3 56

enayat.ghafari@sca.org.af
Web:

www.swedishcommittee.org
Of�ce AdminisPrMPor: EnMyMPullMO GOMfMri
Turkmenistan Consulate

Massoud Road
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 501 382
0799 569 311

Kabayev Bazarbai

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
Darwaza-i-Shadyan, Chihl

Metree St.
Mazar-i-Sharif
(PO Box 3205)

0706 130 024
0790 006 901

ershov@un.org
Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org
PMvel ErsOov

United Nations Children’s Fund
Mazar-i-Sharif

0798 507 376

kabul@unicef.org
Web:

www.unicef.org

United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees
Karte Shafakhana, behind

Mandawi
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 064 673
0041 227 397 504
FonPMcPs: BMlkOCBMmiyMn Provinces
221
0088 21 651 121 598
FMx:

0041 227 3E7 D0D

patel@unhcr.org
afgma@unhcr.org
Web:

www.unhcr.org
HeMd of SuN-Of�ce: AurvMsi PMPel

UniPed NMPions Of�ce on Grugs
and Crime
Mazar-i-Sharif

0799 764 703

Web:

www.unodc.org
ProvinciMl FoordinMPor: IuPf RMOmMn IuP�
WADAN
The Welfare Association
for the Development of
Shar-i-Safa Apartment

Mazar-i-Sharif

0799 691 548
Web:

www.wadan.org
Regional Coordinator: Qazi Subhanullah Lodin
GAA

Welthungerhilfe/German

AgroAction
cCo AFBAR MMzMr-i-SOMrif Field
Darwaza-i-Jamhoriat, Kocha-i-
Aka Yassin, Mazar-i-Sharif
Web:

www.welthungerhilfe.de

Women for Women

International
cCo AFBAR MMzMr-i-SOMrif Field
Darwaza-i-Jamhoriat, Kocha-i-
Aka Yassin
Mazar-i-Sharif
(PO Box 35)
Web:

www.womenforwomen.org

World Health Organization
FOMrM-i-HMji AyouN, Neside

FMrMNi HospiPMl
Mazar-i-Sharif

0700 288 401

ghaffaria@afg.emro.who.int
JeN:

RRRBemroBROoBinPCMfgOMnisPMn
National Health Coordinator:
Mir Ahmad Ghaffary
Bamiyan Province

Adventist Development and
Relief Agency
PMnjMo

0799 828 852

kBjuszkieRicz@MdrM-MfBog
Web:

www.adra.euroafrica.org
ProjecP GirecPor:
KonrMd JuszkieRicz
ACSFO

Afghan Civil Society Forum
Organization
ZMrgMrMn VillMge (oppB TMkiM

0793 559 428
0700 230 933
JeN:

RRRBMcsfBMfCRRRBMcsf-rcBcom
FonPMcP Person:
FMrdin BMyMP
AIHRC


Human Rights Commission
Karte Sulh

0799 304 845
bamyan@aihrc.org.af
Web:

www.aihrc.org.af

Aga Khan Foundation
Sar Asyab

0799 418 060

robert.thelen@akdn.org
Web:

www.akdn.org
Regional Programme Manager: Robert Thelen
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
AADA

Agency for Assistance and
Development of Afghanistan
Sari Asyab, behind UNAMA

0799 409 582

kanwari@aada.org.af
Web:

www.aada.org.af
ProjecP MMnMger:
KOMlilurrMOmMn AnRMri

Bamyan University
Next to Civilian Hospital

0799 304 656

Mrifyosu�@yMOooBcom
MoO Arif Yousu�

Catholic Relief Services
nexP Po UNHFR of�ce
Web:

www.crs.org
CCA

Cooperation Center for

Afghanistan (I)
Next to Ghol Ghola
Shahr-i-Naw

0799 036 653

ccakabul@hotmail.com
Web:

www.cca.org.af
Sayed Ahmad
CCA

Cooperation Center for

Afghanistan (II)
Shahr-i-Naw
Yakawlang

0088 21 621 138 244

ccakabul@hotmail.com
Web:

www.cca.org.af
FAO
Food and Agriculture
Organization of the United
MullMO GOolMm ReseMrcO FMrm

0799 208 853
0799 149 874
0088 21 651 120 379

muhammadmusa.athar@fao.org
faoaf-bamiyan@fao.org
Web:

www.fao.org
Of�cer in FOMrge: MoOMmmMd MusM APOMr

Programme for Afghanistan
TolRMrM VillMge
(opp. But-i-Kalan)

0799 153 965

rMOmP_sOO2006@yMOooBcom
ProjecP MMnMger:
NRC

Norwegian Refugee Council
Sari Asyab, Between ICRC and

0799 147 829
0772 059 701
0772 929 146
0088 21 621 295 011

ilac.bamian@nrcafpk.org
ilac.bamian.tl@nrcafpk.org
Web:

www.nrc.no
Of�ce AdminisPrMPor: BMriMlMy AOmMdzMi
PAN

Pajhwok Afghan News

0799 369 943

gOMfMri_OerMP@yMOooBcom
JeN:

RRRBpMjORokBcom
Contact Person:
Hadi Ghafari

Save the Children Japan

0799 393 281
0087 37 63 491 444

scjNMmyMn2@ReN-sMPBcom
JeN:

RRRBsMvecOildrenBorBjp
Country Representative: Miho Wada
SC-USA

Save the Children USA

Center

0799 054 410

fazam@savechildren.org
FonPMcPs: BMmiyMnCGMikundi Provinces
Web:

www.savethechildren.org
ProgrMm MMnMger: FMruqu AzMm

SAB

Solidarité Afghanistan Belgique
Opp. Oven St.
Sar Asyab
Web:

www.assosab.be
SA

Sar Asiab, Kucha-i-Zendan, in
front of DDR

0799 303 633
afg.cdm@solidarites-afghanistan.org
Web:

www.solidarites.org
Country Director:
Hassan El Sayed
SCRCSO
Rehabilitation, Cultural and
Next to Giant Buddha
Old Bazaar of Bamiyan

0799 472 483
0796 843 427
0774 813 456

scrsco@yahoo.com
akbardanesh@hotmail.com
Web:

www.baharaf.org
Director:


United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
SMrMsyMN VillMge, AirporP RdB
(PO Box 3205)

0799 822 329
0790 006 461

Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org

United Nations Children’s Fund

0798 507 277

kabul@unicef.org
Web:

www.unicef.org

United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees

0708 197 956
0708 197 958
FMx:

0087 37 63 033 321

hussains@unhcr.org
afgba@unhcr.org
Web:

www.unhcr.org
Snr. Prog. Asst. Team Leader:
Sayed Mustafa Hussaini
Daikundi Province
ACF

Action Contre La Faim
ZMrd NMy VillMge FenPre of Nili

0778 331 601
admin-daykundi@af.missions-acf.org
Web:

www.actioncontrelafaim.org
Mohammad Jawad Rezai
AIHRC


Human Rights Commission

0088 21 684 448 556
Web:

www.aihrc.org.af
BRAC

Bangladesh Rural

Advancement Committee
Khawalak, Nili

0706 039 732
Web:

www.bracafg.org
MoOMmmMd RM�qul HslMm
CCA

Cooperation Center for

Afghanistan
Bazaar-i-Chaparak

0088 21 621 138 007

sarwarhussaini@aol.com
Web:

www.cca.org.af
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
224

Coordination of Afghan Relief


0799 223 246

coMr_kNl@yMOooBcom
coarkbl@neda.af
Web:

www.coar.org.af
ProjecP MMnMger:

Ghazni Rural Support Program
Chaprasak Bazaar, Shahristan

0771 037 727

Web:

www.grsp.af
TKG/DHSA
The Killid Group/Development
& Humanitarian Services for
OlgOMn VillMge, neMr Po GisPricP
Governor’s Of�ce

0088 21 689 802 658

dOsM_dMikondi@yMOooBcom
e_M_RMli@yMOooBcom
JeN:

RRRBdOsMBMf C RRRBkillidBcom
ANdul JMli HMmidi

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
Main Nili City, UN Compounds
(PO Box 3205)

0706 062 561

Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org
GovernMnce Of�cer: Niki AmNer Moss

United Nations Children’s Fund

0798 50 7282

kabul@unicef.org
Web:

www.unicef.org
FMrMO Province
ADA

Afghanistan Development
Association
St. 8, District 1, near to HELP

0799 597 953
0799 556 812

ada.farah@ada.org.af
Web:

www.ada.org.af
Provincial Manager: Abdul Saboor Khedmat

Hs. 277, Bagh-i-Pul St. (south
of Barq Bus Station)

0799 615 389
0088 216 5551 8015

farah@cha-net.org
Web:

www.cha-net.org
MMlek AfgOMn JMkili

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
(PO Box 32050)

0799 341 848

Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org
GovernMnce Of�cer: MoOMmmMd Gul Seddiqi
FMryMN Province
ADA

Afghan Development

Association
District 2,Tatara Khana

Bandare Herat Guzar

0772 374 678
0799 461 236

ada.faryab@ada.org.af
Web:

www.ada.org.af
Provincial Manager: Ibrahim Mangal
FonPMcPs: GMikundiCFMrMOCFMryMN Provinces
AWEC

Afghan Women’s Educational
Center

0799 154 137

faryab@awec.info
Web:

www.awec.info
ProjecP MMnMger:
ResOMd
AIHRC


Human Rights Commission

0088 21 621 280 264
Web:

www.aihrc.org.af
AADA

Agency for Assistance and
Development of Afghanistan
Airport Rd., opp. Imam Abu
Hanifa Mosque

0799 271 526

qamaruddinfakhri@yahoo.com
Web:

www.aada.org.af
ProjecP MMnMger:
QMmMruddin FMkOri
ACTED

Agency for Technical

Cooperation and Development
Mukhaberat St., Kohi Khana,
District 1,

0799 173 840

maymana@acted.org
Web:

www.acted.org
Area Coordinator:
Jawid Akbary
BRAC

Bangladesh Rural

Advancement Committee

0700 384 470
Web:

www.bracafg.org



House of Ab. Raouf Soori (near
Qaisar and Almar Bus Stop)

0799 169 783
0088 21 651 13 4 098

faryab@cha-net.org
Web:

www.cha-net.org

Faryab Institute of Higher

Education

0799 274 712
GirecPor:
FMizullMO HMNiNi

International Assistance Mission
FMryMN ProvinciMl HospiPMl
(PO Box 625, Kabul)

0799 188 781

rtl.faryab@iamafg.org
Web:

www.iam-afghanistan.org
FGP ProjecP MMnMger: MMrk AllMn
NRC

Norwegian Refugee Council

0799 147 834
0700 186 518
0088 21 66 723 346

edu.pc1@nrcafpk.org
admin.maimana@nrcafpk.org
Web:

www.nrc.no
ProjecP FoordinMPor: SusMn JisneRski

Partners in Revitalization and
Near Ikhlas Mosque
Shahr-i-Naw, Andkhoy

0799 448 328
Web:

www.prb.org.af
Admin Manager:
SC-USA

Save the Children USA

0799 124 462
0088 21 684 400 118

sazami@savechildren.org
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Web:

www.savethechildren.org
Sr. Program Manager: Dr Sohali Azami

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
North Part of the City,
Next to Da Afghanistan Bank
(PO Box 3205)

0799 173 949
0797 662 500

sMkOipejouOisO@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org

United Nations Children’s Fund

0798 507 387

kabul@unicef.org
Web:

www.unicef.org

United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees

0700 282 647
0087 37 62 929 185
0088 21 651 102 577
FMx:

0087 37 62 736 186

RojM@unOcrBorg
afgmn@unhcr.org
Web:

www.unhcr.org
GurMNle SoluPion Of�cer: JoOn JojM
Ghazni Province

Afghan Amputee Bicyclists for
Rehabilitation and Recreation

0700 639 056

hamdard.aabrar@gmail.com
Web:

www.aabrar.org
AdminCFinMnce Of�cer: HMmid AgOM
AWEEO
Afghan Women Empowerment

0773 133 989

MReeo_Mf_org@yMOooBcom
Director:
AWSE

Afghan Women Services and
Education Organization

0772 102 597

MRse_g@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.awse.org.af
FonPMcP Person:
ADA

Afghanistan Development
Association
Plan 3, Sardar Khan House,
nexP Po SOMmsul Ari�n HigO

0799 144 601

Web:

www.ada.org.af
Provincial Manager: Nasrullah
AADA

Agency for Assistance and
Development of Afghanistan
Opp. Mohammadi Mosque

0799 337 895

Web:

www.aada.org.af
ProjecP MMnMger: MirRMis Sediqi

Bakhtar Development Network

0799 337 895
0700 019 782

mamehrzad.bdf@gmail.com
Web:

www.bdn.org.af
ProjecP MMnMger: MirRMis Sidiqi
FonPMcPs: FMryMNCGOMzni Provinces
227
BRAC

Bangladesh Rural

Advancement Committee

0700 077 993
Web:

www.bracafg.org
Mustafa Mahmudul Masum
CPAU

Cooperation for Peace and Unity
Sang-i-Mash, Jaghori Center
Web:

www.cpau.org.af
Contact Person:
Jawad Bahunar

Coordination of Afghan Relief
Jahan Malika Girl High School

0700 363 400
0799 391 814

coMr_kNl@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.coar.org.af
ProjecP MMnMger:

Ghazni Rural Support Program
Maradina Bazaar, Malistan

0771 037 727

Web:

www.grsp.af
HAFO

Helping Afghan Farmers

Organization
KMrPe FMiz MoOMmmMd KMPiN
behind Airport

0786 500 797
0799 025 610

OMfo_gOMzni@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.hafo-int.org
Regional Manager: Saif Ali Nodrat
NAC

Norwegian Afghanistan

Committee
Post-i-Chehl, Jahan Malika
FMrukOi ResPMurMnP)

0777 898 191
0786 571 574


groadmin@nacaf.org
ProgrMmme Of�ce MMnMger: QMsim Noori
PAN

Pajhwok Afghan News

0700 167 946

JeN:

RRRBpMjORokBcom
Contact Person:

Sanayee Development

Organization
Mandawi-i-Qand, Aday
Qarabagh, across from
Swedish Committee regional

0799 003 028
Web:

www.sanayee.org.af
Abdul Rauf Ramaki
SCA

Swedish Committee for

Afghanistan
Wahdat Street in front of
Hazrati Ali Masque

0799 384 395
0799 384 393
0088 21 644 445 978

Web:

www.swedishcommittee.org
Of�ce AdminisPrMPor: HMNiN JMn
WADAN
The Welfare Association
for the Development of
National Tuberculosis Center

0707 185 511
Web:

www.wadan.org
ProjecP FoordinMPor: JMli
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Ghor Province
ACF

Action Contre La Faim
Taywara District

0088 21 650 602 789


Web:

www.actioncontrelafaim.org
Abdul Wakil

Near Hari Road River,
Ghor-Herat St.

0798 405 609
0797 025 897
0798 101 830
0088 21 684 400 129-30

ghorppm@afghanaid.org.uk
ghorproad@afghanaid.org.uk
Web:

www.afghanaid.org.uk
Provincial Programme Manager:
Abdul Rahman Tariq
BRAC

Bangladesh Rural

Advancement Committee
Nawabad, Chagcharan

0706 039 733
Web:

www.bracafg.org
Abul Hasnat

Catholic Relief Services
HsB 212, GOMrN-i-FMmiliOM
Web:

www.crs.org

Darahi Ghazi Street, west of

0799 298 232
0088 216 5115 0956

ghore@cha-net.org
Web:

www.cha-net.org

International Assistance Mission
IMl-RM-SMrjMngMl BMzMMr
(PO Box 9)

0796 199 285
0088 21 655 589 285

rtl.lal@iamafg.org
Web:

www.iam-afghanistan.org
Regional Manager: Hannelore Stein
NDA

National Development

Association

0088 216 5110 6703
Contact Person:
Ghafoor

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
Next to Airport, Chaghcharan
(PO Box 3205)

0797 403 791

fazelf@un.org
Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org
PoliPicMl AffMirs AssisPMnP: FMzllul HMq FMzel
Helmand Province
BRAC

Bangladesh Rural

Advancement Committee
Kabul-Laghman Rd.
Lashkar Gah

0700 649 575
Web:

www.bracafg.org
Provincial Manager: Abul Monsur
HAFO

Helping Afghan Farmers

Organization
Lashkar Gah

0799 499 169

OMfo_lMsOkMrgMO@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.hafo-int.org
RegionMl MMnMger: FMrooq NMdim
FonPMcPs: GOorCHelmMndCHerMP Provinces

Mercy Corps
Loger Avenue
Lashkar Gah

0707 681 882
0708 393 872
0799 499 158
0088 21 655 520 636

shwali@af.mercycorps.org
Web:

www.mercycorps.org
Program Coordinator: Eng Shah Wali
WADAN
The Welfare Association
for the Development of
Bost St., Opp. Information,
Culture and Tourism
Directorate
Lashkar Gah

0799 254 337
Web:

www.wadan.org
Coordinator:
Abdul Rahman Zahir
Herat Province

Afghan Institute of Learning
Park Millat Street, west of
AIHRC, behind National Army
RecruiPmenP Of�ce

0700 284 326

sMkenM_OerMP@yMOooBcom
JeN:

RRRBcreMPingOopeBorgCMNouPMil
Contact Person: Mohammad Ishaq Rawak
AWEC

Afghan Women’s Educational
Center

0798 415 891

jMn_fMsiOi@MRecBinfo
Web:

www.awec.info
ProjecP MMnMger:
Ali jMn FMsiOi
AHRO

Organization
FOMrMOi HMji YMqooN, nexP
to Talar Almas, Sharikat

0703 188 506

ayubyamen@yahoo.com
Web:

www.ahro.af
Contact Person:
Amrul Haq Ayouby
AIHRC


Human Rights Commission

0700 400 689
0088 216 2122 7751

MiOrc_OrP@yMOooBcom
nMsir_fMrMOmMnd@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.aihrc.org.af

Afghanistan Information

Management Services
UNDP Compound, Gazar Gah
Road
(PO Box 5906)

0700 311 972

0700 426 841

qahar.mahmoodi@aims.org.af
Web:

www.aims.org.af
Regional Manager: Abdul Qahar Mahmoodi

AfgOMnisPMn NGO SMfePy Of�ce
JesPern Region Of�ce

0799 322 192

west@afgnso.org
Web:

www.afgnso.org
Western Region Safety Advisor: Patrick Malach
Afghanistan’s Children, A New
Approach

0799 208 411
Web:

www.aschaina.com
Cordinator:
AKTC

Aga Khan Trust for Culture
Qala Ikhtyaruddin, District 7
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance

0799 333 667
Web:

RRRBMkdnBorgCMfgOMnisPMn_culPurMldevelopmenPB
ProjecP MMnMger:
ACBAR

Agency Coordinating Body for
Afghan Relief
nexP Po UNHFR Of�ce, End
MMjidi of SPreeP, GisPricP 6

0799 403 200
0700 403 200

niazi@acbar.org
Web:

www.acbar.org
FMrid NiMzi

Agency for Basic Services
St. 64 Metra, Ittehad St.
(behind Heraidost Pump

0700 404 838
040 446 296

MNs_Mfg@yMOooBcom
jMnoori1@OoPmMilBcom
Director:
Javed Ahmad Noori
Agency for Rehabilitation
and Energy Conservation in
HsB 386, JMdM-i-KMj
FOMrMOi HMji AyouN

0700 400 190
040 220 843
aminullahkhairandish@yahoo.com
Regional Director: Aminullah Khairandish
ARV

Agency for Rehabilitation of

0799 202 031
0700 404 147
0088 216 5026 6223

Mrv_OerMP@yMOooBcom
ONMid Seddiqui
BRAC

Bangladesh Rural

Advancement Committee
Jada-i-Mahtab, Walid Ahmed

0700 409 551

musa.1962@yahoo.com
Web:

www.bracafg.org
Regional Manager: Mohammad Abu Musa

Catholic Relief Services
HMji GOulMm NMNi HMlemMyMr
House, east side of Abbakhsh,
Badmorghan Avenue,
Telecommunication Rd, District 3

0799 111 093

phicks@crsherat.org
phicks.crs@gmail.com
Web:

www.crs.org
CA

Jada-i-Mahtab, Bagcha-i-Mehtar
(PO Box 1362)

0700 407 837
0799 416 256
040 227 852
0088 216 5110 2689

ca-country-rep@web-sat.com
eoca-general@web-sat.com
Web:

www.christian-aid.org
Country Representative: Joz van Mierlo

Coordination of Afghan Relief
Tallar Qamar, Shamali St.

Shahr-i-Naw

0700 409 108
0700 404 352
040 229 973

coarherat@yahoo.com
coMr_kNl@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.coar.org.af
Contacts: Herat Province
231

JMdM-i-KORMjM ANdullMO AnsMr
Kocha-i-Moallem Ghani

0700 301 657
088 21 621 124 916

herat@cha-net.org
Web:

www.cha-net.org
HMyMPullMO MosOkMni
DAC

Danish Afghanistan Committee

0798 106 761

Web:

www.afghan.dk
ProjecP GirecPor:
DACAAR

Danish Committee for Aid to
Afghan Refugees
Near Check Post 1

0797 987 049
0799 345 596

kiani@dacaar.org
wspherat@dacaar.org
Web:

www.dacaar.org
(Rural Development Programme) Provincial
Abdul Raziq Kiani
DCA

Dutch Committee for

Afghanistan
Qul Ordu Street, Amir Ali Shir
Nawaee School Lane

0700 406 297
0799 884 992
040 441 484

qfakhri@dca-af.org
RegionMl ProgrMmme GirecPor: ANdul QMder FMkOri
Embassy of Italy, Civilian

Component of PRT
cCo PRT HerMP

0088 21 621 190 569
0039 06 46 913 666
FMx:

003E 06 47 3D8 673

Head of Programme: Carlo Ungaro
FAO
Food and Agriculture
Organization of the United
Walayat Street, MAIL

Compound

0799 412 662

nabi.gul@fao.org
faoaf-herat@fao.org
Web:

www.fao.org
FINCA

Foundation for International
Walayat St.

0799 417 266
Web:

www.villagebanking.org
Regional Manager: Issa Khan
GTZ
Gesellschaft für Technische
Technical Cooperation)
cCo AFBAR HerMP Field Of�ce
JeN:

RRRBgPzBdeCMfgOMnisPMn
Contact Person:

Handicap International

Web:

www.handicap-international.org
Country Director:
Alexandra Carrie
HAWCA
Humanitarian Assistance for
the Women and Children of
HsB 8, oppB KOMRjM ANdullMO
Ansar Lycee (Military School)
Prison Street

0797 075 976
0799 490 674
0799 878 766

hawca@hawca.org
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
hawcamail@gmail.com
Web:

www.hawca.org
Director:
Selay Ghaffar


Programme for Afghanistan

0799 224 755

ProjecP MMnMger: TMmMnM
IARCSC
Independent Administrative
Reform and Civil Services
Administration Building of

Governor’s House

0799 339 256
Web:

www.iarcsc.gov.af
GirecPor:
HMji ANul SMlMm

International Assistance

Zaman Jan, 100m after Imam
Hussain Mosque on right side
at end of alley, (PO Box 9)

0799 205 905
0700 400 139

rtl.herat@iamafg.org
Web:

www.iam-afghanistan.org
RegionMl MMnMger: KMijM IiisM MMrPin
IFRC
International Federation of
Red Cross and Red Crescent
Societies
Afghan Red Crescent Society
(ARCS) Compound, District 8,
near to Takhti Safar

0700 400 986

afghanistan.herat@ifrc.org
Web:

www.arcs.org.af

International Islamic Relief
Agency
cCo AFBAR HerMP Field Of�ce
Web:

www.isra-relief.org
FonPMcP Person:
IRC

International Rescue Committee

0799 565 331
0700 452 785
040 227 640

hrtfc@afghanistan.theirc.org
info@afghanistan.theirc.org
Web:

www.theirc.org
Field FoordinMPor: BMsir AOmMd Amini

District 1, front of Inqalab High

040 221 506

Marie Stopes International
Gerdai Park-i-Taraqi (in front

0787 889 504
Web:

www.mariestopes.org

HsB 6, JMdM-i-KMj, BMgO-i-AzMdie SPB

0796 850 834
omohammadi@medicamondiale.org
Web:

www.medicamondiale.org
MCPA

Agency
cCo AFBAR HerMP Field Of�ce
Contact Person:
MOVE

MOVE Welfare Organization
Qool Ordu Rd., Bagh Morad
Street, Opp. Gazer Rd.
Contacts: Herat Province

0700 419 880

gOMznMRy_sMPPMr@yMOooBcom
AdminC FinMnce MMnMger: ANdul SMPPMr GOMznMRi

National Democratic Institute
for International Affairs
Charrahi Bland Ab, Arif Khan

0799 205 618
0088 21 684 400 029

Web:

www.ndi.org
Program Manager: Abdul Aziz Samim
Nippon International
Cooperation for Community
Development
JMdM-i-KMji, SOMOr-i-NMR

0700 431 533
040 230 676
0087 37 63 088 347

herat2@kyoto-nicco.org
mashhad@kyoto-nicco.org
Web:

www.kyoto-nicco.org
YosOiPMkM MrMkMmi
30 Meter Street

0700 410 003
0795 518 800


ahmady.noor.org@gmail.com
info.noor.org@gmail.com
General Manager: Ahmad Shabir Radfar
NRC

Norwegian Refugee Council
Jadeye Walayat, Opp. Agriculture
Department inside alley

0795 138 272
0700 030 436
0796 553 375
0088 2162 1330 214

wam@nrcafpk.org
shelter.pc3@nrcafpk.org
Web:

www.nrc.no
ProjecP FoordinMPor: RoNerPo VilM SexPo

Nye Express Of�ce
i-SOMgOMl HM, joined Po RMdio

0773 333 623

kMmMlnMser_2006@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.nyeexpress.com
KMmMl NMsir Milgery
Organization for Mine
Rehabilitation
Sayed Abdurrazq Hs. 5, Jada-i-
Kag, District 5, Baghcha-i-Mehtar


omarherat@yahoo.com
Web:

www.omar.org.af
PAN

Pajhwok Afghan News

0799 241 128

quraishi1979@yahoo.com
JeN:

RRRBpMjORokBcom
Contact Person:

Baghch-i-Gulha, Opp. Reza
Mosque

0799 022 601
0771 078 888

m.wareymoch@killid.com

info@killid.com
Web:

www.killid.com
Imam Mohammad Wareymoch
Rural Rehabilitation

Association for Afghanistan
Jada-i-Balak Ha-i-Amniyat-
Milli, opp. Amniyat-i- Milli’s

0700 601 853
0093 441 956


rraawest@yahoo.com
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance

Sanayee Development

Organization
Jada-i-Mahtab (near Mirza
AsOeq MMsjed), MirzM HsOMq
Street

040 221 796

OeMrP_sdf@gmMilBcom
Web:

www.sanayee.org.af
Abdul Khaliq Stanikzai
The HALO Trust International
Herat-Islam Qala Main Road,
opp. West Transport Terminal,
north side

0700 665 750
0799 016 144

Web:

www.halotrust.org
JesP RegionMl OperMPions Of�ce: ANdul IMPif RMOimi
Turkmenistan Consulate
Jada-i-Ansari

040 223 718
0700 402 803
0799 329 305

Gurbanov Ahmet

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
HMAFC Pul-i-PMsOPun, AirporP RdB
(PO Box 3205)

0700 093 852
0790 006 601

motta@un.org
Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org
FrMncesco MoPPM

United Nations Children’s Fund

0798 507 673

kabul@unicef.org
Web:

www.unicef.org

United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees
End of MMjidi SPreeP, HerMP FiPy

0700 400 089
0040 447 041 43
FMx:

0041 227 3E7 D06

abdulkad@unhcr.org
afghe@unhcr.org
Web:

www.unhcr.org
HeMd of SuN-Of�ce: HMji JMmM HssM ANdulkMdir

United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees

0799 205 443
0098 91 53 144 113
0088 21 651 121 618

azamy@unhcr.org
afgsi@unhcr.org
Web:

www.unhcr.org
SrB Field AssisPMnP: NMik MoOMmmMd AzMmy
United Nations Human

Settlements Programme

0799 416 237

OMNiPMP_OrP@OoPmMilBcom
wahab@unhabitat-afg.org
Web:

www.unhabitat-afg.org
Provincial Manager: Sayed Sadullah Wahab

UniPed NMPions Of�ce on Grugs
and Crime

0799 226 434

MlPMf-OussMinBjoyM@unodcBorg
Web:

www.unodc.org
Provincial Coordinator: Altaf Hussain Joya
VWO

Voice of Women
Badmorghan (across from


0700 298 732
0799 209 386
FonPMcPs: HerMPCJMRzjMn Provinces
040 226 061

vRo_Mfg@yMOooBcom
vRo_surMyM@OoPmMilBcom
Web:

www.vowo.org
Executive Director: Suraya Pakzad
WC-UK

War Child United Kingdom
Janb-i-Kocha-i-Bagh-i-Morad
Seemetra Street

0797 919 802
0799 327 683
040 220 815

padma@warchild.org.uk
nasir@warchild.org.uk
Web:

www.warchild.org.uk
Field GirecPor:
PMdmMvMPOi YedlM
WASSA

Women Activities and Social
Services Association
Bagh-i-Azadi Rd.

0799 407 660

wassa2010@yahoo.com
wassaherat@yahoo.com
Executive Director: Hulan Khatibi

World Health Organization
Central Tank, in front of Park
Hotel, Lycee Ustad Raiz St.,
Roshan Telecom

0700 088 222
0798 270 373
0700 044 864

rasoolis@afg.emro.who.int
JeN:

RRRBemroBROoBinPCMfgOMnisPMn
National Health Coordinator (NHC): Abobakr Rasooli

World Vision International
Walayat Street, Amiriat
BoulevMrd, UNHFEF Alley

040 224 568
0799 252 896

enzo_veccOio@RviBorg
Web:
www.afghanistan.worldvision.org
NMPionMl GirecPor: Enzo VeccOio
JMRzjMn Province

Adventist Development and
Relief Agency

0799 411 516

d.baratov@adra-af.org
Web:

www.adra.euroafrica.org
Genis BMrMPov
AHRO

Organization

0799 410 413
0788 886 990

achr98@yahoo.com
Web:

www.ahro.af
FonPMcP Person:

Jawzjan Institute of Higher
Education

0757 510 204
GirecPor:
Gul AOmMd FMzli
MOVE

MOVE Welfare Organization
Kocha-e-Semsari-Street
Naswan high school

0799 266 013

moveBjMRzjMn@gMRMNBcom
ProjecP MMnMger:

Save the Children UK
BMndMr-i-AqcOM, AyenM TV


0700 500 639

stamang@psh.paknet.com.pk
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
santa165@gawab.com
Web:

www.savethechildren.org.uk
Health Program Manager: Santa
SC-USA

Save the Children USA

0799 007 469

bngombi@savecdhildren.org
Web:

www.savethechildren.org
SrB ProgrMm MMnMger: Gr BrimM FMPormM NgomNi

STEP Health and Development
Organization
Koche Camisari

0799 202 943
0786 270 286

sPepBjMRzjMn@gmMilBcom
Regional Director: Abdul Basir Mawlawizada

Tearfund

0797 745 560
0772 186 577

dmP-jMRzjMn-Mc@PeMrfundBorg
dmP-jMRzjMn-pm@PeMrfundBorg
Web:

www.tearfund.org
Area Coordinator: Sudarshan Reddy
ZOA

ZOA Refugee Care, Northern
Afghanistan
Bander-i-Andkhoy

0799 150 353
0798 996 237
0799 150 353
ProjecP MMnMger:
Fornelis Verduijn
Kandahar Province


Development Services
Pataw Ghala Rd.
Kabul Shah

0799 331 728

kandahar@ahds.org
Web:

www.ahds.org
ADA

Afghan Development

Association
House, next to UNAMA
KMndMOMr of�ce, neMr Po SerM

0700 320 346
0707 331 951

ada.kandahar@ada.org.af
Web:

www.ada.org.af
Acting Provincial Manager: Anwar Imtiaz
AHRO

Organization
OppB RosOMn Of�ce, KMreez
Bazar, Stadium Rd.

0788 886 971
0700 628 935

MOro_kdr@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.ahro.af
Contact Person:
Ghulam Sakhi Basarki
AIHRC


Human Rights Commission
Felez, neMr Muslim FOMRk)

0700 307 086
0700 303 133
0088 21 621 230 089

kandahar@aihrc.org.af
aihrckdh@yahoo.com
Web:

www.aihrc.org.af
FonPMcPs: JMRzjMnCKMndMOMr Provinces
237

Afghanistan Information

Management Services
UNAMA Compound Kandahar
(PO Box 005, UNDP Kabul)

0700 515 915

ali.qureshi@aims.org.af

zamar.afghan@aims.org.af
Web:

www.aims.org.af
Regional Manager: Ali Ahmad Qureshi

AfgOMnisPMn NGO SMfePy Of�ce
SouPOern Region Of�ce

0700 492 550

Web:

www.afgnso.org
Southern Region Safety Advisor: Noori
BRAC

Bangladesh Rural

Advancement Committee
NeMr ANiPMP Of�ce, KMNul SOMOr
Kariz Bazar

0707 301 273

azadbrac@yahoo.com
Web:

www.bracafg.org

Mosque), Kabul Shah

0700 308 470
0090 21 651 134 068

qandahar@cha-net.org
qandahar@cha-net.org
Web:

www.cha-net.org
AcPing Of�ce MMnMger: ANdul QMOer
DAO

Development and Ability

Organization
Sector 1 to the south of Khirqa

077 88 366 414

info@daoafghanistan.org
Web:

www.daoafghanistan.org
HM�z ANdul IMPif
FAO
Food and Agriculture
Organization of the United
Shahr-i--Naw

0700 299 022
0088 21 621 215 052

gul.ahmad@eirp-afg.org
faoaf-kandahar@fao.org
Web:

www.fao.org

Handicap International

Web:

www.handicap-international.org
Country Director:
Alexandra Carrie
HAFO

Helping Afghan Farmers

Organization
Karte Malemin

0700 365 779

OMfo_kMndMOMr@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.hafo-int.org
Regional Manager: Karim

HOPE Worldwide
Ghazi Park Main Rd. (near

Ghazi Park), District 6
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 301 387
Web:

www.af.hopeww.org
Contact Person:
IbnSina Public Health

Programme for Afghanistan

0707 550 545
ProjecP Of�cer:
IARCSC
Independent Administrative
Reform and Civil Services
Darwaza-i-Herat

0799 193 029
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Web:

www.iarcsc.gov.af
Director:
IFRC
International Federation of
Red Cross and Red Crescent
Societies
Eidgah Jada, Kandahar
Marastoon, Afghan Red
Crescent Society’s compound

0700 303 597

sayed.omershah@ifrc.org
Web:

www.arcs.org.af
SMyed OmMr SOMO

Islamic Relief–Afghanistan
NexP Po HMjMnMi Flinic, KMNul

0703 618 660

Web:

www.islamic-relief.com

www.irafghanistan.org
FinMnce Mnd Admin Of�cer: MMPiullMO

Kandahar University

0700 018 302

Mercy Corps
HMji HsmMil KMndMOMri House
(near Muslim Chawk), District 6
Shahr-i-Naw

0799 290 916

0707 948 234

0700 300 729
0799 448 061

osharif@af.mercycorps.org
Web:

www.mercycorps.org
Provincial Coordinator: Omer Sharif

National Democratic Institute
for International Affairs
Sera Jomat, Old Indian Consulate
Shahr-i-Naw

0799 828 062

msatee@ndi.org
Web:

www.ndi.org
Regional Manager: Mohammad Omar Satai
Nye Express Of�ce
GeO KORMjM, HMji HMNiN

Mosque St.

0799 697 704

MmMnullMO_nMRMNi@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.nyeexpress.com
AmMnullMO NMRMNi
PAN

Pajhwok Afghan News

0799 806 508

bashir.naadim@googlemail.com
JeN:

RRRBpMjORokBcom
Contact Person:
NeMr Po ZMid Bin HMris MMsjid,
Ghazi Mohd Jan Khan Watt,
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 317 320


info@killid.com
Web:

www.killid.com

Sanayee Development

Organization
Muslim Square, across from

0752 054 203

kandahar.sdo@gmail.com
Web:

www.sanayee.org.af

Save the Children UK
Near Read Mosque, District 6
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 306 245

mohdsaeed@psh.paknet.com.pk
Web:

www.savethechildren.org.uk
Programme Coordinator: Mohammad Saeed
Contacts: Kandahar Province
SWABAC
Southern and Western
Afghanistan and Balochistan
Association for Coordination
Herat Road, after the Red
Mosque, next to Khoshbakht
Shahr-i-Naw

0799 088 036
0700 301 105
0799 147 400

swabac@yahoo.com
swabac@gmail.com
Executive Coordinator: Jan Mohammad

Tearfund

0707 879 911

dmt-kandahar-ac@tearfund.org
Web:

www.tearfund.org
Area Coordinator: Dennis Gbambor James

Terre des Hommes

0700 302 677
0087 076 163 8760

Web:

www.tdhafghanistan.org
ProjecP FoordinMPor: TMj MuOMmmMd
TGM


0798 988 164
0700 498 423

graeme.smith@globeandmail.com
Web:

www.globeandmail.com

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
Near to Kandahar Stadium
Shahr-i-Naw
(PO Box 3205)

0700 093 856
0790 006 707

khaydarov@un.org
Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org
ANdusMmMP KOMydMrov

United Nations Children’s Fund

0798 507 570

kandahar@unicef.org
kabul@unicef.org
Web:

www.unicef.org

United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees
Kandahar Stadium), District 6
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 301 266
0041 227 397 510
0088 21 651 121 624
FMx:

0041 227 3E7 D11

fernandn@unhcr.org
afgkd@unhcr.org
Web:

www.unhcr.org
HeMd of SuN-Of�ce: NMsir ANel FernMndes

UniPed NMPions Of�ce on Grugs
and Crime

0797 223 335

fazal.mohammad@unodc.org
Web:

www.unodc.org
ProvinciMl FoordinMPor: FMzel MoOMmmMd FMzli
WADAN
The Welfare Association
for the Development of
Hs. 3, Opp. Ghazi Park main gate
Shahr-i-Naw

0799 271 884
Web:

www.wadan.org
FoordinMPor:
WAA

Women Assistance Association
KOojMk BMNM SPreeP, GisPricP 4

World Health Organization
Section 1, near Mirwais Hospital
Shahr-i-Naw
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
240

0700 290 175

kamwakr@afg.emro.who.int
JeN:

RRRBemroBROoBinPCMfgOMnisPMn
National Health Coordinator: Rhamtullah Kamwak
Kapisa Province
AU
Alberuni University
SOirkMP NMsMji GulNMOMr

0799 317 435

Abdul Rashid
BRAC

Bangladesh Rural

Advancement Committee

0707 833 680
Web:

www.bracafg.org

Marie Stopes International
Padsha Sahib House, Shir Gul

0774 715 081
Web:

www.mariestopes.org
SAB


Belgique
SMnMkOel VillMge, 1BD km souPO
from Nassagi Gulbahar Bazaar
Web:

www.assosab.be
Khost Province

Afghan Amputee Bicyclists for
Rehabilitation and Recreation

0700 265 191
naqeebullah.aabrar@gmail.com
Web:

www.aabrar.org
Administrator:
AADA

Agency for Assistance and
Development of Afghanistan
Beside Police Headquarters

0786 705 542

drdarmal@yahoo.com
Web:

www.aada.org.af
PojecP MMnMger:

Basic Education for Afghans
Bagh-i-Prozha, Khost Bazaar

0799 137 115
E-mMil: noorNMMdsOMOsOMkir_MgNMsed@yMOooBcom
Infrastructural Rehabilitation
Floor 1, JMlMli MMrkeP (NeOind

0799 210 689
Deputy Director:
HealthNet–Transcultural

Psychosocial Organization
Behind Governmental Guest

0788 228 020
0700 363 686

malang456@hotmail.com
Web:

www.healthnettpo.org
FonPMcP person:

International Medical Corps
Tapai Matoon

0799 204 475

drlailuma@yahoo.com
Web:

www.imcworldwide.org
ProjecP MMnMger:
IMilumM AnRer
IRC

International Rescue Committee
Next to the Northern Gate of

0799 135 190
0088 216 2144 7655
FonPMcPs: KMndMOMrCKMpisMCKOosPCKunMr Provinces
241

irckhost@afghanistan.theirc.org
info@afghanistan.theirc.org
Web:

www.theirc.org
Field FoordinMPor:
TKG/DHSA
The Killid Group/Development
and Humanitarian Services for
Behind Government Main


0799 137 346

dOsM_kOosP@yMOooBcom
JeN:

RRRBdOsMBMf C RRRBkillidBcom
HMji SediqullMO

Khost University

0799 249 230
FMiz MoO FMyMz

National Democratic Institute
for International Affairs
Khost Town Ring Road

0799 135 656

Web:

www.ndi.org
Regional Program Manager:

Nye Express Of�ce
MojMOed BooksPore

0799 155 988
Web:

www.nyeexpress.com
MMPeullMO FMzly
WADAN
The Welfare Association
for the Development of
West of Tribal Directorate

0775 119 080
Web:

www.wadan.org
Coordinator:

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
ProjecP GMrden
(PO Box 3205)

0799 134 525

rkhan@un.org
Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org
Kunar Province

Afghan Amputee Bicyclists for
Rehabilitation and Recreation

0700 288 290

inayat.aabrar@gmail.com
Web:

www.aabrar.org
ProjecP MMnMger:
HnMyMPullMO

Basic Education for Afghans
HejrMP KelMi KrMmMr, AsMdMNMd

0756 520 028
0700 643 593
0700 643 594
0088 216 5026 3536

nMjeeNnur@OoPmMilBcom
GulMmmullMO JMqMr
IHSAN

Services Association
SAB

Solidarité Afghanistan Belgique
In Reysate Qabaiel, Asadabad
Web:

www.assosab.be

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
(PO Box 3205)

0700 476 435

haiderzai@un.org
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
242
Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org
AyMz HMidMrzMi
Kunduz Province

Afghan Amputee Bicyclists for
Rehabilitation and Recreation
Kunduz City
Web:

www.aabrar.org
Filed coordinMPor: MoOMmmMd KOMlid
AIHRC


Human Rights Commission
Kocha-i-Zakhail, Maidan-i-

Pukhta (south of PRT hospital)

0799 212 895
0088 21 621 230 047
0088 21 650 268 966

kunduz@aihrc.org.af
MiOrc_kunduz@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.aihrc.org.af

Afghanistan Information

Management Services
UNDP Compound, Pedagogy
Street, opp. Kunduz University
(PO Box 5906)

0700 721 992

asadullah.siyall@aims.org.af

Web:

www.aims.org.af
Regional Manager: Assadullah Siyall
BRAC

Bangladesh Rural

Advancement Committee
288CKocOe MukOMNerMP

Sherkhan High School Street

0700 713 654

mahmud.bagha@yahoo.com
Web:

www.bracafg.org
Regional Manager: Abu Abdullah A Mahmud
CFA

ChildFund Afghanistan
Hs. 1250, Pedagogy Avenue
Region 2

0794 905 005
0787 651 977
Web:

www.childfund.org
CCA

Cooperation Center for

Afghanistan
Center of Kunduz City

0088 21 621 280 659

sarwarhussaini@aol.com
Web:

www.cca.org.af
MusM KMsOi�
Deutscher Entwicklungsdienst
(German Development

Service)
German Hs., Kabul Rd.
(PO Box 25)

0799 455 470

dedafg@web.de
Web:

www.ded.de
Education Training Center
for Poor Women and Girls of
Qahwa Khana Lane, Bandar-i-
Kabul

0799 323 309
0799 206 604

Mrezo_qMniO@yMOooBcom
Director:
Malika Qanih
FAO
Food and Agriculture
Organization of the United
Shahidi Say Darak

Kabul Highway

0700 515 527

ebadullah.azizi@fao.org
faoaf-kunduz@fao.org
Web:

www.fao.org
Contacts: Kunduz Province
243

Ghazni Rural Support Program
Hs. 1473, Municipality St.


0799 205 115

grspkunduz14@gmail.com
Web:

www.grsp.af
GTZ/ BEPA
Gesellschaft für Technische
Technical Cooperation) - Basic
Education Program
Kunduz TTC

0798 371 413

sayed.badehzada@gtz.de
Web:

www.gtz.de
AdminisPrMPive Of�cer: SMyed FMrsOid BMdeOzMdM
HealthNet–Transcultural

Psychosocial Organization
HsB 7, HMji SMngee SPreeP,
NeOind HMji SMngee Mosque,
Bandar-i-Imam Sahib

0789 880 662

drfmsaleh@yahoo.com
Web:

www.healthnettpo.org
FonPMcP Person:
FMiz MoOMmmMd SMleO
IARCSC
Independent Administrative
Reform and Civil Services
front of Madrasa-i-Takharistan)

0799 547 917
Web:

www.iarcsc.gov.af
Director:
Abdul Jalil Hamed
IHSAN

Services Association
SMyed KORMjMn SPB, BMndMr-i-

0799 390 087

Kunduz Institute of Higher

Education

0799 212 980
Director:
Qazi Abdul Qudoos

Kunduz Rehabilitation Agency
Mahkama Road (beside the
Hazrat Ali Mosque)

0799 309 779

info@kra-af.org
Web:

www.kra-af.org
ProgrMmme IiMison Of�cer: ANdul HMmeed

Mercy Corps
Abdul Ghafoor House
Bandar-i-Kabul

0799 447 569
0700 723 002
0799 203 794

trasooli@af.mercycorps.org
Web:

www.mercycorps.org
TMR�q RMsooli

National Democratic Institute
for International Affairs
Communication Street (right

0798 184 820

Web:

www.ndi.org
Regional Program Mgr.: Mohammad Haroon Nasrat
NRC

Norwegian Refugee Council
Feroz KoOi SPreeP

0799 797 746
0700 702 609
0088 216 333 401 118

mustafa@nrcafpk.org
icla.pcaf3@nrcafpk.org
Web:

www.nrc.no
Team Leader:
Mustafa Tahir
PAN

Pajhwok Afghan News

0799 395 005
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
244

sarfraz.afghan@gmail.com
JeN:

RRRBpMjORokBcom
Contact Person:
Abdul Mateen Sarfaraz

Partners in Revitalization and
Lysa-e-Naswan Kunuz, next to
Nawabad

0700 050 283
0799 015 213
0799 184 125

kunduz@prb.org.af
ziaformuly@yahoo.com
Web:

www.prb.org.af
VePB FoordinMPor:
SCA

Swedish Committee for

Afghanistan
Chaifroshi Street, District 3

0799 234 937
0700 257 850
0088 21 621 279 0 65
Web:

www.swedishcommittee.org
Field Of�ce AdminisPrMPor: ANdul QMdeer imMq
WADAN
The Welfare Association
for the Development of
Hs. 1379, St. 3, District 1,
neMr Po Kunduz TV sPMPion

0799 214 682

kmohammad@wadan.org
Web:

www.wadan.org
Regional Coordinator: Khan Mohammad

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
Bandar-i-Imam Sahib
(PO Box 3205)

0700 286 308
0790 006 401

Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org

United Nations Children’s Fund

0798 507 391

kabul@unicef.org
Web:

www.unicef.org

United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees

0700 501 818

haridass@unhcr.org
Web:

www.unhcr.org
AssociMPe ProPecPion Of�cer: HMridMss SrirMm

World Health Organization
Street Tea Sale, Section 4

0799 211 083
0707 248 149

ahmadia@afg.emro.who.int,
nazarahmadi@yahoo.com
JeN:

RRRBemroBROoBinPCMfgOMnisPMn
RegionMl Polio Of�cer: AOMmdi
Laghman Province

Afghan Amputee Bicyclists for
Rehabilitation and Recreation

0778 585 462

MzMP_sMOil@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.aabrar.org
Filed coordinMPor: AzMPullMO SMOil
ADA

Afghan Development

Association
Shahr-i-Naw
Next to the Women’s
Directorate

0797 265 125
FonPMcPs: KunduzCIMgOmMnCIogMr Provinces
245
0772 885 284:


ghani68@hotmail.com
Web:

www.ada.org.af
Provincial Manager: Abdul Ghani
HealthNet–Transcultural

Psychosocial Organization
Mehtarlam Provincial Hospital,
Shahr-i-Naw, Sar-i-Tapa

0789 880 575

sM�drmMjeed@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.healthnettpo.org
FonPMcP person:

Programme for Afghanistan
Qarghayee (next to Qarghayee

0700 629 136

d_qMOir@yMOooBco
ProjecP MMnMger: QMOir
IHSAN
Services Association
Logar Province
AWSE

Afghan Women Services and
Education Organization
Mohammed Agha District

0796 106 730

MRse_g@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.awse.org.af
Contact Person:

Coordination of Afghan Relief
Behind Police Department
Pul-i-Alam

0799 832 120
0700 260 453

coMr_kNl@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.coar.org.af
ProjecP MMnMger: MoOMmmMd RMOim JMrdMk

Country Development Unit

0786 500 625
Web:

www.cduafghan.org
Contact Person:
Sayed Humayoon
IRC

International Rescue

Committee
Bus SPMPion, AgriculPureC
Pul-i-Alam

0700 260 491
0088 21 633 351 530

memu06@dial.pipex.com
info@afghanistan.theirc.org
Web:

www.theirc.org
MRCA

Medical Refresher Courses for
Afghans
Opp. Governor’s House
Pul-i-Alam

0799 399 414
Web:

www.mrca-asso.org
Provincial Coordinator: Abdul Habib Alem
SAB


Belgique
Next to Qomandani Amnia
Baboos Road
Pul-i-Alam
Web:

www.assosab.be
WADAN
The Welfare Association
for the Development of
Behind Lodin Market
Pul-i-Alam

0799 058 074
Web:

www.wadan.org
Coordinator:
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
246
Nangarhar Province

Abdul Haq Foundation
Kama Bus Stand St. (close to

0700 602 182
0799 323 931
abdulhaqfoundation@hotmail.com
Web:

www.abdulhaq.org
Executive Director: Nasrullah Baryalai Arsalaie

Afghan Amputee Bicyclists for
Rehabilitation and Recreation

0700 611 917

nMsir_NMryMl@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.aabrar.org
Assistant Director: Abdul Nasir
ACSFO

Afghan Civil Society Forum
Organization
Hs. 321, Babaryan Street
Public Health Intersection

0793 559 426
0799 326 661
JeN:

RRRBMcsfBMfCRRRBMcsf-rcBcom

drBsOM�q@McsfBMf
ADA

Afghan Development

Association
Hs. 847, St. 5, Part 2 of District
4, RMig-i-SOMmMP KOMn, FMzul
Ali Baba Limited, Jalalabad

0799 722 401
0700 608 955
0786 099 777

ada.nangarhar@ada.org.af
Web:

www.ada.org.af
Regional Director: Ehsanullah Shinwari
AGHCO


FoordinMPion Of�ce
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand
Easter St., Jalalabad
AHSAO


Assistance Organisation


soorgull@hotmail.com

Hs. 1517, St. 3, District 3, Next
Po FruiP MMrkeP
(PO Box 1041)

0795 787 637
Web:

www.ancb.org
Contact Person:
Pacha
AWWD

Afghan Women Welfare

Department
St. 1, Charahi Sehat-i-Ama

0700 634 054

MRRd_jMlMlMNMd@OoPmMilBcom
awwd@brain.net.pk
Executive Director: Jamila Akberzai
AWEC

Afghan Women’s Educational
Center

0708 841 521

jMlMlMNMd@MRecBinfo
Web:

www.awec.info
projecP MMnMger: ZMkiM KMkMr
AHRO

Organization
Hs. 716, St, 2, Pt. 2, District 4
Contacts: Nangarhar Province
247

0788 886 960
0772 916 353

ahro.ngr@gmail.com
Web:

www.ahro.af
AIHRC


Human Rights Commission
(PO Box 005, UNDP Kabul)

0799 352 558
0088 21 621 230 095
Web:

www.aihrc.org.af

Afghanistan Information

Management Services
UNAMA Compound, JAA-

Torkham Highway
(PO Box 5906)

0700 606 843

sOMkerBmujMddidi@MimsBorgBMf

Web:

www.aims.org.af
RegionMl MMnMger: SOMker MujMddidi

AfgOMnisPMn NGO SMfePy Of�ce
EMsPern Region Of�ce

0799 248 362

Web:

www.afgnso.org
Eastern Region Safety Advisor: Philipp Schweers
ACBAR

Agency Coordinating Body for
Afghan Relief
Behind Old Chaparhar Bus
Station, in front of GTZ LOAAR
Of�ce, HSRA Of�ce Fompound

0700 601 917

jMlmMnMger@McNMrBorg
McNMrjld@McNMrBorg
Web:

www.acbar.org
Agency for Rehabilitation
and Energy Conservation in
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.

Amitié Franco-Afghane
near Afghanistan Women

Development Center

0799 001 695

Web:

www.afrane.asso.fr
ProjecP MMnMger:
Olivier MMrPeMu
ATA

Anti Tuberculosis Association
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.
BRAC
Bangladesh Rural
Advancement Committee
HsB 20, SPB 2, HMji ANdul QMder Rd

0700 175 779

jMNed_NrMc@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.bracafg.org
ProjecP MMnMger:

Basic Education for Afghans

075 600 1508
0799 490 167
0700 280 666

nMjeeNnur@OoPmMilBcom
nurista@brain.net.pk
GirecPor:
CWS

Church World Service
Police Headquarters, Lyce
Naswan 2 (near Girls High
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
248

0799 331 519
Web:

www.cwspa.org

Committee for Rehabilitation
Aid to Afghanistan
Hs. 6, St. 2, Area 1,
PO Box 785, Kabul University

0799 322 493
0700 686 951
0088 21 689 802 320

sancraa@brain.net.pk
sanashefa@hotmal.com
Web:

www.craausa.org
Contact Person:

Country Development Unit

0700 698 556
Web:

www.cduafghan.org
Contact Person:
DACAAR

Danish Committee for Aid to
Afghan Refugees
HsB 134, OppB HMji ZMOer
House, Sayed Kaian Street

0799 38 26 06

jMlMlMNMd@dMcMMrBorg
Web:

www.dacaar.org
Water & Sanitation Programme Provincial
FAO
Food and Agriculture
Organization of the United
Old Torkham Bus Station,

close to Agr. High School

0700 613 868
0700 603 613
0798 410 572
0088 21 643 339 364

kOusOMlBMsi�@fMoBorg
fMoMf-jMlMlMNMd@fMoBorg
Web:

www.fao.org
KusOOMl Asi�

HealthNet–Transcultural

Psychosocial Organization
SMrMnRMly, Flose Po UNHFEF

0700 068 174
0756 002 648

a.habibyar@yahoo.com
Web:

www.healthnettpo.org
Contact Person:
Ahmed Zia Habibyar
IARCSC
Independent Administrative
Reform and Civil Services
Opp. Military Hospital, beside
Pakistan Consulate

0700 070 365
Web:

www.iarcsc.gov.af
Director:
Gulalai Jabarkhail
IHSAN

Services Association
Hs. 2, Area 3 (Opp. Dar-ul-


0700 600 591
0700 603 050
IFRC
International Federation of
Red Cross and Red Crescent
Societies
Afghan Red Crescent Society
(ARCS) Compound ,Opp.
Directorate of Health

0700 603 574
Web:

www.arcs.org.af
HfPikOMr AOmMd
Contacts: Nangarhar Province
249

International Foundation of
Block 7, Kabul-Torkham Rd.

0700 605 705

Web:

www.ifhope.org

International Islamic Relief
Agency
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.
Web:

www.isra-relief.org

International Medical Corps
Sector 4, behind Saranwali
Of�ce, TourkOMm Old Bus SPop

0798 246 230

tsesabe@imcworldwide.org
Web:

www.imcworldwide.org
Program Coordinator: Takele Sesabe
IRC

International Rescue Committee
HsB 1, FMzlulOMq MujMOed SPB
New Daramsal

0799 021 207
0700 600 885

jlNfc@MfgOMnisPMnBPOeircBorg
info@afghanistan.theirc.org
Web:

www.theirc.org
Field FoordinMPor: ANdul AOMd SMmoon

Mercy Corps
Gulayie Araban, District 3
and Spin Ghar University


0700 660 841

0795 393 455

0088 21 684 441 610

emuchiri@af.mercycorps.org
Web:

www.mercycorps.org
ProgrMm MMnMger: ElijM MucOiri

MCPA

Agency
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.

Mine Detection and Dog Centre
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.
Web:

www.mdcafghan.org
Développement des
Economies Rurales en
Aghanistan
2nd St. (left), Chehil Metra Rd.,
Reg-i-Shamard Khan, District 4

0700 613 025
0797 425 405
deputyops.east@madera-afgha.org
Web:

www.madera-asso.org
Deputy Operations Director, East:
Abdul Rahman Satarzai

Nangarhar University

0700 640 460

National Democratic Institute
for International Affairs
Saran Wali

0799 382 597

ayousof@ndi.org
Web:

www.ndi.org
Regional Manager: Mohammad Yousaf Alkozay
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
NRC

Norwegian Refugee Council
Regi Shahmard khan, Zone 4
St.4, Sayed Kaykhan Shopes

0797 132 728
0700 181 656
0700 030 422
0088 21 650 269 014

wam@nrcafpk.org
shelter.pc3@nrcafpk.org
Web:

www.nrc.no
Olivier David
Organization for Mine
Rehabilitation

0799 312 948

omMrBjMlMlMNMd@gmMilBcom
Web:

www.omar.org.af
PAN

Pajhwok Afghan News

0799 541 118

OMsOMmi_pMjOoRk@yMOooBcom
JeN:

RRRBpMjORokBcom
Contact Person:
Abdul Muheed Hashimi
Hs. 1078, 2nd Street,
Arabha Avenue, Jalalabad

0700 234 983
0774 743 107

s.hamdard@killid.com

info@killid.com
Web:

www.killid.com
SOM�q HMmdMrd

Relief International

0799 395 979

Web:

www.ri.org
Rural Rehabilitation

Association for Afghanistan
faculty hospital), District 3

0700 601 853

jro_npo@OoPmMilBcom

Save the Children Sweden
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.
SERVE

Serving Emergency Relief and
Vocational Enterprises
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.
Web:

www.serveafghanistan.org

Social Service and

Reconstruction of Afghanistan
Chaperhar Bus stop (behind

0700 600 729
0700 625 970

ssrM_Mfg@yMOooBcom
Director:

Kanishka
SAB

Solidarité Afghanistan Belgique
MMsOkMR SPB, BMgOi TMrPMj
Web:

www.assosab.be
SCA

Swedish Committee for

Afghanistan
Sarnwali-i-Kuhna Street near

0797 069 169
0799 864 045
FonPMcPs: NMngMrOMrCNimroz Provinces
251
0700 263 283
0088 216 542 502 93

Web:

www.swedishcommittee.org
Of�ce AdminisPrMPor: NMjeeNullMO
WADAN
The Welfare Association
for the Development of
Hs. 1517, St. 3, District 3, next
to fruit market, Jalalabad

0700 045 315
Web:

www.wadan.org
Regional Manager: Sheer Ali

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
Arzaaq St., Kabul-Jalalabad Rd.
(PO Box 3205)

0700 182 730
0790 006 501

abuakar@un.org
Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org
NMOid ANuMkMr

United Nations Children’s Fund

0798 507 467

kabul@unicef.org
Web:

www.unicef.org

United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees

0700 611 631
0041 227 397 508
0088 21 651 121 639
FMx:

0041 227 3E7 D0E

belleza@unhcr.org
MfgjM@unOcrBorg
Web:

www.unhcr.org
HeMd of SuN-Of�ce: Jose ANierM BellezM

UniPed NMPions Of�ce on Grugs
and Crime

0797 223 341

mohammad.ghaleb@unodc.org
Web:

www.unodc.org
Provincial Coordinator: Mohammad Alem Ghaleb
GAA

Welthungerhilfe/German

AgroAction
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.
Web:

www.welthungerhilfe.de

World Health Organization
Old GenerMl APPorney’s Of�ce,

0700 252 652

zamank@afg.emro.who.int
JeN:

RRRBemroBROoBinPCMfgOMnisPMn
Nimroz Province
BRAC

Bangladesh Rural

Advancement Committee
St. 3, Abudaud Sistany

0797 618 925

mMlMm_Nd07@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.bracafg.org

Relief International

0799 890 546

engaman.nimroz@gmail.com
Web:

www.ri.org

United Nations Children’s Fund

0798 507 588

kabul@unicef.org
Web:

www.unicef.org
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Paktia Province
ACSFO

Afghan Civil Society Forum
Organization
Hs. 5, St. 3 (Opp. Women

Affairs Directorate)
Paktia

093 559 427
0700 231 166
JeN:

RRRBMcsfBMfCRRRBMcsf-rcBcom
Contact Person:
AWEC

Afghan Women’s Educational
Center
Paktia

0794 315 004

sayedhassanh@yahoo.com
Web:

www.awec.info
ProjecP MMnMger:
SMyed HMsMn HMmkMr
AIHRC


Human Rights Commission
Gardez

0799 394 284
0088 21 621 230 058

gardez@aihrc.org.af
Web:

www.aihrc.org.af
GTZ/ BEPA
Gesellschaft für Technische
Technical Cooperation) - Basic
Education Program
Ghazni line, near to Paktia

University (next to security


0798 419 383

rashha.rohina@gtz.de
Web:

www.gtz.de
Admin Of�cer:
RMsOOM RoOinM
HealthNet–Transcultural

Psychosocial Organization
Wolayat Street, in front of the
Afghanistan Bank, Sharwalay

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
SPB2, ANudMmud SMjisPMni RdB
(PO Box 3205)

0799 725 579

Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org
HMzrMP SMdique Amin

United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees

0799 653 695
0753 520 984
0088 21 651 122 397

naeem@unhcr.org
afgza@unhcr.org
Web:

www.unhcr.org
Nuristan Province
Bargmatal District Center
(PO Box 6066, Karte Parwan
PosP Of�ce)

0088 21 684 400 152

afghanaid@ceretechs.com
Web:

www.afghanaid.org.uk
Provincial Programme Manager: Sher Afzal

Basic Education for Afghans
Want Main Bazar, Want District

nuristan@brain.net.pk
MoOMmmMd ANdullMO
IHSAN

Services Association
(PO Box 625)
FonPMcPs: NimrozCNurisPMnCPMkPiM Provinces
Hotel,
Gardez

0794 415 234
0788 228 201

qmoqtadir@yahoo.com
Web:

www.healthnettpo.org
Contact person:

Programme for Afghanistan
Hn fronP of police of�ce of PMkPiM
Gardez

dr.fazil.mangal@gmail.com

ProjecP MMnMger:
FMzel MoOMmmMd MMngMl
IARCSC
Independent Administrative
Reform and Civil Services
Governor’s Of�ce Building, GMrdez

0799 407 062
Web:

www.iarcsc.gov.af
Director:

IRC

International Rescue Committee
Walayat Rd. (next to The
Gardez

0799 394 082

gardezfc@afghanistan.theirc.org
info@afghanistan.theirc.org
Web:

www.theIRC.org
Field FoordinMPor: HMzrMP Gul BMrekzMi
Nye Express Of�ce
Chawk-i-Gardiz
Sayed Karam Lane

0700 656 722
Web:

www.nyeexpress.com
Contact person:
Waheedullah
PAN

Pajhwok Afghan News
Gardez

0795 101 707

lemar.niazi@gmail.com
JeN:

RRRBpMjORokBcom
Contact person:

Paktia University
Gardez

0799 231 887

Services for Humanitarian
Assistance and Development
Darul Shefa Hospital, Old
Military Hospital (near
Governor Hs.)
Gardez

0799 188 270

Web:

www.shade.org.af
ProjecP Supervisor: QMyum
WADAN
The Welfare Association
for the Development of
Behind Custom House
Shahr-i-Naw

0700 154 887
Web:

www.wadan.org
Coordinator:
Masroor

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
Pir BMgO, ZerMMP ProjecP
(PO Box 3205)

0797 256 627
0790 006 201

roym@un.org
Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org
MMrgueriPe Roy

United Nations Children’s Fund
Gardez

0798 507 262

kabul@unicef.org
Web:

www.unicef.org

United Nations High

Commissioner for Refugees
UN Compound
Gardez
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance

0799 188 603
0041 227 397 512
0088 21 65 1121 672
FMx:

0041 227 3E7 D13

guisse@unhcr.org
afgga@unhcr.org
Web:

www.unhcr.org
HeMd of SuN-Of�ce: MMgMPPe Guisse

World Health Organization
Section 1, inside UN Compound
Gardez

0799 226 152

shamsher@afg.emro.who.int
JeN:

RRRBemroBROoBinPCMfgOMnisPMn
Paktika Province
AWEC

Afghan Women’s Educational
Center

0708 998 684

sadaatanwar@yahoo.com
Web:

www.awec.info
ProjecP MMnMger: SMyed AnRMr SMMdMP
BRAC

Bangladesh Rural

Advancement Committee

0700 365 678

NrMc_pMkPikM@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.bracafg.org
Provincial Manager: Ghulam Mustafa Ahmed

International Medical Corps
Provincial Hospital

0799 384 397

abesmil@imcworldwide.org
Web:

www.imcworldwide.org
ProjecP MMnMger: ANdul JMkil Besmil
PMnjsOir Province
ADA

Afghan Development

Association
Next to Emergency Hospital,
Nawabad, Anaba District

0799 006 114

Web:

www.ada.org.af
Provincial Manager: Momen Jabarkhail
Aunaba

0700 228 574

emergency@emergency.it
Web:

www.emergency.it

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan

Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org
Parwan Province
ACF

Action Contre La Faim
Charikar

0795 688 184

log-parwan@af.missions-acf.org
Web:

www.actioncontrelafaim.org
Jawed Ahmed Hamid

Afghan Amputee Bicyclists for
Rehabilitation and Recreation
Charikar

0778 585 491

Web:

www.aabrar.org
Field FoordinMPor: SoOMil
FonPMcPs: PMkPiMCPMkPikMCPMnjsOirCPMrRMnCSMmMngMnCSMr-i-Pul Provinces
BRAC

Bangladesh Rural

Advancement Committee
Darmsal Rd., Charikar

0700 665 962

mizan57@gmail.com
Web:

www.bracafg.org
Regional Manager: Mohammad Mizanur Rahman

Wolayat St., Chawk-i-Charikar
Charikar

0799 887 911

parwan@cha-net.org
Web:

www.cha-net.org

Opp. Governor’s House,

Charikar

0700 280 921

PMmMri@jen-npoBorg
JeN:

RRRBjen-npoBorg

Parwan Institute of Higher
Education
Parwan

0700 225 286
Director:
SAB

Solidarité Afghanistan Belgique
Parche 7, On 40 Meters Rd.,
Next to Nomania Mosque
Charikar
Web:

www.assosab.be
Samangan Province
ACF

Action Contre La Faim
Aybak District

0799 835 583
log-samangan@af.missions-acf.org
Web:

www.actioncontrelafaim.org
Shawkatullah

Adventist Development and
Relief Agency
Aybak
Web:

www.adra.euroafrica.org

Mastofyat)
Aybak

0799 172 809
0774 580 760
0799 391 358
0088 21 684 400 150-51

Web:

www.afghanaid.org.uk
Provincial Programme Manager:
Abdul Samad Hamkar
BRAC

Bangladesh Rural

Advancement Committee
Takthe Rustom Rd.

0700 550 242

nspNrMc_sMmMngMn@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.bracafg.org
Provincial Manager: Ahmad Shoaib
TKG/DHSA
The Killid Group/
Development & Humanitarian
Services for Afghanistan
Near to Old Cinema, Aybak

0700 553 884
JeN:

RRRBdOsMBMf C RRRBkillidBcom
Acting In Charge:
Sayed Qasim
Sar-i-Pul Province

Coordination of Afghan Relief
Close to the Cinema Building
Shahr-i-Naw
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance

0799 127 335

coMr_kNl@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.coar.org.af
RMfeMllMO NumMni
Programme for Afghanistan

Provincial Hospital)

0798 675 503
ProjecP MMnMger:

Peace Winds Japan
Shahr-i-Naw

0798 264 837

JeN:

RRRBpeMce-RindsBorgCen
Country Representative: Reiko Hiria
SC-USA

Save the Children USA

0799 943 961
0799 943 962
0088 21 694 400 116

snoori@savechildren.org
Web:

www.savethechildren.org
Operations Coordinator: Shukrullah Noori

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
Shahr-i-Naw, District 2
(PO Box 3205)

0796 002 622
Takhar Province
ADA

Afghan Development

Association
District 2, Hospital Rd. Square,
next to Khulafa-i Rashidin
Mosque

0797 919 631
0700 317 954

Web:

www.ada.org.af
ProvinciMl MMnMger: MMlMng SM�

Aga Khan Foundation
Mashtanihai Poyen, St. 135
Taloqan

0798 363 080

Web:

www.akdn.org
Regional Programme Manager: Jalaluddin Dashti
ACTED

Agency for Technical

Cooperation and Development
Communication St., Taloqan

0700 706 743
0088 21 650 601 527

qahar@acted.org
Web:

www.acted.org
Deputy Area Coordinator: Abdul Qahar

Ariameher Rehabilitation

Establishment
Mir Abdullah Shaheed District
OppB MMsjid ZMid Bin SMNeP
Taloqan

0700 203 654

Mre_MfgOMnisPMn@yMOooBcom
Director:
Abdul Ahad Haris
AAR-Japan
Association for Aid and Relief-
Hs. 88, St. 2, Reyaz Amir Moh
SesMd FMmily PMrk, TMloqMn

0700 007 076
0799 876 570
0087 37 61 216 487

MMr-PMloqMn@kEBdionBneBjp
JeN:

RRRBMrrjMpMnBgrBjp
Programme Manager: Masato Tabe
BRAC

Bangladesh Rural

Advancement Committee
Taloqan
FonPMcPs: SMr-i-PulCTMkOMr Provinces
257

0700 295 023

NrMcnsp_PMkOMr@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.bracafg.org
Provincial Manager: Mohammad Showkat Ali
CAF

Care of Afghan Families
Hs. 559, Qeer St., Bandar-i-
Khan Abad, Charahi Shaheed,
next to GTZ guesthouse
Taloqan

0700 704 861

pm.takhar.caf@gmail.com
Web:

www.caf.org.af
ProjecP MMnMger:
AOmMd JMli RMsekO
CFA

ChildFund Afghanistan
Hs. 179, Mashtanihay Bala
Street, Region 1, Taloqan

0700 703 338
Web:

www.childfund.org

Concern Worldwide (I)
HMji GodMmdMr SPreeP
Rostaq New City
(PO Box 2016, Kabul)

0700 434 093

hamayoon.shirzad@concern.net
Web:

www.concern.net
Programme Coordinator: Hamayoon Shirzad

Concern Worldwide (II)
Wakil Mohammad Nazar St.
(behind Great Mosque)
(PO Box 2016, Kabul)
Taloqan

0799 116 527

alicia.oughton@concern.net
Web:

www.concern.net
Assistant Country Director: Alicia Oughton
GTZ/ BEPA
Gesellschaft für Technische
Technical Cooperation) - Basic
Education Program
Takhar TTC, Education
Department St.

0706 713 147

Web:

www.gtz.de
Education Expert: Joachim Klenk

Mercy Corps

Abdul Khaliq House, Guzar-i-


Taloqan

0798 527 544

0798 117 256

0774 683 019

smaudood@af.mercycorps.org
Operation Managers: Sayed Maudood

Wakil Mohammad Nazar St.
Taloqan

0799 099 701

Web:

www.miseast.org
Province ProgrMmme MMnMger: NMder FMyez
Provincial Management
Programme
Taloqan

0799 229 248
0700 705 045

Web:

www.nspafghanistan.org
ProvinciMl mMnMger: MoOMmmMd HsmMil ZMri�
SCA

Swedish Committee for

Afghanistan
St. 1, Central Hospital
Taloqan

0787 413 069
0708 548 701
0088 21 635 532 776

Web:

www.swedishcommittee.org
Of�ce AdminisPrMPor: SOMO JMOMn SMnjMr
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance

Takhar University
Taloqan

0700 709 539

Terre des Hommes
Rostaq

0092 915 702 379

tdhswepesh@brain.net.pk
Web:

www.tdhafghanistan.org
ProjecP FoordinMPor: FMzel MeOmood
Uruzgan Province
ADA

Afghan Development

Association
SPB1, HMji ANdul RMOim JMn
House, Haderi Square, next to
Tirin Kot

0799 847 424
0799 847 427

ada.urzgan@ada.org.af
Web:

www.ada.org.af
Provincial Manager: Sayed Salam Agha
HealthNet–Transcultural

Psychosocial Organization
Tirin Kot

0707 748 107

drOMzrMP_Mmin@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.healthnettpo.org
Contact Person:


Development Services
Tirin Kot

0798 297 462

urozgan@ahds.org
Web:

www.ahds.org

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
Next to Main Hospital
Tirin Kot
(PO Box 3205)

0700 160 270
0796 521 401

shakirs@un.org
Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org
CCA

Cooperation Center for

Afghanistan
Ab-i-Shiroom, Maktab

Technick, Behsood 2

0700 294 693
Web:

www.cca.org.af
CPAU

Cooperation for Peace and Unity
Sayedabad Center (near

Sayeed Abad
Web:

www.cpau.org.af
Contact Person:

Coordination of Afghan Relief

Sayed Abad District

0700 363 400
0799 391 816

coMr_kNl@yMOooBcom
Web:

www.coar.org.af
ProjecP MMnMger:
SCA

Swedish Committee for

Afghanistan

0799 153 339
0799 399 516
FonPMcPs: TMkOMrCUruzgMnCJMrdMkCZMNul Provinces Mnd PMkisPMn

Web:

www.swedishcommittee.org
Of�ce AdminisPrMPor: GOulMm NMNi
Wardak Province

Beside Directorate of
Information and Culture,
behind Maidan Wardak Public

07881 894 114
Web:

www.ancb.org
FonPMcP Person:
FMzMl JMOid
SAB

Solidarité Afghanistan Belgique
NexP Po GMrol MoMllimin FMmily
Web:

www.assosab.be
WADAN
The Welfare Association
for the Development of
Beside Directorate of

Information and Culture

0700154887
Web:

www.wadan.org
FoordinMPor:
Zabul Province
ADA

Afghan Development

Association
OppB Red Fross of�ce,
Main Rd. Kabul-Kandahar,


0700 393 386
0700 039 630

Web:

www.ada.org.af
Provincial Manager: Khan Mohammad

Programme for Afghanistan
Near the Governmental Hs.

ibnsinazbul@yahoo.com
ProjecP MMnMger:
FMzel RMOmMn

United Nations Assistance
Mission in Afghanistan
Seyanak Area, Kabul-

Kandahar Main Road
(PO Box 3205)

0700 031 410
0700 476 437

zahirrasheedi@yahoo.com
Web:

www.unama.unmissions.org
Pakistan
AGHCO


FoordinMPion Of�ce
HsB 3EE, SPB 12, SecPor EC2,
Phase 1, Hayatabad
(PO Box 6066, Karte Parwan
PosP Of�ce)
Peshawar

0092 915 917 709
AHSAO


Assistance Organisation
FlMP 407, Gul HMji PlMzM,

Jamrud Rd., Peshawar


ahsaongo@hotmail.com
ahsao2002@yahoo.com
AWEC

Afghan Women’s Educational
Center

0092 51 228 1143
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance

islamabad@awec.info
Web:

www.awec.info
Contact Person:
Gulalay Haidary

Basic Education for Afghans
Aziz Building, St. 1, University Rd.
Shaheen Town, Peshawar

0092 915 843 470
0092 915 850 725
0092 915 850 725
FMx:

00E2 E1D 842 6E3
AdminCFinMnce MMnMger: FMisMl Mir
CWS

Church World Service

HsB 137, SPB 7, SecPor F-11C1

0092 512 103 171
0092 512 102 293

cwskabul@cyber.net.pk
cwsisb@isb.comsats.net.pk
Web:

www.cwspa.org

Committee for Rehabilitation
Aid to Afghanistan

University Rd.
(PO Box 2016, Kabul)
Peshawar

0092 915 853 220
FMx:

00E2 E1D 840 16E

sancraa@brain.net.pk
sanashefa@yahoo.com
Web:

www.craausa.org
Director:


Abdara Road, Peshawar

0092 915 705 125
0092 915705 133

OMjigul_kOMn@OoPmMilBcom
Web:

www.cha-net.org
HAFO

Helping Afghan Farmers

Organization
53-B Park Avenue
University Town, Peshawar

0092 915 704 677
0092 3005 903 427
0092 3339 224 086
FMx:

00E2 E1D 844 674

hafo99@yahoo.com
Web:

www.hafo-int.org
Programme Coordinator: Qaisar Khan

Programme for Afghanistan
Hs. 79, St. 6, Sector G-2

Phase 2, Peshawar

0092 915 82 544
0092 915 82 516

ibph@brain.net.pk
FMpiPMn FMzel
TKG/DHSA
The Killid Group/
Development & Humanitarian
Services for Afghanistan
8 A, Mulbery Rd., University Town
Peshawar

0092 915 704 239
0092 915 851 378

dhsapesh@pes.comsats.net.pk
JeN:

RRRBdOsMBMf C RRRBkillidBcom
SMyed EsM

Orphan Refugees and Aid -
International
F-27 KOusOMl KOMn KOMPPMk RdB
University Town, Peshawar

0092 915 841 280
FMx:

00E2 E1D 701 08E

hivdirector@oracentralasia.org
Web:

www.oracentralasia.org
Programme Coordinator: Shahzad Bashir
Contacts: Pakistan
261

Services for Humanitarian
Assistance and Development
Hs. 13, St. 2, Canal Town,

Nasir Bagh Rd., Peshawar

0092 915 853 008
0092 915 844 390

Web:

www.shade.org.af
Administration Manager: Riaz ur Rehman
SCA

Swedish Committee for

Afghanistan
(PO Box 689), Peshawar

0092 302 593 5773
FMx:

00E2 E23 640 DEE
Web:

www.swedishcommittee.org
Representative:
Mohammad Tariq

Terre des Hommes
Hs. 84 E, Rahman Baba Rd.
University Town, Peshawar

0092 915 702 379

tdhswcpesh@brain.net.pk
Web:

www.tdhafghanistan.org
ProjecP FoordinMPor: FMzel MeOmood
Index
Index
ANdul HMq FoundMPion (AHF)
Academy of Sciences of Afghanistan (ASA)
Accessibility Organization for Afghan Disabled
(AOAD)
ACKU Box Library Extension (ABLE)
ActionAid
ActionAid Afghanistan
AcPion FonPre IM FMim (AFF)
Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA)
Af�niPy Group of NMPionMl AssociMPions
Afghan Amputee Bicyclists for Rehabilitation and
Recreation (AABRAR)
Afghan Center (AC)
Afghan Center for Socioeconomic & Opinion
Research (ACSOR)
Afghan Civil Society Conference
AfgOMn Fivil SociePy Forum OrgMnizMPion (AFSFO)
Afghan Community Development Organization
(ACDO)
Afghan Conservation Corps (ACC)
Afghan Development Association (ADA)
AfgOMn GenerMl Help FoordinMPion Of�ce (AGHFO)
AfgOMn Geodesy Mnd FMrPogrMpOy HeMd Of�ce
(AGCHO)
Afghan Health and Development Services (AHDS)
(AHSAO)
Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL)
Afghan Institute of Management, Training and

Enhancement of Indigenous Capacities (AIMTEIC)
Afghan Institute of Training and Management
Afghan Interim Authority (AIA)
Afghanistan Bureau for Reconstruction (ABR)
Afghanistan Centre at Kabul University (ACKU)
Afghanistan Chamber of Commerce and Industries
(ACCI)
Afghanistan Civil Service Support (ACSS)
Afghanistan Compact
Afghanistan Country Stability Picture (ACSP)
AfgOMnisPMn GevelopmenP Forum (AGF)
Afghanistan Human Rights Organization (AHRO)
Commission (AIHRC)
Afghanistan Information Management Services
Afghanistan Investment Support Agency (AISA)
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS)
Afghanistan National Development Strategy
Afghanistan Navid Sehat Organization (ANSO)
Afghanistan New Beginnings Programme (ANBP)
AfgOMnisPMn NGO SMfePy Of�ce (ANSO)
Afghanistan-Pakistan Joint Peace Jirga
AfgOMnisPMn PMrliMmenPMry AssisPMnce ProjecP
(APAP)
AfgOMnisPMn ReconsPrucPion TrusP Fund (ARTF)
Afghanistan Rehabilitation and Reconstruction
Agency FMlMO (ARRAF)
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
264
Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU)
AfgOMnisPMn RigOPs Mnd SociMl JusPice FoundMPion
AfgOMnisPMn Rule of IMR ProjecP (AROIP)
Afghanistan Rural Development and Peace
Afghanistan Rural Enterprise Development Program
Afghanistan’s Children, A New Approach
Afghanistan Stabilisation Programme (ASP)
Afghanistan Times Daily (ATD)
Afghanistan Women Council (AWC)
Afghan Landmine Survivors’ Organization (ALSO)
Afghan Media and Cultural Center (AINA)
Afghan National Army (ANA)
Afghan National Auxiliary Police (ANAP)
Afghan National Police (ANP)
AfgOMn NMPionMl SecuriPy Forces (ANSF)
Afghan NGOs Coordination Bureau (ANCB)
Environmental Protection (AOHREP)
Afghan Public Protection Program (APPP or AP3)
Afghan Relief Committee (ARC)
Afghans4Tomorrow
Index
ArmMn FM IimiPed
ArmMnsOMOr FoundMPionCOPEN ASHA
AsiM FoundMPion (TAF)
Asian Development Bank (ADB)
Asian Disaster Reduction and Response Network
AsiMn NePRork for Free ElecPions (ANFREI)
Associated Press (AP)
Association for Aid and Relief - Japan (AAR-Japan)
AssociMPion of ExperPs in POe Fields of MigrMPion Mnd
GevelopmenP FooperMPion (AGEF)
APPorney GenerMl’s Of�ce
Aumo Rehabilitation and Development (ARD)
Badakhshan University (BU)
Baghlan Institute of Higher Education (BIHE)
Bakhtar Development Network (BDN)
Bakhtar News Agency (BNA)
Balkh University (BU)
Bamyan University (BU)
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC)
Basic Education & Employable Skill Training (BEST)
Basic Education for Afghans
Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS)
BBF AfgOMn EducMPion ProjecP
BBC News
BBC World Service
Berlin Meeting
Bonn Agreement
Bonn Conference
Building Education Support Systems for Teachers
(BESST)
, 132
Rehabilitation
Calendars in Afghanistan
Canadian Program Support Unit (CPSU)
Canadian Women4women in Afghanistan
CARE International
FMre of AfgOMn FMmilies (FAF)
Caritas Germany
Catholic Organization for Relief and Development
Aid (CordAid)
Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
Center for Contemporary Arts Afghanistan (CCAA)
Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE)
Center for Policy and Human Development (CPHD)
Central Afghanistan Welfare Committee (CAWC)
FenPrMl AsiMn Free ExcOMnge (FAFE)
Central Government of Afghanistan (Organogram)
Central Prisons Department (CPD)
17
Centre for Policy and Human Development (CPHD)
17
17
FHF HnPernMPionMl
17
FOildFund AfgOMnisPMn (FFA)
17
17
17
Church World Service (CWS)
17
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Committee for Rehabilitation Aid to Afghanistan
Communication Team for Peace and Development
(Ertebat)
17
Comprehensive Agriculture and Rural Development
FMciliPy (FARG-F)
Concern Worldwide
17
FonsPellM FuPures HnPernMPionMl FOMPRH-A SociMl
MMrkePing ProjecP (FOMPRH-A)
17
Constitutional Loya Jirga (CLJ)
Consultative Group (CG)
Cooperation Center for Afghanistan (CCA)
17
Cooperation for Peace and Unity (CPAU)
17
Coordination of Afghan Relief (CoAR)
17
Coordination of Humanitarian Assistance (CHA)
17
Counter-Narcotics
FounPer NMrcoPics TrusP Fund (FNTF)
17
Counterpart International (CPI)
17
Country Development Unit (CDU)
17
Cultural Organization of Youth in Central Area
(COYCA)
17
17
Danish Afghanistan Committee (DAC)
Danish Assistance to Afghan Rehabilitation and
Technical Training (DAARTT)
17
Danish Committee for Aid to Afghan Refugees
(DACAAR)
17
Danish Demining Group (DDG)
17
GelegMPion of POe EuropeMn Union (EUCEF)
17
Department for International Development (United
17
Department of Mine Clearance (DMC)
GevelopmenP Service) (GEGCGGS)
Development and Ability Organization (DAO)
17
Development Assistance Database (DAD)
Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration
Disaster Risk Reduction Consortium (DRRC)
Disbandment of Illegal Armed Groups (DIAG)
Dutch Committee for Afghanistan (DCA)
17
EducMPionMl QuMliPy HmprovemenP ProjecP (EQUHP)
Education Training Center for Poor Women and Girls
Education University - Kabul
17
17
Elections 2009-2010
Electoral Complaints Commission (ECC)
Electoral system
17
17
17
17
Embassy of Denmark
17
17
17
EmNMssy of FrMnce
17
Embassy of Germany
17
Embassy of Hungary
17
17
17
17
17
Embassy of Italy, Civilian Component of PRT
17
Embassy of Kazakhstan
17
Embassy of Norway
Embassy of Pakistan
17
Index
17
FoundMPion for HnPernMPionMl FommuniPy AssisPMnce
17
Free Mnd FMir ElecPion FoundMPion of AfgOMnisPMn
(FEFA)
FriedricO-ENerP FoundMPion
FriedricO-ENerP-SPifPung (FES)
17
Friends for ReOMNiliPMPion Mnd HnPegrMPing
Emergency NMPionMl GevelopmenP (FRHENG)
17
Funders’ NePRork for AfgOMn Jomen (FNAJ)
17
FuPure GenerMPions AfgOMnisPMn (FGA)
17
GermMn AfgOMnisPMn FoundMPion (GAF)
17
German Agro Action (GAA)
GermMn Police ProjecP Of�ce (GPPO)
Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit
(German Technical Cooperation) - Basic
EducMPion ProgrMm (GTZCBEPA)
17
Gesellschaft für Technische Zusammenarbeit
(German Technical Cooperation) (GTZ)
Ghazni Rural Support Program (GRSP)
17
Global Hope Network International (GHNI)
18
Global Partners (GP)
18
GloNMl PMrPnersOip for AfgOMnisPMn (GPFA)
18
Global Point Afghanistan (GPA)
18
Global Rights - Partners for Justice
18
Globe and Mail (TGM)
Goethe-Institute
18
Good Governance for Local Development
(GOFORGOIG)
18
Good Neighbors International Afghanistan (GNI)
18
Government Media and Information Center (GMIC)
18
18
Hague Conference
Embassy of Russia
17
17
Embassy of South Korea
17
17
Embassy of Sweden
17
EmNMssy of TMjikisPMn
17
Embassy of the Netherlands
17
Embassy of the United Arab Emirates
17
Embassy of the United Kingdom
17
Embassy of the United States of America
17
Embassy of the United States of America - Public
Affairs Section
17
Embassy of Turkey
17
Embassy of Turkmenistan
17
17
17
Emergency Loya Jirga (ELJ)
Emergency Programme of the Italian Cooperation
Emergency TelecommunicMPions ProjecP
Enfants du Monde – Droits de L’Homme (EMDH)
17
Enhancing Legal and Electoral Capacity for
Tomorrow (ELECT)
Eqtedaremilli Weekly
17
Equal Access (EA)
17
EuropeMn Fommission HumMniPMriMn Aid Of�ce
17
European Union (EU)
European Union Police Mission in Afghanistan
Export Promotion Agency of Afghanistan (EPAA)
17
FMrOMP ArcOiPecPure Mnd Engineering ReOMNiliPMPion
(FAER)
17
FMryMN HnsPiPuPe of HigOer EducMPion (FHHE)
Focused GisPricP GevelopmenP (FGG)
FOFUS HumMniPMriMn AssisPMnce
17
Food Mnd AgriculPure OrgMnizMPion of POe UniPed
NMPions (FAO)
17
FoundMPion for FulPure Mnd Fivil SociePy (FFFS)
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
HALO Trust International Mine Clearance
18
Hamid Karzai
Handicap International (HI)
18
HMzMrMjMP AssisPMnce NeRslePPer (ArPiNMP NGO)
18
Health and Development Center for Afghan Women
(HDCAW)
18
HealthNet–Transcultural Psychosocial Organization
18
HeinricO Böll SPifPung (HBS)
18
Helping AfgOMn FMrmers OrgMnizMPion (HAFO)
18
Help the Afghan Children (HTAC)
18
HEWAD Reconstruction, Health and Humanitarian
Assistance Committee
18
HigO Of�ce of OversigOP
Hillary Clinton
HOPE Worldwide
Humanitarian Action Plan (HAP)
Humanitarian Assistance for the Women and
Children of Afghanistan (HAWCA)
18
Human Rights Research and Advocacy Consortium
(HRRAC)
18
IbnSina Public Health Programme for Afghanistan
18
Independent Administrative Reform and Civil
Service Commission (IARCSC)
18
Independent Directorate of Local Governance
(IDLG)
18
Independent Humanitarian Services Association
18
Independent National Legal Training Centre
Institute for War & Peace Reporting (IWPR)
18
Integrated Regional Information Networks
(Humanitarian News & Analysis) (IRIN)
18
Integrity Watch Afghanistan (IWA)
18
Inter-Agency Police Coordinated Action Group
(IPCAG)
HnPercooperMPion (HF) C SRiss FoundMPion for
Development and International Cooperation
18
Interim Afghanistan National Development Strategy
(i-ANDS)
Inter-Ministerial Committees (IMCs)
International Assistance Mission (IAM)
18
International Center for Agricultural Research in the
Dry Areas (ICARDA)
18
International Center for Human Rights and
Democratic Development (ICHRDD)
18
International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)
18
HnPernMPionMl Founcil of VolunPMry Agencies
International Crisis Group (ICG)
18
International Development Law Organization (IDLO)
18
HnPernMPionMl FederMPion of Red Fross Mnd Red
FrescenP SociePies (HFRF)
18
HnPernMPionMl FoundMPion for ElecPorMl SysPems
18
HnPernMPionMl FoundMPion of Hope (HFHOPE)
18
International Islamic Relief Agency (ISRA)
18
International Labour Organization (ILO)
18
International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center
18
International Medical Corps (IMC)
18
HnPernMPionMl MonePMry Fund (HMF)
18
International Organization for Migration (IOM)
18
International Police Coordination Board (IPCB)
International Relief and Development (IRD)
18
International Republican Institute
International Rescue Committee (IRC)
18
HnPernMPionMl SecuriPy AssisPMnce Force (HSAF)
Internews Afghanistan
18
Index
18
HSAF JoinP FommMnd PuNlic AffMirs Of�ce, HSAF HQ
18
Islah Daily Government
18
Islamic Development Bank (IDB)
Islamic Relief – Afghanistan (IRA)
18
JMpMn FenPer for Fon�icP PrevenPion (JFFP)
18
JMpMnese HnPernMPionMl FriendsOip Mnd JelfMre
FoundMPion (JHFF)
18
Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)
18
JMRzjMn HnsPiPuPe of HigOer EducMPion
JOpiego, Mn Mf�liMPe of POe JoOns Hopkins UniversiPy
18
Johanniter International Assistance (JIA)
18
18
Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB)
Joint Development Associates International (JDAI)
Joint Electoral Management Body (JEMB)
Judiciary
Justice Sector Reform (JSR)
Kabul Center for Strategic Studies (KCSS)
18
Kabul Military Training Centre (KMTC)
Kabul Municipality
18
Kabul Polytechnic University
Kabul Public Library
18
Kabul Times
18
Kabul University
18
Kabul Weekly
18
Kandahar University (KU)
KfW German Development Bank
18
KOerMd FoundMPion
18
Khost University (KU)
Killid GroupCGevelopmenP Mnd HumMniPMriMn
Services for AfgOMnisPMn (TKGCGHSA)
18
KonrMd AdenMuer FoundMPion (KAS)
18
Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA)
18
Kunduz Institute of Higher Education (KIHE)
Kunduz Rehabilitation Agency (KRA)
IMR Mnd Order TrusP Fund for AfgOMnisPMn (IOTFA)
18
Laws in Afghanistan
Legal & Cultural Services for Afghan Women &
Children (LCSAWC)
18
IemMr TV IimiPed
18
Leprosy Control Organization (LEPCO)
Local Governance & Community Development
ProjecP (ARGCUSAHG) (IGGP)
18
London Conference 2006
18
Management Sciences for Health (Tech Serve)
18
Marie Stopes International (MSI)
18
18
Medecins du Monde – FrMnce (MGM)
18
Medical Emergency Relief International (MERLIN)
Medical Refresher Courses for Afghans (MRCA)
18
Medi Educational Support Association for
18
Mennonites Economic Development Associates
(MEDA)
Mercy Corps (MC)
Micro�nMnce HnvesPmenP SupporP FMciliPy for
AfgOMnisPMn (MHSFA)
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)
Mine Action Coordination Centre for Afghanistan
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
270
(MACCA)
Mine Action Programme for Afghanistan (MAPA)
Mine Clearance and Planning Agency (MCPA)
Mine Detection and Dog Centre (MDC)
Mines Advisory Group (MAG)
Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock
Ministry of Border, Nations and Tribal Affairs
(MoBNTA)
Ministry of Commerce and Industry (MoCI)
Ministry of Communications and IT (MoCIT)
Ministry of Counter Narcotics (MCN)
Ministry of Culture and Information (MoCI)
Ministry of Defence (MoD)
Ministry of Economy (MoEC)
Ministry of Education (MoE)
Ministry of Energy and Water (MoEW)
MinisPry of FinMnce (MoF)
MinisPry of Foreign AffMirs (MFA)
Ministry of Guidance, Pilgrimage and Pious
(MinisPry of HMj Mnd Religious AffMirs) (MoGPP)
Ministry of Higher Education (MoHE)
Ministry of Interior (MoI)
Ministry of Justice (MoJ)
Ministry of Labour, Social Affairs, Martyrs and
Ministry of Mines (MoM)
Ministry of Public Health (MoPH)
Ministry of Public Works (MoPW)
Ministry of Refugees and Repatriates Affairs
Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development
Ministry of Transportation and Civil Aviation
(MoTCA)
Ministry of Urban Development (MoUD)
Ministry of Women’s Affairs (MoWA)
Mission d’Aide au Développement des Economies
Rurales en Aghanistan (MADERA)
Mobile Mini Circus for Children (MMCC)
National Human Development Report (NHDR)
National Justice Programme
National Justice Sector Strategy
National Radio Television of Afghanistan (RTA)
NMPionMl Risk Mnd VulnerMNiliPy AssessmenPs (NRVA)
National Rural Access Program (NRAP)
National Security Directorate (NDS)
National Solidarity Programme (NSP)
National Surveillance System (NSS)
NATO Senior FiviliMn RepresenPMPive’s Of�ce
Index
271
NATO Training Mission — Afghanistan (NTM-A)
New York Times
Nippon International Cooperation for Community
Development
Noor Educational Center (NEC)
North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)
Norwegian Afghanistan Committee (NAC)
NorRegiMn MinisPry of Foreign AffMirs
Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC)
Nye Express Of�ce
Of�ce for FoordinMPion of HumMniPMriMn AssisPMnce
to Afghanistan (UNOCHA)
Of�ce of AdminisPrMPive AffMirs Mnd Founcil of
MinisPers SecrePMriMP (OAACFMS)
Of�ce of POe EuropeMn Union SpeciMl
Representative (EUSR)
Operational Mentor and Liaison Team Programme
Operation Mercy (OPM)
Organisation for Security and Cooperation in Europe
Organization for Mine Clearance and Afghan
Rehabilitation (OMAR)
Organization for Sustainable

Development and Research (OSDR)
Orphan Refugees and Aid International (ORA)
Ottawa Convention
Oxfam Great Britain
Oxfam Novib
Paiwaston
PMjORok AfgOMn NeRs (PAN)
Paktia University (PU)
Paris Conference
Partners for Social Development (PSD)
Partnership for Education of Children in Afghanistan
Partners in Aviation and Communications
Technology (PACTEC)
Partners in Revitalization and Building (PRB)
Parwan Institute of Higher Education (PIHE)
PMrRMz Micro�nMnce HnsPiPuPion
Patta Khazana
Peace Winds Japan (PWJ)
People in Need (PIN)
PerformMnce-BMsed Governors Fund (PBGF)
Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Support for
Afghanistan (PARSA)
Policy Action Group (PAG)
Polish Humanitarian Organization (PHO)
Polish Medical Mission (PMM)
Polytechnic University - Kabul
Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP)
Promote Afghan Civil Society (IPACS)
Provincial Development Plan (PDP)
Provincial Justice Initiative
Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT)
Public Administration Reform (PAR)
Public Sector
RMdio IiNerPyCRMdio Free Europe (RFERI)
Rain Bow Organisation (RBO)
Rebuilding Agricultural Market in Afghanistan
ReconsPrucPion AuPOoriPy for AfgOMnisPMn (RAFA)
Red Crescent Society
Regional Studies Center of Afghanistan (RCSA)
Relief International (RI)
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
272
Renewable Energies, Environment and Solidarities
Group (GERES)
Reuters News Agency
Roots of Peace (RoP)
Rule of Law Conference
Rural Rehabilitation Association for Afghanistan
SAF PuNlic AffMirs Of�ce
18
Salam Watandar (SW)
Sanayee Development Organization (SDO)
Sandy Gall’s Afghanistan Appeal (SGAA)
Save the Children Japan (SC-J)
Save the Children Sweden-Norway (SCS-N)
Save the Children Sweden (SC-S)
Save the Children UK (SC-UK)
Save the Children USA (SC-USA)
Sector Strategy Development Groups (SSDGs)
Security Sector Reform (SSR)
Serve AfgOMnisPMn (SERVE)
Services for Humanitarian Assistance and
Development (SHADE)
Serving Emergency Relief Mnd VocMPionMl
EnPerprises (SERVE)
SOMnPi VolunPeer AssociMPion (SVA)
SOelPer for Iife HnPernMPionMl (SFI)
Shelter Now International (SNI)
Social and Health Development Program (SHDP)
Social Research Institute (SRI)
Social Service and Reconstruction of Afghanistan
Society for the Preservation of Afghanistan’s
Cultural Heritage (SPACH)
Solidarité Afghanistan Belgique (SAB)
SolidMriPy for AfgOMn FMmilies (SAF)
SouPO AsiMn Free MediM AssociMPion (SAFMA)
Southern and Western Afghanistan and Balochistan
Association for Coordination (SWABAC)
SOZO International
Special Mission to Afghanistan (UNSMA)
Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General
Spring of Construction, Rehabilitation, Cultural and
Social Organisation (SCRCSO)
State University of New York (SUNY)
STEP Health and Development Organization
Support to the Establishment of the Afghan
Supreme Court
Swedish Committee for Afghanistan (SCA)
Swedish International Development Cooperation
Agency (SIDA)
Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation
Swiss Peace (SP)
Takhar University (TU)
Tearfund
Terre des Hommes (TdH)
The Children of War (TCOW)
TOe IiMison Of�ce (TIO)
Today Afghanistan International Organization (TAIO)
Tokyo Meeting
Tolo Service & FulPurMl OrgMnizMPionCSociMl
FoundMPion for RemoPe RusPic GevelopmenP
Tolo TV IimiPed
Training Human Rights Association for Afghan
Women (THRA)
Trocaire (Caritas Ireland)
Turkmenistan Consulate
Turquoise MounPMin FoundMPion (TMF)
Index
273
UN Fommon Fund
United Agency for the Rehabilitation of Afghanistan
(UARA)
United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR)
United Nations
United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan
UniPed NMPions FOildren's Fund (UNHFEF)
United Nations Coordination in Afghanistan
United Nations Department of Safety and Security
UniPed NMPions GevelopmenP AssisPMnce FrMmeRork
(UNGAF)
UniPed NMPions GevelopmenP Fund for Jomen
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
UniPed NMPions EducMPionMl, ScienPi�c Mnd FulPurMl
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
United Nations Humanitarian Air Services (UNHAS)
United Nations Human Settlements Programme
United Nations Industrial Development Organisation
United Nations Mine Action Coordination Centre for
Afghanistan (UNMACA)
United Nations Mine Action Service (UNMAS)
UniPed NMPions Of�ce for ProjecP Services (UNOPS)
UniPed NMPions Of�ce of FoordinMPion of
Humanitarian Affairs (UNOCHA)
UniPed NMPions Of�ce on Grugs Mnd Frime (UNOGF)
UniPed NMPions PopulMPion Fund AfgOMnisPMn
(UNFPA)
United Nations Security Coordinator (UNSECOORD)
UniPed NMPions VolunPeers (UNV)
United States Agency for International Development
University of Arizona
UN Of�ce for POe FoordinMPion of HumMniPMriMn Mnd
Economic Assistance Programmes (UNOCA)
US Agency for International Development (USAID)
US Central Command (CENTCOM)
US Forces AfgOMnisPMn (USFOR-A)
US GeologicMl Survey (Agro-MePeorology ProjecP
Voice of AfgOMn JomMn RMdio (VAJR)
Voice of AmericM, AsOnM TV & RMdioCAfgOMnisPMn
(VOA AsOnM)
Voice of Freedom (RMdio Mnd NeRspMper) (VoF)
Voice of Jomen (VJO)
War Child Holland (WC-H)
War Child United Kingdom (WC-UK)
Welfare Association for the Development of
Afghanistan (WADAN)
JelPOungerOilfeCGermMn AgroAcPion (GAA)
Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)
Women Activities and Social Services Association
(WASSA)
Jomen Mnd FOildren IegMl ReseMrcO FoundMPion
(JFIRF)
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
274
Women Assistance Association (WAA)
Women for Women International (WWI)
Women Mirror (WM)
Women, Peace and Governance (WP&G)
World Bank (WB)
Jorld Fivil SociePy Forum
Jorld Food ProgrMmme (JFP)
World Health Organization (WHO)
Jorld Vision HnPernMPionMl (JVH)
Youth Assembly for Afghan Rehabilitation (YAAR)
Zardozi - Markets for Afghan Artisans
ZOA Refugee Care, Northern Afghanistan (ZOA)

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