Гид по Афганистану — 2009


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to Afghanistan Assistance
Seventh Edition
AFGHANISTAN RESEARCH AND EVALUATION UNIT
Improving Afghan Lives Through Research
IMPORTANT NOTE:
The information presented in this Guide relies on the voluntary contributions
of ministries and agencies of the Afghan government, embassies, development agencies
and other organisations representing donor countries, national and international NGOs, and
other institutions. While AREU undertakes with each edition of this Guide to provide the most
accurate and current information possible, details evolve and change continuously. Users
of this guide are encouraged to submit updates, additions, corrections and suggestions
to [email protected]
© Copyright Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit, January 2009. All rights reserved. No part
of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or
by any means, electronic, recording or otherwise without prior written permission of the publisher,
the Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit. Permission can be obtained by emailing [email protected]
areu.org.af or by calling +93 799 608 548.
Coordinating Editor:
Sheela Rabani and Noorullah Elham
Contributors:
Ahmadullah Amarkhil, Amanullah Atel, Chris Bassett, Mia Bonarski, Colin Deschamps,
Noorullah Elham, Susan Fakhri, Paula Kantor, Anna Larson, Sheela Rabani, Rebecca Roberts,
Syed Mohammad Shah, Tom Shaw, Royce Wiles and Yahya Zaki
Special thanks to the representatives and reviewers from numerous agencies and organisations
(in particular, Farhadullah Farhad, LTC Chris Kubik and Ele Pawelski) and AREU staff for their
valuable assistance with the production of this edition
Cover photograph:
Commemorating International Day of Peace (21 September), Kabul/Gulbuddin
Elham, AINA Photo Agency
Tab photographs: (A to Z)
Brick factory, Haratan, Mazar-i-Sharif/Gulbuddin Elham, AINA Photo
Agency
; (Government)
Harvesting apples, Badakhshan/Tom Shaw
; (Documents) E
exams at Kabul University/Gulbuddin Elham, AINA Photo Agency
; (Maps)
Local produce for sale,
Panjshir/Cynthia Lee
; (Contacts);
Woman voting/IEC
; (Reference/Index)
Canal construction,
Daman District, Kandahar/NSP
Printed by: Sareh Graphics, Kabul
AREU grMPefully McknoRledges POe �nMnciMl MssisPMnce of POe governmenPs of NorRMy, SReden,
Switzerland and the United Kingdom in publishing the seventh edition of
The A to Z Guide to
Afghanistan Assistance.
AFGHANISTAN RESEARCH AND EVALUATION UNIT
Flower Street (corner of street 2)
Shahr-i-Naw
Kabul, Afghanistan
website:
www.areu.org.af
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Table of Contents
About the Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit
About
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
A to Z
The Government of Afghanistan
The Public Sector
Afghanistan’s Democratic System
The Judiciary
Table:
Ministries and Ministers of the Afghan Government, December 2008
Table:
OPOer GovernmenP Of�ces Mnd Of�ciMls, GecemNer 2008
Central Government of Afghanistan, December 2008
The Afghanistan Compact
Code of Conduct for NGOs
130
141
Afghanistan: Provinces and Provincial Centres
141
Afghanistan: Physical
Afghanistan: Population Density
Kabul City
144
Kabul City Centre
146
Kandahar City
148
Kunduz City
Mazar-i-Sharif
151
Kabul Province
Provinces
207
Pakistan
257
Reference and Index
261
Acronyms in Afghanistan Assistance
261
Calendars Used in Afghanistan
Index
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
About the Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit
The Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU) is an independent research organisation
NMsed in KMNulB AREU’s mission is Po conducP OigO-quMliPy reseMrcO POMP informs Mnd in�uences
policy and practice. AREU also actively promotes a culture of research and learning by strengthening
MnMlyPicMl cMpMciPy in AfgOMnisPMn Mnd fMciliPMPing re�ecPion Mnd deNMPeB FundMmenPMl Po AREU’s
vision is that its work should improve Afghan lives.
AREU conducPs reseMrcO on M Ride vMriePy of Popics in POe POemMPic �elds of educMPion, gender,
governance, health, livelihoods and human security, natural resource management, and political
economy and markets. It produces approximately 25 research publications each year, ranging
from policy-focused Nrie�ng pMpers Po compreOensive issues Mnd synPOesis reporPsB AREU Mlso
publishes the annual
A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
and the quarterly
Afghanistan
Research Newsletter,
and maintains a website (www.areu.org.af). In addition, AREU organises
workshops and conferences to enable and encourage debate among policy makers and other
stakeholders.
AREU was established in 2002 by the assistance community working in Afghanistan. Its Board
of Directors includes representatives from donors, the UN and other multilateral agencies, and
NGOs. AREU has recently received funding from: the European Commission; the governments of
Denmark (DANIDA), the United Kingdom (DFID), Switzerland (SDC), Norway and Sweden (SIDA);
the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR); the Government of Afghanistan’s
Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock; the World Bank; UNICEF; the Aga Khan Foundation;
and the United Nations Development Fund for Women (UNIFEM).
The AREU Library
Established in 2003, the AREU Library’s main role is to support the research activities of AREU;
the collection (currently 9,000 titles) is fully available for public use. Materials in the collection
Mre selecPed primMrily for long-Perm reseMrcO vMlue, RiPO M speci�c focus on AfgOMnisPMn Mnd
the region. In particular, contemporary materials produced inside Afghanistan and materials
in Afghan languages are collected. One particular aim is to make available for public use
materials that have been produced outside of Afghanistan. The collection comprises materials
of all types (books, journal articles, maps, CDs, DVDs, databases, etc.), which are available
for use inside the library — no public borrowing is allowed. The entire collection is listed online
(see the “Library” page of the AREU website).
Researchers are welcome to visit the library in Kabul or email inquiries ([email protected]).
AREU Library staff work collaboratively with several other libraries in Kabul and can suggest
sources for materials not available at AREU. The library is open from Sunday to Thursday
(closed Friday, Saturday and public holidays) 0900-1230 and 1300-1600 (0800-1400 during
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
About
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Updated each year,
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
aims to enhance general
understanding of the array of actors, structures and government processes related to aid and
reconstruction efforts in the country. The guide provides: an extensive glossary of assistance
terms, an overview of Afghanistan’s system of government, a series of country and city maps,
key primary documents, and an extensive contact directory that includes government agencies,
NGOs, donors and international actors. The guide is also published in Dari and Pashto.
JOen POe �rsP ediPion of POe
A to Z Guide
was published in 2002, the goal then — as it is now —
was “to provide a guide to the terms, structures, mechanisms and coordinating bodies critical to
the Afghanistan relief and reconstruction effort to help ensure a shared vocabulary and common
understanding.” Subsequent editions also saw an expanded Government section, acknowledging
that working with Afghan government institutions is crucial to assistance and noting the importance
of comprehending how the government is structured. This 2009 edition — the seventh — follows
the same successful model and has also attempted to respond to reader feedback, which has
resulPed in modi�ed feMPures sucO Ms enlMrged mMps, M lisP of Mcronyms in AfgOMnisPMn MssisPMnce,
the return of the Government of Afghanistan organogram, and a fresh, new look.
The information presented in the guide relies on the voluntary contribution of agencies and
organisations, and the situation in Afghanistan can change rapidly. Users of the guide are
encouraged to contact AREU with suggestions for additions, corrections or improvements, which
can be submitted to [email protected]
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
These and all other AREU publications are available for download from www.areu.org.af and in hardcopy at
POe AREU of�ce in KMNulB
Microcredit, Informal Credit and Rural Livelihoods: A Village Case Study in Balkh Province, by
Erna Andersen and Amanda Sim (Dec. 2008)
FounPer-NMrcoPics in AfgOMnisPMn: TOe FMilure of Success?, Ny GMvid MMns�eld Mnd AdMm PMin
(Dec. 2008)
“Let Them Eat Promises”: Closing the Opium Poppy Fields in Balkh and its Consequences, by
Adam Pain (Dec. 2008)
A Mandate to Mainstream: Promoting Gender Equality in Afghanistan, by Anna Larson (Nov. 2008)
Elections in 2009 and 2010: Technical and Contextual Challenges to Building Democracy in
Afghanistan, by Grant Kippen (Nov. 2008)
From Disappointment to Hope: Transforming Experiences of Young Afghans Returning “Home”
from Pakistan and Iran, by Mamiko Saito (Nov. 2008)
Natural Resources Management, Farming Systems and Rural Livelihoods, by Alan Roe (Nov. 2008)
Afghanistan’s Hidden Drug Problem: The Misuse of Psychotropics, by David Macdonald (Oct. 2008)
Opium Poppy and Informal Credit, by Adam Pain (Oct. 2008)
FMcPors Hn�uencing Gecisions Po Use FOild IMNour: A FMse SPudy of Poor HouseOolds in HerMP, Ny
Amanda Sim and Marie-Louise Høilund-Carlsen (Aug. 2008)
FMcPors Hn�uencing Gecisions Po Use FOild IMNour: A FMse SPudy of Poor HouseOolds in RurMl
Badakhshan, by Pamela Hunte and Anastasiya Hozyainova (Aug. 2008)
How the Water Flows: A Typology of Irrigation Systems in Afghanistan, by Bob Rout (June 2008)
Resurgence and Reductions: Explanations for Changing Levels of Opium Poppy Cultivation in
NMngMrOMr Mnd GOor in 2006-07, Ny GMvid MMns�eld (MMy 2008)
Microcredit, Informal Credit and Rural Livelihoods: A Village Case Study in Bamyan Province, by
Erna Andersen, Paula Kantor and Amanda Sim (Apr. 2008)
Second-Generation Afghans in Iran: Integration, Identity and Return, by Mohammad Jalal Abbasi-
Shavazi et al. (Apr. 2008)
Subnational State-Building in Afghanistan, by Hamish Nixon (Apr. 2008)
FMcPors Hn�uencing Gecisions Po Use FOild IMNour: A FMse SPudy of Poor HouseOolds in KMNul, Ny
Paula Kantor and Anastasiya Hozyainova (Apr. 2008)
Moving to the Mainstream: Integrating Gender in Afghanistan’s National Policy, by Anna
Wordsworth (Feb. 2008)
The Changing Face of Local Governance? Community Development Councils in Afghanistan, by
Hamish Nixon (Feb. 2008)
Love, Fear and Discipline: Everyday Violence toward Children in Afghan Families, by Deborah J.
Smith (Feb. 2008)
A to Z
A to Z: Contents
Afghan Civil Society Forum (ACSF)
Afghan Interim Authority (AIA)
Afghan National Army (ANA)
Afghan National Auxiliary Police (ANAP)
Afghan National Police (ANP)
Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF)
Afghan NGO Coordination Bureau (ANCB)
Afghan Transitional Authority (ATA)
Afghan Women’s Network (AWN)
Afghanistan Centre at Kabul University (ACKU)
Afghanistan Country Stability Picture (ACSP)
Afghanistan Compact
Afghanistan Development Forum (ADF)
Commission (AIHRC)
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS)
Afghanistan New Beginnings Programme (ANBP)
AfgOMnisPMn NGO SMfePy Of�ce (ANSO)
Afghanistan Parliamentary Assistance Project (APAP)
Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF)
Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU)
Afghanistan Rural Enterprise Developmen
Program (AREDP)
Agency Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief (ACBAR)
Alternative Livelihoods (AL)
Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS)
Berlin Meeting and Declarations
Bonn Agreement
Budget
Civil Service Commission
Coalition Forces (CF)
Combined Security Transition Command–Afghanistan (CSTC-A)
Community Development Council (CDC)
Consultative Group (CG)
Constitutional Loya Jirga (CLJ)
Counter-narcotics (CN)
Counter Narcotics Trust Fund (CNTF)
Development Budget
Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration (DDR)
Disbandment of Illegal Armed Groups (DIAG)
Donor Assistance Database (DAD)
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Emergency Loya Jirga (ELJ)
Enhancing Legal and Electoral Capacity fo
Tomorrow (ELECT)
Human Rights Research and Advocac
Consortium (HRRAC)
Independent Administrative Reform and Civil Service Commission (IARCSC)
Independent Directorate of Local Governance (IDLG)
Interim Afghanistan National Developmen
Strategy (I-ANDS)
International Security Assistance Force (ISAF)
Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB)
Joint Electoral Management Body (JEMB)
Justice Sector Reform (JSR)
Law and Order Trust Fund for Afghanistan (LOTFA)
London Conference
Micro�nMnce HnvesPmenP SupporP FMciliPy fo
Afghanistan (MISFA)
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)
Mine Action Programme for Afghanistan (MAPA)
National Area-Based Development Programme (NABDP)
National Budget
National Development Framework (NDF)
National Development Programmes (NDP)
National Human Development Report (NHDR)
National Risk and Vulnerability Assessment (NRVA)
National Solidarity Programme (NSP)
National Surveillance System (NSS)
Of�ce of AdminisPrMPive AffMirs Mnd Founcil of
Ministers Secretariat (OAA/CMS)
Paris Conference
Policy Action Group (PAG)
Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP)
Provincial Development Plan (PDP)
Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT)
Public Administration Reform (PAR)
Rome Conference on Justice and Rule of Law
Securing Afghanistan’s Future (SAF)
Security Sector Reform (SSR)
Southern and Western Afghanistan and Balochistan Association for Coordination (SWABAC)
Support for an Effective Afghan Legislature (SEAL)
Tokyo Meetings
United Nations Assistance Mission i
UN Coordination in Afghanistan, 1988–2009
United States Forces Afghanistan (USFOR-A)
A to Z
Afghan Civil Society Forum (ACSF)
www.acsf.af
The Afghan Civil Society Forum (ACSF) is a network of Afghan civil society groups and actors. It
provides a platform for dialogue and aims to develop the role of civil society in political decision-
making. ACSF was established at the Afghan Civil Society Conference, held in parallel with the
Bonn Conference (p. 25) in late 2001. At the request of Afghan civil society leaders, ACSF was
initially supported by Swisspeace Foundation. ASCF has been completely independent since
January 2006.
According Po POe AFSF de�niPion, “civil sociePy” includes POose ROo come PogePOer volunPMrily Po
participate in civic affairs for the common good, in peace and without consideration for personal
or political gain. The Forum has 137 members — including 85 organisations and 52 individuals —
and 315 partners for capacity-building, civic education, advocacy and media. Its Board of Directors
comprises seven Afghan and two international representatives, elected for two-year terms by the
Annual General Meeting of ACSF members. The overarching goal of the ACSF is to promote the
development of civil society by:
coordinating, expanding and fostering civil society networks in Afghanistan and abroad;
promoting a sense of active citizenry among Afghan men and women;
building institutional capacities of public and civil society entities; and
collecting, analysing, raising and incorporating civil society’s perspectives and concerns in the
political, social and economic development processes of Afghanistan.
During 2002-05, ACSF supported the implementation of the Bonn Agreement (p. 25); conducted
educational, media and advocacy activities on the constitution-making process; and carried out
civic education and registration campaigns for the presidential and parliamentary elections. After
POe pMrliMmenPMry elecPions in 200D, AFSF modi�ed iPs prMcPices Mnd MpproMcO, moving MRMy
from public outreach and toward the support of institution-building. ACSF has revised its strategy
for 2009-11 to focus on coordination, capacity-building, advocacy, civic education and research.
Since 2005, ACSF has been an implementing organisation of the Initiative to Promote Afghan Civil
Society (IPACS), which aims to promote the development of an active civil society, with an emphasis
on gender. In 2006, ACSF established a peacebuilding department that aims to contribute to the
rebuilding of Afghanistan’s social infrastructure through workshops on peace building, the “Do
No HMrm” principle concerning inPernMPionMl Mid Mnd con�icP PrMnsformMPionB Hn 2006, AFSF Mlso
developed an advocacy strategy to mainstream the work of civil society actors with the work of
pMrliMmenP Mnd oPOer sPMkeOoldersB TOis Rork conPinues PodMy Mnd is orgMnised inPo �ve mMjor
advocacy areas: women; the environment; disability issues; transparency and accountability; and
youPOB Hn mid-2007, AFSF esPMNlisOed regionMl of�ces in JMlMlMNMd, MMzMr-i-SOMrif, BMmiyMn Mnd
Gardez; ACSF’s peace-building, capacity-building and civic education workshops are now offered in
each of these locations. ACSF represented Afghan civil society at the June 2008 Paris Conference
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
(p. 54). Beginning in 2008, ACSF has been working with its partners to initiate a comprehensive
capacity development program for civil servants in the south, southeast and east of Afghanistan.
ACSF maintains a Library Resource Centre and publishes
magazine (in Dari and
Pashto) and a monthly newsletter (in English, Dari and Pashto). ACSF represents Afghan civil society
in many forums, including the Afghanistan Development Forum (ADF, p. 13). Donors include the
Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, USAID, Oxfam-Novib, Counterpart International,
UNDP, DFID, The Asia Foundation, Swedish Committee for Afghanistan, Open Society Institute,
German Development Service (DED), Rights & Democracy, IFES, Christian Aid, Heinrich Boell
Foundation, GTZ, Development Alternatives, Inc. (DAI), Geneva Centre for Democratic Control of
Armed Forces and the British Embassy.
Afghan Interim Authority (AIA)
See Afghan Transitional Authority (ATA), p. 9.
Afghan National Army (ANA)
The Afghan National Army (ANA) was created on 1 December 2002 under a decree issued by
President Hamid Karzai. Serving under Afghanistan’s Ministry of Defense, the ANA makes up one
part of the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF), the other part of which is the Afghan National
Police (ANP, p. 6). Conceived as an all-volunteer force inclusive of Afghans of all social and ethnic
origins, the ANA originally was to be capped at an end-strength of 70,000 service members.
When established in 2003, the ANA was adopted by the Bonn Agreement (p. 25) as one of the
�ve pillMrs of POe AfgOMn governmenP’s SecuriPy SecPor Reform sPrMPegy (SSR, pB D8)B TOe roles of
the ANA are: 1) to secure the borders and deter external threats; 2) to defeat terrorist forces; 3) to
disband, reintegrate or imprison illegal armed groups; and 4) to manage internal security threats
and emergencies in cooperation with the ANP.
As of November 2008 (according to CSTC-A, see p. 28), ANA operating strength stood at nearly
70,900 troops; of these, approximately two-thirds are combat forces and 3 percent are air corps.
Based on ongoing threat assessments and the Government’s desire to play a larger military role in
security efforts in Afghanistan, its request to expand the ANA from a planned 80,000 to 122,000
operational soldiers by 2013 was approved by the Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB,
p. 40) in September 2008. An additional 12,000 soldiers-in-training were also approved, bringing
the eventual total to 134,000 troops. Under this plan, the ANA would then consist of: 21 brigades
(18 infantry, one mechanised, one for headquarters security support, and one commando); the
Kabul-headquartered Capital Division responsible for the security of the capital and the seat
of government; and an air corps providing essential airlift support to ANA brigades. In August
2008, the ANA — along with the ANP — took over lead security responsibility for Kabul from the
International Security Assistance Force (ISAF, p. 38).
The ANA is a conventionally structured and light infantry-based force. It is designed primarily to
combat insurgents and defend Afghanistan’s national sovereignty and territorial integrity. ANA’s
�ve ground-mMnoeuvre corps Mre disPriNuPed Ms regionMl commMnds in KMNul, GMrdez, KMndMOMr,
A to Z
Herat and Mazar-i-Sharif. ANA battalions, or
kandaks,
consist of 700-800 soldiers, sergeants and
of�cersB Equipped RiPO refurNisOed, SovieP Union-erM MircrMfP, POe AfgOMn NMPionMl Air Forps is
being trained to perform a range of missions including presidential airlift, medical and casualty
evacuation, reconnaissance and airborne command and control, and light air attack.
To ensure geographical and ethnic diversity, the ANA has recruitment centres in each of
Afghanistan’s 34 provinces. Around 2,500 new recruits join the ANA every month. Recruits
complete 12-week training courses at the Kabul Military Training Centre (KMTC). All trainers
are Afghan, supported by military trainers from the US, the UK, France and other countries.
Upon graduation from the KMTC, ANA soldiers undergo an additional six weeks of training and
equipping (joining POeir felloR uniP of�cers Mnd non-commissioned of�cers) Nefore Neing deployed
Po POeir respecPive corpsB AddiPionMlly, in 200E POe �rsP-ever clMss of ANA of�cers is expecPed Po
graduate from the National Military Academy of Afghanistan, which was established in 2004. ANA
personnel sign three-year contracts, which can be voluntarily renewed. The maximum length of
service is 25 years.
US training teams are embedded in most ANA units, ranging from
kandaks
to corps. Through its
Operational Mentor and Liaison Team Programme, ISAF similarly embeds mentors in selected
The US is the key partner in training and equipping the ANA, providing the majority of the required
PecOnicMl Mnd �nMnciMl supporPB HP OMs commiPPed Po spending US$17 Nillion on PrMining Mnd
equipping the army from 2008 to 2013.
Afghan National Auxiliary Police (ANAP)
The Afghanistan National Auxiliary Police (ANAP) was dismantled in 2008 and is no longer a
recognised force of the Afghan National Police (ANP, p. 6). The ANAP was created in 2006 as a
PemporMry, communiPy-NMsed sPMPic police force Po �ll POe need for securiPy in AfgOMnisPMn during
the build-up of the ANP. ANAP command and control was held by local ANP police chiefs at the
Regional, Provincial and District levels.
ANAP’s hasty establishment at a time of growing insurgency led many to conclude that its primary
purpose was to serve as a paramilitary force in counter-insurgency operations, rather than as a
civiliMn police forceB TOe MinisPry of HnPerior AffMirs in JMnuMry 2007, OoRever, de�ned ANAP Ms
“not a deployable active force; they are to be used strictly as a static force to back up the ANP.”
While ANAP was created to cover 21 provinces and 124 districts, initial emphasis was placed on
training, equipping and deploying the force in six provinces in southern and eastern Afghanistan.
TOe �rsP ANAP clMss grMduMPed in OcPoNer 2006 in ZMNul province, ROere POe progrMmme RMs
piloted.
At its peak in November 2007, the ANAP’s authorised strength was 11,271. From June 2007 until
1 October 2008, ANAP patrolmen who were selected to join the ANP could attend a three-week
transition course. Those who have not taken the course may still be eligible to serve in the ANP
but will have to undergo the usual processes for ANP recruitment and training.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Afghan National Police (ANP)
The Afghan National Police (ANP) is the Afghan government’s overarching police institution; it
operates under the authority of the Ministry of Interior Affairs (MoI). Together with the Afghan
National Army (ANA, p. 4), the ANP make up the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF). The
ANP’s roles span a wide spectrum of security activities including law enforcement, maintenance
of order, criminal investigation, border security, counter-narcotics and counter terrorism. The ANP
consists of the following police forces:
National Police or Afghan Uniformed Police (AUP) — responsible for most day-to-day police
activities and assigned to police districts as well as Provincial and Regional Commands; each
of its six regions ultimately reports to the Deputy Minister of Security; authorised strength of
Afghan National Civil Order Police (ANCOP) — a highly trained, quick-reaction and specially
equipped police force aimed at dealing with “advanced police situations” such as civil disorder,
looting, hostage-taking and riots; authorised eventual strength of 5,442 (20 battalions)
Afghan Border Police (ABP) — engaged in law enforcement at international borders and the
counPry’s oPOer poinPs of enPry; sPrengPO of 18,000, sPrucPured inPo �ve zones
Counter Narcotics Police of Afghanistan (CNPA) — the lead law enforcement agency charged
with reducing narcotics production and distribution in Afghanistan; authorised strength of
Criminal Investigation Division (CID) — responsible for investigating criminal offences under
Afghan law; authorised strength of 4,148
Afghan Customs Police (ACP) — enforces customs regulations in Afghanistan; ACP operations
come under the authority of the Ministry of Finance
Counter Terrorism Police (CTP) — lead police and law enforcement counter-insurgency and
anti-terrorism efforts; authorised strength of 406
AfgOMnisPMn NMPionMl Fire GepMrPmenP — responsiNle for providing �re suppression, prevenPion
and rescue; the Fire Department operates throughout the country and has an authorised
The Afghan National Auxiliary Police (ANAP, p. 5), which had been established in 2006 as a
temporary, community-based force to reinforce the ANP, is no longer a recognised police force. It
was dismantled in 2008.
The 2006 Afghanistan Compact (p. 11) established as a benchmark for 2010 a fully constituted,
professional, functional and ethnically balanced ANP force of up to 62,000 members. In April
2007, in response to increased insurgency in southern Afghanistan, the Joint Coordination and
Monitoring Board (JCMB, p. 40) raised this number to 82,000. Some donors have raised concerns
MNouP POe �scMl susPMinMNiliPy of increMsing POe size of POe ANP; oPOers Mre concerned POMP POe focus
A to Z
of police reform is shifting from the establishment of a civilian police force to that of a paramilitary
or counter-insurgency force. The US Combined Security Transition Command–Afghanistan (CSTC-A;
see Coalition Forces, p. 27) estimates ANP’s strength at 76,000, as of November 2008.
Reform of POe police secPor, one of POe �ve pillMrs of POe AfgOMn governmenP’s SecuriPy SecPor
Reform strategy (SSR, p. 58), has focused primarily on training and mentoring, provision of
equipment and infrastructure, and institutional restructuring such as pay and rank reform. The
Law and Order Trust Fund for Afghanistan (LOTFA, p. 43) has primary responsibility for coordinating
donor support for ANP salaries. The police sector in Afghanistan has been supported by some 25
donor countries, with Germany taking the coordinating role of “key partner” until 2007. Since
2004, POe US OMs Neen Ny fMr POe lMrgesP overMll conPriNuPor of OumMn Mnd �nMnciMl resources
Po supporP POe police secPor, RiPO M 2007 conPriNuPion esPimMPed MP US$2BD NillionB Since 200D,
CSTC-A has led police reform efforts by the US, along with the training and development of the
ANA. CSTC-A has roughly 2,500 personnel and contractors dedicated to its ANP mission.
Germany coordinated support for the ANP among EU member nations during 2003-07, also
conPriNuPing $80 million POrougO POe GermMn Police ProjecP Of�ce (GPPO)B Guring pMrP of POis
period, the Inter-Agency Police Coordinated Action Group (IPCAG) served as the international
community’s main police coordination body in Afghanistan. In June 2007, the European Union
Police Mission in Afghanistan (EUPOL) subsumed Germany’s primary role in police reform with
the aim of consolidating different approaches among EU members; the mission was established
for at least three years. In late October 2008, EUPOL had deployed 270 personnel, mainly police,
law enforcement and justice experts, across Afghanistan. Plans to increase to 400 staff were to
be implemented from December 2008.
Approaches to police reform have varied widely among donors, and efforts to consolidate and
integrate these approaches have been slow to emerge. In 2007, donors and the Afghan government
established the International Police Coordination Board (IPCB) aimed at consolidating and
integrating international police reform efforts and enhancing Afghan ownership of the reforms.
The Board includes representatives from the MoI, CSTC-A, EUPOL, EC, EU and the US; several
other donor countries are expected to join in early 2009.
The main laws governing the ANP are the 2005 Police Law and the 2004 Interim Criminal Procedure
Code. These laws are based on Articles 56, 75(3) and 134 of the Constitution. In 2006, the MoI
issued an order superseding Article 4 of the Police Law, revising the police chain of command.
The new chain of command is: 1) Minister of Interior; 2) Deputy Minister for Security Affairs; 3)
Regional Commanders; 4) Provincial Chiefs of Police; and 5) District Chiefs of Police. There are
currently ANP six regions: Kabul Province, North, East, South, West and Central.
A commissioned ANP of�cer (
) requires a 12th-grade education and three years of training at
POe KMNul Police AcMdemy (KPA)B A non-commissioned of�cer or sergeMnP
is required
to complete 9th grade and a nine-month course at KPA. Patrolmen
(satunkai)
complete training
courses at either the Central Training Centre in Kabul or one of the Regional Training Centres in
Bamiyan, Gardez, Herat, Jalalabad, Kandahar, Kunduz or Mazar-i-Sharif.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
A major MoI initiative for police reform is Focused District Development (FDD), which began in
December 2007. The programme serves as an overarching strategy for training AUP, which makes
up the largest part of the ANP. Aimed at enhancing district-level police capabilities and rule of law,
the FDD uses a six-phase approach to assess, train, mentor, reorganise, re-equip and monitor
police in selected districts. AUP assigned to Kabul undergo the “Jump Start” training programme.
Beginning in October 2008, the Focused Border Development programme is aimed at training
ABP units working along the eastern and southeastern border.
Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF)
The Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF) consist of the Afghan National Army (ANA, p. 4) and
the Afghan National Police (ANP, p. 6).
Afghan NGO Coordination Bureau (ANCB)
www.ancb.org
The Afghan NGO Coordination Bureau (ANCB) was founded in 1991 and aims to coordinate the
activities of Afghan NGOs with the Afghan government, the UN, international organisations and
donor agencies. ANCB strives to strengthen democracy and enhance the capacity of its member
organisations through workshops, seminars and partnerships.
ANCB membership is restricted to Afghan NGOs. ANCB has approximately 200 members, some
of which are also members of the Agency Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief (ACBAR, p. 22).
Applications for ANCB membership are considered by the Board of Directors and subsequently
voted on at the General Assembly (the quarterly meeting of member organisations). ANCB’s 11-
member Board of Directors, led by a new chairman as of 2008, is elected for a period of one year
by the General Assembly. ANCB’s headquarters are located in Kabul; the bureau has satellite
of�ces in JMlMlMNMd Mnd PesOMRMrB
In 2004-05, ANCB was involved in drafting NGO legislation and the NGO Code of
Conduct (p. 52). It also carried out civic education campaigns in advance of the Constitutional Loya
Jirga and the presidential and parliamentary elections. In 2008, ANCB provided 13 workshops to
member organisations on topics including civic education, women’s rights and human rights.
ANCB convenes monthly member meetings on topics such as health, education, agriculture,
sanitation, reconstruction and government policy. It also arranges seminars and training courses
aimed at building the technical capacity of member NGOs in needs assessment, management,
�nMnce, MdminisPrMPive developmenP, reporP Mnd proposMl RriPing, Mnd compuPer skills; in POese
activities, it attempts to maintain a gender balance among participants. ANCB provides internet
fMciliPies for iPs memNers in POe ANFB of�ce Mnd produces M Reekly neRslePPerB ANFB Mlso puNlisOes
the quarterly magazine
Paiwastoon
(Coordination) and a directory of all its members.
ANCB is a member of the International Council of Voluntary Agencies, the World Civil Society
Forum Mnd POe Af�niPy Group of NMPionMl AssociMPionsB HP is Mlso McPively involved in POe AfgOMn Fivil
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Society Forum (ACSF, p. 3). Funding for ANCB comes from membership fees, small project funders
and the National Endowment for Democracy (NED).
Afghan Transitional Authority (ATA)
The Afghan Transitional Authority (ATA) was a governing body established by the Emergency Loya
Jirga (ELJ, p. 32) in June 2002. It was preceded by the Afghan Interim Authority (AIA) — a temporary
governing body created at the Bonn Conference (p. 25). The head of the ATA was President Hamid
Karzai, previously the Chairman of the AIA, who was elected in a secret ballot by members of the
Under the ATA, in January 2004, the Constitutional Loya Jirga (CLJ, p. 29) decided on a constitution
for the new Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. As per the 2004 Constitution, the ATA was due to stay
in power until a fully representative government could be elected through free and fair elections.
In October 2004, Hamid Karzai was democratically elected as President; at his inauguration in
December 2004, the ATA was transformed into the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan, despite the
rescheduling of National Assembly elections until September 2005.
Afghan Women’s Network (AWN)
www.afghanwomensnetwork.org
The Afghan Women’s Network (AWN) is a network of NGOs and individuals working for the
promotion of Afghan women’s empowerment, rights and equal participation in society. AWN’s
OeMdquMrPers Mre in KMNul, RiPO suN-of�ces in PesOMRMr, HerMP Mnd JMlMlMNMdB TOe NePRork
currently has 64 member NGOs and more than 3,000 individual members. AWN is active in the
areas of capacity-building, coordination among NGOs working on women’s issues, and advocacy
on behalf of women and children.
TOe ideM of AJN �rsP Mrose MP POe 1EED UN Jorld Fonference on Jomen, ROere pMrPicipMnPs
idenPi�ed M need for cooperMPion Mmong Romen in AfgOMnisPMn Mnd POe AfgOMn diMsporMB TOe
network became a formal structure in 1996, comprising NGOs focused on providing: humanitarian
assistance; literacy, education, and vocational and computer skills for refugee women; and aid for
street children. After the fall of the Taliban, the AWN revised its mission to focus on three priority
areas: 1) capacity-building; 2) networking; and 3) advocacy.
In 2006-07, AWN became involved in promoting gender equity issues in the Afghanistan
National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14) process. Since that time, AWN has conducted
awareness campaigns for the reduction of gender-based violence in eight provinces and provided
legal counsel for victims of such violence. AWN continues to publish the youth magazine
Ertiqa
and, in 2009, plans to release a report on child abuse in Afghanistan covering the period 2006-
08. It maintains a library and internet cafe for use by women’s NGOs.
In 2008, together with its implementing partners, AWN conducted leadership and management
workshops, vocational and legal trainings, and civic education courses for Afghan NGOs. To
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
enhance networking among members, AWN’s revamped website now allows member organisations
to submit activity reports, and access training and other resources online. In advocacy activities,
member representatives offered guidance related to the Convention on the Elimination of All
Forms of Discrimination Against Women. AWN also submitted to the Afghan Parliament a proposal
for a law prohibiting violence against women.
The Network’s General Assembly, comprised of AWN members, meets monthly. Members elect an
Executive Committee once a year to serve as the principal decision-making body for AWN. The AWN
also has an Advisory Committee to assist with strategic planning, coordinate with international
NGOs, support fundraising efforts and advise the Executive Committee.
AJN receives projecP-speci�c funding from M vMriePy of sources, including UNHFEM, GFHG, OxfMm-
Novib and the Heinrich Böll Foundation.
Afghanistan Centre at Kabul University (ACKU)
www.ackuaf.org
TOe AfgOMnisPMn FenPre MP KMNul UniversiPy (AFKU) is M non-pro�P orgMnisMPion collecPing Mnd
making available resources to facilitate research that addresses Afghanistan’s nation-building
challenges. With more than 17,000 catalogued items, it provides the most comprehensive
collection of materials related to Afghanistan in the region. Formerly the ACBAR Resource and
Information Centre (ARIC; see Agency Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief, p.22), ACKU was
established independently in September 2005.
The collections — in Dari, Pashto, English and other languages — are largely generated by the
Afghan government, UN agencies, NGOs and international scholars and observers. These contain
practical works on health and agricultural best practices, political analyses, unique internal
documents charting the struggle for women’s rights, recent laws, rare mujahiddin publications,
cultural heritage issues and many works of Afghan literature.
The ACKU reading room provides students, faculty and policy-makers with computers connected
to the internet and the ACKU database. The audiovisual section contains current news reports and
various videotapes on NGO programmes, events in Afghanistan’s recent history, and ethnographic
Mnd culPurMl �lmsB TOe AFKU sPMcks Mnd reMding room Mre locMPed in POe cenPrMl liNrMry of KMNul
UniversiPyB A neR, US$2 million fMciliPy
is
planned for completion in mid-2009. Funded by the
Afghan government, it will be located on the Kabul University campus.
ACKU’s overriding purpose is to provide access to knowledge that contributes to an understanding
of the social, economic, political and cultural dynamics of the Afghan society in the past, present
Mnd fuPureB HPs speci�c oNjecPives Mre Po:
operate as an information depository to facilitate research in Afghanistan and abroad;
function as a well-equipped, professional resource and research centre on Afghan affairs, with
complementary services such as collections management, reader services, IT and outreach
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programmes, seminars, exhibitions, publications and media outlets;
ensure POMP Mll documenPs of reseMrcO signi�cMnce relMPing Po AfgOMnisPMn Mnd iPs people Mre
collected, preserved and made accessible to academics, students, the aid community, civil
society organisations and the general public;
provide maximum access to documents using updated information technology, including a
database, a website, PDFs and CD-ROMs; and
forge links with provincial public and university libraries throughout Afghanistan, as well as
academic institutions abroad.
In 2007, in collaboration with the University of Arizona and funded by the National Endowment for
the Humanities, ACKU began a project to create an online digital catalogue of all ACKU resource
centre holdings. ACKU also operates the ACKU Box Library Extension (ABLE), designed to provide
libraries for communities and high schools in the provinces. Managed by local community
custodians (including teachers, NGO staff, shopkeepers and
), the box libraries (small,
shelved containers on wheels) hold a wide variety of titles on topics ranging from history to the
environment, home management to good health practices. ABLE, which supplies libraries in 33
provinces, also publishes its own easy-to-read books for new literates on subjects such as mother-
child care, animal welfare and Islam. To date, ABLE has published more than 150 titles and
provided more than 100,000 books to approximately 200 schools and community libraries.
Afghanistan Country Stability Picture (ACSP)
The Afghanistan Country Stability Picture (ACSP) is a tool designed to provide country-wide
information on reconstruction and development projects, particularly multi-donor and multi-
agency activities. An initiative of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF, p. 38), the
ACSP is based on an extensive database and can be graphically depicted in such formats as
maps, graphs and tables. The database contains information on more than 87,000 projects from
140 sources, including the Afghan government, donors, Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRT, p.
56) and international organisations.
The ACSP is released on DVD periodically, with the most recent version, Edition 15, available as of
NovemNer 2008B EdiPion 6 (MMrcO 2007) mMrked POe �rsP version POMP HSAF releMsed Po POe NGO
community. Recognised NGOs may apply for access to this material.
Afghanistan Compact
For the full text of the Compact, see p. 114.
The Afghanistan Compact was launched together with the Interim Afghanistan National
Development Strategy (I-ANDS, p. 38) at the January 2006 London Conference (p. 44). It is a
�ve-yeMr frMmeRork for cooperMPion Mmong POe AfgOMn governmenP, POe UN Mnd donors, Mnd RMs
developed through consultation among these actors. The Compact — endorsed by UN Security
Founcil ResoluPions 16DE, 1662, Mnd 1746 — reMf�rms POe commiPmenP of POe AfgOMn governmenP
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
and the international community to work toward a stable and prosperous Afghanistan, with good
governance and human rights protection for all under the rule of law. It states:
The Afghan Government hereby commits itself to realising this shared vision of the
future; the international community, in turn, commits itself to provide resources and
support to realise that vision.
The Compact establishes a mechanism for coordinating Afghan and international development
and reconstruction efforts and follows the Bonn Agreement (p. 25), which formally ended with
the holding of legislative and Provincial Council elections in September 2005. Consistent with
the I-ANDS and the goals articulated by the Afghan government in its Millennium Development
GoMls (MGG, pB 4D) FounPry ReporP 200D (“Vision 2020”), POe FompMcP idenPi�es POree criPicMl
and interdependent areas of activity or “pillars”: 1) Security; 2) Governance, Rule of Law and
Human Rights; and 3) Economic and Social Development. A further vital and cross-cutting area of
work highlighted in the Compact is eliminating the narcotics industry, which remains a formidable
threat to the people and state of Afghanistan.
Annex I of the Compact sets out detailed outcomes, benchmarks and timelines for delivery,
consistent with the high-level goals set by the I-ANDS. Annex II sets forth the commitment of
the Afghan government and the international community to improve the effectiveness and
accountability of international assistance. These actors also established the Joint Coordination
and Monitoring Board (JCMB, p. 40) to oversee and provide regular public reports on the execution
of the Compact and the ANDS.
Hn MMy 2007, POe JFMB releMsed POe �rsP MnnuMl reporP on POe implemenPMPion of POe AfgOMnisPMn
Compact in accordance with the I-ANDS. Consolidating the work of Consultative Groups (CG, p.
28), Technical Working Groups, and quarterly JCMB meetings, the report assessed the progress
made on Compact benchmarks and the challenges ahead. It stated that:
. . .marked progress has been achieved towards the implementation of the Compact
benchmarks. Steady gains in education, health, and rural development have been
made towards the Economic and Social Development Pillar benchmarks. In the
Security Pillar, reforms have been achieved in the Ministry of Interior, although
much work remains. Counter-narcotics and the disbandment of illegal armed
groups Mlso fMce signi�cMnP cOMllenges, RiPO counPer-Perrorism efforPs cMpPuring
a disproportionate share of resources relative to comprehensive security sector
reform. Progress towards curbing corruption, instituting a new legal order, and
promoting reconciliation and political outreach in the Governance, Rule of Law, and
Human Rights Pillar underscores the importance of maintaining momentum among
both national and international partners.
The report presented several recommendations intended to enable the Compact to meet the
expectations of the Afghan people and produce measurable gains in communities across the
country.
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13
Afghanistan Development Forum (ADF)
www.adf.gov.af
The Afghanistan Development Forum (ADF) is a mechanism for discussion of the Afghan
government’s reconstruction and development plans and the mobilisation of resources. It brings
together the Government of Afghanistan, bilateral and multilateral donors, UN agencies, NGOs
and private-sector representatives. Four ADFs have been convened since the signing of the Bonn
Agreement — in 2003, 2004, 2005 and 2007.
The fourth ADF was held in Kabul on 29-30 April 2007. The Afghan government presented its
strategies on health, energy and education, and papers were presented on aid effectiveness,
provincial development plans, and capacity development. In a speech to the ADF participants,
President Hamid Karzai expressed gratitude to Afghanistan’s international partners, and
highlighted both progress and priority concerns in the areas of health, education, capacity
development, aid coordination, anti-corruption, counter-narcotics, energy, security, and regional
cooperation. Recommendations that arose from the 2007 ADF were designed to feed into the
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14).
Commission (AIHRC)
www.aihrc.org.af
The Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHRC) was established as part of the
Bonn Agreement; it became a permanent national institution under the 2004 Constitution (p. 84).
Hn de�ning POe Fommission’s role, POe FonsPiPuPion sPMPes:
The State, for the purpose of monitoring the observation of human rights in
Afghanistan, and their promotion and protection, shall establish the Independent
Human Rights Commission of Afghanistan. Everyone in case of violation of his/her
human rights can report or complain to this Commission. The Commission can refer
the cases of violation of the human rights of the persons to the legal authorities,
and assist them in defending their rights. Structure and mode of function of this
Commission will be regulated by law.
AIHRC played a leading role in the Human Rights Working Group of the Consultative Group (CG,
p. 28) process, and provided input and recommendations on human rights issues for inclusion
in the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14). Representatives on the AIHRC
NoMrd serve �ve-yeMr Perms Mnd Mre nominMPed Ny POe PresidenP of AfgOMnisPMnB Hn 2006, AHHRF
launched a three-year strategic plan that includes: working with traditional dispute-resolution
mechanisms to embrace human rights priorities; providing extensive teacher training in human
rights education; assist

ing in the process of justice sector reform (JSR, p. 41); and developing an
action plan on transitional justice initiatives. Based on this plan, AIHRC, together with UNHCR,
began in 2008 a child rights monitoring program focusing on deportees and returnees.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
In recent years, AIHRC created and equipped transitional justice monitoring and investigation
teams. It has also been involved in the implementation of human rights education curriculum
around the country for grades one through six, with grades seven through twelve soon to follow.
AIHRC has developed radio shows, broadcast in six provinces, promoting information on human
rights and host media roundtables to raise awareness of human rights. The Commission’s current
work also concerns the rights of Afghan nationals who have been detained.
The AIHRC offers the publication
Human Rights Monthly
free of charge. AIHRC also runs a resource
centre in Kabul, open to the public.
Since iP NecMme operMPionMl in June 2002, AHHRF OMs expMnded Po include 627 sPMff in 13 of�ces
— POe OeMd of�ce in KMNul; regionMl of�ces in BMlkO, BMmiyMn, HerMP, KMNul, NMngMrOMr, Kunduz,
KMndMOMr, GOor Mnd PMkPiM; Mnd provinciMl of�ces in BMdMkOsOMn, GMikundi Mnd FMryMNB To
provide the most comprehensive monitoring of the human rights situation in Afghanistan, AIHRC
OMs creMPed POe folloRing uniPs RiPOin eMcO of�ce: moniPoring Mnd invesPigMPion, cOildren’s rigOPs,
Romen’s rigOPs, OumMn rigOPs educMPion, PrMnsiPionMl jusPice, OumMn rigOPs �eld moniPoring, Mnd
people with disabilities. There is also a national-level Media and Publications Unit and a Research
and Policy Unit based in Kabul.
The AIHRC currently works closely with the Ministries of Labour and Rural Rehabilitation and
Development, and receives funding from a number of donors, including UNICEF.
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS)
www.ands.gov.af
The Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS) is intended to be the central framework
for Afghanistan’s development, aiming to promote pro-poor growth, support the development of
democratic processes and institutions, and reduce poverty and vulnerability. It aims to lay out the
strategic priorities and mechanisms for achieving the government’s overall development vision
and serves as the country’s Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP, p. 55) a key document used
by the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund in assessing a country’s eligibility for debt
reliefB TOe developmenP of POe ANGS RMs �rsP proposed MP POe 200D AfgOMnisPMn GevelopmenP
Forum (AGF, pB 13)B TOe �nMl ANGS RMs Mpproved Ny PresidenP HMmid KMrzMi on 21 April 2008
and subsequently presented at the Paris Conference in June (p. 54) to gain support from the
international community for its implementation.
The Government intends for the ANDS to articulate both a policy framework and a road map for
implementation, translating strategic priorities into effective programs that deliver both immediate
and lasting results for the Afghan people. Together with the Afghanistan Compact (p. 11), the
full ANDS is meant to provide a path to achieving Afghanistan’s Millennium Development Goals
(MDGs, p. 45) by 2020.
TOe precursor Po POe �nMl ANGS RMs POe HnPerim ANGS (H-ANGS), ROicO RMs Mpproved Ny POe
Government in December 2005 and presented with the Afghanistan Compact (p. 11) at the
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January 2006 London Conference (p. 44). In 2006, the Government and its international partners
began to implement the I-ANDS and to develop it into a full strategy to meet the requirements of a
PRSP. The I-ANDS covered the period 2006-10 and was linked intrinsically to the implementation
of POe AfgOMnisPMn FompMcP; every FompMcP NencOmMrk RMs re�ecPed Ms M �ve-yeMr sPrMPegic
objective in the interim strategy.
The preparation of the full ANDS was coordinated by the ANDS Secretariat and supervised by the
ANDS Oversight Committee (OSC), comprising seven cabinet ministers. The Joint Coordination
and Monitoring Board (JCMB, p. 40), the high-level governing body overseeing the implementation
of the Afghanistan Compact also provided guidance for preparation of the ANDS.
Hn MccordMnce RiPO POe AfgOMnisPMn FompMcP, POe prioriPies Mnd cOMllenges of POe �nMl ANGS
are organised under three broad pillars: 1) Security; 2) Governance, Rule of Law and Human
Rights; and 3) Economic and Social Development.
TOe �nMl ANGS comprises sPrMPegies for 17 secPors, ROicO fMll under eigOP suN-pillMrs: H) SecuriPy;
II) Good Governance; III) Infrastructure and Natural Resources; IV) Education and Culture; V)
Health and Nutrition; VI) Agriculture and Rural Development; VII) Social Protection; and VIII)
Economic Governance and Private Sector Development.
It also includes strategies for six cross-cutting issues: Capacity Building, Gender Equity, Counter
Narcotics, Regional Cooperation, Anti-Corruption and Environment.
The sector strategies cover the period SY1387-1391 (2007-08 to 2012-13). They can be
downloaded from: http://www.ands.gov.af/ands/ands_docs/index.asp. For the structure of
the ANDS, see below.
The ANDS sector strategies, completed by the end of 2007, were drafted by Sector Strategy
Development Groups (SSDGs) comprising representatives from sector ministries, the Ministry of
Finance and the cross-cutting themes.
TOe �rsP sPep in POe ANGS developmenP process RMs POe prepMrMPion of 43 individuMl sPrMPegies Ny
all government ministries and agencies, following a template provided by the ANDS Secretariat.
After their completion in mid-2007, these were then vetted and strengthened, and their strategic
priorities and funding allocations were aligned, by means of extensive consultation. Through
Consultative Groups (CG, p. 28), donor dialogue meetings, and poverty analysis based on
National Risk and Vulnerability Assessments (NRVA, p. 50), these ministry and agency strategies
were reviewed and improved before being merged into draft sector strategies. A subnational
consultation process organised in all 34 provinces, which resulted in Provincial Development
PlMns (PGP, pB D6), RMs Mimed MP ensuring POe �nMl ANGS Rould re�ecP M NroMd consensus on
development priorities within Afghan society.
AfPer POe secPor sPrMPegies Rere �nMlised, POe ANGS OversigOP FommiPPee prioriPised POem using
Mpproved criPeriM, including implemenPMPion resources MvMilMNle for POe �ve yeMrs POMP folloRed
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
(Ms idenPi�ed Ny POe ANGS MMcroeconomic FrMmeRork)B A feR secPor sPrMPegies Rere inPegrMPed
into the SY1387 (2008-09) National Budget; it is intended that most will be integrated into the
SY1388 (2009-10) Budget.
The ANDS Secretariat, in cooperation with the line ministries, combined the sector strategies
inPo POe drMfP ANGSB TOe �nMl ANGS RMs revieRed Ny POe FGs Mnd senP for MpprovMl Po POe ANGS
Oversight Committee, ensuring that the strategy as a whole is in line with government priorities
and the Afghanistan Compact benchmarks.
JiPO POe �nMlisMPion of POe ANGS documenP, POe GovernmenP is focusing on implemenPMPion Mnd
monitoring of the sector strategies. The ANDS Oversight Committee has been restructured into
the Government Coordinating Committee (GCC), which is responsible for the high-level
coordination of the ANDS process as well as overseeing and reporting on the implementation of
the ANDS. The GCC is made up of eight ministers, the National Security Advisor to the President,
the Chief Economic Advisor to the President, the Director General of the Independent Directorate
of Local Governance and the Deputy Minister of Finance; the work of the GCC is to be supported
by a secretariat. While line ministries have the primary responsibility for implementation of the
ANDS, the Ministries of Finance and Economy will take on the lead role in managing and
monitoring this process. Inter-ministerial committees may play a greater role. The structure of the
JCMB has also been changed to better address the challenges of implementation (see p. 40).
Key dates in the ANDS process

Benchmarks for the Afghanistan Compact are drafted
Afghanistan Compact and the I-ANDS are presented at the London

Conference
2007
Mar.
Work on developing Ministry strategies begins
Apr.
Afghanistan Development Forum; PDPs become part of the ANDS process
May
Ministry strategies are completed
ANDS consultation process is launched
Aug.
Work on developing sector strategies begins
Sector strategies are sent to donors for comments
Sector strategies are completed
MMrB
Gonors Mre inviPed Po commenP on �nMl drMfP of ANGS
AprB
PresidenP Mpproves �nMl ANGS
ANDS launched at the Paris Conference
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17
Structure of the Afghanistan National Development Strategy
(Source: Government of Afghanistan)
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
18
Afghanistan New Beginnings Programme (ANBP)
www.undpanbp.org
The Afghanistan New Beginnings Programme (ANBP) is a UNDP-sponsored project established
in April 2003 to implement the Afghan government’s goal of Disarmament, Demobilisation and
ReinPegrMPionB TOe governmenP �rsP Mnnounced iPs inPenPion Po pursue M nMPionMl volunPMry GGR
process at the Tokyo Meeting (p. 62) in February 2003, as part of its Security Sector Reform
(SSR, p. 58) strategy. Through DDR, the Afghan Military Forces (AMF) — comprising the Northern
Alliance, warlord militias and other Taliban-era armed groups — were supposed to surrender their
weapons and be reintegrated into civilian life.
Soldiers ROo OMnded in POeir ReMpons POrougO POe GGR process received M medMl Mnd M cerPi�cMPe,
and were offered a range of reintegration packages such as vocational training, agricultural
training and small-business opportunities. ANBP completed the disarmament and demobilisation
segments of the DDR process by June 2005, and reintegration activities continued until June
2006. The ANBP’s original mandate was to demobilise and reintegrate 100,000 soldiers over
three years, though this number was later revised downward. When the DDR process formally
cMme Po Mn end in June 2006, 63,380 former AMF of�cers Mnd soldiers OMd Neen disMrmed Mnd
259 AMF units had been decommissioned. A vast majority of these ex-combatants (55,804) chose
one of POe reinPegrMPion opPions, ROicO Nene�Ped D3,41D of POem, leMving Mside 2,7DE drop-ouPsB
Only 2.3 percent of the former combatants chose to join the Afghan National Army (ANA, p. 4).
With the completion of DDR, ANBP shifted its focus to support the government’s Disbandment of
Illegal Armed Groups (DIAG) initiative, designed to disband the estimated 100,000 armed militia
�gOPers operMPing ouPside POe former AMFB JOile GGR RMs M volunPMry process, GHAG is mMndMPory
and supported by both presidential decree and national legislation. Because DIAG deals with
illegal groups, it does not offer a reintegration package the way in which DDR did. Instead of
providing individual incentives for commanders or armed groups, DIAG focuses on securing a safe
environmenP Mnd projecPs POMP Rill Nene�P communiPiesB
Supported by ANBP, DIAG is a government-led project under the authority of the Disarmament &
Reintegration Commission (D&RC), which is chaired by Second Vice President Karim Khalili. DIAG
strategy, development and operations are led by the D&RC, assisted by DIAG’s Joint Secretariat.
The Joint Secretariat includes representatives from the National Directorate of Security (NDS),
the Ministries of Defense and of Interior Affairs, UNAMA (p. 62) and the International Security
Assistance Force (ISAF, p. 38). ANBP directly provides personnel, policy, technical and logistic
support in the implementation of DIAG, including support to the Joint Secretariat.
Since the programme began, more than 42,000 weapons have been handed over to DIAG weapon
collection teams. The programme is due to end in March 2009; in light of the current security
situation, however, it is expected that DIAG will be extended beyond this timeline.
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AfgOMnisPMn NGO SMfePy Of�ce (ANSO)
TOe AfgOMnisPMn NGO SMfePy Of�ce (ANSO), esPMNlisOed in 2003, provides M free securiPy Mdvice
service cMPering speci�cMlly Po POe needs of POe NGO communiPy in AfgOMnisPMnB HP is �nMnced Ny
POe EuropeMn Fommission HumMniPMriMn Aid Of�ce (EFHO), POe SRiss Agency for GevelopmenP
and Cooperation (SDC) and the Norwegian Ministry of Foreign Affairs. In July 2006, ANSO came
under the administration of German AgroAction (Deutsche Welthungerhilfe); it was previously
under the auspices of the International Rescue Committee.
ANSO is OeMdquMrPered in KMNul Mnd OMs regionMl of�ces in KMNul, MMzMr-i-SOMrif, HerMP, JMlMlMNMd
and Kandahar. NGOs registered with ANSO have access to regularly scheduled services, which
daily threat warnings and security alerts, weekly incident listings, as well as biweekly and
quarterly reports analysing and projecting security trends;
weekly regional security meetings;
monthly orientations for staff of NGOs; and
representation of NGOs in relations with national and international security agencies.
ANSO may also provide other services upon request, depending on its available capacity. These
countrywide safety information for NGO movement;
reviews of member NGOs’ security plans and site security;
providing security-related statistical data and analysis;
crisis response services; and
coordination of safety and security training.
All of ANSO’s national and international staff are experienced in safety and security matters.
Afghanistan Parliamentary Assistance Project (APAP)
http://www.sunyaf.org
The USAID-funded Afghanistan Parliamentary Assistance Project (APAP) was launched in 2004 to
assist in establishing a Parliament that “is able to operate as a strong, independent and effective
deliberative body.” The project’s primary objectives are to:
implement a programme to establish and develop such a parliament;
design a legislative strengthening strategy;
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
provide technical assistance to the National Assembly’s committees;
esPMNlisO Mnd supporP M pMrliMmenPMry NudgeP of�ce Mnd pMrliMmenPMry educMPionMl insPiPuPeB
Through the Afghanistan Parliamentary Institute, APAP works to develop the institutional capacity
of the National Assembly secretariat to more effectively support Members of Parliament in their
legislative roles. APAP also works to strengthen the capacity of the MPs themselves in carrying
out their legislative, representative and oversight responsibilities. This includes, but is not limited
to, helping the National Assembly to increase its engagement with constituents and build its
linkages with the executive branch of government, civil society, NGOs and the media. Working
RiPO POe NMPionMl AssemNly, APAP seeks Po increMse puNlic con�dence Mnd Nuy-in Po POe legislMPive
process.
APAP makes available several resources to international organisations, including a regularly
published legislative newsletter containing updates on parliamentary activities.
APAP is operated by the Center for International Development at the State University of New York
(SUNY-CID). In addition to APAP, efforts to assist the Afghan National Assembly include: Support
for an Effective Afghan Legislature (SEAL, p. 60) as well as initiatives by UNIFEM, the National
Democratic Institute and the International Republican Institute.
Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF)
www.worldbank.org/artf
The Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF) was established in April 2002 as a means
for coordinating donor funds in support of the Afghan government’s recurrent expenditures.
The Fund is one of the most important delivery mechanisms for channelling aid into the Afghan
government’s Core Budget (see p. 25) — not only for salaries and operating costs but also for
priority programmes aimed at achieving the country’s national development targets.
As of NovemNer 2008, more POMn US$3 Nillion OMs Neen pledged Po POe ARTF Ny 30 inPernMPionMl
donors. The ARTF is managed by the Management Committee consisting of: the World Bank (the
administrator), the Islamic Development Bank (IDB), the Asian Development Bank (ADB), UNAMA
Mnd UNGPB Guring SY1386 (2007-08), POe ARTF OMndled $634 million in donor conPriNuPionsB For
SY1387 (2008-0E), pledges OMve reMcOed $687 millionB
The priority use of ARTF funds is for the Government’s Core Budget and secondarily for investment
projecPsB Since POe ARTF’s incepPion (unPil OcPoNer 2008), more POMn $1BD Nillion OMs Neen
disNursed Po POe GovernmenP Po �nMnce recurrenP cosPs, Mnd $720 million OMs Neen disNursed for
investment projects.
The Government encourages donors to channel funding through the ARTF rather than through
NGOs or other actors, because it sees the Fund as a way of increasing Afghan ownership of
the reconstruction process, facilitating the tracking and coordination of aid, and increasing
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transparency. When donating funds to the ARTF, donors are able to specify a preference for
supporting a particular government project or programme; such preferences are limited to 50
percent of an agency’s annual contribution.
ARTF OMs �nMnced severMl core nMPionMl developmenP progrMmmes, including POe NMPionMl
Solidarity Programme (NSP, p. 50), the National Emergency Employment Programme (NEEP), the
Educational Quality Improvement Project (EQUIP), the Emergency Telecommunications Project, the
Micro�nMnce HnvesPmenP SupporP FMciliPy in AfgOMnisPMn (MHSFA, pB 44), Mnd rurMl Mnd urNMn RMPer
supply Mnd sMniPMPionB More recenPly, ARTF OMs Neen cOMnnelling pooled �nMnce PoRMrd projecPs
as part of the justice sector strategy (see JSR, p. 41) and for the Civil Service Commission’s
MMnMgemenP FMpMciPy ProgrMm, Mn efforP Po recruiP quMli�ed AfgOMns inPo line minisPriesB
The ARTF underwent two independent external reviews, which resulted in a number of
modi�cMPionsB AfPer Mn exPensive 200D evMluMPion, POe ARTF governMnce sPrucPure RMs modi�ed
to include the Ministry of Finance as an observer at monthly Management Committee meetings.
The Performance Assessment Matrix was also introduced to provide a stronger platform of
mutual accountability for the use of the ARTF funds and to strengthen the role of the Donor
Committee. A second external evaluation, completed in August 2008, set out a medium-term
agenda to transform the ARTF into a programmatic, sector-oriented funding mechanism to drive
the implementation of Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14) priorities. The
evaluation has also led donors and the Government to consider how ARTF could reduce support
Po POe GovernmenP’s operMPing NudgeP over Pime Mnd Rork PoRMrds M more policy-orienPed, �scMlly
sustainable framework.
The largest single contributors to the Fund are the UK, US and Canada. Other donors include 15
European countries, the EC, India, Iran, Turkey, Australia and the Gulf States.
Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU)
www.areu.org.af
Afghanistan Rural Enterprise Development
Program (AREDP)
http://www.mrrd.gov.af/AREDP
An initiative of the Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development, the Afghanistan Rural
EnPerprise GevelopmenP ProgrMm (AREGP) is M proposed �ve-yeMr projecP, scOeduled Po Negin
in 200EB TOe esPimMPed US$30-40 million, Jorld BMnk-supporPed progrMmme is Mimed MP jump-
starting private sector growth in rural Afghanistan.
Aimed at enhancing rural livelihoods, the AREDP seeks to cluster smaller existing microenterprises
Ms Rell Ms communiPy groups Mnd MssociMPions, PrMnsforming POem inPo lMrger, more ef�cienP
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
enterprise associations. These are then intended to have the ability to establish linkages to
the rural economy as well as local and regional markets. The proposed key elements of the
programme are: formation and development of community-level groups; provision of enterprise
support services, such as technical assistance offered by provincial- and regional-level business
developmenP cenPres; developing privMPe-puNlic pMrPnersOips; Mnd offering �nMnciMl services Mnd
links Po micro�nMnce insPiPuPions Mnd commerciMl NMnks Po Mccess crediPB
As of GecemNer 2008, POe �nMl dePMils of AREGP’s design Mnd scope OMve yeP Po Ne dePerminedB
Current plans call for the programme to begin in a limited number of provinces with eventual
scale-up to national coverage in all 34 provinces of Afghanistan.
Agency Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief (ACBAR)
www.acbar.org
The Agency Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief (ACBAR) is an umbrella organisation that facilitates
transparency, accountability and coordination among NGOs in Afghanistan. ACBAR acts as a
conduit for information among the UN, NGOs, donors and the Afghan government. ACBAR was
established in 1988 by NGOs working with Afghan refugees in Pakistan. Among its funders are: the
Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC), the Norwegian and Dutch governments,
and the European Commission.
ACBAR has a membership of 100 national and international NGOs. Membership is open to
nongovernmenPMl, nonpro�P orgMnisMPions POMP meeP cerPMin criPeriMB All memNers Mre required Po
sign the Afghanistan NGO Code of Conduct (p. 52) launched in May 2005. The General Assembly
of the ACBAR membership meets twice a year, and the 12-member steering committee meets
monthly in Kabul. The chairperson of the steering committee is always Afghan, while other
memNers Mre represenPMPives of NoPO AfgOMn Mnd inPernMPionMl NGOsB Hn MddiPion Po iPs mMin of�ce
in KMNul, AFBAR OMs suN-of�ces in HerMP, JMlMlMNMd Mnd MMzMr-i-SOMrifB
ACBAR organises its work along two basic lines: the InfoCoord team is responsible for
disseminating information, organising meetings, publishing a weekly bulletin, maintaining an NGO
Directory, and other communication initiatives; the Advocacy and Policy team facilitates the
excOMnge of vieRs Mnd informMPion Mmong NGOs Po Oelp POem “develop Mnd susPMin M joinP, �eld-
led voice on key issues as they develop.”
ACBAR holds monthly NGO coordination meetings that are occasionally open to the general public;
other monthly meetings are organised around particular themes. ACBAR regularly conducts
workshops on the NGO Law and Code of Conduct in Kabul, Mazar-i-Sharif, Herat and Jalalabad.
Its activities aim to build capacity among NGO and civil society organisations as well as to educate
stakeholders in funding patterns and requirements of legislation. ACBAR also assists in the
appointment of NGO representatives to government-led, inter-agency coordination mechanisms.
ACBAR represented the NGO community at the Afghanistan Development Forum (ADF, p. 13) in
2004, 2005 and 2007. ACBAR has hosted a secretariat to represent Afghan civil society in the
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14) process. In addition, ACBAR has played
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a coordination role between civil society and military actors.
In 2007, ACBAR launched the Afghanistan Pilot Participatory Poverty Assessment (APPPA), in
cooperation with civil society and the Asian Development Bank (ADB). Carried out in Badakhshan,
Nangarhar, Uruzgan and Herat provinces, the APPPA aimed to collect, document, disseminate and
advocate the perspectives of the poor on poverty; its results were intended to feed into the ANDS.
The conclusion of the APPPA in April 2008 was marked by a number of activities bringing attention
to the issue of aid effectiveness. Several advocacy papers assessing the results of APPPA were
being drafted in late 2008 on topics such as aid effectiveness, agriculture and social protection.
In 2008, ACBAR completed its run of informative radio dramas combating negative perceptions
of NGOs in Afghanistan. These were part of a media campaign launched the previous year, which
included a booklet raising awareness about the different types of NGOs in Afghanistan. ACBAR
collaborates with the Afghanistan Information Manage
ment Service (AIMS) to produce a database
of NGO activity throughout Afghanistan called “Who is Doing What Where.”
Alternative Livelihoods (AL)
AlPernMPive IiveliOoods (AI) is POe Perm given Po rurMl developmenP McPiviPies speci�cMlly Mimed MP
supporting farmers and other rural workers with alternatives to opium poppy cultivation. AL is one
of the eight pillars of the Afghan government’s counter-narcotics strategy. Other terminology in use
also describes these kinds of activities; for example, USAID refers to “Alternative Development,”
drawing from its experience in Colombia. The Ministry of Counter Narcotics (MCN) has a department
dedicated to AL, which oversees the Alternative Livelihoods Implementation Plan approved by
President Hamid Karzai in July 2005. This entity also works toward greater engagement by donors
in AI, Ms Rell Ms more coOerenP delivery of relMPed �nMnciMl Mnd PecOnicMl supporPB
In the short term, AL programmes seek to support those who have lost their livelihoods through
self-restraint from planting or forced eradication of their crops. These include cash-for-work
projects that build and rehabilitate rural infrastructure, create greater income generation
and allow skill-building activities for vulnerable households. In the long term, AL programmes
are meant to be comprehensive rural-development initiatives, aiming to generate sustainable
economic development by providing opium farmers and labourers with alternative crop options,
credit mechanisms, business support, market access and social safety nets.
The bulk of AL work has been undertaken by contractors sponsored by USAID, the EC and the UK
in association with key ministries, such as MCN and those of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock;
Rural Rehabilitation and Development; Public Works; and Energy and Water. Initially their work
focused on some of POe counPry’s mosP signi�cMnP opium-producing provinces — including
Nangarhar, Laghman, Kandahar, Helmand, Badakhshan, Uruzgan, Ghor and Balkh. But, as levels
of opium poppy OMve �ucPuMPed, MssisPMnce OMs Neen redirecPed PoRMrds MreMs ROere culPivMPion
is concentrated, particularly in the South. Current debates related to this issue concern the scale
of, nature of and mechanisms for providing development assistance to those provinces that have
Neen declMred “poppy-free” Ny POe UN Of�ce on Grugs Mnd Frime (UNOGF) in POe lMsP PRo yeMrsB
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
MMny rurMl developmenP progrMmmes POMP Mre noP speci�cMlly Mimed MP reducing opium producPion
in Afghanistan will nevertheless contribute to establishing the conditions for reducing cultivation;
these include some of the National Priority Programmes (p. 48). Others, such as the Horticulture
and Livestock Programme and the National Rural Access Programme, have even been designed
to maximise impact on counter-narcotics outcomes. These programmes, however, are typically not
referred to as AL; it is often unclear whether they are included in the level of AL expenditure stated
by the Afghan government as well bilateral and multilateral agencies.
Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS)
The Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS) was developed starting in early 2002 by the Ministry
of Public Health (MoPH) in collaboration with major donors. It has two objectives: 1) to provide
a standardised package of health services that forms the core of service delivery in all primary
health care facilities and 2) to promote a redistribution of health services by providing equitable
access based on population density.
The BPHS entails basic services at low cost and addresses the main causes of morbidity
and mortality. It has a strong focus on conditions that affect women and children. In line with
Afghanistan’s Millennium Development Goals (MDGs, p. 45), the BPHS aims to provide health
services to all Afghans, especially those who are poor and live in remote and rural areas.
In agreement with its major donors — primarily the World Bank, USAID and the European
Commission — the MoPH has contracted NGOs to deliver the BPHS in most provinces and its
oRn ProvinciMl HeMlPO Of�ces in M limiPed numNer of provincesB TOougO mMny iniPiMlly vieRed POis
public-private partnership with suspicion, it has yielded positive results, making public health one
of Afghanistan’s most effective sectors.
TOe de�ned pMckMge is offered Ny four levels of fMciliPy: 1) HeMlPO PosPs, 2) BMsic HeMlPO FenPres,
3) Comprehensive Health Centres, and 4) District Hospitals.
The BPHS also provides standards
for sPMf�ng Mnd infrMsPrucPure reconsPrucPion Mnd reOMNiliPMPion for POese fMciliPiesB
BPHS has provided primary health care to more than 80 percent of Afghans living in rural
Afghanistan, according to an MoPH statement made in December 2008.
Berlin Meeting and Declarations
On 31 March–1 April 2004, Afghanistan’s major donors and development partners attended a
meeting in Berlin at which the government of Afghanistan presented a major fundraising document,
entitled Securing Afghanistan’s Future (SAF). The document concluded that the funds required
Po reNuild AfgOMnisPMn Po M sPMge ROere iP is M self-suf�cienP Mnd sPMNle sPMPe Mre MpproximMPely
US$27B4 Nillion over POe folloRing seven yeMrs — suNsPMnPiMlly more POMn POe $1D Nillion over Pen
years requested at the January 2002 Tokyo Ministerial Meeting (p. 62). At the Berlin meeting,
donors pledged $8B2 Nillion for POe folloRing POree yeMrs Mnd meP POe governmenP’s immediMPe
need of $4B2 Nillion for POe 2004-0D �scMl yeMrB
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In addition to discussing the SAF document, the Berlin Meeting gave the Afghan government
an opportunity to give a progress report on the implementation of the Bonn Agreement and
to present its current plan. “The Way Ahead: The Work Plan of the Afghan Government” set
out an ambitious agenda for Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration (DDR, p. 32);
elecPion-relMPed McPiviPies; Mnd iniPiMPives for puNlic MdminisPrMPion, �scMl mMnMgemenP, economic
and social development, gender, counter-narcotics, rule of law and human rights.
The participants at the meeting signed the Berlin Declaration, in which the international community
committed to continue supporting the Afghan government in its mission to implement the Bonn
Agreement, improve the security situation, and move forward with its development agenda. A
further agreement, the Berlin Declaration on Counter Narcotics, was signed by Afghanistan, China,
Iran, Pakistan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan and Tajikistan. In this declaration, Afghanistan and its
neighbours agreed to improve coordination in their efforts to eliminate the cultivation, production
Bonn Agreement
http://www.mfa.gov.af/Documents/ImportantDoc/The%20Bonn%20Agreement.pdf
The Bonn Agreement set out a timetable for the re-establishment of permanent government
institutions in Afghanistan, and served as a roadmap for the creation of provisional arrangements
until permanent ones could be put in place. The Bonn Agreement was signed on 5 December
2001 by representatives of various Afghan factions (excluding the Taliban) at the conclusion of
the UN-sponsored Bonn Conference on Afghanistan.
The Bonn Agreement laid out several processes, including the Emergency Loya Jirga (ELJ,
p. 32) and the Constitutional Loya Jirga (CLJ, p. 29), through which power would be exercised and
then transferred over time to a fully representative government selected through free and fair
elecPionsB HP provided for POe sovereignPy of AfgOMnisPMn Po reside �rsP in Mn HnPerim AuPOoriPy (AHA),
then in a Transitional Authority (ATA, p. 9) and ultimately in an elected government.
The Bonn Agreement was largely adhered to, although security conditions affected timelines. The
Afghan government and the UN successfully established most of the provisional arrangements
called for — except for the withdrawal of “military units from Kabul and other urban centres or
other areas in which the UN mandated force is deployed.” The last milestones of the Agreement
were the presidential and parliamentary elections that took place in October 2004 and September
2005, respectively. In January 2006, the Bonn Agreement was replaced by the Afghanistan
Compact (p. 11).
Budget
See National Budget, p. 47
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
www.cso.gov.af
TOe FenPrMl SPMPisPics Of�ce (FSO) is POe cenPrMl governmenP Mgency responsiNle for POe collecPion
Mnd disseminMPion of of�ciMl sPMPisPicsB TOe FSO collecPs Mnd MnMlyses dMPM from oPOer governmenP
entities — on national accounts, price indexes, external trade, population and demographics — to
Ne used for moniPoring economic, �nMnciMl Mnd sPrucPurMl policies Ms Rell Ms oPOer McPiviPiesB
The CSO produces the
Afghanistan Statistical Yearbook
, the
Consumer Price Index Yearbook
, the
Afghanistan Trade Statistical Yearbook
and the
Estimated Population of Afghanistan
(with data
on gender and rural-urban residence). The CSO also publishes a quarterly volume on foreign trade
statistics, the monthly Consumer Price Index (CPI) and daily CPIs for Kabul. In 2008, the CSO
launched: the quarterly
Statistical Magazine
in Dari and Pashto (previously published from 1976
to 1997) and, with the assistance of UNICEF,
AfghanInfo
, an annually updated database of all CSO
The work of the CSO is grouped into nine major departments: economic statistics; demographic and
social statistics; national accounts; operations; publication and dissemination; strategic planning
and donor relations; administration; internal evaluation and audit; and a secretariat. Plans are
also underway to develop departments of agricultural statistics and information technology.
In mid-2005, the CSO partnered with the National Surveillance System (NSS, p. 52) to open a
unit within the CSO responsible for data collection for the NSS National Risk and Vulnerability
Assessment (NRVA, p. 50).
Established in 1973, the CSO was declared an independent body by presidential decree in March
2006B HPs 800 sPMff Mre divided Mmong FSO OeMdquMrPers in KMNul Mnd suNof�ces in eMcO provinceB
The CSO reports directly to the President and is advised by the National Statistics Committee
and the National Census Committee (temporarily set up to carry out the national census). Both
committees include representatives from many ministries and the private sector.
In 2004, the CSO created a Statistical Master Plan (SMP) with the assistance of the World Bank,
the Asian Development Bank, the IMF and the UK’s DFID. Approved in 2005, the SMP outlined a
programme designed to build capacity within the CSO to collect the national data required by the
GovernmenP for iPs progrMmmingB Hn 2006, M neR sPMPisPics lMR RMs enMcPed Po clMrify POe of�ciMl
funcPions of POe FSO, Po increMse iPs �exiNiliPy Mnd Po ensure MccounPMNiliPy Mnd PrMnspMrencyB
The CSO conducted a 2007 survey of facilities for disabled individuals in Kabul. As of December
2008, the CSO was collecting data on business enterprises as well as on women’s involvement in
decision-making. Projects proposed for 2009 include surveys on Afghanistan’s labour force and
on household income and expenditure, as well as a preliminary census of Kabul.
The CSO plans to carry out in late 2010 the national population census mandated by the Bonn
AgreemenP (pB 2D); POe speci�c Piming of POis census Rill Ne dePermined in 200EB TOe lMsP census of
this scope was begun in 1979 but was never completed. The CSO has been involved in pre-census
A to Z
activities since 2003; initial household listings for all 34 provinces were released in 2006. The census
proper Rill PMke MpproximMPely 21 dMys, cosP Mn esPimMPed US$62 million Mnd require MpproximMPely
37,000 staff. In mid-2007, the CSO initiated a pilot census to identify obstacles it might have faced in
2008, the year originally scheduled for conducting the national census. A new pilot census has been
planned to take place two to three months before the full census is conducted.
All organisations planning to conduct statistical research in Afghanistan are required by law to
coordinate their activities with the CSO.
Civil Service Commission
See Independent Administrative Reform and Civil Service Commission (IARCSC), p. 35.
Coalition Forces (CF)
www.cstc-a.com, www.cjtf101.com
Coalition Forces (CF) is the general term used to describe the US-led military organisation that has
been in Afghanistan since late 2001. In cooperation with the Northern Alliance, CF overthrew the
Taliban regime in November 2001. Under the mission of Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF), these
troops continue to seek out Taliban and al-Qaeda members in Afghanistan and to reshape the
posture of the Afghan defence forces that will ultimately provide long-term stability in Afghanistan.
CF are a key partner in implementing the Afghan government’s Security Sector Reform (SSR, p.
Coalition Forces, most recently reorganised in October 2008 as US Forces Afghanistan (USFOR-A,
p. 64), are distinct from the UN Security Council-mandated International Security Assistance Force
(ISAF, p. 38) that is also operating in Afghanistan. USFOR-A is overseen by US Central Command
(CENTCOM) while ISAF is a NATO-led force. Since 6 October 2008, however, both USFOR-A and
ISAF have fallen under a single commander. On that day, General David D. McKiernan, the senior-
mosP US miliPMry of�cer in AfgOMnisPMn, RMs Mlso nMmed commMnder of USFOR-A, MfPer OMving
USFOR-A was established to enhance the coordination and effectiveness of US support to the
ISAF mission. It is intended to improve the unity of both ISAF and US-led efforts by aligning and
streamlining command and control of all US forces serving in Afghanistan. As of November 2008,
approximately 15,000 troops were assigned to USFOR-A.
USFOR-A has two primary subordinate commands:
Combined Joint Task Force 101, based at Bagram Air Field, is responsible for counter-terrorism
Combined Security Transition Command–Afghanistan (CSTC-A), headquartered at Camp
Eggers in Kabul, oversees CF involvement in the Afghan security sector, including training of
the Afghan security forces.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Though non-ISAF US troops in Afghanistan continue to be called Coalition Forces outside of the
military, they had been reorganised in February 2004 and renamed Combined Forces Command–
AfgOMnisPMn (FFF-A)B Hn 2004-0D, FFF-A �rsP PrMnsferred regionMl commMnd Po HSAF, Neginning
with the West and North; in July 2006, command of the southern provinces was transferred.
FommMnd of POe �nMl quMrPer of POe counPry, POe EMsP, RMs OMnded over in OcPoNer 2006, leMving
ISAF in charge of maintaining security in all of Afghanistan. (Starting in October 2008, however,
USFOR-A has since assumed OEF responsibility, in coordination with ISAF, for the eastern regional
command.) After the 2006 handover to ISAF, CFC-A as a coalition headquarters was inactivated;
the remaining non-ISAF US troops (then falling under Combined Joint Task Force 76 and CSTC-A
commands) were ultimately overseen by CENTCOM.
Combined Security Transition Command–Afghanistan
(CSTC-A)
See Coalition Forces, p. 27.
Community Development Council (CDC)
See National Solidarity Programme, p. 50.
Consultative Group (CG)
TOe FonsulPMPive Groups (FGs) Rere secPor-speci�c, governmenP-led enPiPies POMP NrougOP PogePOer
government, donors and civil society to monitor the progress toward the Afghanistan Compact
benchmarks and to review the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14). They
Mlso served Po resolve secPor-speci�c issues Mnd cOMllenges, Mnd mMximise POe coordinMPion of
developmenP RiPOin AfgOMnisPMnB JOen POe ANGS RMs �nMlised in mid-2008, FGs ceMsed Po exisPB
The coordination function between the Government and the international community — of which
CGs were a part — has now shifted to: the Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB, p.
40) and its Standing Committees, when concerning policy discussions; and the Inter-Ministerial
Committees (still under development) when concerning implementation.
FGs Rere �rsP esPMNlisOed in eMrly 2003 Po fMciliPMPe inPerMcPion Mmong governmenP, donors, UN
Mgencies Mnd NGOs on POe 16 NMPionMl GevelopmenP ProgrMmmes (NGPs) idenPi�ed in POe NMPionMl
Development Framework (NDF, p. 48). In 2006, the CG mechanism was restructured to align with
the Afghanistan Compact (p. 11) and the ANDS (p. 14). There were eight CGs, corresponding
to the eight sectors of the ANDS: 1) Security, 2) Governance, 3) Infrastructure, 4) Education, 5)
Health, 6) Agriculture and Rural Development, 7) Social Protection, and 8) Economic Governance
and Private Sector Development. Their responsibilities were:
to coordinate and monitor the implementation of the Compact through the ANDS;
to contribute to the National Budget formulation process;
to monitor aid effectiveness within their sector; and
A to Z
to report to the ANDS Presidential Oversight Committee (OSC) on progress in achieving the
Afghanistan Compact benchmarks.
The CG mechanism also supported the OSC in its role as a member of the JCMB, which oversees
POe ful�lmenP of POe AfgOMnisPMn FompMcP NencOmMrksB
Constitutional Loya Jirga (CLJ)
An English translation of the Constitution is available on p. 84 of this guide.
The convening of the Constitutional Loya Jirga (CLJ) was the culmination of the process of
agreeing on a new Afghan constitution. The CLJ opened on 14 December 2003 and continued
for 22 days. Of the 500 delegates, 450 were selected through regional elections, and 50 were
MppoinPed Ny PresidenP KMrzMiB More POMn one-�fPO of POe seMPs Rere MllocMPed for speciMl-cMPegory
representatives, including women, refugees in Pakistan and Iran, internally displaced persons
kuchis
The draft Constitution debated by the CLJ was produced by the Constitutional Drafting Commission
and the Constitutional Review Commission (CRC). In mid-2003, after a month of civic education
activities, a draft of the Constitution was subject to a public consultation process around
Afghanistan and among refugee communities in Iran and Pakistan. UNAMA (p. 62) estimates that
178,000 people were reached through these consultations, 19 percent of whom were women.
TOe FRF puNlisOed iPs �nMl drMfP of POe FonsPiPuPion on 3 NovemNer 2003B
At the CLJ, delegates were divided into working committees to debate the text of the draft
Constitution. A Reconciliation Committee edited the draft text to incorporate the working
committees’ suggestions. Passionate debates, boycotts and heated arguments featured in the
discussions that took place. A vote was supposed to be taken on all contentious articles, which
mostly regarded form of government, the role of Islam, national languages, the national anthem
and the dual nationality of ministers. Although no vote took place, on 4 January 2004 a closing
ceremony RMs Oeld ROere POe delegMPes signMlled POeir MpprovMl of POe �nMl PexP Ny sPMnding upB
TOe FonsPiPuPion RMs of�ciMlly signed on 26 JMnuMry 2004 Ny PresidenP KMrzMiB HP provides for
an elected President along with two nominated Vice Presidents (p. 70), a Cabinet of Ministers
and a National Assembly (p. 70) with two houses — the lower
Wolesi Jirga
(House of the People)
and the upper
Meshrano Jirga
(House of Elders). It grants equal citizenship to Afghan men and
women, and commits Afghanistan to uphold its international human rights obligations. It states
that Afghanistan is an Islamic Republic and that no law can be contrary to Islam.
Counter-narcotics (CN)
www.mcn.gov.af
Counter-narcotics (CN) efforts are integral to reconstruction and development initiatives in
Afghanistan, as the instability and insecurity related to the opium economy is considered a major
oNsPMcle Po progressB FN is one of �ve pillMrs in POe governmenP’s SecuriPy SecPor Reform (SSR,
UNODC’s annual opium survey for 2008
shows a 19 percent decrease in area
cultivating opium poppy compared to
2007’s record harvest.
Due to higher
yields, opium production dropped
less dramatically (6 percent) to 7,700
tonnes.
The number of opium-free
provinces continued to increase,
from six in 2006 to 13 in 2007 to
18 in 2008. Five southern provinces
(Helmand, Farah, Kandahar, Uruzgan
and Nimroz) cultivate 95 percent of
Afghanistan’s opium poppy; in 2007-
08, Helmand alone accounted for 66
percent of the area on which poppy
was cultivated and its 2008 harvest
yielded more opium than that of all
of Afghanistan in 2005.
Nangarhar
Province showed the most dramatic
decrease: it was the second-highest
cultivating province in 2007 but saw
no cultivation in 2008.
Rising food
prices, combined with a drop in opium
farm-gate price, reduced the gross
income ratio of opium to wheat from
10:1 in 2007 to 3:1 in 2008.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
p. 58) policy and a cross-cutting theme in the Afghanistan Compact and the Afghanistan National
Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14). Since the fall of the Taliban in 2001, the Afghan government
OMs NMnned POe culPivMPion, producPion, MNuse Mnd PrMf�cking of nMrcoPic drugsB Hn GecemNer
2004, MP POe �rsP NMPionMl FounPer NMrcoPics Fonference, neRly elecPed PresidenP HMmid KMrzMi
declared CN a priority of his government.
The Ministry of Counter Narcotics (MCN) oversees and coordinates all CN activities, working closely
with the Ministry of Interior Affairs, the Ministry of Agriculture, the Ministry of Public Health and
POe UN Of�ce on Grugs Mnd Frime (UNOGF)B FN iniPiMPives Mre guided Ny POe NMPionMl Grug FonProl
Strategy (NDCS), last updated in January 2006. As the strategic framework for the government’s
FN efforPs, POe NGFS idenPi�es four key prioriPies:
disrupPing POe drugs PrMde Ny PMrgePing PrMf�ckers Mnd POeir NMckers Mnd eliminMPing POe NMsis
for the trade;
strengthening and diversifying legal rural livelihoods;
reducing the demand for illicit drugs and providing treatment for problem drug users; and
strengthening state institutions both at the centre and in the provinces.
In addition to these priorities, the NDCS outlines eight “pillars of activities”: public awareness,
international and regional cooperation, alternative livelihoods, demand reduction, law enforcement,
Much weight has been given to so-called Alternative Livelihood (AL, p. 23) programmes, which
aim to provide opium farmers and labourers with alternative crop options, credit mechanisms,
business support, market access and labour opportunities.
To dMPe, FN efforPs in AfgOMnisPMn OMve noP included M signi�cMnP componenP of erMdicMPion
(physical destruction of crops). The eradication that has taken place has been planned by the
Central Eradication Planning and Monitoring Cell within the Ministry of Interior and carried out
by the Central Poppy Eradication Force with assistance from the international community. Some
eradication has also been conducted by Provincial Governors supplemented by the Afghan
National Police (ANP, p. 6).
The NDCS is backed by the Counter Narcotics Drug Law, enacted by presidential decree in
December 2005, and Article 7 of the 2004 Constitution, which stipulates that “the state prevents
all types of terrorist activities, cultivation and smuggling of narcotic drugs and production and
consumption of intoxicants.” The Ministry of Justice, working to develop an effective CN legal
framework, created a CN Criminal Justice Task Force in February 2005 to deal with CN cases and
train judges, prosecutors and investigators in CN procedures.
There are two institutions designed to enforce CN legislation, both of which fall under the Deputy
Minister of Interior for Counter Narcotics. The Counter Narcotics Police of Afghanistan (CNPA),
expecPed Po develop inPo M speciMlised force of 2,000 of�cers in POe nexP feR yeMrs, is POe primMry
A to Z
31
Mgency responsiNle for dePecPing Mnd invesPigMPing drug PrMf�cking offencesB TOe AfgOMn SpeciMl
Narcotics Force carries out interdiction operations throughout Afghanistan, working closely with
the CNPA. CN training is also provided to the ANP.
Funding for CN initiatives comes from a number of sources. In the past, some of it was processed
through the centralised Counter Narcotics Trust Fund (CNTF, p. 31), launched in 2005 and
originally intended to conclude at the end of 2008. New funding mechanisms are currently
under consideration. A cabinet sub-committee on CN meets twice monthly; it includes relevant
minisPers, Mnd emNMssy Mnd donor represenPMPivesB TOere Mre Mlso severMl issue-speci�c NGFS
working groups under the auspices of the MCN. CN is also on the agenda of the high-level Policy
Action Group (PAG, p. 54); a CN Consultative Group (CG, p. 28) was incorporated into the ANDS
process.
Key issues facing the actors within the CN sector include: the mix and prioritisation of CN activities;
the extent of linkages between the opium poppy economy and insecurity; how to integrate or
mainstream CN into other development activities; and the timing and interface between opium
poppy eradication and development assistance. Another central question is how to achieve short-
term political targets, such as reducing cultivation, while not undermining the long-term goal of
building a prosperous and stable Afghanistan that will ultimately deliver a sustainable reduction
in the opium economy.
Counter Narcotics Trust Fund (CNTF)
The Counter Narcotics Trust Fund (CNTF), established in October 2005, is a multi-donor funding
source POMP conPriNuPes Po ful�lling POe oNjecPives of POe NMPionMl Grug FonProl SPrMPegy (NGFS)B
The broad aims of the Fund include: providing greater resources for the Government’s counter-
narcotics efforts, ensuring transparency and accountability in the allocation of those resources,
enabling greater government ownership over implementation of its CN strategy, and promoting
greater coherence in funding of counter-narcotics activities.
While UNDP is the administrator of the Fund, the Government of Afghanistan retains the overall
responsibility for CNTF through its designated institutions, the Ministry of Finance and the Ministry
of Counter Narcotics (MCN). Ten other ministries, including the Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation
and Development as well as that of Agriculture, have served as the implementing partners of
projects funded by CNTF; they have worked closely with MCN to identify, develop, and implement
counter-narcotics-related activities and projects within their mandated areas. While the Fund was
originally scheduled to end on 31 December 2008, an extension to conclude existing CNTF-funded
projects was under discussion at the time of publication. No second phase of the Fund is planned,
but a number of other sources of funding are under consideration as possible successors to the
CNTF.
The CNTF established the Good Performance Initiative (GPI) in late 2007 as a new mechanism
reRMrding developmenP MssisPMnce Po provinces POMP sPMy poppy-free or demonsPrMPe M signi�cMnP
reduction in poppy cultivation.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
NeMrly US$100 million OMs Neen commiPPed Po POe FNTF, ROicO OMs 17 donors (Ms of GecemNer
2008). The CNTF management board includes representatives from the Government, UNAMA (p.
62), the Asian Development Bank, UNDP, EC and the UK, with the World Bank as an observer.
Development Budget
See National Budget, p. 47.
Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration (DDR)
See Afghanistan New Beginnings Programme, p. 18.
Disbandment of Illegal Armed Groups (DIAG)
www.diag.gov.af
See Afghanistan New Beginnings Programme, p. 18.
Donor Assistance Database (DAD)
With the support of UNDP, the Afghan government established the Donor Assistance Database
(DAD) in June 2002. The DAD aims to provide up-to-date information on all projects that fall within
the national Development Budget (see National Budget, p. 47) as well as some extra-budgetary
projecPsB TOe dMPMNMse sPores dePMiled informMPion MNouP POe locMPion of projecPs, ROo is �nMncing
them and which organisations are involved in their implementation. Via the DAD website, project
managers can submit documents and other information, which are then made available in both
TOe GAG RMs originMlly designed Po PrMck POe �oR of Mid Mnd record POe progress of developmenP
and humanitarian projects around the country. It still serves this purpose; however, as the
government of Afghanistan works to develop a more robust budget, the DAD is also used as a
budget formulation database. Thus, Afghanistan’s Development Budget is now largely based on
the DAD. This is likely to change in coming years, however, as the Development Budget begins to
incorporMPe prioriPies idenPi�ed in POe AfgOMnisPMn NMPionMl GevelopmenP SPrMPegy (ANGS, pB 14)B
Emergency Loya Jirga (ELJ)
As required by the Bonn Agreement, an Emergency Loya Jirga (ELJ) was held on 11-19 June 2002
to “decide on the transitional authority, including a broad-based transitional administration to lead
Afghanistan until such time as a fully representative government can be elected through free and
fair elections to be held no later than two years from the date of the convening of the Emergency
Loya Jirga.” The ELJ largely succeeded in its task by electing and swearing in Hamid Karzai (former
chairman of the Afghan Interim Authority) as President and by approving his cabinet, thereby
forming the Afghan Transitional Authority (ATA, p. 9).
A to Z
A Special Independent Commission (the “Loya Jirga Commission”) determined the rules and
procedures for the ELJ, which was to have seats for 1,501 delegates, including 160 women.
In the end 1,650 delegates participated, including more than 200 women. Concerns about
the proceedings and results of the ELJ included: the criteria for the selection of delegates, the
failure to hold a proper vote to choose the structure of government and the cabinet members,
intimidation of delegates, and a perceived lack of transparency throughout the process. The
conduct of participants at the Constitutional Loya Jirga (CLJ, p. 29), held in late 2003, was generally
thought to have been an improvement on that at the ELJ, with fewer reports of intimidation and
Enhancing Legal and Electoral Capacity for
Tomorrow (ELECT)
http://www.undp.org.af/WhoWeAre/UNDPinAfghanistan/Projects/dcse/prj_elect.htm
The UNDP’s Enhancing Legal and Electoral Capacity for Tomorrow (ELECT) project was established
in 2006 based on recommendations from an evaluation of the 2004 and 2005 elections. ELECT
is intended to build the capacity of the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC, p. 37), which
had just been established at the time ELECT was launched. A key part of ELECT is an inter-
organisational agreement to coordinate activities under which designated organisations take over
speci�c McPiviPies supporPing POe HEF Po Mvoid duplicMPion of RorkB
In 2007, ELECT achieved its other original main aim: completion of a Civil and Voter registry pilot
project that combined nationwide voter registration with a national civil registration programme
conducted in Kabul, Bamiyan and Nangarhar.
ELECT is currently the practical expression of implementing UN Security Council Resolution
1806 (20 February 2008), which provides for international electoral assistance to Afghanistan
coordinated by the UN Assistance Mission to Afghanistan (UNAMA, p. 62) and the Special
Representative of the UN Secretary-General. The Resolution:
speci�es, MP POe requesP of AfgOMn MuPOoriPies, supporP for POe elecPorMl process (pMrPiculMrly
through the IEC) by providing technical assistance; coordinating efforts of international donors,
agencies and organisations; and channeling funds earmarked to support the process; and,
notes the leading role that Afghan institutions will play in the organisation of the next elections;
encourages the Afghan government, with support from the international community, to
accelerate planning and preparation; and emphasises the need for a permanent Civil Voter
Registry in accordance with the Afghanistan Compact (p. 11).
While UNAMA has an overarching oversight role, ELECT is the implementation arm of the
UN’s coordination mandate and deals with project and programme design and management,
mobilisation of donor funding, activity coordination, channelling of funds for electoral support,
and reporting.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
The project was expanded in August 2008 to support the processes for the upcoming electoral
cycle. With Presidential and Provincial Council Elections scheduled for 2009 and Parliamentary
and District Council Elections scheduled for 2010, the ELECT project has been providing
technical assistance and support to the IEC in conducting voter registration, which started in
October 2008. In addition to assistance currently focused on IEC headquarters, ELECT plans to
expMnd iPs McPiviPies Po HEF provinciMl of�ces POrougOouP POe counPry Po Nuild PecOnicMl cMpMciPy in
implementing elections over the next two years.
In December 2008, an extension of the project activities was approved. The new scope of work
will support the 2009 electoral processes (including the Electoral Complaints Commission) as
well as a broader range of activities with a wider group of electoral stakeholders, including civil
society, media, domestic election observers and security actors.
ELECT, the mandate of which ends in October 2010, receives funding from multiple donors, and is
managed by UNDP within a collaborative coordination and management structure.
Human Rights Research and Advocacy
Consortium (HRRAC)
www.afghanadvocacy.org.af
The Human Rights Research and Advocacy Consortium (HRRAC) is a research-based advocacy
organisation that aims to provide a voice for the Afghan population in human rights debates. It was
established in early 2003 as a way of bringing together Afghan and international organisations
promoting the development and implementation of government policies and community practices
to uphold international human rights standards in Afghanistan.
HRRAC’s work focuses on the rights of all Afghans to peace and physical security, to participate
politically, and to share in economic resources and development. Recent HRRAC research projects
have concentrated in particular on security, women’s issues, education, and election participation.
AdvocMcy Mnd ouPreMcO NMsed on POe �ndings of HRRAF reseMrcO include reporPs Po governmenP
Mnd communiPy leMders, rMdio progrMmmes, �lms Mnd POeMPre performMncesB
HRRAF comprises �ve AfgOMn Mnd six inPernMPionMl orgMnisMPions, Mnd OMs PRo Mdvisory memNersB
Representatives from the 14 member organisations make up the Board of Directors, which meets
every month to set and monitor HRRAC’s strategic direction. The Board of Directors advises the
Secretariat, which comprises two to three permanent HRRAC staff. The Secretariat was previously
Ooused MP POe FooperMPion for PeMce Mnd UniPy, NuP during 2007 HRRAF esPMNlisOed iPs oRn of�ces
and administration. HRRAC’s core funding comes from Oxfam Novib and annual membership
fees.
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Independent Administrative Reform and Civil Service
Commission (IARCSC)
http://www.iarcsc.gov.af/
In May 2002, an independent Civil Service Commission was established as required by the Bonn
Agreement to lead the government’s process for Public Administration Reform (PAR, p. 57). Its
responsibilities were subsequently amended and extended by two presidential decrees in June
2003, and the Commission was renamed the Independent Administrative Reform and Civil Service
Commission (IARCSC).
The Commission’s work is aimed at building a public administration in Afghanistan that is sound,
functional, transparent, effective, accountable, responsible, apolitical and impartial. IARCSC’s
strategic goals are to:
draft policies and establish legal infrastructure to allow for administrative reform and
amendments to the salary grade system;
improve organisational structure;
carry out merit-based recruitment and appointment;
improve human resources management for organisational development, planning and
evaluation, as well as capacity-building; and
evaluate the progress of implementing previous and existing reform processes and initiate the
next phase of change and development.
The Commission is composed of: a Civil Service Directorate, a Secretariat, an Independent
Appointments Board and an Independent Appeals Board. The Civil Service Directorate is responsible
for: drafting and overseeing the implementation of policies related to human resources, civil service
employees, training, appointments and retirement; and launching training in human resource
cMpMciPy-NuildingB TOe SecrePMriMP provides execuPive, �nMnciMl Mnd MdminisPrMPive MssisPMnce Po
the Commission and is responsible for coordinating implementation of programmes, projects and
civil service reform.
TOe AppoinPmenPs BoMrd is responsiNle for MppoinPing senior-level civil service of�ciMls Mnd
supervising POe MppoinPmenP of junior-level of�ciMlsB TOe AppeMls BoMrd POe forum POrougO ROicO
civil servants can lodge complaints, including those regarding decisions about appointments. Both
boards, though under the auspices of the IARCSC, are independent and function autonomously.
IARCSC recently launched six-month training courses in management, information technology
Mnd EnglisO lMnguMge Mnd OMve senP civil service of�ciMls Po oPOer counPries on leMdersOip Mnd
felloRsOip progrMmmes for cMpMciPy-NuildingB TOe Fommission OMs 7 regionMl of�cesB
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
RecenP �nMnciMl Mnd PecOnicMl supporP Po POe HARFSF Mnd iPs iniPiMPives OMve come from UNGP,
the Asian Development Bank, the World Bank, the EU, USAID, the UK, Korea, Australia, Norway,
Switzerland, Germany and the Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF, p. 20).
Independent Directorate of Local Governance (IDLG)
The Independent Directorate for Local Governance (IDLG) was established by presidential decree
on 30 August 2007, with a mandate to improve governance and achieve stability at the subnational
level. The IDLG is responsible for supervising provincial and district governors, provincial councils
(p. 72), and municipalities (except Kabul). After a second decree in May 2008, IDLG was tasked
with leading the process of creating a subnational governance policy for Afghanistan that involves
23 ministries and government agencies.
The IDLG’s mission is “to consolidate peace and stability, achieve development and equitable
economic growth and to achieve improvements in service delivery through just, democratic
processes and institutions of good governance at sub-national level thus improving the quality of
life of Afghan citizens.” Its priorities, strategy and functions are outlined in: its Strategic Framework,
its Five Year Strategic Work-plan (covering 2008-2013) and the draft Sub-National Governance
Policy (completed in late 2008), which is to be implemented during the period 2010-13.
IDLG’s goals are:
to ensure that Afghanistan’s framework for subnational governance upholds the principles of
1.
good governance, including open, transparent, accountable, participative, effective, coherent
and inclusive governance based on consensus and rule of law at the subnational level;
to establish and strengthen government institutions at subnational levels in order to ensure
people’s participation in governance and to achieve measurable improvements in the delivery
of services and the protection of rights;
to create and support opportunities for citizens and stakeholders to participate in governance
at the subnational level;
to ensure that subnational governance institutions play an active role in facilitating the delivery
of national activities and programmes aimed at improving the wellbeing of Afghans.
The vision of the IDLG also includes a commitment to ensuring that women enjoy greater equity
in education, political participation and justice.
The Directorate is responsible for an enormous range of functions and activities, of which a
primary task is leading the formulation and ongoing oversight of a coherent overarching policy
and legislative framework for subnational governance.
According Po iPs AnnuMl ReporP (SepPemNer 2008), HGIG’s McOievemenPs in iPs �rsP yeMr include
the following.
Governance: convened senior-level working group meetings (examined the roles and
A to Z
37
responsibilities of provinces, districts, villages; municipalities; women, youth, civil society;
Mnd suNnMPionMl �nMnce Mnd plMnning); complePed POe drMfP SuN-NMPionMl GovernMnce Policy;
developed frMmeRorks for villMge, disPricP, municipMl Mnd provinciMl �nMnce
Public Administration Reform (PAR, p. 57): launched operating manuals in ten districts;
developed the Governors’ Performance-Based Operational Fund; initiated budget reform
programme in subnational administrations
FMpMciPy-Nuilding: lMuncOed M cMpMciPy-Nuilding sPrMPegy for HGIG’s cenPrMl of�ces Mnd
subnational structures; piloted the Good Governance for Local Development (GOFORGOLD)
tool to monitor and report on performance in subnational governance
Subnational infrastructure: construction of 15 district complexes, with another 18 in
progress; commissioned an audit of the Afghanistan Stabilisation Programme, one of the
Government’s National Priority Programmes (see National Development Framework, p. 48)
intended to strengthen subnational-level governance by rebuilding essential infrastructure
and development capacity for local civil administration
Supporting municipalities: for a number of municipalities, improved organisational designs,
created plans to improve revenue generation and for solid waste management, and designed
M �ve-yeMr, US$100 million progrMmme Po reOMNiliPMPe municipMl roMds
Development governance: promotion of Provincial Development Plans (PDPs, p. 56), including
assisting with creation of presidential decree to incorporate 1,581 PDP projects into budgets
of ministries, and launched Local Economic Development Programme
Provincial counter-narcotics: launched IDLG strategy for provincial counter-narcotics
implementation;
Engaging representative bodies: in Wardak province, established operations for Afghanistan
Social Outreach Programme (ASOP), which is aimed at strengthening traditional leadership
systems and groups; launched induction and capacity-building programmes for provincial
councillors
Facilitating national programmes: designed disaster management response system for
provision of relief supplies
www.iec.org.af
The Independent Election Commission (IEC) is the supreme authority responsible for the
preparation, organisation, conduct and oversight of elections and referenda in Afghanistan.
The membership, organisation, responsibilities and functioning of the IEC are determined by
the Constitution (p. 84) and the Electoral Law. The IEC is independent from other branches
of government and administrative institutions. The functions of the IEC include: establishing
regulatory frameworks, supervising the Secretariat in the organisation and conduct of elections,
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
registration of candidates, resolving or referring complaints and disputes, inviting domestic and
international election monitors to observe election operations, and advising on whether the
elections are free and fair. It is also to certify and announce election results and facilitate any
transfers of power.
TOe HEF OMs M governing Nody RiPO M cOMirmMn, depuPy cOMirmMn Mnd �ve memNers (commissioners);
these positions are appointed by the President of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan. The IEC
SecrePMriMP is iPs implemenPing Mrm Mnd is OeMded Ny M cOief elecPorMl of�cer (FEO) Mnd PRo
depuPiesB TOe FEO is POe MccounPing of�cer Mnd is responsiNle for ensuring ef�cienP mMnMgemenP
of the day-to-day activities of the Commission.
After his election in October 2004, President Hamid Karzai appointed the IEC members for a three-
yeMr periodB For iPs �rsP yeMr POe HEF coexisPed Mnd collMNorMPed RiPO iPs predecessor, POe JoinP
Electoral Management Body (JEMB), which completed its mandate with the holding of legislative
elections in September 2005. The JEMB had been established in July 2003 and had both Afghan
and international members. It had overall responsibility for the preparation, organisation, conduct
and oversight of the 2004 presidential and 2005 parliamentary elections. After these elections,
it was dissolved and all its responsibilities transferred to the IEC.
A presidential and provincial council election is scheduled for the fall of 2009, and parliamentary
Mnd disPricP council elecPions Mre plMnned for POe summer of 2010B Speci�c dMPes Rere noP yeP
determined at the time of publication. The IEC is currently working to improve its functioning
and build its capacity in preparation for Afghanistan’s next cycle of elections. The Commission
is currently updating the voters’ registry, aiming to register Afghans who: will reach voting age
(18 years old) by September 2009; have not registered before; have moved to another province
or returned to Afghanistan; or have lost or damaged their previous registration card. The IEC
is Mlso esPMNlisOing M veri�cMPion mecOMnism using NiomePric PecOnology (�ngerprinP Mnd fMciMl
recognition) to identify and remove multiple registrations from the database of voters.
The IEC has begun to establish commissions for electoral complaints and for the media. These
two commissions will consist of Afghan commissioners and internationals working in a technical
advisory capacity.
The IEC operates a resource centre and a data centre, and is planning to build a media centre. It
receives support from the UNDP ELECT (p. 33) project.
Interim Afghanistan National Development
Strategy (I-ANDS)
See Afghanistan National Development Strategy, p. 14.
A to Z
International Security Assistance Force (ISAF)
http://www.nato.int/isaf/index.html
The mission of the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) is to assist the Afghan government
in establishing and maintaining a safe and secure environment in Afghanistan, with the full
involvement of the Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF, p. 8).
HSAF RMs �rsP esPMNlisOed Ny UN SecuriPy Founcil ResoluPion 1386 on 20 GecemNer 2001 Ms
envisaged in Annex I of the Bonn Agreement and upon the invitation of the Afghan Interim
Administration (AIA, p. 4). It is a UN-authorised multinational force, not a UN peacekeeping force,
and the costs of maintaining ISAF are borne by its contributing nations rather than by the UN.
In August 2003, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) took over leadership of ISAF, the
mission of which was then limited to Kabul. In October 2003, the UN Security Council authorised
the expansion of the NATO mission beyond Kabul. Until February 2007, leadership rotated
Mmong pMrPicipMPing nMPions; POe �rsP HSAF missions Rere led Ny POe UK, Turkey, GermMny Mnd
the Netherlands. Each subsequent rotation is referred to by a new roman numeral. With the
implementation of ISAF X in February 2007, ISAF was made a “composite headquarters” rather
POMn Neing PMsked Po M single counPryB TOis meMns POMP individuMl nMPions volunPeer Po �ll POeir
MlloPPed posiPions in POe RMy POey see �PB As of GecemNer 2008, US GenerMl GMvid GB McKiernMn
was the commander of ISAF.
ISAF and its operations are distinct from the US-led Coalition Forces (CF, p. 27), which overthrew
the Taliban and continues to pursue remnants of the Taliban and al-Qaeda as part of its Operation
Enduring Freedom. ISAF was initially responsible for security only in Kabul, while CF was in
command of security in the rest of the country. Since 2003, however, the long-term goal has been
to expand ISAF and unify both military forces under one central command. Regional command of
the Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs, p. 56) was thus transferred to ISAF during the period
2004-06B FomplePing POe geogrMpOicMl expMnsion of POe HSAF mission, commMnd of POe �nMl,
eastern quarter of the country was handed over on 5 October 2006, leaving ISAF in charge of all
25 PRTs and effectively responsible for security in all of Afghanistan. ISAF also implements the
Operational Mentor and Liaison Team Programme, which embeds mentors in selected
kandaks
(battalions) of the Afghan National Army (p. 4). In August 2008, ISAF transferred lead security
responsibility for Kabul to the Afghanistan National Security Forces.
As of December 2008, 41 countries (26 of which are NATO members) were contributing a
total of approximately 51,350 troops to ISAF: Albania, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belgium,
Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany,
Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Jordan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macedonia, the
Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia,
Spain, Sweden, Turkey, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, the UK and the USA. The philosophies,
caveats and instructions of troop-contributing nations place restrictions on how ISAF troops can
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
ISAF consists of: Kabul-based headquarters; the Air Task Force responsible for air operations;
RegionMl FommMnds for eMcO of POe �ve regions (FMpiPMl, NorPO, JesP, SouPO, EMsP); ForRMrd
Support Bases; and PRTs. The North Atlantic Council, NATO’s decision-making body, provides
political guidance to ISAF in consultation with non-NATO nations contributing troops to the force.
Operational-level management of ISAF is provided by Allied Joint Force Command Headquarters
Brunssum, which falls under NATO’s main Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers in Europe
(SHAPE)B NATO OMs M Senior FiviliMn RepresenPMPive’s Of�ce in KMNul, ROicO includes poliPicMl
and military advisors and facilitates NATO’s and ISAF’s political and diplomatic relations with the
Afghan government and the international community in Afghanistan.
Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB)
http://www.ands.gov.af/ands/jcmb/site/index.asp?page=home
The Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB) is a high-level governing body established in
2006 to provide overall strategic coordination of the implementation of the Afghanistan Compact
(p. 11). The JCMB was formed by the government of Afghanistan and the international community
following the endorsement of the Compact and the Interim Afghanistan National Development
Strategy (I-ANDS, p. 38) at the January 2006 London Conference. It aims to ensure greater
coherence of efforts by the Afghan government and the international community to realise the
goals set forth in the Compact and the declaration resulting from the Paris Conference (p. 54)
to provide high-level oversight of progress in the implementation of the political commitments
of the Afghanistan Compact;
Po provide direcPion Po Mddress signi�cMnP issues of coordinMPion, implemenPMPion, �nMncing
for the benchmarks and timelines in the Compact, and any other obstacles or bottlenecks
idenPi�ed Ny POe governmenP or POe inPernMPionMl communiPy; Mnd
to report on the implementation of the Compact to the President, the National Assembly, the
UN Secretary-General, the donors, and the public.
The JCMB is co-chaired by the UN Secretary-General’s Special Representative for Afghanistan (see
UNAMA, p. 62) and the Chair of the Afghan government’s cabinet-level Coordinating Committee,
which is responsible for JCMB oversight and the implementation of the ANDS (p. 14). Along with
the 12 representatives of this committee, the JCMB is composed of 23 representatives of the
international community who are selected based on such criteria as the largest contribution of
development aid and military troops as well as regional representation. These include UNAMA,
NATO (see ISAF, p. 38), the Combined Security Transition Command–Afghanistan (CSTC-A, p.
28), the World Bank, the Asian Development Bank, donor governments, the European Union and
governments of neighbouring countries.
The JCMB meets up to four times per year, usually in Kabul but occasionally outside of Afghanistan.
In 2008, the JCMB adopted a new format aimed at streamlining decision-making and enhancing
coordination.
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The work of the JCMB is now facilitated by three standing committees covering security; governance,
human rights and rule of law; and economic and social development. These thematic groupings
correspond to the pillars of the ANDS. In carrying out its assessments, the JCMB considers inputs
from the standing committees, which consist of representatives of the Afghan Government and
relevant international partners, as well as ad hoc, expert task forces that are established by the
sPMnding commiPPees Po Mddress speci�c PecOnicMl issuesB SeverMl oPOer coordinMPion mecOMnisms
— such as the Policy Action Group (PAG, p. 54) — report occasionally to the JCMB as the central
coordination body on security, reconstruction and development. The JCMB produces an annual
report and additional reports available to the public.
Hn line RiPO POe AfgOMnisPMn FompMcP, POe JFMB is consPiPuPed for M period of �ve yeMrs, from April
2006 to March 2011 (SY1385-89). Since its inception, the JCMB has provided guidance for the
development of the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14).
Joint Electoral Management Body (JEMB)
See Independent Election Commission, p. 37.
Justice Sector Reform (JSR)
JusPice SecPor Reform (JSR), one of POe �ve pillMrs of POe AfgOMn governmenP’s SecuriPy SecPor
Reform (SSR, p. 58) strategy, involves a wide range of projects undertaken by an equally wide
range of actors. Within the government of Afghanistan, the permanent institutions engaged with
and subject to JSR initiatives are the Supreme Court, the Ministry of Justice and the Attorney
GenerMl’s Of�ceB MMin donors in POe jusPice secPor include HPMly, POe US, FMnMdM, NorRMy, GermMny
and the UK. A number of UN agencies also contribute to JSR, including UNAMA (p. 62), UNDP,
UNODC, UNICEF and UNIFEM. JSR includes top-down institutional development and bottom-up
public access initiatives, such as:
construction and reconstruction of infrastructure for justice institutions, and capacity-building
and training of justice-sector employees;
defence lawyer training courses at some universities;
drafting of legislation;
expansion of the provision of legal aid and public legal awareness campaigns;
improvement of traditional justice mechanisms (primarily local
and
) to ensure
that they conform to the norms of the national legal order and international human rights
standards; and
coordination with other government priorities, such as counter-narcotics (CN, p. 29), anti-
corruption and land reform.
Since 2001, achievements in JSR have included the passage of several key laws; the training of
judges, judicial police, prosecutors and defence lawyers; and the construction of a number of
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
courPOouses, prosecuPors’ of�ces, prisons Mnd oPOer jusPice-secPor insPiPuPionsB Beginning in 2004,
the Italy-led Provincial Justice Initiative trained Afghan trainers and deployed them around the
country to build legal capacity at the subnational level. The Independent National Legal Training
Centre opened in 2007 and is situated at Kabul University. The Centre provides legal training for
post-graduate students, legal professionals and staff from Afghan justice institutions; in 2008, it
opened AfgOMnisPMn’s �rsP full-service lMR liNrMryB
During 2001-05, JSR was considered to lag behind reform in other sectors. By late 2007,
however, the justice sector had achieved a position of leadership in sector reform in Afghanistan.
Commitment to JSR was revitalised with the establishment of the International Coordination
Group on Justice Reform in October 2006, the December 2006 Rule of Law Conference in Dubai,
and the July 2007 Rome Conference on Justice and Rule of Law in Afghanistan.
Participants at the Rome Conference — representatives of the Afghan government, donors and the
international community — agreed to a series of joint goals, underlying principles and key actions.
Implementation of key actions began following the conference; this included the establishment
of a National Justice Programme, a National Justice Sector Strategy, and a mechanism for pooled
donor funding of the programme, providing both immediate support for short-term projects and
long-term, coordinated funding. Rome Conference participants also agreed to the establishment of
an Afghan-led monitoring and evaluation system for the justice sector under the ANDS Secretariat
and the Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB, p. 40).
As part of the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14) process, each Afghan
jusPice insPiPuPion — POe Supreme FourP, POe MinisPry of JusPice Mnd POe APPorney GenerMl’s Of�ce
— prepMred M �ve-yeMr sPrMPegy for reformB JiPO guidMnce Mnd PecOnicMl MssisPMnce provided Ny
UNAMA’s Rule of IMR of�ce, POese sPrMPegies Rere comNined Ny NovemNer 2007 inPo M jusPice
sector strategy widely viewed as the best-developed of the ANDS sector strategies. Both the
NMPionMl JusPice ProgrMmme Mnd SecPor SPrMPegy Rere �nMlised in MMrcO 2008B TOese Rill see
the establishment of a Project Oversight Committee (POC) — composed of the high-level Afghan
governmenP of�ciMls Mnd Mdvised Ny Mn inPernMPionMl BoMrd of GirecPors — Mnd M ProgrMm SupporP
Unit (PSU); these are intended to replace the functions of the Consultative Group (CG, see p. 28)
that dealt with the justice sector and ceased to exist after the completion of the ANDS process.
The Afghanistan Justice Sector Reform Project (AJSRP) is currently being developed under the
guidMnce of POe Jorld BMnk Mnd �nMnced Ny POe AfgOMnisPMn ReconsPrucPion TrusP Fund (ARTF, pB
20); iP Rill Ne POe �rsP jusPice secPor projecP implemenPed under POe FundB TOe AJSRP is designed
to enhance the capacity of the Afghan justice institutions to deliver legal services. It focuses
on enhancing: management of human resources and physical infrastructure, information and
communication technology; legal aid and legal awareness; and support to the POC and PSU.
Other developments in this sector in 2008 include:
the establishment of the Provincial Justice Coordination Mechanism, which stems directly
from the Rome Conference; the initiative, which began in July, is run jointly by UNDP and
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UNAMA along with main justice sector counterparts and is designed to assist the Afghan
Government to systematically expand rule of law beyond Kabul and improve the delivery of
justice assistance in the provinces;
the formal inauguration of the Afghan Bar Association in July; and
POe lMuncO of POe IegMl Aid BoMrd in GecemNer MfPer legMl Mid regulMPions Rere of�ciMlly pMssed
in July; with external support, implementation of government-administered system of legal aid
is likely to begin in 2009.
Law and Order Trust Fund for Afghanistan (LOTFA)
The Law and Order Trust Fund for Afghanistan (LOTFA) is a funding mechanism used by international
donors to channel their contributions to the reform of the security sector in Afghanistan, particularly
the Afghan National Police (ANP, p. 6). Established in 2002, LOTFA is implemented by the Ministry
of Interior Affairs, which is responsible for the implementation of the project, and a Project
Management Unit, established to support the Ministry in the implementation of project activities.
The project is led by a Steering Committee comprised of donors, including representatives from the
Ministry of Finance, UNAMA (p. 62) and UNDP. LOTFA’s expenditures are prioritised as follows:
1.
Payment of the police force remuneration;
Institutional development;
Procurement, maintenance and operations of non-lethal police equipment and supplies;
Rehabilitation, maintenance and operations of police facilities;
Gender Orientation (selection, recruitment and training of police); and
Payment of remuneration of uniformed personnel employed by the Central Prisons Department
through specially earmarked contributions.
BePReen 2002 Mnd 2008, MpproximMPely US$DD3 million RMs conPriNuPed Po IOTFA, mosP of ROicO
was used for police salaries and allowances. The largest overall donor since the Fund’s inception
has been the European Commission; at present, the US and European Commission are the largest
donors.
LOTFA Phase IV (1 April 2006-31 March 2008) focused on implementing programmes to bring
about increased transparency and accountability in the above priority areas. Around the country,
police personnel bank accounts for more than 33,000 individuals were set up, with the goal
of sending funds solely by electronic transfer by March 2009. Twenty-eight provinces have
also successfully begun submitting monthly reports electronically. In keeping with its Gender
Orientation priority, LOTFA advocated successfully for a Ministry of Interior Affairs gender unit and
implemented gender awareness capacity-building training.
After the conclusion of Phase IV, the terms of the next phase were negotiated during an interim
exPension periodB POMse V NegMn on 1 SepPemNer 2008, RiPO M PoPMl NudgeP of $4D4 million, Mnd
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
is scheduled to conclude on 31 August 2010. This phase will focus extensively on institutional
development of the Ministry of Interior Affairs in addition to payment of police salaries. Moreover,
continued efforts will be made to increase transparency and accountability in the payment of
London Conference
On 31 January–1 February 2006, the government of the United Kingdom hosted the London
Conference on Afghanistan, a major international summit co-chaired by the UN and the
government of Afghanistan. Attended by over 200 delegates from 70 countries and international
organisations, the Conference served as a forum to discuss the next phase of Afghanistan’s
development. It had three aims: to formally launch the Afghanistan Compact (p. 11), to allow
the Afghan government to present the Interim Afghanistan National Development Strategy
(I-ANDS, p. 38) to the international community, and to ensure that the Government of Afghanistan
has adequate resources to meet its domestic ambitions and international commitments.
TOe Iondon Fonference mMrked POe complePion of POe Bonn process (pB 2D) Mnd POe end of POe �rsP
stage of Afghanistan’s post-Taliban development, which saw the re-establishment of key political
institutions and a democratically elected national government. The Conference also allowed
memNers of POe inPernMPionMl communiPy Po reMf�rm POeir poliPicMl Mnd �nMnciMl commiPmenP Po
Micro�nMnce HnvesPmenP SupporP FMciliPy for
Afghanistan (MISFA)
www.misfa.org.af
TOe Micro�nMnce HnvesPmenP SupporP FMciliPy in AfgOMnisPMn (MHSFA) RMs esPMNlisOed joinPly Ny POe
GovernmenP of AfgOMnisPMn Mnd POe donor communiPy in 2003B HP provides funds for micro�nMnce
insPiPuPions (MFHs) POMP offer smMll loMns Mnd oPOer �nMnciMl services Po poor Mnd vulnerMNle
AfgOMnsB Micro�nMnce is M meMns of supporPing Mnd encourMging income-generMPing McPiviPies
among the very poor, which would not otherwise have access to credit facilities and economic
opportunities.
MISFA was registered as an independent non-distributive company in March 2006 and has an
independent board composed of representatives from the Government and the private sector as
Rell Ms inPernMPionMl micro�nMnce experPsB HP is POe �rsP micro�nMnce lending fMciliPy of iPs kind
in AfgOMnisPMn, pooling diverse donor funding mecOMnisms inPo sPreMmlined, �exiNle supporP Po
micro�nMnce insPiPuPions (MFHs)B HP operMPes RiPO supporP from POe AfgOMn MinisPry of FinMnce,
the World Bank, the Consultative Group to Assist the Poor (CGAP), the Canadian International
Development Agency (CIDA), the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development
(DFID), the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), Oxfam Novib, and the
embassies of Finland, The Netherlands and Denmark.
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As of SepPemNer 2008, MHSFA OMd provided more POMn US$D18 million in loMns Po iPs 1D pMrPner
MFHsB TOese implemenPing pMrPners use M rMnge of micro�nMnce mePOods — individuMl Mnd group
lending, village banking and credit unions — and have more than 447,000 clients in 24 provinces,
63 percenP of ROom Mre RomenB TOe MverMge loMn size Mmong MHSFA’s pMrPners is $311 Mnd POe
loan repayment rate is at 95 percent. The sector employs nearly 5,000 Afghans, 40 percent of
whom are women.
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)
www.un.org/millenniumgoals
In 2004, Afghanistan’s transitional government declared its intention to achieve the Millennium
Development Goals (MDGs) established at the 2000 UN Millennium Summit. MDGs are intended
to act as a framework to guide the development of national policies and reconstruction priorities
around the world, with benchmarks set for 2015 and 2020. The MDGs are incorporated into the
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14) and the Afghanistan Compact (p. 11).
1.
Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger;
Achieve universal primary education;
Promote gender equality and empower women;
Reduce child mortality;
Improve maternal health;
Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases;
7.
Ensure environmental sustainability; and
Develop a global partnership for development.
To this list, the Afghan government has added a ninth goal for its own development initiatives:
enhancing security. In June 2005, the Afghan government held a conference in Kabul to discuss
how to meet the MDG benchmarks and determine MDG progress. The meeting resulted in the
“Afghanistan’s 2020 Vision” report, in which most of the 2015 targets were revised to be met by
2020, recognising capacity constraints and security impediments on the country’s development.
Mine Action Programme for Afghanistan (MAPA)
The Mine Action Programme for Afghanistan (MAPA), the world’s largest mine action programme,
RMs esPMNlisOed in 1E8E under POe direcPion of POe UniPed NMPions Of�ce for POe FoordinMPion of
Humanitarian and Economic Assistance to Afghanistan (UNOCA, p. 64) to make Afghanistan safe
from the threat of mines and unexploded ordnance (UXO).
Oversight and coordination of MAPA is currently in transition. While previously the responsibility
of the UN-supported Mine Action Centre for Afghanistan (MACA), control of the programme is
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
gradually shifting to national ownership. Both MACA and the newly formed Department of Mine
Clearance (DMC) work under the direction of the Mine Action Working Group of the Afghanistan
National Development Strategy process (ANDS, p. 14) to develop strategy and implement and
monitor MAPA activities and targets.
The DMC, with continuing support from MACA, coordinates nationwide MAPA activities through
seven area mine action centres in Kabul, Herat, Kandahar, Mazar-i-Sharif, Kunduz, Gardez
Mnd JMlMlMNMdB TOese regionMl of�ces, sPMffed enPirely Ny AfgOMns, Mre responsiNle for regionMl
coordination and oversight of mine action activities. MAPA has 24 implemen
ting partners, mostly
national and international NGOs, that carry out activities such as mine clearance and survey,
mine risk education, victim assistance, capacity-building, advocacy, monitoring and training.
Around 697 km
of land are contaminated with anti-personnel or anti-tank mines and other
explosive remnants of war (ERW); 75 percent of this is located in only 12 of Afghanistan’s 34
provinces. From January to September 2008, nearly 69,000 anti-personnel mines, over 700 anti-
tank mines, and over two million ERW were destroyed. Led by the Ministry of Education, mine risk
education programmes, continue around the country; between January and September 2008,
this initiative provided information to more than one million people.
MAPA works to meet mine action benchmarks set by the Ottawa Treaty banning landmines and
the Afghanistan Compact, which call for a 70 percent reduction in contaminated land area by
March 2011 and a 100 percent clearance of anti-personnel mines by 2013.
National Area-Based Development Programme
The National Area-Based Development Programme (NABDP) is a UNDP-supported programme
run by the Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development (MRRD). NABDP was launched in
2002 Ms one of POe AfgOMn governmenP’s NMPionMl PrioriPy ProgrMmmes, de�ned in POe NMPionMl
Development Framework (NDF, p. 48).
TOe NABGP Mims Po promoPe urgenP recovery Mnd longer-Perm developmenP in idenPi�ed prioriPy
areas of rural development while building government capacity to lead and coordinate participatory
MpproMcOes Po developmenP Mcross POe counPryB AfPer complePion of iPs �rsP pOMse (2002 Po
2004-05), NABDP Phase II was launched in February 2006 and was intended to serve as a key
coordination mechanism for government and UN-supported rural development programmes. The
current phase focuses more on institutional development, capacity-building, and intersectoral
coordination at the regional and provincial levels, as well as promotion of regional and local
economic regenerMPion McPiviPiesB TOe ProgrMmme OMs �ve mMin componenPs:
Community Empowerment: establishing participatory and consultative mechanisms at district
1.
and provincial level to result in an integrated rural development planning process
Economic Regeneration: enhancing capacity of the Government in formulating and updating
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of comprehensive regional economic regeneration policies and strategies; identifying viable
interventions for economic investment, poverty reduction and livelihood improvement
Institutional Development: strengthening institutional capacity and technical capabilities of
MRRG Mnd sPrMPegic pMrPners Po ful�ll mMndMPe of promoPing rurMl regenerMPion Mnd improved
livelihoods
Implementation Support: strengthening MRRD’s implementation capacity, mobilising private
and public resources, and coordinating implementation arrangements among partners and
stakeholders to deliver rural infrastructure projects
Rural Energy: initiation of the Energy for Rural Development Afghanistan (ERDA) component
RiPO speci�c oNjecPives of governmenP Mnd communiPy cMpMciPy developmenP, policy revieR,
and piloting of demonstration projects concerning rural and renewable energy (e.g. microhydro
projecPs Mnd rurMl elecPri�cMPion)
To date, NABDP has supported the establishment of more than 300 District Development
Assemblies, covering approximately 75 percent of the country. Each Assembly has formulated a
District Development Plan, which is taken into account in planning rural infrastructure projects.
Under Phase II, nearly 500 of these projects have been completed and more than 325 are
ongoing. NABDP also supports the growth of small and medium enterprises in ten provinces
POrougO Nusiness plMn supporP Mnd grMnPsB PlMnning is underRMy for M �ve-yeMr NABGP POMse HHH,
which is expected to begin in mid-2009.
National Budget
www.budgetmof.gov.af
Afghanistan’s National Budget comprises the Core Budget and the External Budget. The External
Budget refers to funds that are reported to but not controlled by the government — funds distributed
directly by donors to their contracting partners. The Core Budget includes all funds over which
the government has control; these funds are channelled through the Treasury. At the start of
POe SY1387 �scMl yeMr (April 2008-MMrcO 200E), POe ExPernMl BudgeP RMs MpproximMPely US$4B8
Nillion Mnd POe Fore BudgeP RMs $2B6 Nillion (POis lMPPer �gure, OoRever, OMs Necome $3B73 Nillion
over the course of the year due to unspent SY1386 funds carried forward and the mid-year review
of the National Budget).
The Afghan government encourages donors to channel funding through the Core Budget to
increase Afghan ownership over the reconstruction process. The Afghanistan Reconstruction
Trust Fund (ARTF, p. 20) was created for this purpose; it provides donors a support mechanism
POMP meePs inPernMPionMl �duciMry sPMndMrdsB On pMper, POe Nulk of MssisPMnce is spenP POrougO
the Core Budget, but this may be misleading due to incomplete spending of the Core Budget and
incomplete or untimely donor reporting of “off-budget” plans to the External Budget.
The Core Budget has two lines of expenditure, the Development Budget and the Operating
Budget:
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
The Development Budget funds capital and other investment. In SY1387, this accounts for
1.
MpproximMPely $2B2D NillionB
The Operating Budget primarily funds salaries, administrative operations and maintenance. In
SY1387, POis MccounPs for MpproximMPely $1B47 NillionB
The process of budget implementation is still an evolving one; for SY1386 (2007-08) only
54 percent of the Development Budget was spent. Poor spending can be attributed to the
dif�culPies of implemenPing projecPs in Mn unsPMNle environmenP, overly MmNiPious PMrgePs Mnd
varying spending abilities of ministries.
The formulation, execution and reporting of the National Budget is coordinated by the Budget
Department of the Ministry of Finance, supported by the UNDP-funded Making Budgets and Aid
Jork progrMmmeB TOe NMPionMl BudgeP is Po Ne OMrmonised RiPO nMPionMl progrMmmes de�ned Ny
the Afghanistan Compact and the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14), and
the Budget Department is thus structured along the ANDS sectors. The Department’s goal is to
develop a comprehensive, policy-based and sustainable budget that can also be used as a tool for
improved coordination, alignment and effectiveness of international development aid.
National Development Framework (NDF)
The National Development Framework (NDF) was drawn up by the Afghan Interim Authority (AIA,
p. 4) in early 2002 as a road map for the development and reconstruction process in Afghanistan.
HP idenPi�ed 16 NMPionMl GevelopmenP ProgrMmmes (NGPs) Mnd six cross-cuPPing issues under
three broad pillars: 1) human capital and social protection, 2) physical infrastructure, and 3) an
enMNling environmenP for developmenPB TOe NGF Mlso idenPi�ed six NMPionMl PrioriPy ProgrMmmes
(NPPs) that were to take precedence over other activities. Six additional NPPs, meant to be major
policy priorities for the government, were added in 2004.
The 16 NDPs were overseen by corresponding Consultative Groups (CGs, p. 28). Theoretically,
these 16 CGs operated as a forum within which the details of reconstruction and development
projects in each sector were designed and discussed, although the effectiveness of the individual
CGs varied. Each CG then implemented its sector’s plans by propo
sing a Public Investment
Programme (PIP) for the national Development Budget (see National Budget, p. 47). In addition,
Advisory Groups existed for each of the six cross-cutting issues.
The NDF, under the auspices of the Ministry of Finance, remained the primary basis for government
and donor planning until January 2006, when it was replaced by the Interim Afghanistan National
Development Strategy (I-ANDS, p. 38).
National Development Programmes (NDP)
See National Development Framework, p. 38.
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National Human Development Report (NHDR)
OPPp:CCOdrBundpBorgCenCreporPsCnMPionMlreporPsCMsiMPOepMci�cCMfgOMnisPMnC
National Human Development Reports (NHDRs) are based on the human develop
ment concept,
which emphasises the divers
ity of human needs such as income, access to knowledge, nut
and health, security, political and cultu
ral free
dom and participation in the community. Since
1992, more than 500 NHDRs have been produced, primarily by developing countries with UNDP
support.
AfgOMnisPMn’s �rsP NHGR RMs releMsed in FeNruMry 200D, Mnd focused on POe relMPionsOip
between security and development. Produced by Kabul University and UNDP on behalf of the
Afghan government, the report was based on a number of sectoral and thematic back
ground
papers commissioned from national researchers.
The second Afghanistan NHDR, released in late 2007, was produced by the UNDP-sponsored
Centre for Policy and Human Development (CPHD) at Kabul University. It focused on the linkages
between the rule of law and human development, highlighting key challenges to the expansion of
the rule of law in Afghanistan and proposing approaches to bridge modernity and tradition in the
search for social justice.
The Report provides:
a review of progress toward Afghanistan’s Millennium Development Goals (MDGs, p. 45).
an assessment of major threats to the rule of law, such as personal insecurity, past human
rights violations, injustice toward women and children, the narcotics trade, corruption and
land disputes.
an analysis of why the judiciary, police and legislature have failed to meet the needs of Afghan
a transitional “hybrid model of Afghan justice” that combines new, old and Islamic systems for
the promotion of the rule of law and human development.
The 2007 NHDR argues that engaging traditional rule of law institutions must become an integral
component of the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14) and related efforts to
move towards an effective, modern system of justice. It concludes that “only when Afghans secure
their rights and uphold their responsibilities will justice prevail and the country and surrounding
region build the foundations for a durable peace.”
The third NHDR is being prepared by the CPHD and Kabul University, planned for release in
November 2009. The report’s theme, water, was selected after a consultative process involving
civil society, Parliament, academics and other experts. As of November 2008, the project was in
its design phase, with preliminary work underway. Several aspects of water are being considered
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
for assessment in the report: health, agricultural, environmental, and water-sharing within
Afghanistan and across its borders.
National Risk and Vulnerability Assessment (NRVA)
www.mrrd.gov.af/nss-vau
www.cso-af.net
The National Risk and Vulnerability Assessment (NRVA) is the primary instrument through which the
NMPionMl SurveillMnce SysPem (NSS, pB D2) uniP of POe FenPrMl SPMPisPics Of�ce (FSO, pB 26) gMPOers
informMPion MNouP poverPy, food securiPy Mnd vulnerMNiliPy of POe AfgOMn populMPionB TOe �rsP PRo
NRVAs were carried out in 2003 and 2005. Fieldwork for the NRVA 2007-08 was conducted over
12 months, ending in August 2008. The release of the data is expected in December 2008. A
request form is available from the CSO for those requiring access to the data.
The NRVA surveys serve to provide timely, credible information for use by the government and
assistance actors in the design and implementation of social protection programmes, policies
and strategies, such as the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS). NRVA 2007-
08 collected information on: education and health; housing and household facilities; water
and sanitation; agriculture practices and livestock; migration, remittances and social networks;
household income sources, expenditures, assets and credit access; household consumption; the
activities of women; and risk, shocks and coping strategies.
With its large sample size — more than 31,000 households in 2005 and 21,000 households in
2007-08 — the NRVA is able to provide statistics for all 34 provinces, eleven provincial centres
idenPi�ed Ms urNMn Mnd “
kuchi
” (nomads). NRVA data may be used to indicate changes taking
place at the provincial level. Data results and reports from all NRVA activities will become available
on POe ReNsiPe of POe FenPrMl SPMPisPics Of�ce (see link Po ReNsiPe MNove)B
National Solidarity Programme (NSP)
www.nspafghanistan.org
TOe NMPionMl SolidMriPy ProgrMmme (NSP) RMs de�ned in POe NMPionMl GevelopmenP FrMmeRork
(NDF, p. 48) and is one of the still-functioning, original National Priority Programmes (NPP). The
NSP is intended to alleviate rural poverty and create a foundation for improved governance
through:
establishing a framework for village-level consultative decision-making and representative
local leadership as a basis for interaction within and between communities on the one hand,
and with the government and aid agencies on the other; and
promoting local-level reconstruction, development and capacity-building, which will lead to a
decrease in poverty levels.
The NSP seeks to attain these objectives through four core programme elements: 1) facilitating
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the creation of Community Development Councils (CDCs), representative decision-making bodies
elected by secret ballot in fair and open elections involving both male and female community
members; 2) helping the CDCs produce a Community Development Plan (CDP), which outlines
development priorities and proposes reconstruction projects; 3) providing direct block grant
transfers to fund CDP priorities; and 4) linking CDCs to government agencies, NGOs, and donors
to improve access to services and resources. The programme is implemented with the help of NSP
Facilitating Partners — UN Habitat and 28 international and local NGOs (as of November 2008).
One aspect of NSP activities is human capital development, involving administrative training
for CDC members as well as literacy and livelihoods training focused on female community
members.
As of October 2008, NSP had facilitated the election of more than 21,600 CDCs and guided the
preparation of nearly 21,400 CDPs in 351 districts and provincial centres. Since the Programme’s
incepPion, more POMn US$D3D million in grMnPs OMve Neen disNursed Po rurMl communiPies, more
than 25,100 projects have been completed and another 19,000 have been approved. The majority
of these projects have been undertaken in the areas of water supply and sanitation, transport,
irrigation, power supply, and education. In many remote parts of the country, NSP is the only
functioning government development programme.
The responsibility for overall management and supervision of the NSP lies with the Ministry
of Rural Rehabilitation and Development; a management support consultant assists the NSP
progrMmme of�ce in POis RorkB Hn MddiPion, M Jorld BMnk PMsk PeMm OMs M supervisory funcPion;
a donor working group regularly liaises with NSP management; and an NSP Steering Committee
and Inter-Ministerial Task Force act in an advisory capacity on programme policy, implementation
and coordination.
The original NSP was followed by a second phase (referred to as NSP II) launched in April 2007.
NSP HH exPended POe progrMmme Po communiPies POMP Rere noP covered Ny POe �rsP pOMse Mnd OMs
M POree-yeMr mMndMPeB HP is sPrucPured on POe �rsP NSP, NuP provides PRo rMPOer POMn POree yeMrs
of facilitation and has conferred more of the management responsibility to the NSP programme
of�ceB Hn lMPe 2008, POe AfgOMn GovernmenP Mnd NSP donors Rere discussing M possiNle POird
phase of the programme. This could address remaining funding needs for a national roll-out of
NSP; involve consolidating CDCs to ensure their sustainability; and further tackle reconstruction
needs in rural communities. As of November 2008, the NSP had planned to pilot a programme in
three provinces that would provide funding to clusters of CDCs.
Funding for the NSP comes from the World Bank, the Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund
(ARTF, p. 20), and from the governments of the UK, Japan, Denmark, Sweden Switzerland, the
Netherlands, New Zealand, the Czech Republic, Canada and the US.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
National Surveillance System (NSS)
http://www.mrrd.gov.af/nss-vau/
www.cso-af.net
The National Poverty, Vulnerability and Food Security Surveillance System, or simply the National
Surveillance System (NSS), was designed to bring data collection on food security, poverty and
vulnerability under one umbrella. Activities began in September 2003. The objectives of the NSS
are to generate information that contributes to improved policy development and programming,
and to ensure relevant government institutions have the capacity to implement NSS activities in
the future. The NSS has four major components:
1.
baseline monitoring through the biannual National Risk and Vulnerability Assessment survey
(NRVA, p. 50);
emergency needs assessments;
an early warning and information system; and
reseMrcO Mnd speci�c sPudiesB
The project was led by the Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development (MRRD), in close
collaboration with the World Food Programme (WFP), the Ministry of Public Health, UNICEF and
the Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock. The Vulnerability Analysis Unit (VAU) within
MRRD was established to implement NSS initiatives. In 2005, NSS partnered with the Central
SPMPisPics Of�ce (FSO, pB 26), Mnd Mn NSS uniP RMs creMPed RiPOin FSO Po PMke over NRVA dMPM
collection. NSS is working to develop methodologies that better satisfy the government’s need for
informMPion in Pimes of McuPe crisis, sucO Ms eMrPOquMkes or severe �ooding, Mnd Po develop eMrly
warning systems and emergency assessment services.
Since 2002 POere OMve Neen PRo mMjor iniPiMPives Po clMrify ROMP is, Mnd ROMP is noP, M noP-for-pro�P
nongovernmental organisation (NGO), and to strengthen the accountability and transparency of
NGO McPiviPies in AfgOMnisPMnB TOe �rsP iniPiMPive RMs legislMPion Po dePermine ROMP is Mn NGO Mnd
what are permissible NGO activities, set criteria for the establishment and internal governance of
NGOs, clMrify reporPing requiremenPs for NGOs, enMNle pro�P-mMking Nodies currenPly regisPered Ms
NGOs to establish themselves as businesses, and enhance the transparency and accountability
of NGOs. The second initiative was an NGO Code of Conduct, designed by the NGO community
working in Afghanistan as a self-governing mechanism to ensure commitment to transparency,
accountability and professional standards from all signatories.
In consultation with NGOs and with technical assistance from the International Centre for
NoP-for-Pro�P IMR (HFNI), Mn iniPiMl drMfP for POe NGO legislMPion RMs presenPed Po POe MinisPry
of JusPice in 2003B NGOs cMlled for POe Pimely �nMlisMPion of POe legislMPion MP POe AfgOMnisPMn
Development Forums (ADF, p. 13) in both April 2004 and April 2005, and the NGO legislation was
A to Z
eventually passed in June 2005. This legislation provides a means by which genuine NGOs can
be differentiated from the many contractors registered as NGOs: between 2001 and 2004 around
2,400 enPiPies OMd regisPered RiPO POe governmenP Ms NGOs, despiPe POe lMck of Mny of�ciMl criPeriM
for such a registration.
SOorPly MfPer POe �rsP NGO legislMPion drMfP RMs prepMred for POe governmenP in July 2003, 120
NGOs participated in a workshop to discuss the content of the NGO Code of Conduct. The text of
the Code was jointly drafted by the four major NGO coordination bodies in Afghanistan — Agency
Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief (ACBAR, p. 22), Afghan NGO Coordinating Bureau (ANCB, p.
8), Southern and Western Afghanistan and Balochistan Association for Coordination (SWABAC, p.
60) and Afghan Women’s Network (AWN, p. 9). A Code of Conduct Secretariat was established
under POe Muspices of AFBAR Po coordinMPe Mnd �nMlise POe drMfP, ROicO RMs complePed in MMy
2004. The NGO community publicly launched the Afghanistan NGO Code of Conduct on 30 May
2005. In order to be a signatory to the Code of Conduct, NGOs are required to submit several
documents to prove their NGO status, including legal registration documentation, coordination
Nody memNersOip, �nMnciMl records, Mnd proof of reporPing Po POe relevMnP minisPryB TOe NGO
Code of Conduct has 100 Afghan and international signatories.
For the full text of the NGO Code of Conduct, see p. 130 of this guide.
Of�ce of AdminisPrMPive AffMirs Mnd Founcil of
Ministers Secretariat (OAA/CMS)
TOe Of�ce of AdminisPrMPive AffMirs Mnd Founcil of MinisPers SecrePMriMP (OAACFMS) Mre Mn
executive-level coordinating and advising body that “supports the President of the Islamic
Republic of Afghanistan in his role as Head of Government and Chairman of the Council of
Ministers.” Originally set up in the 1950s under King Zahir Shah, the OAA was re-established in
2002; the Secretariat of the Council of Ministers was established as a Directorate in 2003. The
OAA’s mMin funcPions Mre Po provide MdminisPrMPive, logisPicMl Mnd �nMnciMl supporP Po POe of�ces
of the President, Vice Presidents and advisors to the President. The OAA also ensures policy
coordination and monitoring of the implementation of the Presidential decrees and the decisions
of the Council of Ministers. Among the functions of the Secretariat to the Council of Ministers are
preparing agendas and minutes of Cabinet meetings and facilitating the Council with required
Although executive bodies, the OAA/CMS were designed to be impartial. They do not create policy,
NuP rMPOer coordinMPe policy developmenPB TOe Of�ce Mnd SecrePMriMP revieR policies drMfPed Ny
ministries and Cabinet, ensuring that these comply with the Afghanistan National Development
Strategy (ANDS, p. 14), address cross-cutting initiatives and contain a clear, accurate budget.
Once the OAA/CMS approve the draft policy, it is passed on to the President and Cabinet for
�nMl revieR Mnd possiNle MpprovMlB Hf M policy is Mpproved, POe OAACFMS moniPor Mnd evMluMPe iPs
implementation.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
TOe of�ce convenes regulMr, Reekly meePings of POe FMNineP Ms Rell Ms FMNineP economic, sociMl,
and cultural committees. In 2008, assisted by other government agencies, the OAA/CMS organised
many key events, meetings and conferences, including the Afghanistan-Pakistan Joint Peace Jirga
and sessions related to the Afghan government’s process of accountability to the nation.
Paris Conference
OPPp:CCRRRBdiplomMPieBgouvBfrCenCcounPry-�les_1D6CMfgOMnisPMn_4E8C
international-conference-in-support-of-afghanistan-paris-12th-june-2008_6366/
index.html
The International Conference in Support of Afghanistan, more widely known as the Paris
Conference, was held on 12 June 2008 and was co-chaired by French President Nicolas Sarkozy,
Afghan President Hamid Karzai and UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon. This major international
meeting formally launched the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14), which is
aimed at laying out the strategic priorities and mechanisms for achieving the Afghan government’s
overall development vision and serves as the country’s Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP,
p. 55). The conference was intended to be a show of “partnership” from the Afghan government
and the international community “to work more closely together under Afghan leadership” to
support the ANDS, as stated in the resulting declaration.
TOe declMrMPion from POe conference reMf�rmed POMP POe AfgOMnisPMn FompMcP (pB 11) Rould
remMin POe NMsis for POe developmenP of AfgOMnisPMn; iP speci�ed POe prioriPy MreMs of sPrengPOening
institutions and economic growth, particularly in agriculture and energy. The conference also
resulted in statements on a renewed commitment to strengthening the effectiveness and quality
of aid, as a shared responsibility. The international community agreed to provide increased
resources in more consistent, coordinated way while the Afghan government promised to step
up economic Mnd poliPicMl reformB AP POe conference, MpproximMPely $20 Nillion RMs pledged Po
�nMnce POe implemenPMPion of POe ANGS, including supporP for POe prepMrMPion of elecPions in
2009 and 2010.
Policy Action Group (PAG)
The Policy Action Group (PAG), a high-level task force and crisis management group, was
established in June 2006 by President Hamid Karzai and then-Commander of the International
Security Assistance Force (ISAF, p. 38) General David Richards to address the growing threat of
insurgency in Afghanistan’s southern provinces.
The PAG is aimed at improving Afghanistan’s high-level capacity to manage crises; to enhance the
coordination of security operations and other security-related matters between the Government
and the international community. The PAG meets monthly and includes: the National Security
Advisor (as chair); the Ministers of Defense, Interior Affairs, Rural Rehabilitation and Development,
Communications and Information Technology, Counter Narcotics and Education; the Director
General of the Independent Directorate for Local Governance (IDLG, p. 36); top representatives
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from the UN Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA, p. 62), the International Security
Assistance Force (ISAF, p. 38) and CSTC-A (see Coalition Forces, p. 27); and the ambassadors of
the UK, the US, Australia, Canada, Denmark and the Netherlands in addition to the EU Special
Representative.
After the Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB, p. 40), a high-level governing body, was
restructured in 2008, the PAG members agreed in October to use the JCMB Standing Committee
on Security to discuss policy issues, while the PAG would be used to discuss operational issues.
It was also agreed that the PAG’s work would include security issues related to the whole country.
The PAG is currently reviewing how to strengthen relations with its six pillar working groups:
Security, Reconstruction, Strategic Communications, Intelligence Fusion, Governance and
Counter-narcotics).
Key achievements of the PAG
have i
ncluded: the increased delivery of reconstruction assistance
to the South; development of a joint security plan for voter registration between Afghanistan
National Security Forces (ANSF, p. 8) and the international military; and the establishment of the
National Communications Coordination Centre, which formed the basis for improved information
�oR NePReen POe GovernmenP Mnd iPs inPernMPionMl pMrPnersB TOe neR GovernmenP MediM Mnd
Information Centre has since taken over this role.
Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP)
Poverty Reduction Strategy Papers (PRSPs) are designed to provide a framework of operation
for donors and governments of poor countries. To qualify for debt relief and other concessions,
loR-income counPries musP produce M PRSP for some donorsB TOe PRSP formMP is �exiNle, NuP iP is
based on a number of set principles. A PRSP should:
be country driven and owned, with the input of civil society and the private sector;
OMve resulPs orienPed Po Nene�P POe poor;
be comprehensive in recognising the multidimensional nature of poverty;
be partnership oriented (developed in cooperation with bilateral, multilateral and
nongovernmental actors); and
be based on a long-term perspective for poverty reduction.
Interim PRSPs (I-PRSPs) are developed by countries that are not yet ready to develop a full PRSP.
At the Berlin Meeting (p. 24) in 2001, Afghanistan agreed to prepare a PRSP, with an I-PRSP due
in June 2005. At the April 2005 Afghanistan Development Forum (ADF, p. 13), it was decided that
the development of the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14) would meet
the benchmarks of a PRSP process. The Interim ANDS (I-ANDS), which was launched in January
2006 after a nine-month preparation period, moved the country toward the achievement of a full
PRSP.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
TOe full ANGS RMs �nMlised in April 2008 Mnd suNmiPPed Po POe Jorld BMnk Mnd POe HMF Ms
Afghanistan’s PRSP. If it is approved, the World Bank will develop a Country Assistance Strategy
for Afghanistan. This would most likely detail planned work over a certain period and contain
information about procedures for loans, monitoring and analysis, and technical assistance.
Provincial Development Plan (PDP)
Aimed at ensuring broad consensus on development priorities in Afghanistan, the process of
creating a Provincial Development Plan for each of the country’s 34 provinces was initiated by the
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14). The plans are the result of subnational
consultations with local communities organised in every province to identify priorities and proposals
for projects. The plans cover eight key sectors: infrastructure and natural resources; economic
governance and private sector development; agriculture and rural development; education;
health; social protection; governance; security; and rule of law/human rights. Subsequent
consultations were held with representatives from the provincial administration, civil society and
donor organisations to ensure the plans were aligned with the strategies of relevant government
According to the Independent Directorate of Local Governance (IDLG, p. 36), the PDP process is
among the efforts to have provincial planning and budgeting done by the provinces rather than for
the provinces (by central ministries in Kabul).
Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT)
http://www.nato.int/isaf/topics/recon_dev/prts.html
Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRT) are small teams of both military and civilian staff located
in bases; PRTs are intended to facilitate reconstruction and provide security for aid efforts at
POe provinciMl levelB TOe concepP RMs �rsP proposed Ny POe FoMliPion Forces (FF, pB 27) Mnd POe
US embassy in mid-2002 during discussions about shifting from Operation Enduring Freedom’s
Phase III (combat phase) to Phase IV (reconstruction phase). The establishment of PRTs was
of�ciMlly Mnnounced Mnd endorsed Ny PresidenP HMmid KMrzMi in NovemNer 2002B
PRTs were originally established by Coalition Forces. The International Security Assistance Force
(ISAF, p. 38), however, began taking over and establishing new PRTs in the North and West of
Afghanistan in 2004, after an October 2003 UN Security Council resolution expanded ISAF’s
mandate beyond Kabul. Command of PRTs in the South and East was transferred to ISAF in 2006,
leaving ISAF in charge of all 25 PRTs then in Afghanistan. In November 2008, there were 26 PRTs
operating in the country.
The objective of PRTs, as set forth by the PRT Executive Steering Committee, is to:
assist the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to extend its authority, in order to facilitate
POe developmenP of M sPMNle Mnd secure environmenP in POe idenPi�ed MreMs of
operations, and enable SSR [Security Sector Reform] and reconstruction efforts.
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This broadly stated mission statement is not backed by a detailed mandate, and there is no single
PRT model. While PRTs are led by individual lead nations, the military components of PRTs come
under POe commMnd of HSAF FommMndersB TOe sPrucPure Mnd operMPion of PRTs Mre in�uenced
by the situation in particular provinces as well as by the philosophies, caveats and instructions of
troop-contributing nations. As a result, confusion over priorities, strained resources and lack of
coordination often plague PRT efforts.
Some of POe speci�c PMsks of POe PRT Mre Po: improve POe securiPy environmenP for POe people of
AfgOMnisPMn POrougO diMlogue RiPO regionMl leMders Mnd miPigMPing likely MreMs of con�icP; MssisP
the Afghan government in disseminating its decisions and policies to regional leaders; establish a
presence as well as monitor and assess military, political and civilian situations in assigned areas
of operations; assist the international community with reform of civil administration; facilitate
information sharing between the government and civil agencies; and direct assistance to civilian
elements of the PRT (e.g. transport support, engineering).
Each PRT comprises an average of 100-200 staff depending on location. The military personnel
provide protection for the civilian component, which includes foreign affairs representatives,
developmenP of�cers Mnd donorsB Some PRTs Mlso OMve MgriculPurMl Mnd vePerinMry Mdvisors,
civilian police trainers, governance advisors, development advisors, and counter-narcotic
specialists. The coordination of reconstruction and development activities is the responsibility of
civilian PRT staff.
PRT activities are monitored and guided by a PRT Executive Steering Committee chaired by the
Minister of Interior Affairs and co-chaired by ISAF and CF commanders. The Committee includes
representatives from the Ministry of Finance, the Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development,
CF, ISAF, UNAMA (p. 62) and troop-contributing nations. A PRT working group supports the work
of the Steering Committee.
Many NGOs are concerned that PRT involvement in humanitarian assistance blurs the distinction
between the military and aid sectors. Proponents counter that PRTs, because they are armed
and uniformed, may enable reconstruction projects to be carried out in high-risk areas generally
inaccessible to aid agencies.
Public Administration Reform (PAR)
TOe GovernmenP’s PuNlic AdminisPrMPion Reform (PAR) frMmeRork seeks Po creMPe Mn ef�cienP,
effective and transparent civil service in Afghanistan. Overseen by the Independent Administrative
Reform and Civil Service Commission (IARCSC, p. 35), PAR is one of the priorities laid out in the
Afghanistan Compact (p. 11) and the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14).
PAR aims to address a variety of problems, including: the fragmentation of government structures,
with many overlapping functions and a lack of coordination among agencies; the often tenuous
connection between the centre (Kabul) and the provinces; the unclear lines of accountability with
weak reinforcement mechanisms; the lack of experienced professional staff with the necessary
skills; the lack of robust procedures for recruitment and appointment on merit, which has led
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
to a high level of patronage-based appointments; the need for a pay and grading structure that
attracts, retains and motivates civil servants; poor physical infrastructure; and slow and outdated
administrative systems.
A central element of PAR has been the Priority Reform and Restructuring (PRR) initiative, aimed
at creating administrative capacity in ministries and give targeted salary increases. PRR was also
designed to ensure consistency across ministries that are reforming with the help of different
donors.
In 2005, the PAR programme was redesigned and a framework for SY1385-89 (2006-10) was
developed, shifting the focus away from piecemeal initiatives toward more comprehensive reform
involving whole ministries and other independent agencies that are allocated funds directly from
the Ministry of Finance (also known as primary budget agencies); it is also intended to move the
reforms from the centre to provinces and districts. This new version of the PAR programme has
Neen reorgMnised inPo �ve pMrPs, Mlong funcPionMl Mnd progrMmmMPic POemes: 1) MdminisPrMPive
reform; 2) salaries and incentives, 3) civil service management, 4) ensuring and expanding merit-
based appointments; and 5) capacity enhancement. Progress on PAR since 2002 has included:
1) the establishment of the IARCSC and the operationalisation of its departments; 2) the approval
of a new Civil Service Law in 2005; 3) some progress in functional audits leading to proposals for
new structures of key ministries and agencies at the central level through the PRR programme;
4) initial policy work on a new pay and grade structure; 5) progress on the development of a
new methodology and framework for reform and restructuring; and, 6) progress in merit-based
recruitment for both senior- and junior-level civil servants.
The PAR initiative, and the PRR project in particular, has been considered a success by some,
while others complain that reform has been largely “cosmetic” and overly focused on pay scales
to the detriment of more fundamental change, including the consistent application of merit-based
For more information on Afghanistan’s public sector, see p. 67.
Rome Conference on Justice and Rule of Law
See Justice Sector Reform, p. 41.
Securing Afghanistan’s Future (SAF)
See Berlin Meeting and Declarations, p. 24.
Security Sector Reform (SSR)
Poor security remains one of the primary obstacles to the timely progress of reconstruction and
development activities in Afghanistan. The government’s framework for Security Sector Reform
(SSR) aims to address this problem. Announced at the February 2003 Tokyo Meeting on the
FonsolidMPion of PeMce in AfgOMnisPMn (pB 62), SSR OMs �ve pillMrs:
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The establishment of the Afghan National Army (ANA, p. 4);
1.
The establishment of the Afghan National Police (ANP, p. 6);
Justice Sector Reform (JSR, p. 41);
Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration (DDR, p. 32); and
Counter Narcotics (CN, p. 29).
Upon completion of the DDR process in June 2005, the Disbandment of Illegal Armed Groups
(DIAG, p. 32) commenced. DIAG is designed to disarm and disband illegal armed groups operating
ouPside cenPrMl governmenP conProlB (For more informMPion on eMcO of POe pillMrs, see POeir speci�c
With the exception of DDR, these pillars corresponded explicitly to the reform and creation of
government ministries — the Ministry of Defence, the Ministry of Interior Affairs, the Ministry of
JusPice Mnd POe MinisPry of FounPer NMrcoPicsB AP POe Bonn (pB 2D) Mnd Tokyo (pB 62) meePings, �ve
donor counPries Mgreed Po eMcO PMke POe leMd on M speci�c SSR pillMr: POe US on POe ANA, GermMny
on the ANP (a role later taken over by the European Union Police Mission in Afghanistan), Italy
on JSR, Japan on DDR, and the UK on counter narcotics. Originally referred to as “lead donors,”
these “key partners” were responsible for overseeing their particular sectors, although they were
not necessarily contributing the most funds; the “lead donor” or “key partner” terminology is
no longer used. Additional donors are involved to various degrees in each area, and the US is
involved to some extent in all of them.
The wide range of actors involved in the security sector, the limited reach of the central government
around the country, resistance to reform, and disagreement among stakeholders on some key
policy approaches have posed obstacles to progress in SSR. Management of the numerous SSR
activities has also been a challenge. Since 2004, the National Security Council (NSC) and the
Of�ce of POe NMPionMl SecuriPy Founcil OMve Neen responsiNle for overMll coordinMPion of SSR
activities and estab¬lished two coordinating committees, both of which included international
representation: the Security Sector Reform Coordination Committee and the Security Coordination
Forum. Coordination among Coalition Forces (CF, p. 27), the International Security Assistance Force
(HSAF, pB 38) Mnd AfgOMn securiPy forces is somePimes dif�culPB TOe presence of privMPe securiPy
companies further contributes to the complexity of security issues in Afghanistan; legislation has
been drafted to determine their scope and to register and license their operation, but this has also
been a point of considerable friction among stakeholders.
A neR securiPy secPor sPrMPegy RMs included in POe �nMl AfgOMnisPMn NMPionMl GevelopmenP SPrMPegy
(ANDS, p. 14), which was approved by President Hamid Karzai in April 2008.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Southern and Western Afghanistan and Balochistan
Association for Coordination (SWABAC)
Southern and Western Afghanistan and Balochistan Association for Coordination (SWABAC) is a
coordination body for Afghan and international NGOs working in southern Afghanistan. Its head
of�ce is in KMndMOMr; iP plMns Po open M suN-of�ce in KMNul in POe neMr fuPureB
SWABAC was founded in September 1988 by 12 NGOs engaged in relief and rehabilitation work
with Afghan refugee villages in Balochistan and communities inside Afghanistan. Membership is
open to government-registered NGOs working in southern Afghanistan who show a dedication to
coordinMPion Mnd OMve proof of donor funding, OMve Mn orgMnisMPionMl pro�le Mnd Mre cerPi�ed Ny
�ve oPOer NGOsB As of NovemNer 2008, SJABAF OMd 40 memNersB HP Oolds regulMr memNersOip
meetings, monthly general assembly meetings and biweekly panel meetings for the advisory
committee, as well as meetings on an as-needed basis.
SWABAC’s activities fall within three major categories: coordination, advocacy and capacity-
building. SWABAC provides a forum for members to discuss their concerns about policy guidelines
for delivering assistance, resource management and other operational issues, with the ultimate
goal of improving coordination among the assistance community in southern Afghanistan.
SWABAC was involved in drafting the NGO Code of Conduct (p. 52) in cooperation with the Agency
Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief (ACBAR, p. 22), the Afghan NGO Coordination Bureau (ANCB,
p. 8) and the Afghan Women’s Network (AWN, p. 9). On behalf of its member NGOs and as a
representative of the southern region, SWABAC played a role in developing both the Agriculture
and the Rural Development sectors in the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p.
14) process.
SWABAC is also a member of the Afghan Civil Society Forum (ACSF, p. 3) and has been named
the lead agency for the Local Cooperation and Coordination Sector of Kandahar’s Provincial
Development Committee.
In the future, the association plans to focus more on capacity-building of civil society through
workships, training and the establishment of a resource centre.
The association’s funding sources
include membership fees; its monitoring and evaluation projects are funded by the UN.
Support for an Effective Afghan Legislature (SEAL)
www.undp.org.af/WhoWeAre/UNDPinAfghanistan/Projects/dcse/prj_seal.htm
The original Support for the Establishment of the Afghan Legislature (SEAL) project was launched
by the UNDP and the Afghan government in February 2005. The objective of SEAL was to:
“conPriNuPe Po POe esPMNlisOmenP of M fully operMPionMl Mnd ef�cienP pMrliMmenP recognised Ny Mll
the people of Afghanistan as their representative institution, accountable and transparent, and
that will be the interface between citizens and the government.”
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SEAL played a central role in establishing the Afghan National Assembly (also often referred to as
PMrliMmenP, see pB 70) in GecemNer 200DB Guring iPs �rsP PRo yeMrs, SEAI MssisPed in sePPing up POe
minimum requirements of human resources, equipment, institutional arrangements — including
the necessary parliamentary legislative environment and administrative support — needed for the
initial functioning of the National Assembly. After the inauguration of Parliament, SEAL expanded
its activities to focus more on capacity-building of National Assembly members and staff and to
include MddiPionMl PrMining, equipmenP Mnd of�ce procuremenPsB Among iPs goMls, SEAI Mlso Mimed
to establish effective coordination of support activities to the National Assembly and ensure that
the set-up and initial basic running costs of the National Assembly are met.
With a four-year mandate, SEAL II — modifying its name to “Support for an Effective Afghan
Legislature” — began in March 2008 after the term of the original SEAL ended in February 2008.
SEAL II seeks to:
enhance the capacity of the elected Members/Senators to exercise their legislative
support Members/Senators of National Assembly in overseeing the activities of the
Executive;
strengthen dialogue between the National Assembly and citizens;
improve capacity for effective decision- and policy-making by the elected members/Senators
(e.g. budget process, national development including poverty reduction, security and
international relations); and
help put in place effective administrative structures and processes.
SEAL’s priorities are increasingly focused on developing the professional capacities of Members
of Parliament including increasing exposure to norms of parliamentary culture and practice
(which includes partnerships with other parliaments), supporting legislation- and policy-making
work of commissions, strengthening oversight of government, targeted support to women
parliamentarians and assistance for citizen engagement such as public hearings and constituency
visits (representation and accountability for elected Members).
UNDP is responsible for the implementation of SEAL, with overall guidance from the SEAL/UNDP
ProjecP BoMrd ROicO includes memNers of POe NMPionMl AssemNly Mnd ex of�cio pMrPicipMPion of
donors. SEAL Management Team, which is responsible for the managerial and administrative
MspecPs of SEAI’s implemenPMPionB JiPO �gures similMr Po SEAI H, POe second version of POe four-
yeMr projecP OMs M PoPMl esPimMPed NudgeP of US$1DB3 million, RiPO conPriNuPions from UNGP,
Denmark, Sweden and other donors expected in 2009 and 2010.
In addition to SEAL, efforts to assist the Afghan National Assembly include: the Afghanistan
Parliamentary Assistance Project (APAP, p. 19) as well as initiatives by UNIFEM, the National
Democratic Institute and the International Republican Institute.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Tokyo Meetings
The Tokyo Ministerial Meeting — formally known as the International Conference on Reconstruction
Assistance to Afghanistan — was a meeting of the Afghanistan Reconstruction Steering Group
(ARSG) POMP moNilised POe �rsP suNsPMnPiMl posP-TMliNMn donor commiPmenPs for POe reconsPrucPion
of Afghanistan. It took place on 21-22 January 2002, and was co-chaired by Japan, the United
States, the European Union and Saudi Arabia. Ministers and representatives from 61 countries
and 21 international organisations attended. NGOs held a separate parallel meeting, the results
of which were reported to the plenary session of the Ministerial Meeting.
Discussions focused on a comprehensive framework for reconstruction over the longer term and
cosPed POe recovery needs of AfgOMnisPMn over POe folloRing Pen yeMrs MP US$1D NillionB TOis �gure
RMs increMsed Po $27B4 Nillion in POe Securing AfgOMnisPMn’s FuPure reporP POMP resulPed from POe
Berlin Meeting (p. 24) held in March 2004.
In February 2003 another meeting was held in Tokyo: the Tokyo Conference on the Consolidation
of Peace in Afghanistan. It was held to discuss security re

form in Afghanistan and resulted in the
�ve-pillMr SecuriPy SecPor Reform (SSR, pB D8) sPrMPegyB
United Nations Assistance Mission in
www.unama-afg.org
The United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) was established by UN Security
Founcil ResoluPion 1401 on 28 MMrcO 2002B UNAMA is responsiNle for ful�lling POe UN’s
obligations in Afghanistan as originally outlined by the Bonn Agreement (p. 25) and for managing
UN humanitarian relief, recovery and reconstruction activities in coordination with the Afghan
government.
UNAMA absorbed the two UN agencies that preceded it: the Special Mission to Afghanistan
(UNSMA), M poliPicMl mission POMP OMd Negun in July 1EE6, Mnd POe Of�ce for FoordinMPion of
Humanitarian Assistance to Afghanistan (UNOCHA), a relief and reconstruction mission that had
Negun in JMnuMry 1EE3B Prior Po UNOFHA, POe UN Of�ce for POe FoordinMPion of HumMniPMriMn Mnd
Economic Assistance Programmes (UNOCA) coordinated reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan.
The chart below illustrates the evolution of UN coordination in Afghanistan.
UNAMA’s mMndMPe OMs Neen exPended �ve Pimes Ny POe UN SecuriPy Founcil Ny: ResoluPion 1471
(March 2003), Resolution 1536 (March 2004), Resolution 1589 (March 2005), Resolution 1662
(March 2006) and Resolution 1806 (March 2008). Resolution 1806 extended UNAMA’s mandate
until March 2009 and instructs UNAMA to continue to: provide political and strategic advice for
POe peMce process; provide good of�ces; MssisP POe AfgOMn governmenP in POe implemenPMPion
of the Afghanistan Compact; promote human rights; provide technical assistance; and continue
to manage all UN humanitarian relief, recovery, reconstruction and development activities in
A to Z
coordination with the Afghan government.
UNAMA, the main point of contact for the entire UN system in Afghanistan, is the only agency
authorised to speak on behalf of the UN regarding political insecurity in the country. It is led by
the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General (SRSG); in March 2008, Kai Eide was
MppoinPed Po POis posPB TOe Of�ce of POe SRSG is responsiNle for policy guidMnce Mnd OigO-level
decision-making, and it liaises with the Govern
ment, the Coalition Forces (CF, p. 27) and the
International Security Assistance Force (ISAF, p. 38). The SRSG has Special Advisers in human
rights, gender, drugs, rule of law, police, military, demobilisation and legal issues, as well as a
spokesperson POMP runs POe Of�ce of FommunicMPion Mnd PuNlic HnformMPionB
Two Deputy Special Representatives to the Secretary-General head the two pillars of UNAMA’s
operations: 1) Political Affairs and 2) Relief, Recovery and Reconstruction. The UNAMA Chief of
Staff is responsible for integrating the two strands of the mission and providing support to UNAMA’s
17 �eld of�ces in KMNul, BMlkO, Kunduz, GOor, HerMP, NMngMrOMr, BMmiyMn, PMkPiM, KOosP, Nimroz,
Badghis, Herat, Faryab, Badakhshan, Daikundi, Kandahar and Zabul.
From 2007 and in 2008, UNAMA’s activities focused on: improving donor and government
coordination through the Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB, p. 40), the Policy Action
Group (PAG, pB D4) Mnd HSAF; con�icP resoluPion MP provinciMl levels; rMising POe issue of civiliMn
cMsuMlPies Mnd promoPing POe process of cMsuMlPy veri�cMPion; vePPing senior of�cers RiPOin POe
Afghan National Police (ANP, p. 6) for criminal and human rights violations as part of pay and rank
reform; and advocating for reform of the Ministry of Interior Affairs.
In 2008, UNAMA acted at the national and provincial levels to promote the implementation of
the Afghan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14). For the second year in a row, UNAMA
took part in the International Day of Peace truce as well as the National Youth Day. The agency
will continue to provide assistance to Afghanistan’s elections process by working closely with the
HndependenP ElecPorMl Fommission (HEF, pB 37), offering Mdvisors Mnd PrMining Po of�ciMls Ms iP did
during the 2004-05 elections to the Joint Electoral Management Body (JEMB, p. 41).
The activities of all 20 UN agencies in Afghanistan are guided by the UN Development Assistance
Framework (UNDAF) for Afghanistan, an operational framework based on a 2004 UN Common
Country Assessment. The UNDAF, originally intended for 2006-08, has been extended into 2009.
HP idenPi�es four criPicMl MreMs of supporP Mnd cooperMPion for POis period: 1) GovernMnce, Rule of
Law and Human Rights; 2) Sustainable Livelihoods; 3) Health and Education; and 4) Environment
and Natural Resources. A new UNDAF currently being formulated will be based on the completed
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14).
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
UN Coordination in Afghanistan, 1988–2009
United States Forces Afghanistan (USFOR-A)
See Coalition Forces, p. 27.
Government
The Government of Afghanistan: Contents
Background
The Public Sector
Pay and Grading
Afghanistan’s Democratic System
The Executive
Provincial Councils
Electoral system
Political parties
The Judiciary
The Supreme Court
Courts of Appeal
Primary Courts
Table:
Ministries and Ministers of the Afghan Government, December 2008
Table:
OPOer GovernmenP Of�ces Mnd Of�ciMls, GecemNer 2008
Central Government of Afghanistan, December 2008
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Background
Following the collapse of the Taliban regime at the end of 2001, Afghan factional leaders came
together at a UN-sponsored conference in Bonn, Germany, where the Bonn Agreement (p. 25) was
signed. The Agreement appointed the Afghanistan Interim Administration (AIA, p. 4) and set out
a timetable for re-establishing permanent government institutions and “a broad-based, gender
sensitive, multi-ethnic and fully representative government” in Afghanistan over the course of
two and a half years. The Emergency Loya Jirga (ELJ, p. 32) of June 2002 replaced the AIA with
the Afghanistan Transitional Authority (ATA), and elected Hamid Karzai as the head of state — and
temporary head of government, in the absence of a legislature — of the Transitional Islamic State
In line with the Bonn timetable, a new Constitution (full text included in the Documents section
of this guide) was debated and endorsed by a Constitutional Loya Jirga (CLJ, p. 29), which ran
from 14 December 2003 to 4 January 2004. The Constitution provides for an elected President,
along with two nominated Vice Presidents, and a National Assembly comprising two houses, the
lower
Wolesi Jirga
(House of the People) and the upper
Meshrano Jirga
(House of Elders). On the
subnational level, it provides for elected Provincial, District, Village and Municipal Councils, as well
as Governors and Mayors appointed by the President.
Hn Mn elecPion Oeld on E OcPoNer 2004, HMmid KMrzMi NecMme POe �rsP populMrly elecPed PresidenP
of Afghanistan, with 55 percent of the vote. He was sworn in on 7 December 2004, at which time
POe PrMnsiPionMl sPMPe of�ciMlly NecMme POe neR HslMmic RepuNlic of AfgOMnisPMnB PresidenP KMrzMi
chaired the interim Cabinet, which effectively acted as Afghanistan’s legislative body until the
National Assembly was elected and convened.
Legislative, provincial and district elections were supposed to be held concurrently with the
presidential election, but were postponed due to security and technical problems. Elections
for the
Wolesi Jirga
and Provincial Councils were eventually held on 18 September 2005. As of
GecemNer 2008, POe �rsP-ever elecPions for GisPricP Founcils Rere plMnned for 2010, Mlongside
Wolesi Jirga
AlPOougO POe SepPemNer 200D elecPions of�ciMlly ended AfgOMnisPMn’s PrMnsiPionMl pOMse, POe
country’s government is still very much in transition. Some of the institutions discussed in this
secPion Mre only of�ciMlly in plMce, Mnd mMny reforms Rill PMke M signi�cMnP lengPO of Pime Po �lPer
through the system or to reach provinces and districts. A variety of wide-ranging administrative
reforms of government departments are in process through the Public Administrative Reform
(PAR, p. 57). The establishment of new government agencies and merging of ministries is also
ongoing, and government institutions are likely to continue to evolve over the next several years.
Government
The Public Sector
Structure
Afghanistan’s public sector consists of the central government, provinces, municipalities (urban
sub-units of provinces) and districts (rural sub-units of provinces), as well as state enterprises
(wholly and majority owned).
State agencies, including central government ministries and
institutions, are considered to be primary budgetary units with their own discrete budgets.
In theory, Afghanistan is a unitary state: All political authority is vested in the government in Kabul.
The powers and responsibilities of the provincial and district administrations are determined (and
therefore may be withdrawn) by the central government. Though provinces and districts are legally
recognised units of subnational administration, they are not intended to be autonomous in their
policy decisions. Given the political and military strength of some regional power-holders, however,
the practical reality is that certain provinces have considerable decision-making authority.
The Constitution explicitly allows a measure of decentralisation by stating that “the government,
while preserving the principle of centralism — in accordance with the law — shall delegate certain
authorities to local administration units for the purpose of expediting and promoting economic,
social, and cultural affairs, and increasing the participation of people in the development of the
nMPion” (ArPicle 137)B HP speci�es POMP M ProvinciMl Founcil RiPO elecPed memNers is Po Ne formed in
every province, and that District and Village Councils are to be elected.
The country’s 34 provinces are the basic units of local administration. The executive at the
provincial level is the Governor, who is appointed by the President. The provinces are not distinct
political entities in any legal sense and formally have a very modest role in decisions concerning
their own structure, recruitment of senior staff, and size and composition of work force. In effect,
the administration of each province is a collection of branches of central government ministries.
TOe mMjoriPy of decisions on provinciMl sPMf�ng Mre mMde in KMNul Ny POe pMrenP minisPry, in
negoPiMPion RiPO POe Of�ce of AdminisPrMPive AffMirs (OAA, pB D3) Mnd RiPO oversigOP Ny POe OeMd of
the Independent Administrative Reform and Civil Service Commission (IARCSC, p. 35). Beginning
in SY1386 (2007–08), cerPMin key posPs Mlso require rMPi�cMPion Ny POe HndependenP AppoinPmenPs
Board of the IARCSC. A government body for subnational administration, the Independent
Directorate for Local Governance (IDLG, p. 36), was created in August 2007. IDLG has a mandate
to improve governance and achieve stability on the subnational level, and is responsible for
supervising provincial and district Governors, Provincial Councils, and municipalities (except
Kabul Municipality).
Provinces (wolayat) are divided into districts (woliswali) and municipalities (sharwali). Administrative
arrangements between the province and its districts are similar to those in the relationship
between the centre and the province. The central ministry in Kabul determines district senior
sPMf�ng Mnd NudgeP MllocMPions, OoRever, leMving provinciMl of�ciMls RiPO relMPively liPPle discrePion
in POis regMrd, MP leMsP of�ciMllyB MunicipMliPies Mre overseen Ny POe HGIG, in some provinces RiPO
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
gni�cMnP in�uence Ny POe GovernorB TOe HGIG Mpproves sPMf�ng numNers Mnd NudgePs in eMcO
municipality, even though municipalities are entitled to collect and retain their own taxes. In some
provinces, such as Herat and Kandahar, rural municipalities also have a reporting relationship with
the provincial municipality although this is contrary to the established government structure.
FenPrMl governmenP minisPries Mnd insPiPuPions Mre primMry NudgeP uniPs RiPO speci�c NudgePs
determined by law; provincial departments of the central government ministries and some
independent units are secondary budget units — that is, they receive their allotments at the
discrePion of POeir minisPries Mnd relevMnP independenP MgenciesB TOere Mre no speci�c provinciMl
department budgets. Districts are tertiary budget units; their budget allocations depend on the
decisions made at the request of the relevant provincial-level departments of Kabul ministries and
other independent units. All revenues collected by provinces and districts are national revenues;
provinces Mre merely POe PMx collecPorsB Hn effecP, NoPO provinciMl Mnd disPricP sPMf�ng levels Mnd
budgets are determined based more on precedent than on rational planning. This system gives
Kabul considerable political authority over provincial expenditure policy, although provincial and
district Governors have a certain amount of de facto authority.
State enterprises report to the ministry or department in their respective sector. For example, the
head of a coal mine would report to the provincial Department of Mines as well as the Ministry of
Mines in Kabul. There are no provincially owned enterprises.
AlPOougO POey do noP Oold formMl poRer, communiPy sOurMs or jirgMs cMn Mlso Ne in�uenPiMl
local actors. Shuras (best translated as local councils) are longstanding features of Afghan
political society. They are convened on an ad hoc basis and are rarely permanent bodies with
idenPi�MNle memNersB SOurMs of ulemM (HslMmic scOolMrs) Mnd sOurMs of elders Mre usuMlly found
at the provincial level, though there are often competing local and district shuras, some of which
are run by unelected strongmen. As District Councils have not yet been elected, many district
administrators make use of shuras in their activities. Many districts are also effectively divided
into villages (qaryahas), which correspond to areas of shared resources.
In addition to the provincial and district administrative structures, historically there has been a
de�niPion of regions or zones (OMRzM) in AfgOMnisPMn, primMrily for miliPMry purposesB TOese OMRzM
have no legal standing as administrative units and, unlike provinces, districts and municipalities,
are not mentioned in the 1964 Constitution or the new 2004 Constitution. At times, however, they
have been used for administrative convenience. Formally, this zonal structure no longer exists, but
some inter-provincial coordination and sectoral activities based on zones continue.
The President is Commander-in-Chief of the Afghan National Army (ANA, p. 4), and the government
does not recognise any other military or paramilitary units. The ANA serves under the Ministry of
Defense while the Afghan National Police (ANP, p. 6) operates under the authority of the Ministry
of Interior Affairs.
Pay and Grading
Every public employee has a grade — in Kabul, in the provinces, and at the district level. Two scales
apply throughout Afghanistan, one for permanent staff (karmand) and one for contract staff (agir).
Government
KMrmMnd Mre regulMr, permMnenP puNlic employees, ROereMs Mgir Mre (of�ciMlly) Oired on �xed-
term contracts. In practice, most agir employees remain in government for many years and follow
a career path very similar to that of karmand staff. The two pay scales are almost identical.
The key differences between karmand and agir employees are:
agir employees are meant to occupy lower-skilled and manual labour posts (such as drivers,
cooks, painters, etc.);
advancement through the grade (and pay) structure for many agir positions is capped at a
particular level (for instance, drivers cannot be promoted beyond grade 2); however, higher-
skilled agir employees can advance to the top of the scale (“over” grade); and
agir employees are not entitled to receive a professional bonus in addition to their salary.
Pay policy is set centrally for all public employees in Afghanistan. The pay system emphasises
rank-in-person arrangements (employees are promoted even if they remain in the same position)
rather than the more common rank-in-post arrangements (where promotion generally comes with
a new job). Thus, through years of service and regular promotions (once every three years), staff
in lower positions of authority can occupy a higher grade and earn a higher salary than their
managers. Different occupational groups have ceilings above which they cannot be promoted.
The underlying pay scale, established by the 1970 (SY1349) Law on the “Status and Condition
of Government Employees,” and amended by the 1977 (SY1356) Decree No. 143, offers a
reasonably well-structured scale for base pay. The real salary scale for public employees is low
— meal allowances (given equally to all public employees) can account for over 90 percent of the
monthly pay. Since 2004, the Independent Administrative Reform and Civil Service Commission
(IARCSC, p. 35) has been working to update the government’s pay and grading structure, crucial
Po POe governmenP’s efforPs Po MPPrMcP Mnd rePMin quMli�ed sPMff Mnd Po reduce incenPives for
corruption within the civil service. A new Civil Service Law was passed in 2005 (SY1384), and in
2007 an eight-grade structure was designed, with new pay scales attached to these grades (with
M minimum sMlMry of US$100 Mnd mMximum of $6D0)B HmplemenPMPion Rill Ne sequenced, re-
grMding senior posiPions (GrMdes 1 Mnd 2) �rsP, folloRed Ny junior grMdes on M minisPry-Ny-minisPry
Pay and grading reform is one element of the IARCSC-led Public Administration Reform (PAR, p.
57) framework, which seeks to restructure the civil service and institute merit-based, non-partisan
recruitment. Practical reforms took place in several government departments and agencies in
2006-07 through a revised Priority Restructuring and Reform (PRR) process that streamlines the
work and structure of key departments, reduces costs, and improves effectiveness.
The effectiveness of pay and grading reforms may be complicated by the so-called “second civil
service” consisPing of of�ciMls, Mdvisors, Mnd sPMff of Mid conPrMcPors Mnd inPernMPionMl Mgencies,
most of whom receive higher salaries through “top ups.”
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Afghanistan’s Democratic System
The Executive
TOe execuPive NrMncO of AfgOMnisPMn’s cenPrMl governmenP is comprised of POe Of�ce of POe
President, two Vice Presidents, the Attorney General, 26 ministers, as well as several independent
bodies and other central government agencies. Thirty ministries existed under the Afghan
Transitional Authority (ATA, p. 9), but in 2004 and again in early 2006 the functions of several
ministries were merged, creating a more streamlined cabinet.
TOe PresidenP is direcPly elecPed Ny secreP NMlloP for M �ve-yeMr period Mnd cMn serve M mMximum of
two terms. Candidates for the presidency name their two vice presidential candidates at the time
of nomination (usually approximately six months before the election is to be held). The President
is elected by absolute majority; if no candidate receives over 50 percent of the votes, a run-off
election is held between the top two candidates. The next presidential election is due to be held
in fMll of 200E; MP POe Pime of puNlicMPion, POe speci�c dMPe OMd noP Neen sePB
The President is the Head of State, the Chair of the Cabinet and the Commander-in-Chief of the
armed forces. With the approval of the National Assembly, the President appoints the ministers,
the Attorney General, the Governor of Da Afghanistan Bank (the central bank), the members of
the Supreme Court and various other posts.
For M lisP of minisPers Mnd oPOer governmenP of�ciMls, see pB 7EB
As provided by the 2004 Constitution, the National Assembly — commonly referred to as the
Parliament — consists of two houses, the lower
Wolesi Jirga
(House of the People) and the upper
Meshrano Jirga
(House of Elders)B TOe neR NMPionMl AssemNly convened for POe �rsP Pime in
December 2005, following the September 2005 parliamentary elections.
Members of the
Wolesi Jirga
Mre elecPed direcPly for �ve yeMrs Ny free Mnd secreP NMlloP in provinciMl
constituencies. There are currently 249 seats in the
Wolesi Jirga
; the Constitution stipulates that
the maximum number of seats is 250. Seats are distributed among the provinces according to
population size (see table on p. 73). At present, the Constitution states that an average of two
seats from each province, 68 in total, are reserved for women. Ten seats are reserved for the
kuchi
(nomad) population, three of which must go to women.
Meshrano Jirga
has 102 members, selected by a mixture of presidential appointments and
indirect elections following popular elections for the
Wolesi Jirga
and Provincial and District Councils.
Two-thirds of the members are indirectly elected and one-third are appointed. The Constitution
stipulates that members of the
are elected and appointed as follows:
from among the members of each Provincial Council, the respective council elects one person
Government
for a period of four years.
from among the District Councils of each province, the respective councils elect one person
for a period of three years.
The President from among experts and experienced persons — including two representatives of the
disabled and two representatives of nomads — appoints the remaining one-third of the members
for M period of �ve yeMrsB Of POese presidenPiMl MppoinPees, D0 percenP Mre Po Ne RomenB
While the Constitution has provisions for District Council elections, these have not been held to
date (see p. 72). A temporary solution has been devised for the interim: Each Provincial Council
elects two of its members to the
Meshrano Jirga
(one for four years and a second for three years
or until district elections are held), thereby maintaining the 2:1 ratio of elected to appointed seats
until District Councils are formed.
Members of the National Assembly must be Afghan citizens. Candidates must be at least 25
years of age at the date of candidacy for the
Wolesi Jirga
, and at least 35 at the date of election or
appointment to the
Meshrano Jirga
. It is not possible to be a member of both the
Meshrano Jirga
Wolesi Jirga
The National Assembly convenes two ordinary sessions a year, and its term is nine months in the
year. Sessions are open to the public unless secrecy is requested by the Chairman of the National
Assembly or at least ten members, and it is granted by the Assembly.
According to Article 90 of the Constitution, the National Assembly has the following authorities:
RMPi�cMPion, modi�cMPion or MNrogMPion of lMRs Mnd legislMPive decrees;
Approval of plans for economic, social, cultural and technological development;
Approval of state budget, permission for obtaining and granting loans;
FreMPion, modi�cMPion, Mnd MNrogMPion of MdminisPrMPive uniPs;
RMPi�cMPion of inPernMPionMl PreMPies Mnd MgreemenPs, or MNrogMPion of POe memNersOip of
Afghanistan to them; and
Policies Mnd legislMPion cMn Ne iniPiMPed Ny POe Of�ce of POe PresidenP, individuMl minisPries or POe
National Assembly, and become law after passing through both houses of the National Assembly
and being endorsed by the President. Article 94 of the Constitution states that:
Law is what both Houses of the National Assembly approve and the President endorses unless
this Constitution states otherwise.
In case the President does not agree to what the National Assembly approves, he can send the
documenP NMck RiPO jusPi�MNle reMsons Po POe
Wolesi Jirga
within 15 days of its submission.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
With the passage of this period or in case the
Wolesi Jirga
approves a particular case again
with a two-third majority vote, the bill is considered endorsed and enforced.
Certain legislative documents (rules, directives, and guidelines) can be decreed by individual
ministers. A proposed bill or signed decree should be passed by the National Assembly within one
month of its submission. There are 18 commissions in the
Wolesi Jirga
and 14 in the
In March 2007, Afghanistan’s National Assembly passed a controversial bill offering general
amnesty from prosecution to all former combatants who agree to abide by the Constitution and
laws of Afghanistan. The bill allows for the prosecution of National Assembly members already
under investigation when the bill became law.
Provincial Councils
The 34 Provincial Councils have between nine and 29 members depending on the size of the
province’s population, and are elected in a single provincial constituency. Candidates must reside
in the province in which they stand for election, and cannot stand simultaneously for both
Wolesi
and Provincial Council elections. The election law states that one-quarter of the seats on
a Provincial Council should be reserved for women. Two members from each Provincial Council
serve in the
Meshrano Jirga
(this will decrease to one member per Provincial Council when District
Councils have been elected and formed). The next Provincial Council elections are scheduled for
2009, to coincide with the presidential elections.
TOe 2007 ProvinciMl Founcil IMR is vMgue on POe Founcils’ responsiNiliPies, Mnd signi�cMnP
confusion remains about their exact role. To date, the role of the Provincial Councils has been to:
elect, from among its own elected members, provincial representatives to the
Meshrano Jirga
participate in the development of the provinces and the improvement of administrative affairs;
and advise and cooperate with the provincial administrations on a variety of issues, including
development planning.
According Po POe FonsPiPuPion, GisPricP Founcils Rill OMve NePReen �ve Mnd 1D memNers depending
on the size of the district’s population. Candidates must reside in the district in which they stand
for election. When formed, District Councils will elect one-third of the members of the
. The Constitution prescribes that District Council elections be held every three years. To date,
OoRever, elecPions for GisPricP Founcils OMve noP yeP Neen OeldB As of GecemNer 2008, POe �rsP
elections for District Councils were planned for 2010, alongside
Wolesi Jirga
The Constitution also calls for the election of Village Councils, Municipal Councils and Mayors
through free, general, secret and direct elections. Village Councils are to be elected for three
yeMrsB TOe Perms of MunicipMl Founcils Mnd MMyors Mre noP yeP speci�ed, Mnd POe mMndMPes of Vil
Government
lage and Municipal Councils are not elaborated in the Constitution or the Election Law. Elections
for these bodies are unlikely to be held in the next several years.
As mentioned above, the mandates and roles of Provincial, District and Village Councils are yet to
Ne complePely de�nedB TOere is M need for coordinMPion NePReen POese neR councils Mnd exisPing
bodies such as those of the public administration, informal
and the Community Develop
ment Councils (CDCs) set up by the National Solidarity Programme (NSP, see p. 50)
Electoral system
In Afghanistan, suffrage is universal for male and female citizens 18 years of age and older.
AfgOMnisPMn’s �rsP posP-RMr elecPion lMR RMs signed Ny POen-inPerim PresidenP KMrzMi in MMy 2004B
A revised version of the law was approved by presidential decree on 29 April 2005, ending a long
debate over the system for electing representatives to the
Wolesi Jirga
The electoral system chosen for this election was the unusual Single Non-Transferable Vote
(SNTV). Under SNTV, each eligible Afghan voter casts one vote for one individual in his or her
mulPi-memNer consPiPuency (province)B TOe principMl Nene�Ps of POe SNTV sysPem Mre POMP iP is
easy to explain to voters and simple to count. It also ensures representation of independent
candidates, which can be important in a country suspicious of political parties (see below).
On the other hand, SNTV encourages personality-driven politics and undermines the role of political
parties and constituency platforms. Because all votes go to individuals, a party’s candidates may
win the majority of votes in a province, but still receive only a minority of the seats. SNTV can also
have a negative impact on the development of effective parliamentary politics by encouraging
candidates to push local, ethnic or tribal issues rather than promoting a national agenda and
encouraging coalition building and cooperation between ethnic or regional groupings.
Election experts have debated whether other electoral models might be more appropriate for
Afghanistan. Some critics of SNTV have argued that Open List Proportional Representation would
be a better system, due to its transparent translation of votes into seats and its encouragement
of national-based, multi-ethnic parties.
According to the Constitution, the electoral law cannot be changed within a year of the election in
which it would be implemented. In 2008, the SNTV electoral system was debated in the
Wolesi
and other options (such as a parallel party list and SNTV system) were put forward as
alternatives. It was decided, however, that SNTV would be used again in the 2009 presidential
elecPionB One minor cOMnge likely Po Ne con�rmed is POMP pMrPy memNers Rill Ne MlloRed Po idenPify
POeir pMrPy Mf�liMPion on POe NMlloP pMper, ROicO RMs noP of�ciMlly permiPPed in 2004 Mnd 200DB
The Constitution states that
Wolesi Jirga
seats are to be distributed among the provinces ac
cording Po populMPionB TOis provision OMs proved dif�culP NecMuse some disPricP Mnd provinciMl
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
boundaries remain disputed and no authoritative population data is available. The last census in
Afghanistan was conducted in 1979 and was never completed. A new national census is planned
for 2010 (see CSO, p. 26). In preparation for the new census, a household listing survey was con
ducted in 2004–05. Seat allocations for the 2005
Wolesi Jirga
elections were based on an aver
Mge of POis recenP OouseOold lisPing Mnd POe 1E7E census �gures MdjusPed for populMPion groRPO
using an annual population growth rate of 1.92 percent.
Province
Population
Wolesi Jirga
Provincial Council seats
Total
Women
Total
Women
TOTAL
21,677,700
249
124
412,400
748,000
1,052,500
Bamiyan
371,900
Daikundi
Farah
Faryab
824,500
1,020,400
574,800
767,300
1,515,400
17
Jawzjan
443,300
Kabul
3,013,200
Kandahar
971,400
Kapisa
478,100
Kunar
374,700
Kunduz
817,400
371,000
326,100
Nangarhar
1,237,800
Nimroz
135,900
Nuristan
Paktia
Paktika
362,100
Government
Province
Population
Wolesi Jirga
Provincial Council seats
Total
Women
Total
Women
Panjshir
127,900
Parwan
321,500
Sar-i-Pul
Takhar
811,700
Uruzgan
291,500
Wardak
Reserved for kuchi
Schedule of elections
The Constitution prescribes the following elections schedule:
Frequency
every 5 years
(Presidential Appointees)
every 5 years
(Provincial Council representatives)
every 4 years
(District Council representatives)
every 3 years
Wolesi Jirga
every 5 years
Provincial Councils
every 4 years
every 3 years
every 3 years
Mayors
Given the low capacity and scarce resources of the Independent Election Commission (IEC,
pB 37), POe OigO cosP Mnd dif�culPy of Oolding elecPions in AfgOMnisPMn, POe lMck of securiPy in some
areas, and the unclear mandates of some elected bodies, it is likely the electoral calendar will
continue to be revised. As of December 2008, the presidential and Provincial Council elections
are scheduled for fall 2009, and the parliamentary elections for summer 2010.
Political parties
It is widely recognised that in a democratic system, political parties are necessary for effective
representation of citizens’ interests and to advance and support policy creation and governance.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
76
Many Afghans, however, have a negative view of political parties, which they associate with the
FommunisP PMrPy Mnd POe SovieP invMsion, Ms Rell Ms RiPO mujMOiddin fMcPions ROose in-�gOPing
caused much of the instability and bloodshed of the 1990s. Thus Afghans generally do not trust
political parties but rather see them as pursuing policies that are in the interest of their particular
ethnic group, clan or tribe. One rationale for Afghanistan’s unusual choice of electoral system was
its emphasis on individual candidates rather than parties.
Afghans often associate political parties with militias, which previously acted with impunity
in Afghanistan. While most of the major parties in Afghanistan once had close ties to military
groups (Mnd some sPill do), oPOer �edgling pMrPies OMve civiliMn rooPs Mnd democrMPic inPenPionsB
The Constitution clearly prohibits political parties from having military wings, and a political
party registration depart
ment has been established by the Ministry of Justice to approve those
parties that meet the criteria set out in the Constitution. As of June 2007, 84 parties had been
approved and registered by the Ministry of Justice (this list is available at: http://www.moj.gov.
af/?lang=en&p=e16). This list is currently under revision and has not yet been published by the
Ministry. According to various party leaders and agencies working with parties, the estimated
number of parties range from approximately 95 to as many as 120.
For the 2005 elections, candidates were technically not allowed to indicate their political party
Mf�liMPion on POe NMlloP (MlPOougO some did so regMrdless)B JOile POis mMde NMlloPs simpler, iP mMy
have prevented voters from knowing the alliances of those for whom they voted. In the upcoming
200E elecPions, iP is likely Po Ne con�rmed POMP cMndidMPes mMy OMve POe opPion Po declMre pMrPy
Mf�liMPion on POe NMlloP pMperB
The Judiciary
TOe mMjor permMnenP jusPice insPiPuPions in AfgOMnisPMn Mre POe Supreme FourP, POe Of�ce of POe
Attorney General and the Ministry of Justice. The justice sector was long heavily factionalised,
with strained relationships among justice institutions. In 2008, however, Justice Sector Reform
(JSR, pB 41) MdvMnced signi�cMnPly, RiPO coordinMPed Mnd inPegrMPed MpproMcOes MdopPed Mnd
implemented by the Afghan justice institutions, the Afghan government and the international
assistance community. This included the adoption of a National Justice Sector Strategy and
National Justice Program that encompasses the entire justice sector.
The 2004 Constitution states:
The judicial branch is an independent organ of the state of the Islamic Republic of
Afghanistan. The judicial branch consists of the Supreme Court (
Stera Mahkama
High Courts, Appeal Courts, and Primary Courts, the structure and authorities of
which are determined by law.
In June 2005, a new law regulating the judiciary and courts was passed by the Cabinet. Until
this point, the system had been governed by the 1990 Law of the Jurisdiction and Organisation
of the Courts of Afghanistan (No. 63, SY1369). The new law divides the courts into three tiers:
Government
77
e Supreme Court, the Courts of Appeal and the Primary Courts. It allows for travelling or mobile
courts in the event that they are needed; these must be approved by the President.
The Supreme Court has wide-ranging powers of interpretation: Its duties include the review of
laws, decrees, international treaties and international covenants to ensure they comply with the
FonsPiPuPionB TOe Of�ce of POe APPorney GenerMl is Mn independenP Nody, pMrP of POe ExecuPive
branch, responsible for investigation and prosecution.
The Bonn Agreement stated that the Constitution of 1964 and other existing laws (providing they
were not inconsistent with the Bonn Agreement or Afghanistan’s international legal obligations)
would constitute an interim legal framework until a new Constitution was passed. The new
Constitution entered into force in 2004 and numerous decrees and laws have been enacted
according to its provisions. The department of the Ministry of Justice responsible for drafting
legislation, the
Taqnin
, has so far drafted more than 100 laws, many of which have replaced
old legislation. A large body of often contradictory legislation enacted by various former regimes
remains, however, and harmonisation efforts are likely to take several years.
TOe reMcO of POe formMl jusPice sysPem vMries signi�cMnPly Mcross POe counPryB A lMrge proporPion
of disputes in Afghanistan are settled outside the formal court system — particularly, but not
exclusively, in rural areas. Traditional justice mechanisms —
jirgas
— often settle civil
and sometimes criminal disputes using
(Islamic) and customary/tribal laws of that area.
The justice system is therefore composed of both formal and informal mechanisms that include
civil law,
and customary/tribal law. There are common elements among these systems
with respect to issues such as land and property, but they diverge quite dramatically on criminal
matters and the role and nature of punishment. The Constitution allows for judges to be trained in
either civil or Islamic law. Sitting judges are not allowed to hold political party membership.
As speci�ed in POe Bonn AgreemenP, POe JudiciMl Reform Fommission (JRF) RMs esPMNlisOed
in November 2002 to review and reform the fragmented justice sector. The JRC was tasked
with guiding the physical and structural restoration of the justice system — balancing modern
and Islamic law, addressing the plurality of legal organs, and clarifying the roles and reporting
structures of the various parts of the judicial branch. The JRC was a temporary institution, and by
early 2005 its responsibilities had devolved to the permanent justice institutions. As part of the
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS, p. 14) process, national-level coordination of
justice sector initiatives came under the responsibility of the Justice Sector Consultative Group
(pB 28)B JiPO POe �nMlisMPion of POe ANGS in 2008, POe NMPionMl JusPice ProgrMmme’s ProjecP
Oversight Committee and Program Support Unit (see Justice Sector Reform, p. 41) are intended
to take over these coordinating functions.
The Supreme Court
In accordance with the Constitution, the Supreme Court has nine members, appointed for ten-
year terms by the President, with the approval of the
Wolesi Jirga
. The President selects one of
the nine members to serve as Chief Justice. The Supreme Cou
rt manages the personnel, budgets,
and policy decisions of the entire national, provincial and district court system.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
The Supreme Court convenes regular sessions at least once every 15 days, but additional sessions
can be convened by request. The presence of at least six members is needed for a Supreme Court
quorum, and decisions are made by majority vote. The Supreme Court is divided into four sub-
courts or departments (
dewans
) — General Criminal, Public/National Security, Civil and Public
Rights, and Commercial — each headed by a Supreme Court Justice.
Nine new Supreme Court members were sworn in on 5 August 2006. The new Court is
characterised as moderate, technocratic and highly educated in comparison to its ultra-
conservative predecessor.
Courts of Appeal
Courts of Appeal are operational in all provinces (although a few in some provinces do not have
the requisite number of judges to hear appeal cases). They comprise the chief of the court, other
judicial members and heads of
dewans
B FourPs of AppeMl in more populous provinces OMve �ve
dewans
— GenerMl FriminMl (ROicO Mlso deMls RiPO PrMf�c violMPions), PuNlic SecuriPy, Fivil Mnd
Family, Public Rights, and Commercial. Those in less populous provinces have four
dewans
— City
Primary Court, General Criminal, Civil, and Public Security. Only the Court of Appeal in Kabul has a
Juvenile Court specially created to hear cases involving juveniles; however, in many provinces there
are judges experienced or trained to deal with juvenile cases. The Courts of Appeal oversee the
rulings and decisions of the Primary Courts in their respective province, and have the authority to
correcP, overPurn, Mmend, con�rm or repeMl POese rulings Mnd decisionsB TOey Mre Mlso responsiNle
for deciding on con�icPs of judiciMl jurisdicPionB
Primary Courts
At the district level, the City Primary Court (which is primary court in the provincial capital) consists
of �ve
dewans
— GenerMl FriminMl, Fivil, PuNlic RigOPs, PuNlic SecuriPy Mnd TrMf�cB PrimMry FourPs
in all districts outside the provincial capital have three
dewans
— General Criminal, Public Security,
and Civil and Public Rights. Many districts do not currently have functional primary courts, mainly
due to security concerns. In many cases, judges hold primary court sessions in the provincial
FriminMl cMses Mre iniPiMPed Ny POe prosecuPor’s of�ce �ling POem Po POe PrimMry FourP; civil rigOPs
cMses Mre �led RiPO Mn of�ce in POe MinisPry of JusPiceB TOereMfPer, M series of judiciMl sessions
may be held until a decision is reached by the Primary Court. Almost as a matter of customary
practice, most cases decided by the Primary Courts are appealed to the Courts of Appeals. In
many subsequent appeals of cases reaching the Supreme Court, judges often send the case back
to the Primary Court for a new hearing.
Government
Ministries and Ministers of the Afghan Government, December 2008
Ministry
Minister
Of�ciMl ReNsiPe
Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock
www.agriculture.gov.af
Borders and Tribal Affairs
Commerce and Industry
Wahidullah Shahrani (acting)
www.commerce.gov.af
Communications and Information
Technology
www.mcit.gov.af
Counter Narcotics
www.mcn.gov.af
Culture and Youth Affairs
Abdul Karim Khorram
RRRBculPurMlpro�lesBnePC
Afghanistan/Units/1.html
Defense
Abdul Rahim Wardak
Economy
Ghulam Farooq Wardak
www.moe.gov.af
Energy and Water
Anwar-ul Haq Ahadi
www.mof.gov.af
Foreign Affairs
Rangin Dadfar Spanta
www.mfa.gov.af
Haj and Religious Affairs
Dr. Azam Dadfar
www.mohe.gov.af
Interior Affairs
Mohammad Hanif Atmar
Sarwar Danish
www.moj.gov.af
Labour, Social Affairs, Martyrs and
Noor Mohammad Qarqeen
Ibrahim Adel
Mohammad Amin Fatimie
www.moph.gov.af
Public Works
Sohrab Ali Saffary
Refugees and Repatriation
Abdul Karim Barahawi
Rural Rehabilitation and Development
www.mrrd.gov.af
Transport and Civil Aviation
Mohammad Omar Zakhilwal
www.motca.gov.af
Urban Development and
Yusuf Pashtun
Women’s Affairs
Husn Bano Ghazanfar
www.mowa.gov.af
Of�ce of MinisPer of SPMPe for PMrliM
mentary Affairs
Anwar Jagdalak
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
OPOer GovernmenP Of�ces Mnd Of�ciMls, GecemNer 2008
ElecPed or MppoinPed of�ciMl
Of�ciMl ReNsiPe
Hamid Karzai
www.president.gov.af
First Vice President
Mohammad Karim Khalili
Senior Minister in the Cabinet
Hedayat Amin Arsala
National Security Advisor
Attorney General
Mohammad Ishaq Alako
www.ago.gov.af
Chief Justice of the Supreme Court
Abdul Salaam Azimi
www.supremecourt.gov.af
Wolesi Jirga
Mohammad Yunus Qanooni
www.nationalassembly.af
www.nationalassembly.af
Abdul Qadeer Fitrat
www.centralbank.gov.af
www.aihrc.org.af
Disarmament and Reintegration Com
Mohammad Karim Khalili
www.diag.gov.af
Independent Administrative Reform
and Civil Service Commission
www.iec.org.af
National Reconciliation and Peace
Of�ce of AdminisPrMPive AffMirs
Dr. Sadeq Modaber
Afghan-Pak Joint Peace Jirga Com
Dr. Abdullah Abdullah
Afghan Red Crescent Society
Fatima Gailani
Supreme Of�ce Po MoniPor POe Hmple
mentation of Anti Corruption Strategy
Mohammad Yasin Osmani
Independent Directorate of Local
Governance
Jelani Popal
Geodesy and Cartography
Abdul Rauf Yari
Department of Disaster Prepared
Abdul Matin Edrak
Government
Independent Directorate of Standards
Mr. Popalzai
Independent Directorate of Environ
ment Conservation
Mustafa Zaher
Mr. Ghafoori
www.cso.gov.af
National Directorate of Security
Independent Directorate of Kuchis
Of�ce of AudiP Mnd FonProl
Kabul Municipality
Abdul Ahad Sahibzada
GenerMl Of�ce of SporPs
Science Academy
Mr. Rashed
FOief of SPMff of POe Of�ce of POe
Mohammad Umer Daudzai
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Central Government of Afghanistan
83
Documents: Contents
Contents
Chapter One: The State
Chapter Two: Fundamental Rights and Duties of Citizens
Chapter Three: The President
Chapter Four: The Government
Chapter Five: The National Assembly
Chapter Six: Loya Jirga
Chapter Seven: The Judiciary
Chapter Eight: The Administration
Chapter Nine: The State of Emergency
Chapter Ten: Amendments
Chapter Eleven: The Miscellaneous Provisions
Chapter Twelve: The Transitional Provisions
The Afghanistan Compact
Purpose
Governance, Rule of Law and Human Rights
Economic and Social Development
Counter Narcotics: A Cross-Cutting Priority
Coordination and Monitoring
ANNEX I: Benchmarks and Timelines
ANNEX II: Improving the Effectiveness of Aid to Afghanistan
ANNEX III: Coordination and Monitoring
ANNEX IV: Participants in the London Conference on Afghanistan
Code of Conduct for NGOs
13
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
TOis is Mn unof�ciMl PrMnslMPion of POe 2004 FonsPiPuPion of AfgOMnisPMn; refer Po POe of�ciMl GMri
Mnd PMsOPo versions for MccurMcyB (Source: HGIO; Of�ce of POe PresidenP ReNsiPe)
Year 1382
In the Name of God, the Merciful, the Compassionate
Contents
Chapter One
The State

(21 Articles)
Chapter Two
The Fundamental Rights and Duties of Citizens

(38 Articles)
Chapter Three

(11 Articles)
Chapter Four
The Government

(10 Articles)
Chapter Five

(29 Articles)
Chapter Six
The Loya Jirga

(6 Articles)
Chapter Seven
The Judiciary

(20 Articles)
Chapter Eight
The Administrative Division

(7 Articles)
Chapter Nine
The State of Emergency

(6 Articles)
Chapter Ten

(2 Articles)
Chapter Eleven
The Miscellaneous Provisions

(7 Articles)
Chapter Twelve
The Transitional Provisions

(5 Articles)
In the name of God, the Merciful, the Compassionate
Preamble
We the people of Afghanistan:
JiPO �rm fMiPO in God AlmigOPy Mnd relying on His lMRful mercy, Mnd Nelieving in POe sMcred
1.
Realizing the injustice and shortcoming of the past, and the numerous troubles imposed on
our country,
JOile McknoRledging POe sMcri�ces Mnd POe OisPoric sPruggles, rigOPful JeOMd Mnd jusP resisPMnce
of all people of Afghanistan and respecting the high position of the martyrs for freedom of the
country,
With the understanding that Afghanistan is a single and united country and belongs to all
ethnicities residing in this country,
85
Observing the United Nations Charter and respecting the Universal Declaration of Human
For strengthening national unity, safeguarding independence, national sovereignty, and
territorial integrity of the country,
For establishing a government based on people’s will and democracy,
7.
For creation of a civil society free of oppression, atrocity, discrimination, and violence and
based on the rule of law, social justice, protection of human rights, and dignity and ensuring
For strengthening the political, social, economic, and defensive institutions of the country,
For ensuring a prosperous life and sound environment for all those residing in this land,
10.
Finally for regaining Afghanistan’s deserving place in the international community,
11.
have adopted this constitution in accordance with historical, cultural, and social requirements of
the era, through our elected representatives in the Loya Jirga dated 14 Jaddi 1382 in the city of
Kabul.
Chapter One: The State
ArPicle 1

AfgOMnisPMn is Mn HslMmic RepuNlic, independenP, uniPMry Mnd indivisiNle sPMPeB
ArPicle 2

TOe religion of POe sPMPe of POe HslMmic RepuNlic of AfgOMnisPMn is POe sMcred
FolloRers of oPOer religions Mre free Po exercise POeir fMiPO Mnd perform POeir
religious rites within the limits of the provisions of law.
ArPicle 3
Hn AfgOMnisPMn no lMR cMn Ne conPrMry Po POe Neliefs Mnd provisions of POe sMcred
ArPicle 4
NMPionMl sovereignPy in AfgOMnisPMn Nelongs Po POe nMPion POMP exercises iP
directly or through its representatives.
TOe nMPion of AfgOMnisPMn consisPs of Mll individuMls ROo Mre POe ciPizens of
TOe nMPion of AfgOMnisPMn is comprised of PMsOPun, TMjik, HMzMrM, UzNMk,
Turkman, Baluch, Pashai, Nuristani, Aymaq, Arab, Qirghiz, Qizilbash, Gujur,
Brahwui and other ethnic groups.
TOe Rord AfgOMn Mpplies Po every ciPizen of AfgOMnisPMnB
No memNer of POe nMPion cMn Ne deprived of OisCOer ciPizensOip of
AffMirs relMPed Po POe ciPizensOip Mnd Msylum Mre regulMPed Ny lMRB
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
ArPicle D •

HmplemenPMPion of POe provisions of POis consPiPuPion Mnd oPOer lMRs, defending
independence, national sovereignty, territorial integrity, and ensuring the
security and defense capability of the country, are the basic duties of the
state.
ArPicle 6 •

TOe sPMPe is oNliged Po creMPe M prosperous Mnd progressive sociePy NMsed
on social justice, protection of human dignity, protection of human rights,
realization of democracy, and to ensure national unity and equality among all
ethnic groups and tribes and to provide for balanced development in all areas
of the country.
ArPicle 7
TOe sPMPe sOMll oNserve POe FOMrPer of POe UniPed NMPions, inPernMPionMl PreMPies,
international conventions that Afghanistan is a part to, and the Universal
TOe sPMPe prevenPs Mll Pypes of PerrorisP McPiviPies, culPivMPion Mnd smuggling of
narcotic drugs and production and consumption of intoxicants (muskirat).
ArPicle 8
TOe sPMPe regulMPes POe foreign policy of POe counPry on POe NMsis of preserving
the independence, national interests, territorial integrity, non-interference,
good neighborliness, mutual respect, and equal rights.
ArPicle E
Mines Mnd oPOer underground resources Mnd culPurMl OeriPMges Mre POe
properties of the state.
ProPecPion, mMnMgemenP Mnd mode of proper uPilizMPion of POe puNlic properPies
shall be regulated by law.
ArPicle 10
TOe sPMPe encourMges Mnd proPecPs privMPe invesPmenPs Mnd enPerprises NMsed
on the market economy and guarantees their protection in accordance with the
provisions of law.
ArPicle 11
AffMirs relMPed Po POe domesPic Mnd exPernMl PrMde sOMll Ne regulMPed Ny lMR in
accordance with the needs of the national economy and the public interest.
ArPicle 12
GM AfgOMnisPMn BMnk is POe cenPrMl Mnd independenP NMnk of POe sPMPeB
HssuMnce of currency Mnd formulMPion Mnd implemenPMPion of monePMry policy
of the country are the mandates of the central bank in accordance with the
law.
TOe cenPrMl NMnk sOMll consulP POe economic commission of POe Jolesi JirgM in
matters related to printing of currency.
SPrucPure Mnd operMPion of POis NMnk sOMll Ne regulMPed Ny lMRB
87
ArPicle 13

TOe sPMPe sOMll formulMPe Mnd implemenP effecPive progrMms for POe developmenP
of industries, growth of production, increasing of public living standards and
support to craftsmanship.
ArPicle 14 •
TOe sPMPe sOMll design Mnd implemenP RiPOin iPs �nMnciMl resources effecPive
programs for the development of agriculture and animal husbandry, improving
the economic, social and living conditions of farmers, herders, settlement and
TOe sPMPe MdopPs necessMry meMsures for Oousing Mnd disPriNuPion of puNlic
esPMPes Po deserving ciPizens in MccordMnce RiPOin iPs �nMnciMl resources Mnd
the law.
ArPicle 1D •
TOe sPMPe is oNliged Po MdopP necessMry meMsures for sMfeguMrding Mnd
improving forests and the environment.
ArPicle 16•
From Mmong POe lMnguMges of PMsOPu, GMri, UzNeki, TurkmMni, BMlucOi, PMsOMi,
Nuristani, Pamiri and other languages spoken in the country, Pashtu and Dari
Mre POe of�ciMl lMnguMges of POe sPMPeB
Hn MreMs ROere POe mMjoriPy of people speMk one of POe UzNeki, TurkmMni,
Baluchi, Pashai, Nuristani and Pamiri languages, that language shall be
recognized Ms POird of�ciMl lMnguMge in MddiPion Po PMsOPu Mnd GMri, POe modMliPy
of its implementation shall be regulated by law.
TOe sPMPe MdopPs Mnd implemenPs effecPive plMns for sPrengPOening Mnd
developing all languages of Afghanistan.
PuNlicMPions Mnd mMss mediM Mre MlloRed in Mll lMnguMges spoken in POe
country.
TOe exisPing nMPionMl McMdemic Mnd MdminisPrMPive Perminology of POe counPry
shall be preserved.
ArPicle 17
TOe sPMPe sOMll MdopP necessMry meMsures for promoPion of educMPion in Mll
levels, development of religious education and organizing and improving the
conditions of mosques, madrasas and religious centers.
ArPicle 18
TOe cMlendMr of POe counPry sOMll Ne NMsed on POe migrMPion of POe PropOeP
TOe NMsis of Rork for sPMPe of�ces sOMll Ne POe solMr cMlendMrB
FridMys Mnd POe 28PO of AsMd Mnd POe 8PO of SMRr Mre puNlic OolidMysB
OPOer OolidMys sOMll Ne regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle 1E
TOe AfgOMn �Mg is mMde up of POree equMl pMrPs, RiPO NlMck, red Mnd green
colors juxtaposed from left to right perpendicularly.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
TOe RidPO of every colored piece is equMl Po OMlf of iPs lengPOB TOe nMPionMl
insigniM is locMPed in POe cenPer of POe �MgB TOe nMPionMl insigniM of POe sPMPe
of AfgOMnisPMn is composed of MeOrMN Mnd pulpiP in ROiPe colorB TRo �Mgs Mre
located on its two sides. In the upper-middle part of the insignia the sacred
phrase of “There is no God but Allah and Mohammad is his prophet, and Allah
is Great” is placed, along with a rising sun. The word “Afghanistan” and year
1298 (solar calendar) is located in the lower part of the insignia. The insignia is
encircled with two branches of wheat.
TOe lMR sOMll regulMPe POe use of nMPionMl �Mg Mnd emNlemB
ArPicle 20
TOe NMPionMl AnPOem of AfgOMnisPMn sOMll Ne in PMsOPu Mnd menPion “AllMOu
Akbar” and the names of the ethnic groups of Afghanistan.
ArPicle 21
TOe cMpiPMl of AfgOMnisPMn is POe ciPy of KMNulB
Chapter Two: Fundamental Rights and Du�es of Ci�zens
ArPicle 22
Any kind of discriminMPion Mnd privilege NePReen POe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn Mre
prohibited.
TOe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn – ROePOer RomMn or mMn – OMve equMl rigOPs Mnd
duties before the law
ArPicle 23
Iife is M gifP of God Mnd M nMPurMl rigOP of OumMn NeingsB No one sOMll Ne deprived
of this right except by the provision of law.
ArPicle 24
IiNerPy is POe nMPurMl rigOP of OumMn NeingsB TOis rigOP OMs no limiPs unless
affecting the rights of others and public interest, which are regulated by law.
IiNerPy Mnd digniPy of OumMn Neings Mre inviolMNleB
TOe sPMPe OMs POe duPy Po respecP Mnd proPecP POe liNerPy Mnd digniPy of OumMn
ArPicle 2D
Hnnocence is POe originMl sPMPeB
An Mccused is considered innocenP unPil convicPed Ny M �nMl decision of Mn
authorized court.
ArPicle 26
Frime is M personMl McPionB
TOe prosecuPion, MrresP, Mnd dePenPion of Mn Mccused Mnd POe execuPion of
penalty cannot affect another person.
ArPicle 27
No McP is considered M crime, unless dePermined Ny M lMR MdopPed prior Po POe
date the offense is committed.
No person cMn Ne pursued, MrresPed or dePMined NuP in MccordMnce RiPO POe
provisions of law.
89
No person cMn Ne punisOed NuP in MccordMnce RiPO POe decision of Mn MuPOorized
court and in conformity with the law adopted before the date of the offense.
ArPicle 28
No ciPizen of AfgOMnisPMn Mccused of M crime cMn Ne exPrMdiPed Po M foreign
state unless according to mutual agreement and international conventions that
No AfgOMn Rould Ne senPenced Po deprivMPion of ciPizensOip or Po exile inside
the country or abroad.
ArPicle 2E
TorPure of OumMn Neings is proOiNiPedB
No person, even RiPO POe inPenPion of discovering POe PruPO, cMn resorP Po PorPure
or order the torture of another person who may be under prosecution, arrest,
detention or convicted to be punished.
PunisOmenP conPrMry Po OumMn inPegriPy is proOiNiPedB
ArPicle 30
Any sPMPemenP, confession or PesPimony oNPMined from Mn Mccused or of MnoPOer
person by means of compulsion, are invalid.
Fonfession Po M crime is M volunPMry Mdmission Nefore Mn MuPOorized courP Ny Mn
accused in a sound state of mind.
ArPicle 31
Every person upon MrresP cMn seek Mn MdvocMPe Po defend OisCOer rigOPs or Po
defend his/her case for which he/she is accused under the law.
TOe Mccused upon MrresP OMs POe rigOP Po Ne informed of POe MPPriNuPed MccusMPion
and to be summoned to the court within the limits determined by law.
Hn criminMl cMses, POe sPMPe sOMll MppoinP Mn MdvocMPe for M desPiPuPeB
TOe con�denPiMliPy of orMl, RriPPen or PelepOonic communicMPions NePReen Mn
advocate and his/her accused client are immune from invasion.
TOe duPies Mnd MuPOoriPies of MdvocMPes sOMll Ne regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle 32
Being in deNP does noP limiP M person’s freedom or deprive OimCOer of liNerPyB
TOe mode Mnd meMns of recovering M deNP sOMll Ne regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle 33
TOe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn OMve POe rigOP Po elecP Mnd Ne elecPedB
IMR regulMPes POe condiPions Mnd meMns Po exercise POis rigOPB
ArPicle 34
Freedom of expression is inviolMNleB
Every AfgOMn OMs POe rigOP Po express POougOPs POrougO speecO, RriPing, or
illustration or other means by observing the provisions of this Constitution.
Every AfgOMn OMs POe rigOP Po prinP or puNlisO Popics RiPOouP prior suNmission Po
the state authorities in accordance with the law.
GirecPives relMPed Po prinPing Oouse, rMdio, Pelevision, press, Mnd oPOer mMss
media, shall be regulated by law.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
ArPicle 3D
TOe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn OMve POe rigOP Po form sociMl orgMnizMPions for POe
purpose of securing material or spiritual aims in accordance with the provisions
of law.
TOe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn OMve POe rigOP Po form poliPicMl pMrPies in MccordMnce
with the provisions of law, provided that:
The program and charter of the party are not contrary to the principles
1.
of sacred religion of Islam, and the provisions and values of this
TOe orgMnizMPionMl sPrucPure, Mnd �nMnciMl sources of POe pMrPy Mre mMde
The party does not have military or paramilitary aims and structures.
SOould OMve no Mf�liMPion Po M foreign poliPicMl pMrPy or sourcesB
FormMPion Mnd funcPioning of M pMrPy NMsed on ePOniciPy, lMnguMge, religious
sect and region is not permissible.
A pMrPy seP up in MccordMnce RiPO provisions of POe lMR sOMll noP Ne dissolved
without lawful reasons and the decision of an authorized court.
ArPicle 36
TOe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn OMve POe rigOP Po unMrmed demonsPrMPions for
legitimate peaceful purposes in accordance with the law.
ArPicle 37 •
Fon�denPiMliPy Mnd freedom of correspondence Mnd communicMPion ROePOer
in the form of letters or through telephone, telegraph and other means are
immune from invasion.
TOe sPMPe does noP OMve POe rigOP Po inspecP personMl correspondence Mnd
communication unless authorized by the provisions of law.
ArPicle 38
A person’s residence is immune from invMsionB
OPOer POMn POe siPuMPions Mnd mePOods indicMPed in POe lMR, no one, including
the state, is allowed to enter or inspect a private residence without prior
permission of the resident or holding a court order.
Hn cMse of Mn evidenP crime, Mn of�ciMl in-cOMrge of POe siPuMPion cMn enPer or
conduct a house search prior to the permission of the court.
TOe of�ciMl involved in POe siPuMPion is required Po oNPMin M suNsequenP courP
order for the house search within the period indicated by law.
ArPicle 3E
Every AfgOMn OMs POe rigOP Po PrMvel or sePPle in Mny pMrP of POe counPry excepP in
the regions forbidden by law.
Every AfgOMn OMs POe rigOP Po PrMvel MNroMd Mnd rePurn Oome in MccordMnce RiPO
the provisions of law.
TOe sPMPe sOMll proPecP POe rigOPs of POe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn MNroMdB
91
ArPicle 40
ProperPy is immune from invMsionB
No person sOMll Ne forNidden from Mcquiring Mnd mMking use of M properPy
except within the limits of law.
No person’s properPy sOMll Ne con�scMPed RiPOouP POe provisions of lMR Mnd POe
order of an authorized court.
AcquisiPion of M person’s properPy, in rePurn for M prior Mnd jusP compensMPion
within the bounds of law, is permitted only for securing public interests in
accordance with the provisions of law.
HnspecPion Mnd disclosure of M privMPe properPy Mre cMrried ouP only in MccordMnce
with the provisions of law.
ArPicle 41
Foreign individuMls do noP OMve POe rigOP Po oRn immovMNle properPy in
IeMse of immovMNle properPy for POe purpose of invesPmenP is permissiNle in
accordance with the law.
TOe sMle of esPMPes Po diplomMPic missions of foreign counPries Mnd Po POose
international agencies of which Afghanistan is a member is permissible in
accordance with the provisions of law.
ArPicle 42
Every AfgOMn is oNligMPed Po pMy PMxes Mnd duPies Po POe governmenP in
accordance with the provisions of law.
No PMxes Mnd duPies Mre enforced RiPOouP provisions of POe lMRB
TOe rMPe of PMxes Mnd duPies Mnd POe mePOod of pMymenPs Mre dePermined Ny
law on the basis of observing social justice.
TOis provision is Mlso Mpplied Po foreign individuMls Mnd MgenciesB
Every kind of PMx, duPy Mnd income collecPed sOMll Ne delivered Po POe SPMPe MccounPB
ArPicle 43
EducMPion is POe rigOP of Mll ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn, ROicO sOMll Ne provided up
to the level of the Bachelors (lisâns) free of charge by the state.
TOe sPMPe is oNliged Po devise Mnd implemenP effecPive progrMms for M NMlMnced
expansion of education all over Afghanistan, and to provide compulsory
intermediate level education. The state is also required to provide the
opportunity to teach native languages in the areas where they are spoken.
ArPicle 44
TOe sPMPe sOMll devise Mnd implemenP effecPive progrMms for NMlMncing Mnd
promoting education for women, improving of education of the nomads and
elimination of illiteracy in the country.
ArPicle 4D
TOe sPMPe sOMll devise Mnd implemenP M uni�ed educMPionMl curriculum NMsed
on the provisions of the sacred religion of Islam, national culture, and in
accordance with academic principles, and develops the curriculum of religious
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
subjects on the basis of the Islamic sects existing in Afghanistan.
ArPicle 46 •
EsPMNlisOing Mnd operMPing of OigOer, generMl Mnd vocMPionMl educMPion Mre POe
duties of the state.
TOe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn Mlso cMn esPMNlisO OigOer, generMl, Mnd vocMPionMl
private educational institutions and literacy courses with the permission of the
state.
TOe sPMPe cMn Mlso permiP foreign persons Po seP up OigOer, generMl Mnd
vocational educational private institutes in accordance with the law.
TOe condiPions for Mdmission Po sPMPe OigOer educMPion insPiPuPions Mnd oPOer
related matters to be regulated by the law.
ArPicle 47
TOe sPMPe sOMll devise effecPive progrMms for POe promoPion of science, culPure,
literature and the arts.
TOe sPMPe guMrMnPees POe rigOPs of MuPOors, invenPors, Mnd discoverers Mnd
encourMges Mnd supporPs scienPi�c reseMrcOes in Mll MreMs Mnd puNlicizes POe
effective use of their results in accordance with the law.
ArPicle 48
Jork is POe rigOP of every AfgOMnB
Jorking Oours, pMid OolidMys, rigOP of employmenP Mnd employee Mnd oPOer
related affairs are regulated by law.
FOoice of occupMPion Mnd crMfP is free RiPOin POe limiPs of lMRB
ArPicle 4E
Forced lMNor is forNiddenB
AcPive pMrPicipMPion in Pimes of RMr, cMlMmiPy, Mnd oPOer siPuMPions POreMPening
lives and public welfare is a national duty of every Afghan.
FOildren sOMll noP Ne suNjecPed Po forced lMNorB
ArPicle D0
TOe sPMPe is oNliged Po MdopP necessMry meMsures for creMPion of M sProng Mnd
sound administration and realization of reforms in the administration system of
the country.
GovernmenP of�ces Mre Nound Po cMrry POeir Rork RiPO full neuPrMliPy Mnd
incompliance with the provisions of law.
TOe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn OMve POe rigOP of Mccess Po POe informMPion from POe
governmenP of�ces in MccordMnce RiPO POe provisions of lMRB TOis rigOP OMs no
limits, unless violation of the rights of the others.
TOe ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMn Mre employed for sPMPe services on POe NMsis of
quMli�cMPion RiPOouP Mny kind of discriminMPion Mnd in MccordMnce RiPO POe
law.
ArPicle D1
Any person suffering undue OMrm Ny governmenP McPion is enPiPled Po
compensation, which he can claim by appealing to court.
93
JiPO POe excepPion of siPuMPion sPMPed in POe lMR, POe sPMPe cMnnoP clMim iPs rigOP
without the order of an authorized court.
ArPicle D2
TOe sPMPe is oNliged Po provide free meMns of prevenPive OeMlPO cMre Mnd
medical treatment, and proper health facilities to all citizens of Afghanistan in
accordance with the law.
TOe sPMPe encourMges Mnd proPecPs POe esPMNlisOmenP Mnd expMnsion of privMPe
medical services and health centers in accordance with law.
TOe sPMPe in order Po promoPe pOysicMl educMPion Mnd improve nMPionMl Mnd
local sports adopts necessary measures.
ArPicle D3
TOe sPMPe PMkes necessMry meMsures for regulMPing medicMl services Mnd
�nMnciMl supporP Po descendMnPs of mMrPyred Mnd losP, re-inPegrMPion of POe
disabled and handicapped individuals and their active participation in the
society in accordance with the law.
TOe sPMPe guMrMnPees POe rigOPs of pensioners Mnd renders necessMry MssisPMnce
to needy elders, women without caretakers, disabled and handicapped
individuals and needy orphans in accordance with the law.
ArPicle D4
FMmily is M fundMmenPMl uniP of sociePy Mnd is supporPed Ny POe sPMPeB
TOe sPMPe MdopPs necessMry meMsures Po ensure pOysicMl Mnd psycOologicMl Rell
being of family, especially of child and mother, upbringing of children and the
elimination of traditions contrary to the principles of sacred religion of Islam.
ArPicle DD
TOe defense of POe counPry is POe responsiNiliPy of Mll ciPizens of AfgOMnisPMnB
TOe condiPions for miliPMry services Mre regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle D6
ONserving POe provisions of POe FonsPiPuPion, oNeying POe lMRs, MdOering Po
public law and order are the duties of all people of Afghanistan.
HgnorMnce MNouP POe provisions of lMR is noP considered Mn excuseB
ArPicle D7
TOe sPMPe guMrMnPees POe rigOPs Mnd liNerPies of POe foreign ciPizens residing in
Afghanistan in accordance with the law. These people are obliged to observe
the laws of the state of Afghanistan in accordance with the International Law.
ArPicle D8
TOe SPMPe, for POe purpose of moniPoring POe oNservMPion of OumMn rigOPs in
Afghanistan, and their promotion and protection, shall establish the Independent
Everyone in cMse of violMPion of OisCOer rigOPs cMn reporP complMinP Po POis
TOe Fommission cMn refer POe cMses of violMPion of POe OumMn rigOPs of POe
persons to the legal authorities, and assist them in defending their rights.
SPrucPure Mnd mode of funcPion of POis Fommission Rill Ne regulMPed Ny lMRB
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
94
ArPicle DE
No one cMn misuse POe rigOPs Mnd freedoms under POis FonsPiPuPion MgMinsP
independence, territorial integrity, sovereignty and national unity.
Chapter Three: The President
ArPicle 60 •
TOe PresidenP is POe OeMd of sPMPe of POe HslMmic RepuNlic of AfgOMnisPMn, Mnd
conducts his authorities in executive, legislative, and judiciary branches in
accordance with the provisions of this Constitution.
TOe PresidenP sOMll OMve �rsP Mnd second Vice PresidenPsB
TOe cMndidMPe Po POe Presidency on Ois or Oer cMndidMcy sOMll Mlso declMre POe
names of the Vice Presidents to the nation.
TOe FirsP Vice PresidenP in POe MNsence, resignMPion, Mnd or deMPO of POe
President, acts in accordance with the provisions of this Constitution.
Hn POe MNsence of POe �rsP Vice PresidenP, POe second Vice PresidenP sOMll McP in
accordance with the provisions of this Constitution.
ArPicle 61
TOe PresidenP is elecPed Ny receiving more POMn D0% of POe voPes cMsP POrougO
free, general, secret, and direct voting.
TOe presidenPiMl Perm expires on POe �rsP of JMRzM of POe �fPO yeMr MfPer POe
ElecPions for POe neR presidenP Mre Oeld RiPOin POirPy Po sixPy dMys Nefore POe
end of the presidential term.
Hf none of POe cMndidMPes succeeds Po receive more POMn D0% of POe voPes in POe
�rsP round, M run-off elecPion sOMll Ne Oeld RiPOin PRo ReeksB
Hn POis round, only PRo cMndidMPes RiPO POe OigOesP numNer of voPes Rill
participate.
Hn POe run-off, POe cMndidMPe ROo gePs POe mMjoriPy of POe voPes sOMll Ne elecPed
Hn cMse of deMPO of one of POe cMndidMPes during POe �rsP or second round, MfPer
the elections or prior to the announcement of the results of elections, new
elections shall be held in accordance with the provisions of law.
ArPicle 62
PresidenPiMl cMndidMPes sOould posses POe folloRing quMli�cMPions:
Should be citizen of Afghanistan, Muslim and born of Afghan parents, and
1.
should not have citizenship of another country.
On the day of becoming a candidate, his age should not be less than forty
years.
Should not have been convicted of crimes against humanity, criminal act,
or deprivation of the civil rights by a court.
No one cMn Ne elecPed Ms presidenP for more POMn PRo PermsB
95
TOe provision of POis MrPicle is Mpplies Po POe Vice PresidenPs Ms RellB
ArPicle 63
TOe PresidenP-elecP, prior Po resumpPion of OisCOer duPies, performs POe folloRing
oath in accordance with the rules of procedures prescribed by law:
Hn POe nMme AllMO, POe Merciful, POe FompMssionMPe; Hn POe nMme God AlmigOPy,
in the presence of you representatives of the nation of Afghanistan, I swear
to obey and safeguard the provisions of the sacred religion of Islam, to
observe the Constitution and other laws of Afghanistan and supervise their
implementation; to safeguard the independence, national sovereignty, and the
territorial integrity of Afghanistan and the fundamental rights and interests of
the people of Afghanistan, and with the assistance of God and the support of
the nation, to make great and sincere efforts for the happiness and progress of
ArPicle 64
TOe poRer Mnd duPies of POe PresidenP Mre Ms folloRs:
Supervising the implementation of the Constitution
1.
Determining the fundamental policies of the state with the approval of the
Being the Command-in-Chief of the armed forces of Afghanistan
GeclMrMPion of RMr Mnd ceMse�re RiPO POe con�rmMPion of POe NMPionMl
Assembly
Taking the required decision to defend the territorial integrity and protect
Sending contingents of the armed forces to foreign countries with the
Convening Loya Jirga except in the situation stated in Article Sixty-eight of
7.
GeclMring POe sPMPe of emergency Mnd ending iP RiPO POe con�rmMPion of POe
Inaugurating the National Assembly and the Loya Jirga
Accepting resignation of the Vice Presidents
10.
Appointing Ministers, the Attorney General, the Governor of the Central
11.
Bank, Head of the National Security Directorate and the President of the
AfgOMn Red FrescenP SociePy RiPO POe con�rmMPion of POe Jolesi JirgM,
Appointing the head and members of the Supreme Court with the
con�rmMPion of POe Jolesi JirgM
Appointing, retiring and accepting the resignation of and dismissing judges,
13.
of�cers of POe Mrmed forces, police, nMPionMl securiPy, Mnd OigO-rMnking
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
of�ciMls in MccordMnce RiPO POe lMR
Appointing heads of the diplomatic missions of Afghanistan in foreign
14.
countries and international organizations
Accepting the credentials of diplomatic missions in Afghanistan
15.
Signing laws and legislative decrees
16.
Issuing credential letter for the conclusion of bi-lateral and international
17.
treaties in accordance with the provisions of law
Reducing and pardoning penalties in accordance with the law
18.
Issuing medals and honorary titles in accordance with the provision of
19.
law
Establishing commissions for the improvement of the administrative
condition of the country, in accordance with the law
Exercising other authorities in accordance with the provisions of this
21.
ArPicle 6D
TOe PresidenP cMn cMll for M referendum on imporPMnP nMPionMl poliPicMl, sociMl
FMll for referendum sOMll noP Ne conPrMry Po POe provisions of POis FonsPiPuPion
or for amending it.
ArPicle 66
TOe PresidenP PMkes inPo considerMPion POe supreme inPeresPs of POe people of
Afghanistan while enforcing the powers stated in this Constitution.
TOe PresidenP cMnnoP sell or NesPoR sPMPe properPies RiPOouP POe provisions of
law.
TOe PresidenP cMnnoP McP NMsed on linguisPic, ePOnic, religious, poliPicMl, Mnd
regionMl considerMPions during Ois Perm in of�ceB
ArPicle 67
Hn cMse of resignMPion, impeMcOmenP, or deMPO of POe PresidenP, or of M serious
illness that could hinder the performance of duties, the First Vice President
undertakes his/her duties and authorities.
TOe PresidenP suNmiPs OisCOer resignMPion personMlly Po POe NMPionMl
Assembly.
TOe serious illness sOMll Ne proved Ny Mn MuPOorized medicMl commiPPee
appointed by the Supreme Court.
Hn POis cMse, elecPion for POe neR PresidenP sOMll Ne Oeld RiPOin POe period of
three months in accordance with the Article 61 of this constitution.
Guring POe Pime ROen POe FirsP Vice PresidenP McPs Ms POe inPerim PresidenP, OeC
she cannot perform the following:
1.
Dismissal of ministers
97
Call for a referendum.
Guring POis period POe Vice PresidenPs cMn nominMPe POemselves Ms cMndidMPes
for the post of President in accordance with the provisions of this constitution.
Hn POe MNsence of POe PresidenP, POe duPies of POe FirsP Vice PresidenP sOMll Ne
determined by the President.
ArPicle 68
Hn cMse of resignMPion Mnd or deMPO of one of POe Vice PresidenPs, MnoPOer
person shall replace him by the proposal of the President and approval of the
Wolesi Jirga.
Hn cMse of simulPMneously deMPO of POe PresidenP Mnd POe FirsP Vice PresidenP,
in turn the Second Vice President, the Chair of the Meshrano Jirga and in
the absence of the chair of the Meshrano Jirga, the Chair of the Wolesi Jirga,
and in the absence of the Chair of the Wolesi Jirga, the Foreign Minister shall
perform the duties of the President in accordance with the article 67 of this
ArPicle 6E
TOe PresidenP is responsiNle Po POe nMPion Mnd POe Jolesi JirgM Mccording Po POis
Article.
AccusMPions of crime MgMinsP OumMniPy, nMPionMl PreMson or crime cMn Ne leveled
against the President by one third of the members of the Wolesi Jirga.
Hf PRo POirds of POe Jolesi JirgM voPes for cOMrges Po Ne NrougOP forPO, POe Jolesi
Jirga shall convene a Loya Jirga within one month. If the Loya Jirga approve the
accusation by a two-thirds majority of votes the President is then dismissed, and
the case is referred to a special court. The special court shall be composed of
three members of the Wolesi Jirga, and three members of the Supreme Court
appointed by the Loya Jirga and the Chair of the Meshrano Jirga.
TOe lMRsuiP is conducPed Ny M person MppoinPed Ny POe IoyM JirgMB
Hn POis siPuMPion, POe provisions of ArPicle 67 of POis FonsPiPuPion Mre MppliedB
ArPicle 70
TOe sMlMry Mnd expendiPures of POe PresidenP Mre regulMPed Ny lMRB
AfPer expirMPion of Ois Perm, POe PresidenP is enPiPled Po �nMnciMl Nene�Ps of POe
presidency for the rest of his life in accordance with the law except in the case
Chapter Four: The Government
ArPicle 71
TOe governmenP consisPs of POe minisPers ROo Rork under POe FOMirmMnsOip of
NumNer of POe MinisPers Mnd POeir duPies sOMll Ne regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle 72
TOe person ROo is MppoinPed Ms POe MinisPer, sOould OMve POe folloRing
quMli�cMPions:
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Must have only the citizenship of Afghanistan. Should a nominee for a
ministerial post hold also the citizenship of another country, the
Wolesi
sOMll OMve POe rigOP Po con�rm or rejecP Ois or Oer nominMPionB
Should have higher education, work experience and good reputation.
HisCOer Mge sOould noP Ne less POMn POirPy-�veB
Should not have been convicted of crimes against humanity, criminal act,
7.
or deprivation of civil rights by a court.
ArPicle 73
TOe minisPers cMn Ne MppoinPed from RiPOin Mnd RiPOouP POe NMPionMl
Assembly.
Hf M memNer of POe NMPionMl AssemNly is MppoinPed Ms M minisPer, OeCsOe loses
his/her membership in the National Assembly, and is replaced by another
person in accordance with the provisions of law.
ArPicle 74
Prior Po PMking of�ce, POe minisPer perform POe folloRing oMPO in POe presence of

In the name of Allah, the merciful and compassionate: I swear in the name
of God Almighty to support the provisions of the sacred religion of Islam,
follow the Constitution and other laws of Afghanistan, protect the rights of
citizens, and safeguard the independence, territorial integrity and national
unity of Afghanistan, and consider God Almighty present in performing all my
responsibilities, and honestly perform the duties assigned to me.
ArPicle 7D
TOe governmenP sOMll OMve POe folloRing duPies:
ExecuPe POe provision of POis FonsPiPuPion, oPOer lMRs, Mnd �nMl orders of
the courts
Protect the independence, defend the territorial integrity, and safeguard
the interests and dignity of Afghanistan in the international community
Maintenance of public law and order and elimination of administrative
10.
PrepMre POe NudgeP, regulMPe �nMnciMl MffMirs Mnd proPecP puNlic ReMlPO
11.
Devise and implement programs for social, cultural, economic, and
technological progress
ReporP Po POe NMPionMl AssemNly MP POe end of POe �scMl yeMr MNouP POe
13.
PMsks MccomplisOed Mnd MNouP POe mMin plMns for POe neR �scMl yeMr
Perform other duties as recognized by this Constitution and other laws to
14.
be duties of the government.
ArPicle 76
Hn order Po implemenP POe mMin policies of POe counPry Mnd regulMPion of iPs
duties, the government shall devise and approve regulations. These regulations
should not be contradictory to the text and spirit of any law.
99
ArPicle 77
As OeMds of MdminisPrMPive uniPs Mnd memNers of POe governmenP, POe minisPers
perform their duties within the limits determined by this Constitution and other
laws.
TOe minisPers Mre responsiNle Po POe PresidenP Mnd POe Jolesi JirgM for POeir
particular duties.
ArPicle 78
Hf M minisPer is Mccused of crime MgMinsP OumMniPy, nMPionMl PreMson or criminMl
act of a crime, the case shall be referred to a special court in accordance with
the Article 134 of this constitution.
ArPicle 7E
Hn cMses of recess of POe Jolesi JirgM, POe governmenP cMn MdopP legislMPion
in an emergency situation on matters other than those related to budget and
�nMnciMl MffMirsB
TOe legislMPive decrees Necome lMRs MfPer POey Mre signed Ny POe PresidenPB TOe
legislative decrees should be submitted to the National Assembly in the course
of POirPy dMys Neginning from POe �rsP session of POe NMPionMl AssemNlyB
Hn cMse of rejecPion Ny POe NMPionMl AssemNly, POe legislMPions Necome voidB
ArPicle 80
MinisPers during POe course of POeir Rork cMnnoP use POeir posPs for linguisPic,
regional, ethnic, religion and partisan purposes.

Chapter Five: The Na�onal Assembly
ArPicle 81

TOe NMPionMl AssemNly of POe HslMmic RepuNlic of AfgOMnisPMn Ms POe OigOesP
legislative organ is the manifestation of the will of its people and represents the
Every memNer of POe NMPionMl AssemNly PMkes inPo judgmenP POe generMl RelfMre
and supreme interests of all people of Afghanistan at the time of casting their
vote.
ArPicle 82
TOe NMPionMl AssemNly consisPs of PRo Oouses: Jolesi JirgM (POe House of
People) and Meshrano Jirga (House of Elders).
No one cMn Necome memNer of NoPO Oouses simulPMneouslyB
ArPicle 83
MemNers of POe Jolesi JirgM Mre elecPed Ny POe people POrougO free, generMl,
secret, and direct elections.
TOeir mMndMPe ends on POe 1sP of SMrMPMn of POe �fPO yeMr MfPer POe elecPions
and the new assembly starts its work.
TOe elecPion of POe memNers of POe Jolesi JirgM sOMll Ne Oeld RiPOin 30 Po 60
days before the expiry of the term of the Wolesi Jirga.
TOe numNer of memNers of POe Jolesi JirgM, proporPionMPe Po POe populMPion of
eMcO region, sOMll Ne noP more POMn PRo Oundred Mnd �fPyB
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100
ElecPorMl consPiPuency Mnd oPOer relMPed issues sOMll Ne dePermined Ny elecPion
laws.
Hn POe elecPion lMR meMsures sOould Ne MdopPed for so POe elecPion sysPem sOMll
provide general and just representation for all the people of the country and
based on the population, from each province on average at least two female
delegates shall have membership to the Wolesi Jirga.
ArPicle 84
MemNers of POe MesOrMno JirgM Mre elecPed Mnd MppoinPed Ms folloRs:
From among the members of each provincial council, the respective council
1.
elects one person for a period of four years.
From among the district councils of each province, the respective councils
elect one person for a period of three years.
The President from among experts and experienced personalities — including
two representatives of the disabled and impaired and two representatives
from the Nomads — appoints the remaining one-third of the members for a
period of �ve yeMrsB
TOe presidenP MppoinPs D0 percenP of POese people from Mmong RomenB
A person, ROo is MppoinPed Ms M memNer of POe MesOrMno JirgM, sOMll relinquisO
his membership in the respective council, and another person replaces him in
accordance with the law.
ArPicle 8D
A person ROo is nominMPed or MppoinPed Ms M memNer of POe NMPionMl AssemNly
sOould OMve POe folloRing quMli�cMPions in MddiPion Po POose considered Ny
voters:
Should be the citizen of Afghanistan, or has obtained the citizenship of the
1.
state of Afghanistan at least ten years before becoming candidate or being
appointed.
Should not have been convicted by a court for committing a crime against
humanity, a crime, or sentenced of deprivation of his/her civil rights.
MemNers of Jolesi JirgM sOould Ne MP leMsP PRenPy-�ve yeMrs old MP POe dMPe
of candidacy and members of the Meshrano Jirga should be at least thirty-
�ve yeMrs old MP POe dMPe of cMndidMcy or MppoinPmenPB
ArPicle 86
FredenPiMls of memNers of POe NMPionMl AssemNly Mre revieRed Ny POe
Independent Election Commission in accordance with the law.
ArPicle 87
Hn POe Neginning of POe legislMPive period, eMcO one of POe PRo Oouses elecPs one
of its members as the Chairperson for one legislative period, and two people
Ms POe �rsP Mnd second Vice FOMirperson, Mnd PRo people Ms POe secrePMry Mnd
assistant secretary for a period of one year.
TOese individuMls consPiPuPe POe BureMu in POeir respecPive OousesB
TOe duPies of POe BureMu Mre dePermined in POe regulMPions perPMining Po POe
101
internal duties of each house.
ArPicle 88
EMcO Oouse of POe NMPionMl AssemNly sePs up commissions Po sPudy POe Popics
under discussion in accordance with its internal regulations.
ArPicle 8E
TOe Jolesi JirgM OMs POe MuPOoriPy Po seP up M speciMl commission if one-POird
of its members put forward a proposal to inquire about and study government
TOe composiPion Mnd procedure of POis commission is speci�ed in POe inPernMl
regulations of Wolesi Jirga.
ArPicle E0
TOe NMPionMl AssemNly OMs POe folloRing MuPOoriPies:
RMPi�cMPion, modi�cMPion, or MNrogMPion of lMRs Mnd or legislMPive decrees
1.
Approval of plans for economic, social, cultural, and technological
development
Approval of state budget, permission for obtaining, and granting loans
FreMPion, modi�cMPion, Mnd or MNrogMPion of MdminisPrMPive uniPs
RMPi�cMPion of inPernMPionMl PreMPies Mnd MgreemenPs, or MNrogMPion of POe
membership of Afghanistan to them
ArPicle E1
TOe Jolesi JirgM OMs POe folloRing speciMl MuPOoriPies:
Geciding on inPerpellMPion of eMcO of POe minisPers in MccordMnce RiPO POe
provisions of Article 92 of this Constitution.
TMking decisions MNouP POe sPMPe’s developmenP progrMms Mnd POe sPMPe NudgePB
ApprovMl or rejecPion of POe MppoinPmenPs Mccording Po POe provisions of POis
ArPicle E2
TOe Jolesi JirgM, NMsed on M proposMl Ny PRenPy percenP of iPs memNers, cMn
interpellate each of the Ministers.
Hf POe responses given Mre noP sMPisfMcPory, Jolesi JirgM sOMll consider POe issue
of voPe of no con�denceB
TOe voPe of no con�dence on M minisPer sOMll Ne expliciP, direcP, Mnd on POe
basis of well-founded reasons. This vote should be approved by a majority of all
members of the Wolesi Jirga.
ArPicle E3
Any commission of NoPO Houses of POe NMPionMl AssemNly cMn quesPion eMcO of
POe minisPers MNouP speci�c PopicsB
TOe person quesPioned cMn provide verNMl or RriPPen responseB
ArPicle E4
IMR is ROMP NoPO Houses of POe NMPionMl AssemNly Mpprove Mnd POe PresidenP
endorses unless this Constitution states otherwise.

Hn cMse POe PresidenP does noP Mgree Po ROMP POe NMPionMl AssemNly Mpproves,
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Oe cMn send POe documenP NMck RiPO jusPi�MNle reMsons Po POe Jolesi JirgM
RiPOin �fPeen dMys of iPs suNmissionB JiPO POe pMssMge of POis period or in cMse
the Wolesi Jirga approves a particular case again with a majority of two-thirds
votes, the bill is considered endorsed and enforced.
ArPicle ED
ProposMl for POe promulgMPion of M lMR cMn Ne iniPiMPed Ny POe governmenP, or
members of the National Assembly, and in the domain of regulating the judicial
affairs through the Supreme Court by the government. Proposals for drafting
POe NudgeP Mnd �nMnciMl MffMirs lMRs sOMll Ne mMde only Ny POe GovernmenPB
ArPicle E6
Hf M proposMl for POe promulgMPion of lMR includes imposiPion of neR PMxes or
reduction in state incomes, it is included in the working agenda on condition
that an alternative source is also envisioned.
ArPicle E7
ProposMls for promulgMPion of lMR iniPiMPed Ny POe governmenP Mre suNmiPPed
�rsP Po POe Jolesi JirgMB
TOe Jolesi JirgM Mpproves or rejecPs Ms M ROole POe proposMl for promulgMPion
of lMR including NudgeP Mnd �nMnciMl MffMirs Mnd POe proposMl of PMking or giving
loan after discussion.
TOe Jolesi JirgM cMnnoP delMy POe proposMl more POMn one monPOB
TOe proposed drMfP of lMR is suNmiPPed Po POe MesOrMno JirgM, MfPer iPs MpprovMl
by the Wolesi Jirga.
TOe MesOrMno JirgM decides on POe drMfP RiPOin M period of �fPeen dMysB
TOe NMPionMl AssemNly sOMll give prioriPy Po POe promulgMPion of lMRs, PreMPies,
and development plans of the government that require urgent consideration
and decision as per the request of the government.
Hf M proposMl for promulgMPion of lMR is iniPiMPed Ny Pen memNers of one of POe
PRo Houses Mnd POen Mpproved Ny one �fPO memNers of POe respecPive Oouses,
it can be admitted to the agenda of the respective houses.
ArPicle E8
TOe sPMPe NudgeP Mnd developmenP plMn of POe governmenP is suNmiPPed POrougO
the Meshrano Jirga along with an advisory comments to the Wolesi Jirga.
TOe decision of POe Jolesi JirgM, irrespecPive of POe consenP of POe MesOrMno
Jirga, is enforceable after it is signed by the President.
Hf for some reMsons POe NudgeP is noP Mpproved Nefore POe Neginning of POe neR
�scMl yeMr, POe NudgeP of POe yeMr Nefore is Mpplied unPil POe MpprovMl of POe neR
budget.
TOe governmenP is oNligMPed Po give Po POe Jolesi JirgM POe NudgeP of POe neR
�scMl yeMr Mnd M Nrief MccounP of POe currenP yeMr’s NudgeP RiPOin POe fourPO
quMrPer of POe �scMl yeMrB
TOe de�niPe MccounP of POe previous �scMl yeMr sOMll Ne suNmiPPed Ny POe
government to the Wolesi Jirga within six months of the new year, in accordance
with the provisions of law.
103
TOe Jolesi JirgM cMnnoP delMy POe MpprovMl of POe NudgeP for more POMn one
month or permission to give or take loan for more than 15 days.
Hf during POis period Jolesi JirgM does noP PMke Mny decision RiPO regMrds Po
taking or giving loan, the proposal will be considered as approved.
ArPicle EE
Hf, during M session of POe NMPionMl AssemNly, POe MnnuMl NudgeP or M
developmental plan or an issue related to public security, territorial integrity, and
the country’s independence is under discussion, the session of the assembly
cannot end before the approval of the matter.
ArPicle 100•
Hn cMse POe decision of one Oouse is rejecPed Ny MnoPOer Oouse, M comNined
committee composed of equal members of each house is formed to resolve the
TOe decision of POe commiPPee is enforced MfPer iPs MpprovMl Ny POe PresidenPB
Hn cMse POe comNined commiPPee cMnnoP solve POe disMgreemenP, POe defeMPed
resolution is considered void.

Hn POis cMse POe Jolesi JirgM, cMn Mpprove iP in POe nexP session of POe Jolesi
Jirga by the two third majority vote of its all members.

TOis MpprovMl is Mssumed Ms enforceMNle, MfPer iP is signed Ny POe PresidenP,
without submission to the Meshrano Jirga.
ArPicle 101•
No memNer of POe NMPionMl AssemNly is legMlly prosecuPed due Po expressing
his views while performing his duty.
ArPicle 102•
JOen M memNer of POe NMPionMl AssemNly is Mccused of M crime, POe lMR
enforcement authority informs the house, of which the accused is member,
about the case, and the accused member can be prosecuted.
Hn cMse of Mn evidenP crime, POe lMR enforcemenP MuPOoriPy cMn legMlly pursue
and arrest the accused without the permission of the house, which the accused
Hn NoPO cMses, ROen legMl prosecuPion requires dePenPion of POe Mccused, lMR
enforcement authorities are obligated to inform the respective house, about
the case immediately.
Hf POe MccusMPion PMkes plMce ROen POe MssemNly is in recess, POe permission
of arrest is obtained from the administrative board of the respective house and
POe decision of POis NoMrd is presenPed Po POe �rsP session of POe MforemenPioned
house for a decision.
ArPicle 103•
TOe minisPers cMn pMrPicipMPe in POe sessions of eMcO one of POe PRo Oouses of
the National Assembly.
EMcO Oouse of POe NMPionMl AssemNly cMn demMnd POe pMrPicipMPion of MinisPers
to take part in its session.
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ArPicle 104•
BoPO Oouses of POe NMPionMl AssemNly Oold POeir sessions sepMrMPely MP POe

Under POe folloRing circumsPMnces, NoPO Oouses cMn Oold joinP sessions:
When the legislative session or the annual session is inaugurated by the
1.
When it is deemed necessary by the President.
Hn POis cMse, POe OeMd of POe Jolesi JirgM, cOMirs POe joinP session of POe NMPionMl
Assembly.
ArPicle 10D•
TOe sessions of POe NMPionMl AssemNly Mre open unless POe FOMirmMn of POe
assembly, or at least ten members of the National Assembly request their
secrecy and the assembly accepts this request.
No one sOMll enPer POe Nuilding of POe NMPionMl AssemNly Ny forceB
ArPicle 106•
TOe quorum of POe sessions of eMcO Oouse of POe NMPionMl AssemNly for voPing
is complete with the presence of the majority of the members, and its decisions
are taken with the majority of the members present, unless this Constitution
states otherwise.
ArPicle 107•
TOe NMPionMl AssemNly convenes PRo ordinMry sessions eMcO yeMrB
TOe Perm of POe NMPionMl AssemNly in eMcO yeMr is nine monPOsB JOen necessMry,
the assembly can extend this period.
ExPrMordinMry sessions of POe MssemNly during recess cMn PMke plMce Ny POe
order of the President.
ArPicle 108•
Hn cMses of deMPO, resignMPion Mnd dismissMl of M memNer of POe NMPionMl
Assembly, and/or disability or handicap, which prevents performance of duties
permanently, election in the related constituency is held for a new representative
for the rest of the legislative period, in accordance with the law.
MMPPers involving POe presence or MNsence of memNers of POe NMPionMl AssemNly
are regulated according to internal rules.
ArPicle 10E•
ProposMls for MmendmenPs of POe elecPorMl lMR cMnnoP Ne included in POe
working agenda of the assembly during the last year of the legislative period.
Chapter Six: Loya Jirga
ArPicle 110•
IoyM JirgM is POe OigOesP mMnifesPMPion of POe people of AfgOMnisPMnB
IoyM JirgM consisPs of POe folloRing:
Members of the National Assembly.
1.
Chairpersons of the provincial, and district councils.
105
TOe MinisPers, FOief JusPice Mnd memNers of POe Supreme FourP Mnd POe
Attorney General can participate in the sessions of the Loya Jirga without the
right to vote.
ArPicle 111 •
IoyM JirgM sOMll Ne convened in POe folloRing siPuMPions:
To PMke decision on POe issues relMPed Po independence, nMPionMl sovereignPy,
territorial integrity, and supreme interests of the country
To Mmend POe provisions of POis FonsPiPuPion
To prosecuPe POe PresidenP in MccordMnce RiPO POe provisions of ArPicle 6E of
ArPicle 112•
TOe IoyM JirgM in iPs �rsP session elecPs from Mmong iPs memNers M cOMirperson,
a deputy chair, and a secretary and an assistant secretary.
ArPicle 113•
TOe quorum of POe IoyM JirgM for voPing is complePed Ny POe mMjoriPy of
members.
TOe decisions of POe IoyM JirgM Mre PMken Ny M mMjoriPy of POe presenP memNers
except in cases as explicitly stated in this Constitution.
ArPicle 114•
Giscussions of POe IoyM JirgM Mre open excepP ROen one-fourPO of iPs memNers
demand their secrecy, and the Loya Jirga accepts this demand.
ArPicle 11D•
Guring POe session of M IoyM JirgM, POe provision of ArPicles 101 Mnd 102 of POis
Constitution are applied on its members.
Chapter Seven: The Judiciary
ArPicle 116•
TOe judiciMl NrMncO is Mn independenP orgMn of POe sPMPe of POe HslMmic RepuNlic
TOe judiciMl NrMncO consisPs of POe Supreme FourP (SPerM MMOkMmM), HigO
Courts, (Appeal Courts), and Primary Courts, structure and authorities of which
are determined by law. The Supreme Court shall be the highest judicial organ,
heading the judicial power of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan.
ArPicle 117•
TOe Supreme FourP is composed of nine memNers ROo Mre MppoinPed Ny POe
PresidenP for M period of Pen yeMrs RiPO POe con�rmMPion of POe Jolesi JirgM RiPO
observance of the provisions of last paragraph of the Article 50 and article 118
of this Constitution. In the beginning the appointment will be as such:
TOree memNers Mre MppoinPed for M period of four yeMrs, POree memNers for
seven years and three members for ten years.
IMPer MppoinPmenPs Rill Ne for M period of Pen yeMrsB
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TOe MppoinPmenP of POe memNers for POe second Perm is noP permissiNleB
TOe PresidenP MppoinPs one of iPs memNers Ms POe HeMd of POe Supreme
Court.
MemNers in no RMy cMn Ne dismissed from POeir service unPil POe end of POeir
term, except circumstances stated in Article 127 of this Constitution.
ArPicle 118•
A memNer of POe Supreme FourP sOould OMve POe folloRing quMli�cMPions:
The age of the Head of the Supreme Court and its members should not be
1.
lower than forty at the time of appointment
Should have higher education in law or in Islamic jurisprudence, and
should have enough expertise and experience in the judicial system of
Should enjoy high ethics and good reputation
Should not have been convicted of crimes against humanity, crimes, and
sentenced of deprivation of his civil rights by a court
SOould noP Ne M memNer of Mny poliPicMl pMrPy during POe Perm of of�ciMl
duty.
ArPicle 11E•
MemNers of POe Supreme FourP PMke POe folloRing oMPO in POe presence of POe
President before occupying the post:
Hn POe nMme AllMO, POe Merciful Mnd POe FompMssionMPe: H sReMr in POe nMme of
God Almighty to support justice and righteousness in accord with the provisions
of the sacred religion of Islam and the provisions of this Constitution and other
laws of Afghanistan, and to execute the duty of being a judge with utmost
honesty, righteousness and nonpartisanship.
ArPicle 120•
TOe MuPOoriPy of POe judiciMl orgMn is Po MPPend Po Mll lMRsuiPs in ROicO reMl
individuals or incorporeal including the state stand before it as plaintiff or
defendant and in its presence is expressed in accord with provisions of the law.
ArPicle 121•
TOe Supreme FourP on POe requesP of POe GovernmenP or POe FourPs sOMll revieR
the laws, legislative decrees, international treaties and international covenants
for their compliance with the Constitution and provide their interpretation in
accordance with the law.
ArPicle 122•
No lMR, under Mny circumsPMnce, cMn PrMnsfer M cMse from POe jurisdicPion of POe
judicial branch to another organ as has been determined in this Constitution.
TOis provision does noP Mpply Po esPMNlisOing speciMl FourPs sPMPed in ArPicles
69 and 78 and 127 of this Constitution and military courts in matters relating
to them.
107
TOe sPrucPure Mnd MuPOoriPy of POese courPs Mre regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle 123•
JiPO oNservMnce of POe provisions of POis FonsPiPuPion, POe rules relMPed Po POe
structure, authority, and performances of the courts, and the duties of judges
are regulated by law.
ArPicle 124 •
OPOer of�ciMls Mnd MdminisPrMPive personnel of POe judiciMl NrMncO Mre suNjecP
Po POe provisions of POe lMRs relMPed Po POe of�ciMls Mnd oPOer MdminisPrMPive
personnel of the state, but their appointment, dismissal, promotion, pension,
rewards and punishments are regulated by the Supreme Court in accordance
with the law.
ArPicle 12D •
TOe NudgeP of POe judiciMl NrMncO is prepMred Ny POe Supreme FourP in
consultation with the government and presented by the government to the
National Assembly as part of the state budget.
HmplemenPMPion of POe NudgeP of POe judiciMl NrMncO is POe MuPOoriPy of POe
Supreme Court.
ArPicle 126•
MemNers of POe Supreme FourP enjoy of�ciMl �nMnciMl Nene�Ps for POe resP of
their lives provided they do not occupy state and political positions.
ArPicle 127•
JOen more POMn one-POird of POe memNers of POe Jolesi JirgM demMnd POe
trial of the Chief Justice, or a member of the Supreme Court due to a crime
committed during the performance of duty, and the Wolesi Jirga approves of
this demand by a majority of two-thirds votes, the accused is dismissed from
his post and the case is referred to a special court.
TOe sePPing up of POe courP Mnd POe procedures of PriMl Mre regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle 128 •
Hn POe courPs of AfgOMnisPMn, PriMls Mre open Mnd everyone is enPiPled Po MPPend
trials in accordance with the law.
TOe courP, in siPuMPions, ROicO Mre sPMPed in POe lMR or in siPuMPions in ROicO
the secrecy of the trial is deemed necessary, can conduct the trial behind
closed doors, but the announcement of the court decision should be open in
ArPicle 12E•
TOe courP is oNliged Po sPMPe POe reMsons for POe decision iP issuesB
All �nMl decisions of POe courPs Mre enforceMNle, excepP for cMpiPMl punisOmenP,
which is conditional upon approval of the President.
ArPicle 130•
JOile processing POe cMses, POe courPs Mpply POe provisions of POis FonsPiPuPion
and other laws.
JOen POere is no provision in POe FonsPiPuPion or oPOer lMRs regMrding ruling on
an issue, the courts’ decisions shall be within the limits of this Constitution in
Mccord RiPO POe HMnM� jurisprudence Mnd in M RMy Po serve jusPice in POe NesP
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possible manner.
ArPicle 131•
TOe FourPs sOMll Mpply SOiM scOool of lMR in cMses deMling RiPO personMl mMPPers
involving the followers of Shia Sect in accordance with the provisions of law.
Hn oPOer cMses if no clMri�cMPion Ny POis consPiPuPion Mnd oPOer lMRs exisP, courPs
will resolve the matter according to laws of this Sect.
ArPicle 132•
Judges Mre MppoinPed RiPO POe recommendMPion of POe Supreme FourP Mnd
approval of the President.
TOe MppoinPmenP, PrMnsfer, promoPion, punisOmenP, Mnd proposMls Po rePire judges
are within the authority of the Supreme Court in accordance with the law.
TOe Supreme FourP sOMll esPMNlisO POe GenerMl AdminisPrMPion Of�ce of POe
Judicial Power for the purpose of better arrangement of the administration and
judicial affairs and insuring the required improvements.
ArPicle 133•
JOen M judge is Mccused of OMving commiPPed M crime, POe Supreme FourP sOMll
inquire about the case involving the judge in accordance with the law.
AfPer lisPening Po Ois defense, ROen POe Supreme FourP regMrds POe MccusMPion
to be valid, it shall present a proposal about the judge’s dismissal to the
AfPer POe PresidenPiMl MpprovMl, POe Mccused judge is dismissed from duPy, Mnd
punished in accordance with the provisions of the law.
ArPicle 134•
Giscovery of crimes is POe duPy of POe police Mnd invesPigMPion Mnd prosecuPion Mre
conducPed Ny POe APPorney’s Of�ce in MccordMnce RiPO POe provisions of POe lMRB
TOe APPorney’s Of�ce is pMrP POe ExecuPive NrMncO, Mnd is independenP in iPs
performances.
TOe sPrucPure, MuPOoriPy, Mnd McPiviPies of POe APPorney’s Of�ce Mre regulMPed Ny lMRB
Giscovery Mnd invesPigMPion of crimes relMPed Po POe Mrmed forces, Police, Mnd
NMPionMl SecuriPy of�ciMls Mre regulMPed Ny M speciMl lMRB
ArPicle 13D•
Hf pMrPies involved in M cMse do noP knoR POe lMnguMge in ROicO POe PriMl is
conducted, they have the right to understand the material and documents
related to the case through an interpreter and the right to speak in their mother
language in the court.
Chapter Eight: The Administra�on
ArPicle 136•
TOe AdminisPrMPion of POe HslMmic RepuNlic of AfgOMnisPMn sOMll Ne NMsed on
central and local administrative units in accordance with the law.
109
TOe cenPrMl MdminisPrMPion is divided inPo M numNer of MdminisPrMPive uniPs,
each of which shall be headed by a minister.
TOe locMl MdminisPrMPive uniP is M provinceB
TOe numNer, MreM, pMrPs, Mnd sPrucPures of POe provinces Mnd POe relMPed
administrations are regulated by law on the basis of population, social and
ArPicle 137•
TOe governmenP, ROile preserving POe principle of cenPrMlism, sOMll delegMPe
certain authorities to local administration units for the purpose of expediting
and promoting economic, social, and cultural affairs, and increasing the
participation of people in the development of the nation.
ArPicle 138•
Hn every province M provinciMl council is Po Ne formedB
MemNers of POe provinciMl council Mre elecPed in proporPion Po POe populMPion Ny
free, direct, secret ballot, and general elections by the residents of the province
for a period of four years in accordance with the law.
TOe provinciMl council elecPs one of iPs memNers Ms FOMirmMnB
ArPicle 13E•
TOe provinciMl council PMkes pMrP in securing POe developmenPMl PMrgePs of POe
state and improving its affairs in a way stated in the law, and gives advice on
important issues falling within the domain of the province.
ProvinciMl councils perform POeir duPies in cooperMPion RiPO POe provinciMl
ArPicle 140•
Hn order Po orgMnize McPiviPies involving people Mnd provide POem RiPO POe
opportunity to actively participate in the local administration, councils are set
up in districts and villages in accordance with the provisions of the law.
MemNers of POese councils Mre elecPed Ny POe locMl people POrougO, free,
general, secret and direct elections for a period of three years.
TOe pMrPicipMPion of nomMds in POese councils is regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle 141•
MunicipMliPies sOMll Ne seP up in order Po MdminisPer ciPy MffMirsB
TOe mMyor Mnd memNers of POe municipMl councils Mre elecPed Ny free, generMl,
secret, and direct elections.
TOe MffMirs relMPed Po municipMliPies Mre regulMPed Ny lMRB
ArPicle 142•
For POe purpose of POe implemenPMPion of POe provisions, Mnd ensuring POe
values of this constitution, the state shall establish the required departments.
Chapter Nine: The State of Emergency
ArPicle 143•
Hf due Po RMr, POreMP of RMr, serious reNellion, nMPurMl disMsPers, or siPuMPions
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similar to these protecting the independence or nation’s survival becomes
impossible by following the provision of this Constitution, the President in
con�rmMPion of NMPionMl AssemNly sOMll declMre M sPMPe of emergency in some
or all parts of the country.
Hf POe sPMPe of emergency conPinues for more POMn PRo monPOs, POe MgreemenP
of National Assembly is required for its extension.
ArPicle 144•
Guring POe sPMPe of emergency, POe PresidenP, RiPO POe consulPMPions of OeMds
of the National Assembly, and the Supreme Court can transfer some authorities
of the National Assembly to the government.
ArPicle 14D•
Guring POe sPMPe of emergency, POe PresidenP RiPO POe consenP of POe OeMds of
the National Assembly and the Supreme Court can suspend the validity of the
following Articles or can place restrictions on them:
Paragraph two of Article 27
1.
Article 36
Paragraph two of Article 37
Paragraph two of Article 38.
ArPicle 146•
Guring POe sPMPe of emergency, POe FonsPiPuPion cMnnoP Ne MmendedB
ArPicle 147•
Hf POe PresidenPiMl Perm of of�ce, Mnd or POe legislMPive period expire during M
state of emergency, the new elections shall be postponed, and the presidency,
and the legislative period shall be extended for up to four months.
Hf POe sPMPe of emergency conPinues for more POMn four monPOs, M IoyM JirgM
shall be called by the President for further decisions.
FolloRing POe PerminMPion of sPMPe of emergency, elecPion Rould Ne Oeld RiPOin
two months.
ArPicle 148•
AfPer POe end of POe sPMPe of emergency, POe meMsures MdopPed on POe NMsis
of Articles 144 and 145 of this Constitution shall be considered invalid
immediately.
Chapter Ten: Amendments
ArPicle 14E•
TOe provisions of MdOerence Po POe provisions of POe sMcred religion of HslMm
and the regime of Islamic Republic cannot be amended.
TOe MmendmenP of POe fundMmenPMl rigOPs of POe people Mre permiPPed only in
order to make them more effective.
Fonsidering neR experiences Mnd requiremenPs of POe Pime, oPOer conPenPs of
this Constitution can be amended by the proposal of the President or by the
111
majority of members of the National Assembly in accordance with the provisions
of Article 67, and 146 of this Constitution.
ArPicle 1D0•
Hn order Po implemenP proposMls regMrding Mmending POe FonsPiPuPion, M
commission composed of members of the government, National Assembly, and
the Supreme Court, would be established by a Presidential decree, and the
commission shall prepare a draft of the amendments.

For MpprovMl of POe MmendmenPs, M IoyM JirgM sOMll Ne convened Ny POe decree
of the President in accordance with the provisions of the Chapter on the Loya
JOen POe IoyM JirgM Mpproves Mn MmendmenP Ny M mMjoriPy of PRo-POirds of iPs
members, it shall be enforced after endorsement by the President.
Chapter Eleven: The Miscellaneous Provisions
ArPicle 1D1•
TOe PresidenP, Vice PresidenPs, MinisPers, HeMd Mnd memNers of POe Supreme
Court, Attorney General, Head of the Central Bank, National Security Directorate,
Governors Mnd MMyors cMnnoP engMge in Mny pro�PMNle Nusiness conPrMcPs RiPO
POe governmenP during POeir Perm of of�ceB
ArPicle 1D2•
TOe PresidenP, Vice PresidenPs, minisPers, OeMds Mnd memNers of POe NMPionMl
Assembly, the Supreme Court, Attorney General and judges, cannot undertake
oPOer joNs during POeir Perms of of�ceB
ArPicle 1D3•
Judges, APPorneys, Mnd Of�cers of POe Armed Forces Mnd Police, Mnd memNers
of the National Security, cannot be members of political parties during their
Perms of of�ceB
ArPicle 1D4•
TOe ReMlPO of POe PresidenP, Vice PresidenPs, minisPers, memNers of POe
Supreme FourP Mnd POe APPorney GenerMl Nefore Mnd MfPer POeir Perm of of�ce
would be registered and monitored by an organ to be set by law.
ArPicle 1DD•
AppropriMPe sMlMries sOMll Ne pMid Po POe Vice PresidenPs, MinisPers, FOMirs Mnd
members of the National Assembly, the Supreme Court, Attorney General and
Judges in accordance with the provisions of law.
ArPicle 1D6•
TOe HndependenP ElecPorMl Fommission sOMll Ne seP up for POe orgMnizMPion Mnd
supervision of any election and for holding a referendum within the country
based on the provisions of the law.
ArPicle 1D7•
TOe HndependenP Fommission for POe Supervision of POe HmplemenPMPion of POe
Constitution will be established by the provisions of the law.
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112
MemNers of POis Fommission sOMll Ne MppoinPed Ny POe PresidenP RiPO POe
con�rmMPion of POe Jolesi JirgMB
Chapter Twelve: The Transi�onal Provisions
ArPicle 1D8•
TOe PiPle of POe FMPOer of POe NMPion Mnd POe privileges grMnPed Ny POe Emergency
Loya Jirga of 1381 (2002) to His Majesty Mohammad Zahir Shah Former King
of Afghanistan are preserved for him during his lifetime, in accordance with the
provisions of this constitution.
ArPicle 1DE•
TOe period, folloRing POe MdopPion of POis FonsPiPuPion, unPil POe dMPe of
inauguration of the National Assembly, is deemed as transitional period.
Guring POe PrMnsiPionMl period, POe HslMmic TrMnsiPionMl SPMPe of AfgOMnisPMn
would carry out the following tasks:
Issue the legislative decrees related to the elections of the President,
1.
Issue decrees regarding the structure and authorities of the courts and
basic administration structures within a period of less than one year
Establish an Independent Electoral Commission
Take necessary measures for reform of executive and judicial affairs
Adopt necessary measures for preparing the ground for enforcement of the
provisions of this Constitution.
ArPicle 160•
TOe �rsP elecPed PresidenP sOMll PMke up OisCOer duPies MfPer POirPy dMys of POe
announcement of the elections in accordance with this Constitution.
Every efforP sOMll Ne mMde Po Oold POe �rsP presidenPiMl elecPions Mnd POe
parliamentary elections at the same time.
UnPil POe esPMNlisOmenP of POe NMPionMl AssemNly, POe poRers of POis MssemNly
outlined in this constitution will be held by the government, and the interim
Supreme Court shall be established by Presidential Decree.
ArPicle 161•
TOe NMPionMl AssemNly Rill exercise iPs poRers immediMPely MfPer iPs
establishment in accordance with this Constitution.
TOe GovernmenP, Mnd POe Supreme FourP sOMll Ne esPMNlisOed RiPOin POirPy dMys
MfPer POe �rsP session of POe Jolesi JirgM is PMken plMceB
TOe PresidenP of POe TrMnsiPionMl HslMmic SPMPe of AfgOMnisPMn sOMll conPinue Ois
duPies unPil POe elecPed PresidenP OMs PMken OMs PMken POe of�ceB
TOe execuPive, Mnd judiciMl orgMns of POe sPMPe in MccordMnce RiPO provisions of
paragraph 4 of Article 159 of this constitution shall continue their duties, until
the formation of the Government and the Supreme Court.
TOe decrees enforced from POe Neginning of POe inPerim period, sOMll Ne
113
suNmiPPed Po POe �rsP session of POe NMPionMl AssemNlyB
TOese decrees Mre enforceMNle unPil POey Mre Mnnulled Ny POe NMPionMl
Assembly.
ArPicle 162•
TOis FonsPiPuPion is enforced upon iPs MpprovMl Ny POe IoyM JirgM, Mnd Rill Ne
signed and announced by the President of the Transitional Islamic State of
Upon POe enforcemenP of POis FonsPiPuPion, lMRs Mnd decrees conPrMry Po POe
provisions of it are invalid.
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114
The Afghanistan Compact
For more information on the Afghanistan Compact, see page 11.
Preamble
The Islamic Republic of Afghanistan and the international community:
Determined to strengthen their partnership to improve the lives of Afghan people, and to
contribute to national, regional and global peace and security;
Af�rming POeir sOMred commiPmenP Po conPinue, in POe spiriP of POe Bonn, Tokyo Mnd Berlin
conferences, to work toward a stable and prosperous Afghanistan, with good governance
and human rights protection for all under the rule of law, and to maintain and strengthen that
commitment over the term of this Compact and beyond;
Recognising the courage and determination of Afghans who, by defying violent extremism
and hardship, have laid the foundations for a democratic, peaceful, pluralistic and prosperous
state based on the principles of Islam;
Noting the full implementation of the Bonn Agreement through the adoption of a new
consPiPuPion in JMnuMry 2004, Mnd POe Oolding of presidenPiMl elecPions in OcPoNer 2004 Mnd
NMPionMl AssemNly Mnd ProvinciMl Founcil elecPions in SepPemNer 200D, ROicO OMve enMNled
Afghanistan to regain its rightful place in the international community;
Mindful that Afghanistan’s transition to peace and stability is not yet assured, and that strong
international engagement will continue to be required to address remaining challenges;
Resolved Po overcome POe legMcy of con�icP in AfgOMnisPMn Ny sePPing condiPions for susPMinMNle
economic growth and development; strengthening state institutions and civil society; removing
remaining terrorist threats; meeting the challenge of counter narcotics; rebuilding capacity
and infrastructure; reducing poverty; and meeting basic human needs;
Have agreed to this Afghanistan Compact.
The Afghan Government has articulated its overarching goals for the well-being of its people in the
“Afghanistan Millennium Development Goals Country Report 2005 — Vision 2020”. Consistent
RiPO POose goMls, POis FompMcP idenPi�es POree criPicMl Mnd inPerdependenP MreMs or pillMrs of
McPiviPy for POe �ve yeMrs from POe MdopPion of POis FompMcP:
Security;
Governance, Rule of Law and Human Rights; and
Documents: Afghanistan Compact
115
Economic and Social Development.
A further vital and cross-cutting area of work is eliminating the narcotics industry, which remains
a formidable threat to the people and state of Afghanistan, the region and beyond.
The Afghan Government hereby commits itself to realising this shared vision of the future; the
international community, in turn, commits itself to provide resources and support to realise
that vision. Annex I of this Compact sets out detailed outcomes, benchmarks and timelines for
delivery, consistent with the high-level goals set by the Afghanistan National Development Strategy
(ANDS). The Government and international community also commit themselves to improve the
effectiveness and accountability of international assistance as set forth in Annex II.
Principles of Coopera�on
As the Afghan Government and the international community embark on the implementation of
this Compact, they will:
Respect the pluralistic culture, values and history of Afghanistan, based on Islam;
Work on the basis of partnership between the Afghan Government, with its sovereign
responsibilities, and the international community, with a central and impartial coordinating
role for the United Nations;
Engage further the deep-seated traditions of participation and aspiration to ownership of the
Pursue �scMl, insPiPuPionMl Mnd environmenPMl susPMinMNiliPy;
Build lasting Afghan capacity and effective state and civil society institutions, with particular
emphasis on building up human capacities of men and women alike;
Ensure balanced and fair allocation of domestic and international resources in order to offer
all parts of the country tangible prospects of well-being;
Recognise in all policies and programmes that men and women have equal rights and
Promote regional cooperation; and
Combat corruption and ensure public transparency and accountability.
Genuine security remains a fundamental prerequisite for achieving stability and development in
Afghanistan. Security cannot be provided by military means alone. It requires good governance,
justice and the rule of law, reinforced by reconstruction and development. With the support of the
international community, the Afghan Government will consolidate peace by disbanding all illegal
armed groups. The Afghan Government and the international community will create a secure
environment by strengthening Afghan institutions to meet the security needs of the country in a
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116
�scMlly susPMinMNle mMnnerB
To that end, the NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), the US-led Operation
Enduring Freedom (OEF) and partner nations involved in security sector reform will continue to
provide strong support to the Afghan Government in establishing and sustaining security and
stability in Afghanistan, subject to participating states’ national approval procedures. They will
continue to strengthen and develop the capacity of the national security forces to ensure that
they become fully functional. All OEF counter-terrorism operations will be conducted in close
coordination with the Afghan Government and ISAF. ISAF will continue to expand its presence
throughout Afghanistan, including through Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs), and will
continue to promote stability and support security sector reforms in its areas of operation.
Full respect for Afghanistan’s sovereignty and strengthening dialogue and cooperation between
Afghanistan and its neighbours constitute an essential guarantee of stability in Afghanistan and the
regionB TOe inPernMPionMl communiPy Rill supporP concrePe con�dence-Nuilding meMsures Po POis endB
Governance, Rule of Law and Human Rights
Democratic governance and the protection of human rights constitute the cornerstone of
sustainable political progress in Afghanistan. The Afghan Government will rapidly expand
its capacity to provide basic services to the population throughout the country. It will recruit
competent and credible professionals to public service on the basis of merit; establish a more
effective, accountable and transparent administration at all levels of Government; and implement
meMsurMNle improvemenPs in �gOPing corrupPion, upOolding jusPice Mnd POe rule of lMR Mnd
promoting respect for the human rights of all Afghans.
The Afghan Government will give priority to the coordinated establishment in each province
of functional institutions — including civil administration, police, prisons and judiciary. These
institutions will have appropriate legal frameworks and appointment procedures; trained staff;
and adequate remuneration, infrastructure and auditing capacity. The Government will establish
M �scMlly Mnd insPiPuPionMlly susPMinMNle MdminisPrMPion for fuPure elecPions under POe supervision
Reforming the justice system will be a priority for the Afghan Government and the international
community. The aim will be to ensure equal, fair and transparent access to justice for all based
upon written codes with fair trials and enforceable verdicts. Measures will include: completing
legislative reforms for the public as well as the private sector; building the capacity of judicial
institutions and personnel; promoting human rights and legal awareness; and rehabilitating
TOe AfgOMn GovernmenP Mnd POe inPernMPionMl communiPy reMf�rm POeir commiPmenP Po POe
protection and promotion of rights provided for in the Afghan constitution and under applicable
international law, including the international human rights covenants and other instruments
to which Afghanistan is party. With a view to rebuilding trust among those whose lives were
Documents: Afghanistan Compact
117
shattered by war, reinforcing a shared sense of citizenship and a culture of tolerance, pluralism
and observance of the rule of law, the Afghan Government with the support of the international
community will implement the Action Plan on Peace, Justice and Reconciliation.
Economic and Social Development
The Afghan Government with the support of the international community will pursue high rates of
sustainable economic growth with the aim of reducing hunger, poverty and unemployment. It will
promoPe POe role Mnd poPenPiMl of POe privMPe secPor, Mlongside POose of POe puNlic Mnd non-pro�P
sectors; curb the narcotics industry; ensure macroeconomic stability; restore and promote the
development of the country’s human, social and physical capital, thereby establishing a sound
basis for a new generation of leaders and professionals; strengthen civil society; and complete the
reintegration of returnees, internally displaced persons and ex-combatants.
Public investments will be structured around the six sectors of the pillar on economic and social
development of the Afghanistan National Development Strategy:
Infrastructure and natural resources;
Agriculture and rural development;
Social protection; and
Economic governance and private sector development.
In each of these areas, the objective will be to achieve measurable results towards the goal of
equitable economic growth that reduces poverty, expands employment and enterprise creation,
enhances opportunities in the region and improves the well-being of all Afghans.
Counter Narco�cs: A Cross-Cu�ng Priority
Meeting the threat that the narcotics industry poses to national, regional and international
security as well as the development and governance of the country and the well-being of Afghans
will be a priority for the Government and the international community. The aim will be to achieve
M susPMined Mnd signi�cMnP reducPion in POe producPion Mnd PrMf�cking of nMrcoPics RiPO M vieR
to complete elimination. Essential elements include improved interdiction, law enforcement and
judicial capacity building; enhanced cooperation among Afghanistan, neighbouring countries
and the international community on disrupting the drugs trade; wider provision of economic
alternatives for farmers and labourers in the context of comprehensive rural development; and
building national and provincial counter narcotics institutions. It will also be crucial to enforce a
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
118
zero-PolerMnce policy PoRMrds of�ciMl corrupPion; Po pursue erMdicMPion Ms MppropriMPe; Po reinforce
the message that producing or trading opiates is both immoral and a violation of Islamic law; and
to reduce the demand for the illicit use of opiates.
Coordina�on and Monitoring
The Afghan Government and the international community are establishing a Joint Coordination
and Monitoring Board for the implementation of the political commitments that comprise this
Compact. As detailed in Annex III, this Board will be co-chaired by the Afghan Government and the
United Nations and will be supported by a small secretariat. It will ensure greater coherence of
efforts by the Afghan Government and international community to implement the Compact and
provide regular and timely public reports on its execution.
ANNEX I: Benchmarks and Timelines
The Afghan Government, with the support of the international community, is committed to
McOieving POe folloRing NencOmMrks in MccordMnce RiPO POe Pimelines speci�edB
International Security Forces
Through end-2010, with the support of and in close coordination with the Afghan Government, the
NATO-led International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and
their respective Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs) will promote security and stability in all
regions of Afghanistan, including by strengthening Afghan capabilities.
Afghan National Army
By end-2010: A nationally respected, professional, ethnically balanced Afghan National Army
will be fully established that is democratically accountable, organized, trained and equipped
to meet the security needs of the country and increasingly funded from Government revenue,
commensurate with the nation’s economic capacity; the international community will continue to
support Afghanistan in expanding the ANA towards the ceiling of 70,000 personnel articulated in
the Bonn talks; and the pace of expansion is to be adjusted on the basis of periodic joint quality
assessments by the Afghan Government and the international community against agreed criteria
which take into account prevailing conditions.
Afghan National and Border Police
By end-2010, a fully constituted, professional, functional and ethnically balanced Afghan National
Police and Afghan Border Police with a combined force of up to 62,000 will be able to meet the
securiPy needs of POe counPry effecPively Mnd Rill Ne increMsingly �scMlly susPMinMNleB
Documents: Afghanistan Compact
119
Disbandment of Illegal Armed Groups
All illegal armed groups will be disbanded by end-2007 in all provinces.
Counter Narcotics
By end-2010, the Government will strengthen its law enforcement capacity at both central and
provincial levels, resulting in a substantial annual increase in the amount of drugs seized or
destroyed and processing facilities dismantled, and in effective measures, including targeted
eradication as appropriate, that contribute to the elimination of poppy cultivation.
By end-2010, the Government and neighbouring and regional governments will work together
to increase coordination and mutual sharing of intelligence, with the goal of an increase in the
seizure and destruction of drugs being smuggled across Afghanistan’s borders and effective
McPion MgMinsP drug PrMf�ckersB
Mine Action and Ammunition
By end-2010, in line with Afghanistan’s Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and Afghanistan’s
Ottawa Convention obligations, the land area contaminated by mines and unexploded ordnance
will be reduced by 70%; all stockpiled anti-personnel mines will be located and destroyed by end-
2007; and by end-2010, all unsafe, unserviceable and surplus ammunition will be destroyed.
Governance, Human Rights and Rule of Law
Public Administrative Reform
By end-2010: Government machinery (including the number of ministries) will be restructured and
rMPionMlised Po ensure M �scMlly susPMinMNle puNlic MdminisPrMPion; POe civil service commission
Rill Ne sPrengPOened; Mnd civil service funcPions Rill Ne reformed Po re�ecP core funcPions Mnd
A clear and transparent national appointments mechanism will be established within 6 months,
applied within 12 months and fully implemented within 24 months for all senior level appointments
to the central government and the judiciary, as well as for provincial governors, chiefs of police,
district administrators and provincial heads of security.
By end-2006 a review of the number of administrative units and their boundaries will be undertaken
RiPO POe Mim of conPriNuPing Po �scMl susPMinMNiliPyB
By end-2010, in furtherance of the work of the civil service commission, merit-based appointments,
vetting procedures and performance-based reviews will be undertaken for civil service positions
at all levels of government, including central government, the judiciary and police, and requisite
support will be provided to build the capacity of the civil service to function effectively. Annual performance-
based reviews will be undertaken for all senior staff (grade 2 and above) starting by end-2007.
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Corruption
TOe UN FonvenPion MgMinsP ForrupPion Rill Ne rMPi�ed Ny end-2006, nMPionMl legislMPion MdMpPed Mccordingly
by end-2007 and a monitoring mechanism to oversee implementation will be in place by end-2008.
The Census and Statistics
The census enumeration will be completed by end-2008 and the complete results published.
Reliable statistical baselines will be established for all quantitative benchmarks by mid-2007 and
statistical capacity built to track progress against them.
National Assembly
The National Assembly will be provided with technical and administrative support by mid-2006 to
ful�l effecPively iPs consPiPuPionMlly mMndMPed rolesB
The Afghanistan Independent Election Commission will have the high integrity, capacity and
resources Po underPMke elecPions in Mn increMsingly �scMlly susPMinMNle mMnner Ny end-2008, RiPO
the Government of Afghanistan contributing to the extent possible to the cost of future elections
from its own resources. A permanent civil and voter registry with a single national identity document
will be established by end-2009.
By end-2010: the National Action Plan for Women in Afghanistan will be fully implemented; and, in
line with Afghanistan’s MDGs, female participation in all Afghan governance institutions, including
elected and appointed bodies and the civil service, will be strengthened.
Rule of Law
By end-2010, the legal framework required under the constitution, including civil, criminal and
commercial law, will be put in place, distributed to all judicial and legislative institutions and made
available to the public.
By end-2010, functioning institutions of justice will be fully operational in each province of Afghanistan,
and the average time to resolve contract disputes will be reduced as much as possible.
A review and reform of oversight procedures relating to corruption, lack of due process and
miscarriage of justice will be initiated by end-2006 and fully implemented by end-2010; by end-
2010, reforms will strengthen the professionalism, credibility and integrity of key institutions of
POe jusPice sysPem (POe MinisPry of JusPice, POe JudiciMry, POe APPorney GenerMl’s of�ce, POe MinisPry
of Interior and the National Directorate of Security).
By end-2010, justice infrastructure will be rehabilitated; and prisons will have separate facilities
for women and juveniles.
Documents: Afghanistan Compact
121
Land Registration
A process for registration of land in all administrative units and the registration of titles will be
started for all major urban areas by end-2006 and all other areas by end-2008. A fair system for
settlement of land disputes will be in place by end-2007. Registration for rural land will be under
way by end-2007.
Counter Narcotics
By end-2010, POe GovernmenP Rill increMse POe numNer of MrresPs Mnd prosecuPions of PrMf�ckers
Mnd corrupP of�ciMls Mnd Rill improve iPs informMPion NMse concerning POose involved in POe
drugs trade, with a view to enhancing the selection system for national and sub-national public
appointments, as part of the appointments mechanism mentioned earlier in this annex.
By end-2010: The Government’s capacity to comply with and report on its human rights treaty
obligations will be strengthened; Government security and law enforcement agencies will adopt
corrective measures including codes of conduct and procedures aimed at preventing arbitrary
arrest and detention, torture, extortion and illegal expropriation of property with a view to the
elimination of these practices; the exercise of freedom of expression, including freedom of media,
will be strengthened; human rights awareness will be included in education curricula and promoted
among legislators, judicial personnel and other Government agencies, communities and the
public; human rights monitoring will be carried out by the Government and independently by the
Afghan Independent Human Rights Commission (AIHRC), and the UN will track the effectiveness of
meMsures Mimed MP POe proPecPion of OumMn rigOPs; POe AHHRF Rill Ne supporPed in POe ful�lmenP of
its objectives with regard to monitoring, investigation, protection and promotion of human rights.
The implementation of the Action Plan on Peace, Justice and Reconciliation will be completed by
Economic and Social Development
Infrastructure and Natural Resources
Roads
Afghanistan will have a fully upgraded and maintained ring road, as well as roads connecting
POe ring roMd Po neigONouring counPries Ny end-2008 Mnd M �scMlly susPMinMNle sysPem for roMd
maintenance by end-2007.
Air Transport
By end-2010: Kabul International Airport and Herat Airport will achieve full International Civil
Aviation Organisation compliance; Mazar-i-Sharif, Jalalabad and Kandahar will be upgraded with
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
runRMy repMirs, Mir nMvigMPion, �re Mnd rescue Mnd communicMPions equipmenP; seven oPOer
domestic airports will be upgraded to facilitate domestic air transportation; and air transport
services and costs will be increasingly competitive with international market standards and
rates.
By end-2010: electricity will reach at least 65% of households and 90% of non-residential
establishments in major urban areas and at least 25% of households in rural areas; at least 75%
of the costs will be recovered from users connected to the national power grid. A strategy for the
development and the use of renewable energies will be developed by end-2007.
Mining and Natural Resources
An enMNling regulMPory environmenP for pro�PMNle exPrMcPion of AfgOMnisPMn’s minerMl Mnd nMPurMl
resources will be created by end-2006, and by end-2010 the investment environment and infrastructure
will be enhanced in order to attract domestic and foreign direct investment in this area.
Water Resource Management
Sustainable water resource management strategies and plans covering irrigation and drinking
water supply will be developed by end-2006, and irrigation investments will result in at least 30%
of water coming from large waterworks by end-2010.
Urban Development
By end-2010: Municipal governments will have strengthened capacity to manage urban
developmenP Mnd Po ensure POMP municipMl services Mre delivered effecPively, ef�cienPly Mnd
transparently; in line with Afghanistan’s MDGs, investment in water supply and sanitation will
ensure that 50% of households in Kabul and 30% of households in other major urban areas will
have access to piped water.
Environment
In line with Afghanistan’s MDGs, environmental regulatory frameworks and management services
will be established for the protection of air and water quality, waste management and pollution
control, and natural resource policies will be developed and implementation started at all levels
of government as well as the community level, by end-2007.
Primary and Secondary Education
By end-2010: in line with Afghanistan’s MDGs, net enrolment in primary school for girls and boys
will be at least 60% and 75% respectively; a new curriculum will be operational in all secondary
schools; female teachers will be increased by 50%; 70% of Afghanistan’s teachers will have
passed a competency test; and a system for assessing learning achievement such as a national
Documents: Afghanistan Compact
testing system for students will be in place.
By end 2010: enrolment of students to universities will be 100,000 with at least 35% female
students; and the curriculum in Afghanistan’s public universities will be revised to meet the
development needs of the country and private sector growth.
Skills Development
A human resource study will be completed by end-2006, and 150,000 men and women will be
trained in marketable skills through public and private means by end-2010.
A comprehensive inventory of Afghan cultural treasures will be compiled by end-2007. Measures
will be taken to revive the Afghan cultural heritage, to stop the illegal removal of cultural material
and to restore damaged monuments and artefacts by end-2010.
Health and Nutrition
By end-2010, in line with Afghanistan’s MDGs, the Basic Package of Health Services will be
extended to cover at least 90% of the population; maternal mortality will be reduced by 15%; and
full immunisation coverage for infants under 5 for vaccine-preventable diseases will be achieved
and their mortality rates reduced by 20%.
Agriculture and Rural Development
Agriculture and Livestock
By end-2010: The necessary institutional, regulatory and incentive framework to increase
production and productivity will be established to create an enabling environment for legal
agriculture and agriculture-based rural industries, and public investment in agriculture will
increase by 30 percent; particular consideration will be given to perennial horticulture, animal
OeMlPO Mnd food securiPy Ny insPiPuPing speciMlised supporP Mgencies Mnd �nMnciMl service delivery
mechanisms, supporting farmers’ associations, branding national products, disseminating timely
price and weather-related information and statistics, providing strategic research and technical
assistance and securing access to irrigation and water management systems.
Comprehensive Rural Development
By end-2010: RurMl developmenP Rill Ne enOMnced compreOensively for POe Nene�P of 1E million
people in over 38,000 villages; this will be achieved through the election of at least a further
14,000 voluntary community development councils in all remaining villages, promoting local
governance and community empowerment; access to safe drinking water will be extended to 90%
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124
of villages and sanitation to 50%; road connectivity will reach 40% of all villages, increasing access
Po mMrkePs, employmenP Mnd sociMl services; 47% of villMges Rill Nene�P from smMll-scMle irrigMPion;
800,000 OouseOolds (22% of Mll AfgOMnisPMn’s OouseOolds) Rill Nene�P from improved Mccess Po
�nMnciMl services; Mnd liveliOoods of MP leMsP 1D% of POe rurMl populMPion Rill Ne supporPed POrougO
the provision of 91 million labour days.
Counter Narcotics
By end-2010, the Government will design and implement programmes to achieve a sustained
annual reduction in the amount of land under poppy and other drug cultivation by the strengthening
Mnd diversi�cMPion of liciP liveliOoods Mnd oPOer counPer nMrcoPics meMsures, Ms pMrP of POe
overall goal of a decrease in the absolute and relative size of the drug economy in line with the
Government’s MDG target.
Social Protection
Poverty Reduction
By end-2010, in line RiPO AfgOMnisPMn’s MGGs, POe proporPion of people living on less POMn US$1
a day will decrease by 3% per year and the proportion of people who suffer from hunger will
decrease by 5% per year.
Humanitarian and Disaster Response
By end-2010, an effective system of disaster preparedness and response will be in place.
By end-2010, increased assistance will be provided to meet the special needs of all disabled
people, including their integration in society through opportunities for education and gainful
employment.
Employment of Youth and Demobilised Soldiers
By end-2010, employment opportunities for youth and demobilised soldiers will be increased
through special programmes.
Refugees and IDPs
By end-2010, all refugees opting to return and internally displaced persons will be provided
assistance for rehabilitation and integration in their local communities; their integration will be
supported by national development programmes, particularly in key areas of return.
Vulnerable Women
By end-2010, the number of female-headed households that are chronically poor will be reduced
by 20%, and their employment rates will be increased by 20%.
Documents: Afghanistan Compact
Counter Narcotics
By end-2010, the Government will implement programmes to reduce the demand for narcotics
and provide improved treatment for drug users.
Economic Governance and Private Sector Development
By end-2007, POe GovernmenP Rill ensure improved PrMnspMrenP �nMnciMl mMnMgemenP MP
POe cenPrMl Mnd provinciMl levels POrougO esPMNlisOing Mnd meePing NencOmMrks for �nMnciMl
management agreed with and monitored by the international community, including those in the
anticipated Poverty Reduction Growth Facility (PRGF). In turn, and in line with improved government
accountability, donors will make more effort to increase the share of total external assistance to
Afghanistan that goes to the core budget.
Domestic Revenues
Afghanistan’s total domestic budgetary revenue — equivalent to 4.5% of estimated legal GDP in
1383 (2004/05) — will steadily increase and reach 8% of GDP by 1389 (2010/11). The ratio of
revenue to estimated total recurrent expenditures, including estimated recurrent expenditures in
the core and external development budgets, is projected to rise from 28% in 1383 (2004/05) to
an estimated 58% in 1389, resulting in a continuing need, in accord with the principles in Annex II,
for (1) external assistance to the core budget and (2) increasing cost-effectiveness of assistance
that funds recurrent expenditure though the external development budget.
Private Sector Development and Trade
All legislMPion, regulMPions Mnd procedures relMPed Po invesPmenP Rill Ne simpli�ed Mnd OMrmonised
by end-2006 and implemented by end-2007. New business organisation laws will be tabled in
the National Assembly by end-2006. The Government’s strategy for divestment of state-owned
enterprises will be implemented by end-2009.
Financial Services and Markets
Internationally accepted prudential regulations will be developed for all core sectors of banking and
non-NMnk �nMnciMl insPiPuPions Ny end-2007B TOe NMnking supervision funcPion of GM AfgOMnisPMn
Bank will be further strengthened by end-2007. Re-structuring of state-owned commercial banks
will be complete by end-2007. State-owned banks that have not been re-licensed will be liquidated
by end-2006.
Regional Cooperation
By end-2010: Afghanistan and its neighbours will achieve lower transit times through Afghanistan
by means of cooperative border management and other multilateral or bilateral trade and transit
agreements; Afghanistan will increase the amount of electricity available through bilateral power
purchase; and Afghanistan, its neighbours and countries in the region will reach agreements to
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
enable Afghanistan to import skilled labour, and to enable Afghans to seek work in the region and
ANNEX II: Improving the E�ec�veness of Aid to Afghanistan
TOe inPernMPionMl communiPy OMs mMde M signi�cMnP invesPmenP in POe fuPure of M democrMPic
sPMPe of AfgOMnisPMn since GecemNer 2001B TOis FompMcP is Mn Mf�rmMPion of POMP commiPmenPB
The Afghan Government and the international community are further committed to improving the
effectiveness of the aid being provided to Afghanistan in accordance with the Paris Declaration
on Aid Effectiveness (2005), recognising the special needs of Afghanistan and their implications
for donor support.
Consistent with the Paris Declaration and the principles of cooperation of this Compact, the
Government and the international community providing assistance to Afghanistan agree that the
principles for improving the effectiveness of aid to Afghanistan under this Compact are:
Leadership of the Afghan Government in setting its development priorities and strategies and,
within them, the support needs of the country and the coordination of donor assistance;
Transparency and accountability on the part of both the Government and the donors of the
international assistance being provided to Afghanistan.
Under these principles and towards the goal of improving the effectiveness of aid to Afghanistan,
the Government will:
Provide a prioritised and detailed Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS) with
indicators for monitoring results, including those for Afghanistan’s Millennium Development
Improve its abilities to generate domestic revenues through, inter alia, customs duties and
taxes; and to achieve cost recovery from public utilities and transportation;
Agree RiPO donors, inPernMPionMl �nMnciMl insPiPuPions Mnd UniPed NMPions Mgencies on POe
benchmarks for aid channelled through the Government’s core budget and for the utilisation
of such aid; and monitor performance against those benchmarks; and
Provide regular reporting on the use of donor assistance and performance against the
benchmarks of this compact to the National Assembly, the donor community through the
Afghanistan Development Forum and the public at large.
The donors will:
Provide assistance within the framework of the Afghanistan National Development Strategy;
programmes and projects will be coordinated with Government in order to focus on priorities,
eliminate duplication and rationalise donor activities to maximise cost-effectiveness;
Increasingly provide more predictable and multiyear funding commitments or indications of
Documents: Afghanistan Compact
127
multiyear support to Afghanistan to enable the Government to plan better the implementation
of its National Development Strategy and provide untied aid whenever possible;
Increase the proportion of donor assistance channelled directly through the core budget, as
agreed bilaterally between the Government and each donor, as well as through other more
predictable core budget funding modalities in which the Afghan Government participates,
such as the Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF), the Law and Order Trust Fund for
Afghanistan (LOTFA) and the Counter Narcotics Trust Fund (CNTF);
Provide assistance for the development of public expenditure management systems that are
essential for improving transparency and accountability in the utilisation of donor resources
and countering corruption;
Recognise that, because of the need to build Afghan capacity, donor assistance provided
through the external budget will be designed in such a manner as to build this capacity in the
GovernmenP Ms Rell Ms POe privMPe secPor Mnd non-pro�P secPor;
Ensure that development policies, including salary policies, strengthen national institutions that
are sustainable in the medium to long term for delivery of programmes by the Government;
For aid not channelled through the core budget, endeavour to:
Harmonise the delivery of technical assistance in line with Government needs to focus
Reduce the external management and overhead costs of projects by promoting the
Afghan private sector in their management and delivery;
HncreMsingly use AfgOMn nMPionMl implemenPMPion pMrPners Mnd equMlly quMli�ed locMl
and expatriate Afghans;
Increase procurement within Afghanistan of supplies for civilian and military activities;
Use Afghan materials in the implementation of projects, in particular for infrastructure;
Within the principles of international competitive bidding, promote the participation in the
bidding process of the Afghan private sector and South-South cooperation in order to overcome
capacity constraints and to lower costs of delivery;
Provide Pimely, PrMnspMrenP Mnd compreOensive informMPion on foreign Mid �oRs, including
levels of pledges, commitments and disbursements in a format that will enable the Afghan
Government to plan its own activities and present comprehensive budget reports to the National
Assembly; this covers the nature and amount of assistance being provided to Afghanistan
through the core and external budgets; and
For external budget assistance, also report to the Government on: the utilisation of funds; its
ef�ciency, quMliPy Mnd effecPiveness; Mnd POe resulPs McOievedB
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
These mutual commitments are intended to ensure that the donor assistance being provided
Po AfgOMnisPMn is used ef�cienPly Mnd effecPively, POMP POere is increMsed PrMnspMrency Mnd
accountability, and that both Afghans and the taxpayers in donor countries are receiving value
for money.
ANNEX III: Coordina�on and Monitoring
The Afghan Government and the international community recognise that the success of the
AfgOMnisPMn FompMcP requires sProng poliPicMl, securiPy Mnd �nMnciMl commiPmenP Po McOieve
the benchmarks within the agreed timelines. Equally, the success of the Compact relies on an
effective coordination and monitoring mechanism.
To this end, and in addition to existing sectoral coordination mechanisms, the Afghan Government
and the international community are establishing a Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board
RiPO POe pMrPicipMPion of senior AfgOMn GovernmenP of�ciMls MppoinPed Ny POe PresidenP Mnd
representatives of the international community. The Board will be co-chaired by a senior Afghan
GovernmenP of�ciMl MppoinPed Ny POe PresidenP Mnd Ny POe SpeciMl RepresenPMPive of POe UN
Secretary-General for Afghanistan. Its purpose would be to ensure overall strategic coordination
of the implementation of the Compact.
The Board will have a small secretariat staffed by the Afghan Government and the United Nations.
It will be supported by technical experts, as needed. The Board will hold periodic meetings and
special sessions as required to review the implementation of this Compact and suggest corrective
action, as appropriate.
Afghan state institutions and sectoral coordination mechanisms involved in the implementation
of the Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS) will provide inputs to the Board with
regard to the implementation of the Compact. In addition, in carrying out its assessments, the
Board will consider inputs from the international community, including United Nations agencies,
inPernMPionMl �nMnciMl insPiPuPions, donors, inPernMPionMl securiPy forces Mnd relevMnP non-
governmental organisations and civil society representatives.
Periodic progress reports on the implementation of the Compact prepared by the Joint Coordination
and Monitoring Board will be made public.
ANNEX IV: Par�cipants in the London Conference on Afghanistan
Participating Countries
Australia
Austria
Czech Republic
Denmark
Documents: Afghanistan Compact
France
Germany
Hungary
Jordan
Kazakhstan
Korea (Republic of)
Kuwait
Kyrgyzstan
Luxembourg
Malaysia
Netherlands
New Zealand
Norway
Pakistan
Poland
Portugal
Romania
Russia
Sweden
Tajikistan
Turkey
Turkmenistan
United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom (co-Chair)
United States of America
Aga Khan Foundation
Asian Development Bank
European Commission
European Union
Islamic Development Bank
International Monetary Fund
North Atlantic Treaty Organisation
Organisation of Islamic Conference
United Nations (co-Chair)
World Bank
Participating Organisations
Observers
Croatia
Estonia
Organisation for Security and Cooperation in
Europe
Slovakia
Slovenia
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
130
Code of Conduct for NGOs engaged in Humanitarian
Action, Reconstruction, and Development in
For more informMPion on POe NGO Fode of FonducP, see pMge D2B
Preamble
Afghanistan is at a unique point in its history and has the opportunity to move towards
long-term stability, economic prosperity and respect for human rights;
NGOs are civil society actors and a strong civil society is essential to the development
and functioning of a stable Afghan nation and state;
NGOs are committed to the development of Afghanistan and Afghan capacity;
the development of a new Constitution and a legislative structure for Afghanistan provide
M conPexP in ROicO MccounPMNle Mnd responsiNle NeOMviour cMn �ourisO Mnd Ne recognised;
NGOs, as civil society organisations and emergency and development programme
implementers, continue to make important contributions with and for the Afghan people;
the nature and roles of NGOs are not well understood, leading to accusations that NGOs
misuse funds and are wasteful and self-serving;
vMrious “for-pro�P” Mnd poliPicMl McPors misuse POe NGO umNrellM Po promoPe POeir
commercial or political interests;
NGOs continue to face demands that pull them in many different directions and may
threaten their capacity and their independence as civil society actors; and
Codes of Conduct are a mechanism by which NGOs can ensure higher standards –
including greater transparency and accountability,
Je, POe MccrediPed represenPMPives of NGOs in AfgOMnisPMn, OereNy volunPMrily Mf�x our signMPures
to this Code of Conduct and commit our organisations to upholding the Principles of Conduct in
De�ni�ons
The Code of Conduct
is a set of shared norms, principles and values that aims to enhance the
131
Non-governmental organisations
Mre volunPMry, noP-for-pro�P, non-pMrPisMn Mnd independenP
organisations or associations engaged in serving the public good. NGOs may be national as
well as international; secular as well as “faith-based”; and of membership and non-membership
categories.
“Voluntary” denotes free will on the part of the NGO as well as community partners.
“NoP-for-pro�P” meMns POMP Mn NGO cMnnoP disPriNuPe iPs MssePs, eMrnings or pro�Ps Ms sucO Po
any person. However, there may be paid employees or activities generating revenue which will
be used solely for the stated purposes of the organisation.
Non-partisan and independent indicates that the NGO is controlled and directed by its
governing body, in keeping with its mandate and not by any other power or group.
Signatories
are NGOs whose duly accredited representative has signed and accepted this Code
refers to all signatories to the Code of Conduct.
Civil society
includes all formal and informal groups and associations that are not of the public
and business sectors. NGOs are a part of civil society.
Gender equality
means that the different behaviour, aspirations, needs and rights of women
and men are considered, valued and favoured equally. It does not mean that women and men
have to become the same, but that their rights, responsibilities and opportunities will not depend
on whether they are born male or female.
Gender equity
means fairness of treatment for women and men, according to their respective
needs. This may include equal treatment or treatment that is different but which is considered
equivMlenP in Perms of rigOPs, Nene�Ps, oNligMPions Mnd opporPuniPiesB
FMpMciPy Nuilding
is the process by which individuals, groups, organisations, institutions and
societies increase their abilities to:
perform core funcPions, solve proNlems, de�ne Mnd McOieve oNjecPives; Mnd
2 understand and deal with their development needs in a broad context and in a sustainable
manner.
Humanitarian action
includes those activities taken to prevent and alleviate human suffering
Mrising ouP of con�icP, crisis Mnd cMlMmiPy, including Mny siPuMPion involving:
1 dMmMge Po or loss of lives of non-comNMPMnPs in M con�icP siPuMPion; or
2 pMPPerns of (gross) OumMn rigOPs or OumMniPMriMn lMR violMPions MgMinsP civiliMns in con�icP
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132
NGO Mission Statement
Our general mission as NGOs operating in Afghanistan is to address humanitarian, reconstruction
and sustainable development needs in Afghanistan, with a special focus on the rights of those
who are disadvantaged and vulnerable. We work in partnership with each other, the government,
donors and communities.
The Code of Conduct will promote:
improved understanding of NGOs, their purposes and their accomplishments among the
general public, government, donors and the media;
transparency, accountability and good management practices in the operation of NGOs by
voluntary self-regulation; and
improved quality of services provided by NGOs by raising standards of conduct.
1 Our organisations are people-centered
1.1
Focus on the people we serve: Our primary loyalty, accountability and responsibility is to
the people we serve. Our programmes are designed and developed in response to the
1.2
Self-reliance and ownership: We seek to help people and communities to solve their own
problems. We encourage and enable the development of self-reliance and advance the
right of people to fully participate in decisions that affect their lives.
1B3
HumMn rigOPs: Je endeMvour Po respecP, proPecP Mnd promoPe POe ful�lmenP of POe OumMn
rights and obligations of all Afghans in accordance with international law.
1.4
Trust: We work to build the trust of the communities with which we work.
1.5
Participation and non-discrimination: We involve men, women, youth and children of our
target communities to the greatest possible extent, engaging them in the conception,
implementation and evaluation of projects and programmes. We strive to ensure the
participation of marginalised groups in communities where we work.
1.6
Respect for local values: We respect the dignity and identity of the individual, and
acknowledge indigenous knowledge, culture, religious faith and values. This does not
mean that we support practices that undermine the human rights of any individual or
group.
133
2 Our organisations are committed to sustainable positive impact
2.1
Effectiveness: We are committed to effectiveness and to maximising the positive impact
of our programmes. We avoid duplication of services.
Sustainability: Whenever possible, our programmes seek durable solutions that are cost
effective, that build Afghan ownership and capacity, and that are driven by the long-term
development goals of communities.
Environmental impact: We exercise a responsible and responsive approach to the care
of the physical, natural environment and to the proper management of Afghanistan’s
ecosystems in all our activities.
Monitoring and evaluation: We monitor and evaluate the impact of our programmes and
sOMre �ndings RiPO relevMnP sPMkeOolders, including POe communiPies Re serve, donors,
government and the general public.
3 Our organisations are committed to transparency and accountability
3.1
We are transparent and accountable in our dealings with the government and community
partners, the public, donors and other interested parties.
AccounPMNiliPy: Je develop Mnd mMinPMin sound �nMnciMl policies, MudiPs, Mnd sysPems in
order to manage our accounts. We conform to the constitution, laws, rules and regulations
of the government of Afghanistan and where necessary, lobby for policy change. We are
truthful and honest in all matters related to raising, using and accounting for funds.
Je mMinPMin sound �nMnciMl, MccounPing, procuremenP, PrMnsporP Mnd MdminisPrMPive
systems that ensure the use of resources in accordance with intended purposes.
Transparency: We disseminate information on our goals and activities to interested
sPMkeOoldersB Je mMinPMin Mnd mMke MvMilMNle �nMnciMl Mnd McPiviPy reporPs upon requesP
by relevant and interested parties. We use all available opportunities to inform the public
about our work and about the origin and the use of our resources.
4 Our organisations are committed to good internal governance
4.1
Governing documentation: We have written constitutions or memorandums of association
POMP cleMrly de�ne our missions, our oNjecPives Mnd our orgMnisMPionMl sPrucPuresB
Equal opportunity: We develop and apply written policies, rules and procedures that
Mf�rm our commiPmenP Po equMl opporPuniPies in our employmenP prMcPices Mnd in POe
promotion of staff.
Employment practices: We apply hiring and termination practices that respect the
freedom of choice of individuals and the human resource needs of other stakeholders.
We offer positions based on merit, pay appropriate salaries, allocate job responsibilities
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
134
according to individual capacities, and demand adequate notice from employees and
provide adequate notice for terminations without cause.
No con�icPs of inPeresP: All our orgMnisMPionMl PrMnsMcPions Mre free of con�icPs of personMl
and professional interest. The services of board members shall be given freely and
voluntarily, other than reimbursements for essential costs incurred during service.
5 Our organisations are committed to honesty, integrity and cost effectiveness
5.1
Honesty: We are truthful in all our professional activities.
Integrity: We refrain from internal and external practices that undermine the ethical
integrity of our organisations. We do not engage in theft, corrupt practices, nepotism,
bribery or trade in illicit substances. We accept funds and donations only from sources
whose aims are consistent with our mission, objectives and capacity, and which do not
undermine our independence and identity.
Cost effectiveness: We utilise the resources available to our organisations in order to
pursue our missions and strategic objectives in cost-effective ways. We strive to minimise
waste and unnecessary expense, and to direct all possible resources to the people we
serve.
6 Our organisations are committed to diversity, fairness, non-discrimination
MgMinsP mMrginMlised groups Mnd Po Mf�rmMPive McPion
6B1
GiversiPy: Je seek Po OMve M Rorkforce POMP MppropriMPely re�ecPs POe gender, ePOnic,
geographic and religious diversity of Afghanistan and of the areas where we work.
Equity: We seek to advance greater balance and to promote equity in all internal relations
as well as equitable access to opportunities within our organisations. We seek to include
the underserved, the vulnerable, the disabled and other marginalised groups in all our
initiatives.
Gender equity: We consider and value equally the different behaviour, aspirations, needs
and rights of women and men. This may include equal treatment or treatment that is
differenP NuP ROicO is considered equivMlenP in Perms of rigOPs, Nene�Ps, oNligMPions Mnd
opportunities. Their rights, responsibilities and opportunities do not depend on whether
they are born male or female.
Non-discrimination against marginalised groups: Our human resource policies and
practices promote non-discriminatory recruitment, hiring, training and working practices,
Af�rmMPive McPion: Je sPrive Po increMse POe represenPMPion of under-represenPed groups
in senior decision-mMking posiPions MP OeMdquMrPers, in POe �eld, in NoMrds Mnd in Mdvisory
135
groups. We seek to include the underserved, the vulnerable, the marginalised and the
disabled in all our initiatives. We endeavour to strengthen the position of Afghan women
both within and outside our organisations.
7 Our organisations are committed to building Afghan capacity
7.1
Capacity building: We take every appropriate opportunity to help build Afghan capacity
to understand needs, establish priorities and take effective action so that ultimately
humanitarian, development and reconstruction needs are met by Afghans.
7.2
Consultation: We design and implement projects in consultation with local communities
and the government because we are committed to the long-term sustainable development
7.3
Sustainability: We design and facilitate projects so that services may be taken over by
target communities or by government bodies to enhance sustainability.
7.4
Human resources: In line with our policy of commitment to capacity building, we give
priority to Afghan nationals in our recruitment, hiring and training practices.
7.5
Physical and technical resources: We maximise the utilisation of locally available physical
and technical resources, where appropriate.
7.6
Appropriate technologies: We promote the use of appropriate technologies that can be
owned and maintained by communities.
8 Our Organizations are Committed to Independence
8.1
Independence: We formulate our own policies, programs, and implementation strategies.
We do not allow ourselves to be used to implement programs or gather information of
a political, military or economically sensitive nature for governments or other bodies
that may serve purposes other than those directly consistent with our humanitarian or
development missions.
Autonomy: We strive to maintain our autonomy according to Afghan and international
law, and to resist the imposition of conditionalities that may compromise our missions
In humanitarian emergency contexts, we adhere to the following additional principles:
9 Impartiality:
We provide aid on the basis of need alone. We provide support regardless of the race, religion,
ePOniciPy, gender, or nMPionMliPy Mnd poliPicMl Mf�liMPion of POe recipienPsB Je do noP Pie POe promise,
delivery or distribution of humanitarian assistance to the embracing or acceptance of a particular
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136
10 Neutrality:
We do not promote partisan national or international political agendas. We do not choose sides
NePReen pMrPies Po M con�icPB
11 Application of SPHERE:
“We are knowledgeable about the SPHERE Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards
in Disaster Response, and seek to apply these standards and the SPHERE indicators in the
implementation, monitoring and evaluation of our humanitarian projects and programs.
Code Observance
12 The Code Observance Committee
12.1
The Code Observance Committee (hereafter called “the Committee”) shall be the body
ultimately responsible for promoting observance of the code.
13 Composition of the Committee
13.1
The Committee shall have seven members.
The Agency Coordination Body For Afghan Relief (“ACBAR”), the Afghan NGOs’
Coordinating Bureau (ANCB), and the South-West Afghanistan and Balochistan
Association for Coordination (SWABAC) will each nominate two representatives to the
Committee.
The Afghan Women’s Network (AWN) will nominate one member to the committee.
13B2
TOe Perm of of�ce of memNers of POe FommiPPee sOMll Ne one yeMrB
13.3
A member can only serve for three consecutive terms.
13.4
The Committee shall select a Chair and a Secretary from among its members.
14 Functions of the Committee
14.1
The Committee shall act as guardian of the Code of Conduct.
14.2
The Committee shall ensure understanding, trust and co-operation between the Public,
the Government, the donors, the NGO sector itself and community partners.
14.3
The Committee shall meet twice a year to consider:
Petitions by NGOs to become Code signatories. The Committee will permit NGOs to
sign the Code only upon such NGOs furnishing the appropriate documentation as
listed in Clause 14 below.
Petitions or complaints related to the nonobservance of the Code by an NGO. The
137
petition may be received from government, a donor, a community partner, the public
or another NGO.
14.4
The Committee shall nominate a Secretary who will manage the administrative
responsibilities of the Committee. Among other things, the Committee Secretary shall:
Receive all requests from NGOs to become Code signatories.
MMinPMin �les of puNlic documenPs of signMPories, Mnd mMke POose �les MvMilMNle Po
key stakeholders upon request.
Request a signatory to provide a written report when implicated in alleged breach of
Ensure that a signatory receives a copy of the complaint registered against it by the
person or group of persons who lodged the compliant.
14.5
The Committee shall be engaged in awareness raising about the Code of Conduct
enshrined herein involving Signatories.
15 Becoming a Signatory to the Code of Conduct
15.1 To become a signatory to the Code of Conduct an NGO must submit to the secretary in
Legal registration
: A copy of the NGO’s legal registration with the Government of
Operational experience
: A signed sPMPemenP on of�ciMl sPMPionMry Mf�rming POMP POe
NGO has been operational for at least one year;
FoordinMPion Body MemNersOip
: A lePPer Mf�rming POe NGO’s currenP memNersOip in
one or more of the following coordination bodies: ACBAR, ANCB, or SWABAC;
Governance Documentation
: A copy of the NGO’s written constitution or memorandum
of MssociMPion POMP cleMrly de�ne POe NGO’s mission, oNjecPives Mnd orgMnizMPionMl
Financial Documentation
: A copy of Mn MudiPed �nMnciMl reporP for iPs mosP recenP
�scMl yeMr; Mnd
Operational Documentation
: A copy of its annual report for its most recent year of
operMPionsB For inPernMPionMl NGOs, M copy of POe gloNMl MnnuMl reporP Rill suf�ceB
Completed Survey of Accomplishments
: A completed survey of accomplishments
allowing the Secretariat to monitor and communicate the combined accomplishments
Mandatory Government Reports
: Copies of semi-annual reports required by the
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
138
Ministry of Planning.
16 Complaints
16B1
Any one person or group of persons mMy �le M complMinP or pePiPion (supporPed Ny
evidence) with the Secretary of the Committee.
16.2
A written compliant shall include the following:
The name and address of the complainant;
TOe nMme Mnd Mddress of POe NGO or of�ciMl MgMinsP ROom POe pePiPion is lodged;
The circumstances in which the breach or violation of the Code is alleged to have
been committed; and
Where possible, a reference to the Standard of Conduct that was allegedly
16B3
TOe SecrePMry sOMll open M �le MfPer receiving M fully documenPed complMinP Mnd
shall immediately share a copy of the complaint with all members of the Observance
Committee.
17 Jurisdiction of the Committee
17.1
The Committee shall hear and decide on all instances involving the violation or breach
of the Code of Conduct by any signatory or any other acting for and/or on behalf of a
signatory.
17.2
When a complaint is made under Clause 16 hereof, the Committee may either dismiss
POe cMse ROere no NreMcO of POe Fode is esPMNlisOed or noPify POe signMPory or of�ciMl
against whom the complaint is made.
17B3
Hn Mn insPMnce of M signi�cMnP NreMcO or violMPion of POe SPMndMrds of FonducP, POe
Committee:
SOMll cMll M meePing of POe Mccused signMPory MndCor of�ciMl of POe Mgency Mnd POe
person or group of persons who lodged the compliant in order to discuss the case.
This can take place either at the regularly scheduled semi-annual meeting of the
Committee, or in the case of a grievous violation of the code, an extraordinary meeting
SOMll requesP Mny signMPory MndCor Of�ciMl Po provide evidence on POe cMse under
17B4
JOen POe FommiPPee �nds POMP POe signMPory or iPs employee OMs violMPed POe Fode, iP
shall take one or more of the following measures:
139
Provide the necessary education for compliance;
Call on another signatory to assist in the education process;
Advise POe signMPory in violMPion Po PMke correcPive meMsures MgMinsP POe NGO of�ciMl
or employee who is directly responsible for the breach of the Code;
Admonish the signatory;
Suspend or cancel the signature of the NGO to the code.
18 The Unseating of a Committee Member
18.1
A Committee member shall not take part in any deliberation or decision making process
where he or she has an interest in the case presented to the Committee.
19 Scope of Application
19.1
The Principles of Conduct shall apply to all NGO signatories to this Code of Conduct
working in Afghanistan
1EB2
TOe Principles of FonducP sOMll Mpply Po Mll of�ciMls Mnd employees ROo McP for MndCor on
behalf of NGOs which have agreed to abide by this Code.
20 Compliance to the Code
20.1
All signatories and all individuals or groups who act for and/or on behalf of the signatories
shall observe, respect and uphold the standards of this Code.
To POMP end, every signMPory sOMll ensure POMP Mll iPs of�ciMls Mnd employees Mre MdequMPely
acquainted with the standards of the Code and work by them.
21 Revision of Code
21.1 Revision of the Code will require the approval of two-thirds of the representatives of the
signatory organizations.
21.2 The Committee may from time to time review and recommend changes to the Code to
the Coordination bodies.
Annex: Historical Context
Since the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979, national and international NGOs have played
a crucial role in providing assistance to people in rural and urban communities throughout the
country and to people in refugee camps in Pakistan.
1979-88
: Immediately following the Soviet invasion, NGOs began programs to address the food,
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
140
shelter and health care needs of Afghan refugees in Pakistan. In the early 1980s NGOs initiated
cross-border programs into Afghanistan to address the basic health and livelihood needs of those
Afghans in areas not under Soviet control. Cross-border programs working inside Afghanistan
included education by 1984 and agricultural and infrastructure projects commenced in 1986.
Throughout this period, “cash-for-food” projects sought to give Afghans in resistance-held areas
the resources they needed to remain inside Afghanistan. During the 1980s many NGOs were also
engaged in advocacy efforts to raise awareness in Western capitals about the plight of Afghans as
both victims of military aggression and refugees.
: By the late 1980s, NGOs had begun to implement development activities — using
development principles in a context of “chronic emergency” and political and security instability
— in addition to providing emergency assistance. The changed political context and increase in
resources for Afghanistan in the late 1980s led to a number of developments in the NGO sector.
The number of Afghan NGOs grew rapidly, support for Afghan capacity building increased, and
several NGO coordination bodies were formed, which focused on strengthening the accountability,
standards, and professionalism of the NGO community and on coordinating to increase impact
and reduce duplication of activities. During this period, many Afghan NGOs, and thousands
of Afghans, built their professional skills in NGO-led training institutions with support from
international NGOs.
1996-2001
: In the Taliban period, from 1996 to 2001, despite political restrictions, improved
security in many parts of the country enabled agencies to work directly with local communities
in remote rural areas. NGOs continued to coordinate closely with UN and donor agencies in
establishing programming priorities and setting out agreed principles for the promotion of coherent
and well-focused assistance to Afghans. The efforts of around twenty, mostly NGO organizations,
Po develop Mn improved seP of leMrning sPMndMrds for AfgOMn cOildren, Pypi�ed POe cooperMPive
approach during this period
The severe drought from 1997-2001 exacerbated humanitarian need for many rural communities
and forced new waves of displacement into urban areas, internal camps and refugee camps in
Pakistan and Iran. While NGOs expanded their emergency activities to help these populations,
they also continued their development programs.
Late 2001-present
: Following the events of September 11 2001, the working environment
for NGOs in Afghanistan changed dramatically. In 2002, the return to Afghanistan of large
numbers of refugees from neighboring countries required new emergency shelter and feeding
programmes. Following the fall of the Taliban, NGOs have, in coordination with the transitional
Afghan authorities, increasingly sought to balance their emergency response work with longer-
term reconstruction and development initiatives. The advent of an internationally recognized
Transitional Islamic State of Afghanistan has provided NGOs the opportunity to rearticulate the
role of humanitarian actors, not as service contractors, but rather as mission-driven civil society
151
acts: Contents
Abou
Kabul Province
Badakhshan Province
Badghis Province
Baghlan Province
Balkh Province
Bamiyan Province
Daikundi Province
Farah Province
Faryab Province
Ghazni Province
Ghor Province
Helmand Province
Herat Province
Jawzjan Province
Kandahar Province
Kapisa Province
Khost Province
Kunar Province
Kunduz Province
Laghman Province
Logar Province
Nangarhar Province
Nimroz Province
Nuristan Province
Paktia Province
Paktika Province
Panjshir Province
Parwan Province
Samangan Province
Sar-i-Pul Province
Takhar Province
Uruzgan Province
Wardak Province
Zabul Province
Pakistan
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
152
About this section
This section includes contact information for the assistance community, government agencies
and foreign missions in Afghanistan. It does not include private companies. An electronic version
of this directory is available at www.areu.org.af.
The information in this directory was updated between August and December 2008. Addresses,
phone numbers and email contacts constantly change as organisations relocate or expand.
The accuracy of this list relies on the voluntary contributions of organisations listed, which are
encouraged to send any additions or changes to [email protected]
All orgMnisMPions’ conPMcP dePMils Mre lisPed Ny provinceB KMNul Province is lisPed �rsP, RiPO POe
remaining provinces following in alphabetical order. Afghanistan-related contacts in Pakistan are
listed at the end. Within each section, contacts are listed alphabetically by the full title of the
No distinction is made between mobile, satellite and digital phone lines. Afghan numbers beginning
with 070 or 079 indicate mobile lines, 0088 indicate satellite lines, and all others indicate digital
or ground lines. Numbers in Pakistan (beginning with 0092) are listed as dialled from Afghanistan.
When calling Afghanistan from other countries, the country code is +93.
Contacts: Kabul Province
153
Kabul Province
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0799 455 411
[email protected]
Web:
Director: Ms Rosemary Stasek
ANdul HMq FoundMPion (AHF)
Charahi Torabaz Khan (corner of Flower Street,
3rd �oor)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 202 170
0799 301 408
0700 602 182
[email protected]
Web:
www.abdulhaq.org
Executive Director: Mr Nasrullah Baryalai Arsalaie
Academy for Educational Development (AED)
Hs. 466, St. 13
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0088 163 143 2863
[email protected]
Country Director: Ms Lisa Piper
Academy of Sciences of Afghanistan (ASA)
Charahi Sherpoor
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
020 210 2921
020 210 2919
020 210 3116
Deputy for Human Science Section
ACCESS Health Services Support Project
Hs. 585, Street 3rd, Shar-e-Naw, District 4,
Kabul
0799-779448
0799-878691
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.jhpiego.org
www.accesstohealth.org
Chief of Party: Denise Byrd
AccessiNiliPy OrgMnizMPion for AfgOMn GisMNled
(AOAD)
Shapoor Ahmadzai Plaza, Main Kart -i- Naw Rd
(Opp. Ramin Pump Station) 3rd part of Shah
Shah shaeed, Kabul
0700 157 317
077 831 5600
Executive Director: Mr Abdul Khaliq Zazai
Action Contre La Faim (ACF)
Hs. 4 (next to Emergency Hospital)
Charahi Shir Poor, Kabul
0700 277 337
0799 338 239
0797 272 766
0799 182 227
[email protected]
Web:
www.actioncontrelafaim.org
Head of Mission: Mr Angelomatteo Perrone
ActionAid Afghanistan (ActionAid)
Hs. 132, St. 5 (near Haji Mohammad Dad
Mosque)
Taimani, Kabul
0799 043 656
0799 205 324
0799 758 687
0798 253 872
Fax:
0093 20 220 3771
Web:
www.actionaidafg.org
Country Director: Mr G. B. Adhikari
Adventist Development and Relief Agency
Hs. 11, Lane 2 of Kolola Pushta St., Charahi
Ansari, Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 274 601
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
154
0799 328 403
0088 216 5426 0530
[email protected]
Web:
www.adra.org
Country Director: Mr Marcel Wagner
AfgOMn AmpuPee BicyclisPs for ReOMNiliPMPion
and Recreation (AABRAR)
Taimani Project, Kabul
0700 284 986
0700 611 917
0700 273 558
0088 216 5026 5570
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.aabrar.org
Executive Director: Dr Abdul Baseer Toryalai
Afghan Center (AC)
Hs. 1441, 3rd St. (behind Soria High School)
Karte Char, Kabul
075 200 1799
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.ariseproject.org
Deputy Country Director:
Mr Fazel Muhammad Baidariwal
Afghan Center for Socio- Economic & Opinion
Research (ACSOR Survey)
Hs. 112, Lucky Five St, Haji Yaqoob Saqare,
District 10
Sharh-i-Naw, Kabul
0799 328 714
0797 540 234
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.acsor-surveys.com
Managing Director: Mr Matt Warshaw
Afghan Civil Society Forum (ACSF)
Hs. 48, Shahr-Ara-Watt (Opp. Malalai Maternity
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
075 202 3787
020 220 1061
0700 277 284
0799 337 828
[email protected]
Web:
www.acsf.af
MMnMging GirecPor: Eng Aziz RM�ee
AfgOMn FommuniPy GevelopmenP OrgMnizMPion
(ACDO)
St. 9 (opp. Gust House of Russian Embassy)
Taimani, Kabul
0700 281 991
[email protected]
Executive Director: Mr Gul Waiz Kazar
Afghan Connection (AC)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
001 635 578 841
007 801 915 899
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanconnection.org
Chairman: Dr Sarah Fane
Afghan Conservation Corps (ACC)
c/o Central Zone Environment Directorate (2
Street after Shora Street, opp. Darul Insha-i-
Karte Sai, Kabul
0700 201 126
Project Manager: Mr Noorullah Malung
(AGHCO)
Hs. 21242, St. 33, Charahi Panjsad Family, Part
Khair Khana, Kabul
(PO Box 994)
0700 224 891
0799 338 316
0700 277 766
0799 330 072
[email protected]
Contacts: Kabul Province
155
[email protected]
Director: Mr Sayed Fazlullah Wahidi
Afghan Health and Development Services
Hs. 72, Zafar Khan Watt, Chawke Qala-i-Fatullah
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
(PO Box 53)
0700 284 275
0700 238 374
0700 300 417
[email protected]
Web:
www.ahds.org
Deputy Director: Dr Mohammad Fareed
OrgMnizMPion (AHSAO)
Hs. 9461, Block 6, District 12, Ahmad Shah
Karte Mamorin, Kabul
0799 320 664
0799 218 880
0700 614 949
[email protected]
[email protected]
Deputy Director: Mr Omar Gul
Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL)
Hs. 63, St. 2 (behind Cinema Baharestan, next
to Mir Ahmad Mosque)
Karte Parwan, Kabul
0700 284 326
0700 293 579
0799 236 575
0700 167 135
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.creatinghope.org/aboutail
President Executive Director: Prof Sakena Yacoobi
Afghan Institute of Management, Training
Hs.704, St. 4, Silo Rd (Opp. of Ariana Kabul
Wedding Hall)
Kot-i-Sangi, Kabul
0799 190 015
0700 155 410
077 201 0001
Fax:
075 202 3986
[email protected]
[email protected]
Director: Mr Abdul Ghani Asalati
Afghan Institute of Training and Management
Opp. former British Embassy, Part 2
Karte Parwan, Kabul
0799 334 370
0700 252 117
[email protected]
Managing Director: Mr Sardar Mohammad
AfgOMn IMndmine Survivors’ OrgMnizMPion
St.12 (between MTN Antenna & Assadullah
Ghalleb Mosque)
Qala-e-Fataullah, Kabul
0799 316 253
0799 353 669
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanlandminesurvivors.org
Program Director: Mr Suliaman Aminy
Afghan Media and Cultural Center (AINA)
St.2, Ministry of Haj Lane, Chahrahi Haji Yakoob
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 238 955
0799 333 888
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.ainaworld.org
Country Director: Mr Brajesh Verma
Hs. 1, St. 3
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
156
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
(PO Box 981)
0799 333 621
0700 285 738
0700 224 681
0700 200 266
[email protected]
Web:
www.ancb.org
Director: Mr Masood Khalili
Environmental Protection (AOHREP)
Behind Sayed Jamaludin school
Karte Char, Kabul
0799 234 026
0799 260 236
[email protected]
Director: Mr Abdul Rahman Hotaki
Afghan Relief Committee (ARC)
3rd Floor, Katawaz Building (Opp. Millie Cinema)
Salang Watt, Kabul
0700 287 606
[email protected]
HeMd of Of�ce: Mr ANdulMO QMderdMn
Afghan Technical Consultants (ATC)
Hs. 8, Lane 3 in the left, St. 13 (opp.
Turkmanistan Embassy)
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0700 278 261
0700 220 326
020 230 1308
[email protected]
Web:
www.atcafghanistan.org
Director: Mr Kefayatullah Eblagh
Afghan Turk Cag Education (ATCE)
9th Floor, Ministry of Communications Building
Cinema Pamir, Kabul
0700 285 511
0700 218 255
020 210 0722
Fax:
0093 20 210 0722
[email protected]
Deputy Director: Mr Feti Karakoc
AfgOMn JomMn Mnd TrMde MMgMzine (AJT)
Kabul
0700 275 826
0700 296 014

Director: Ms Mina Sherzoy
AfgOMn JomMn MMgMzine (AJ)
Next to Nazo Ana Hospital
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
Director: Ms Fatana Gylani
AfgOMn Jomen EmpoRermenP & EducMPion
OrgMnizMPion (AJEEO)
Opp. Ministry of Higher Education
Karte Char, Kabul
077 635 4270
077 313 3989
0799 047 332
[email protected]
[email protected]
Director: Mr Ahmad Farid
Afghan Women Services and Education
OrgMnizMPion (AJSE)
Behind Block 1,
Air port Blocks, Street of First
Department of National Security (next to Malang
Dar Maltoon)
Bibi Mahro, Kabul
(AJSE PosP in AFBAR Of�ce)
0799 326 132
0799 188 762
[email protected]
[email protected]
Executive Director: Ms Gulsoom Satarzai
Afghan Women Welfare Department (AWWD)
Hs. 7056, Panjshir Watt
Khair Khana, Kabul
0700 282 494
Contacts: Kabul Province
157
0777 282 494
075 201 6708
[email protected]
[email protected]
Executive Director: Ms Jamila Akberzai
AfgOMn Jomen’s NePRork (AJN)
St. 9 (next to Homa Hospital)
Taimani Watt, Kabul
0700 286 598
0799 689 079
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanwomensnetwork.org
Acting Director: Ms Leeda Yaqoobi
AfgOMn Jomen’s NeR FoundMPion (AJNF)
Apt. 29, Block 20, Macrorayon 4
Macrorayon, Kabul
0700 203 161
0700 182 713

Director: Ms Farida Sherzoy
Afghan Women’s Educational Center (AWEC)
Hs. 1228 (opp. Ministry of Higher Education)
Karte Char, Kabul
0700 263 794
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.awec.info
GirecPor: Ms HMssinM SM�
Afghan Women’s Resource Centre (AWRC)
Dainow dibori , St. 3, silo (In front of Ariana
Kabul Hotel) Near Raiyasat Awdat Mahajrin
,Kabul
(PO Box 362)
0700 280 179
0799 203 056
075 201 2958
[email protected]
ARrcB�[email protected]
Web:
www.awrc.org.af
Country Representative: Ms Maryam Rahmani
Hs. 94, Hesa-i-Do, Main Rd
Karte Parwan, Kabul
(PO Box 6066)
0799 310 498
0799 309 373
0088 216 8440 0140
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanaid.org.uk
Managing Director:
Ms Farhana Faruqi-Stocker
Afghanistan Bureau for Reconstruction (ABR)
Taimani, Kabul
0700 291 104
075 201 9642
[email protected]
[email protected]
Regional Director: Eng Ahmad Ibrahim Haidari
AfgOMnisPMn FenPre MP KMNul UniversiPy (AFKU)
Kabul University Central Library
Jamal Mina, Kabul
(PO Box 335)
0700 281 415
075 200 9547
0799 328 883
0799 328 885
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanresources.org
AfgOMnisPMn FOMmNer of Fommerce Mnd
Industries (ACCI)
Chamane Hozori (next to Kabul Nandary)
, Kabul
(PO Box 233)
0799 345 905
0799 810 184
070 6 150 010
075 202 5854
[email protected]
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
158
Web:
www.acci.org.af
FOief ExecuPive Of�cer:
AfgOMnisPMn FounPry SPMNiliPy PicPure (AFSP)
ISAF Headquarters-CJ9
Great Massoud Rd, Kabul
0799 512 283
0797 752 297
0798 202 626
[email protected]
[email protected]
Section Chief: Mr Francesco De Santis
Afghanistan Development Association (ADA)
Hs. 48, Haji Mir Ahmad Mosque (across from
Karte Parwan, Kabul
(AHRO)
Hs. 41, St. 10, Paikob-i-Naswar
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0700 203 866
0799 672 404
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.ahro.af
Commission (AIHRC)
Pul-i-Surkh
Karte Sai, Kabul
020 250 0676
0700 277 720
0799 012 018
0700 298 642
Fax:
0093 20 250 0677
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.aihrc.org.af
Executive Director: Dr Najibullah Babrakzai
Afghanistan Information Management Services
Hs. 1070, St. 15 (1st sub street in the left side)
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0700 233 751
0700 105 482
0700 248 827
[email protected]
Web:
www.aims.org.af
Programe Manager: Mr Neal Bratschum
Afghanistan Investment Support Agency (AISA)
Opp. Ministry of Foreign Affairs
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt, Kabul
0700 288 304
0799 336 526
020 210 3408
020 210 3404
Web:
www.aisa.org.af
Main Road
Kolola Poshta, Kabul
0700 281 209
0700 295 700
0799 110 750
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanistan-libre.fr
Afghanistan Market Development (AMD)
Blue Glass Building (opp. Attorney General
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 079 609
001 877 764 0400
Fax:
001 877 663 1332
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.amdi-international.com
Contacts: Kabul Province
159
rket Development Specialist:
Mr Behzad Noubary
AfgOMnisPMn NMvid SeOMP OrgMnizMPion (ANSO)
Darvaza Bus Station
Karte Sakhi, Kabul
0798 174 915
077 541 3741
0799 418 313
[email protected]
[email protected]
Administrator: Mr Ali Jafari
0797 165 017
0799 323 792
0088 216 6788 1671
Web:
www.afgnso.org
Operations Coordinator:
Mr Nathan Ronaldson
Afghanistan Parliamentary Assistance Project
(APAP)
Hs. 2, Shura Street, Darul Aman Road, District 6
Karte Se, Kabul
020 250 0940
0795 975 919
0799 490 989
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.sunyaf.org
Chief of Party: Mr Walter Guevara
Afghanistan Primary Education Programme
Hs. 1578, St. 1(near Habibia High School)
Karte Char, Kabul
Web:
www.caii.com
Chief of Party: Mr Julio Ramires-De-Arellano
AfgOMnisPMn ReOMNiliPMPion Mnd ReconsPrucPion
Agency Falah (ARRAF)
Hs. 840, St. 7
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
(PO Box 289)
0777 698 069
0797 228 904
[email protected]
[email protected]
President: Mr Abdul Wadood Hazeq
AfgOMnisPMn ReseMrcO Mnd EvMluMPion UniP (AREU)
Flower St. (corner of St. 2), Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0799 608 548
Web:
www.areu.org.af
Director: Ms Paula Kantor
Foundation (ARSJF)
Hs. 4, St. 2, Darullaman Main Rd (next to
Russian Embassy)
Karte Se, Kabul
0707 446 724
0700 193 540
[email protected]
[email protected]
Executive Director: Mr Ajmal Solamal
Afghanistan Rural Enterprise Development
Program (AREDP)
MRRD Compound, Dar-ul- Aman Rd
Karte Se, Kabul
075 202 2310
077 362 4214
0700 157 590
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.mrrd.gov.af/aredp
Program Coordinator: Mr Ahmed Javaid Zeerak
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
160
Afghanistan Times, Daily (AT)
Esmat Muslim St. (Opp. Areeba Communication
Co.)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
Phone: 0799 572 050
[email protected]
[email protected]
Mr Enayatullah Alami
Afghanistan Women Council (AWC)
Hs. 61, Burj-i-Barq Stop
Kolola Poshta, Kabul
(PO Box 1913)
0799 888 118
0700 049 980
Fax:
0093 20 220 1625
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanistanwomencouncil.org
Chairperson: Ms Fatana Ishaq Gailani
AgM KOMn GevelopmenP NePRork (AKGN)
Hs. 297, St. 17
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0799 300 082
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.akdn.org
Resident Representative: Mr Ali Mawji
Aga Khan Education Services (AKES)
Hs. 648, St. 9b Shirpoor, District 10
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0799 235 112
[email protected]
Web:
www.akdn.org
Admin AssisPMnP: Mr ANdul SMmMd Yousu�
Aga Khan Foundation - Afghanistan (AKF)
Hs. 43, St. 13, Main Rd
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
(PO Box 5753)
0798 981 280
0799 330 554
Fax:
0093 20 230 1189
Web:
www.akdn.org
Gonor RelMPion & Resource MoNilizMPion Of�cer:
Ms Michaela Peach
Aga Khan Health Service Afghanistan (AKHS)
Hs. 648, St. 9-b Shirpoor, District 10
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
(PO Box 5753)
0799 419 599
0799 330 558
[email protected]
Web:
www.akdn.org
Country Programme Director: Dr Nayamat Shah
Aga Khan Trust for Culture (AKTC)
Humaira Saljoqi Mosque)
Darulaman Road, Kabul
(PO Box 5805)
0799 015 685
0799 335 675
0088 216 8444 3402
[email protected]
Web:
www.akdn.org
FOief ExecuPive Of�cer: Mr Jolyon Ieslie
Agence France Presse (AFP)
PO Box 710, Kabul
0700 282 666
0799 215 027
0700 284 350
[email protected]
Web:
www.afp.com
Agency Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief
(ACBAR)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 276 464
0799 755 001
0700 284 323
0700 286 144
[email protected]
Contacts: Kabul Province
161
[email protected]
Web:
www.acbar.org
Director: Ms Anja De Beer
Agency for Assistance and Development of
Afghanistan (AADA)
Hs. 3, Charahi Pul-i-surkh
Karte Sai, Kabul
0799 410 391
0700 068 730
0798 043 533
[email protected]
Web:
www.aada.org.af
Programe Development Director:
Dr Abdullah Abed
Agency for ReOMNiliPMPion Mnd Energy
Conservation in Afghanistan (AREA)
Hs. 94, Hesa-i-Do, Main Rd
Jamal Mina, Kabul
0799 328 618
0700 289 631
077 720 7879
0799 307 147
[email protected]
[email protected]
Managing Director: Eng Khial Shah
Agency for Technical Cooperation and
Development (ACTED)
Hs. 93, St. 397, District 4, Zone 1, Kabul
0700 282 539
0799 611 775
0700 202 806
0088 216 506 01460
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.acted.org
Country Director: Ms Ziggy Garewal
Agency French Development (AFD)
3, Park Plaza
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0797 323 235
0799 731 499
0797 562 211
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.afd.fr
Regional Director: Mr Yves Terracol
Agency of Consultancy for Training (ACT)
Kabul-Kandahar Rd., Fazel Biag (near Water
Fazel Biag, Kabul
0799 362 953
077 736 2953
0700 281 495
0799 326 594
[email protected]
[email protected]
Managing Director: Eng Alamgul Ahmadi
Agro-MePeorology ProjecP of UniPed SPMPes
GeologicMl Survey (USGS)
Afghanistan Geological Survey building (between
Pul-i-Mahomood Khan & Charahi Abdul Haq), Kabul
0799 193 334
077 221 4307
0700 156 738
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.usgs.org
Mr Mohammad Fahim Zaheer
Aide Médicale Internationale (AMI)
Hs. 43, St. 1, Part 1
Kart-i-Parwan, Kabul
(PO Box 747)
0799 799 760
0088 216 5026 0504
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.amifrance.org
Logistics Coordinator: Ms Stephanie Lienard
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
162
AlNironi ReconsPrucPion & ReOMNiliPMPion
Institute (ARRI)
St. 12, Qallah-e-Fatullah
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 276 459
077 201 0336
077 526 3404
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.arri.org.af
Executive Director: Mr Aboraihan Wafa Sarwary
Butcher St. (next to Koshi Aqiq)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
Hs. 1057, St. 4
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0799 888 666
[email protected]
Web:
www.altaiconsulting.com
Director: Eric Davin
AmericMn BroMdcMsPing FompMny NeRs
(ABFNeRs)
c/o BBC, Hs. 24, Park Western Rd.
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0799 569 692
0799 893 909
0700 300 456
0044 773 944 8038
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.abcnews.com
Local Producer: Mr Aleem Agha
American Friends Service Committee/Quaker
Service Afghanistan (AFSC/QSA)
Jade Sewom Akrab, Pirzad Hospital lane
Kart-i-Char, Kabul
0700 277 465
0797 284 828
[email protected]
Web:
www.afsc.org
Country Representative: Dr Patricia Omidian
American Institute of Afghanistan Studies
Hs. 57, Lane 1st on the left, St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
(PO Box 1708)
0700 252 251
[email protected]
Web:
www.bu.edu/aias/
Administrative Manager: Mr Rohullah Amin
Amitie Franco-Afghane (AFRANE)
Hs. 31 Sarak-e Qasabi (near Cinema Baharistan)
Karte Parwan, Kabul
(PO Box 1216)
0799 837 350
0088 216 5068 3779
[email protected]
Web:
www.afrane.org
Head of Mission: Ms Xavier Duvauchelle
ANGS FoordinMPion & GevelopmenP UniP,
Directorate for Policy and Strategy, General
Directorate of Budget (ANDS)
Ministry of Finance
Pashtoonistan Watt, Kabul
0799 053 657
0700 182 623
0700 201 266
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.ands.gov.af
Director for Policy and Strategy:
Mr Wahidullah Waissi
3rd Floor Azadi Printing Press Building,
Macrorayon 2
Macrorayon, Kabul
Editor-in-Chief: Mr Sakhi Muneer
Contacts: Kabul Province
163
sar Relief Institute (ARI)
NexP Po HFRF HeMd Of�ce (MfPer FOMrMOi HMji
Yaqoob)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 290 427
0700 224 442
0098 511 606 5321
Web:
www.emdadari.com
ExPernMl RelMPions Of�cer: Mr RezM SMdodini
AnPi TuNerculosis AssociMPion AfgOMnisPMn
Programme (ATA)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
[email protected]
Area Mine Action Center (AMAC)
Hs. 271, St. 14
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0700 295 444
0700 223 352
0087 076 291 8170
Fax:
0087 076 291 8172
[email protected]
Area Manager: Mr Habibulhaq Javeed
AriMmeOer ReOMNiliPMPion EsPMNlisOmenP (ARE)
Hs. 220 (Opp. Haji Matin Mosque)
Karte Parwan Part 2, Kabul
0700 289 867
0700 203 654
020 240 1548
[email protected]
[email protected]
ProgrMmme Of�cer: Ms RMziM FMzl
Kabul
(PO Box 1045)
Phone: 0798 139 530
0799 321 010
Fax:
001 865 342 5771
[email protected]
Web:
www.arman.fm
ArmMne Milli NeRspMper (AMN)
4th Floor Azadi Printing Press Building,
Macrorayon 2
Macrorayon, Kabul
Editor-in-Chief: Mr Mir Haidar Mutaher
ASFHHANA: AfgOMnisPMn’s FOildren, A NeR
Approach (ASCHIANA)
Next to Ministry of Women’s Affairs
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
(PO Box 1827)
0700 277 280
0700 243 591
0777 243 591
[email protected]
Web:
www.aschaina.com
Director: Eng Mohammad Yousuf
Asian Development Bank (ADB)
Hs. 126, St. 2, Haji Yaqoob Square
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
(PO Box 3070)
0799 191 488
0700 283 748
0799 020 462
[email protected]
Web:
www.adb.org/afrm
Country Director: Mr Craig M. Steffensen
Associated Press (AP)
0700 278 290
0799 320 482
[email protected]
Web:
www.ap.org
Correspondent: Mr Daniel Cooney
Association for Community Development (ACD)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
[email protected]
Director:
Mr Akmal Naveed
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
164
Association of Experts in the Fields of Migration
and Development Cooperation (AGEF)
Serahe Lycee Habibia, next to THW
Darulaman Road, Kabul
0799 300 506
[email protected]
Web:
www.agef.net
Executive Director: Mr Khalid Noorzad
APPorney GenerMl Of�ce (AGO)
Tymani wat, District 10
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
020 220 0017
0700 290 940
Fax:
0093 75 202 3421
[email protected]
Attorney General: Mr Mohammad Ishaq Alako
Aumo ReOMNiliPMPion Mnd GevelopmenP (ARG)
St. 4 (opp. petrol pump)
Taimani, Kabul
0700 277 377
0700 279 602
0088 216 8444 3536
[email protected]
[email protected]
Director: Eng Nazir Mohammad
BMkOPMr GevelopmenP NePRork (BGN)
St. 1, Baharistan, Karte Parwan, Kabul
(PO Box 1664)
0700 288 961
0700 693 572
0700 238 778
0799 007 564
[email protected]
Web:
www.bdn.org.af
Managing Director: Mr Ahmad Farid Fayeq
Bakhtar Information Agency (BIA)
Ministry of Culture and Youth
Da Afghanan, Kabul
Phone: 020 210 1304
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC)
Karte Parwan, Kabul
0700 288 300
[email protected]
Web:
www.bracafg.org
Country Program Coordinator: Mr Mohammad
Fazlul Hoque
BMsic EducMPion & EmployMNle Skill TrMining
St. 1,Char Rahi Speen Kalai (Opp. of Imam-E-
Raza Mosque)
Khoshal Khan, Kabul
0799 113 901
0700 606 364
0799 856 660
0777 016 352
[email protected]
Web:
www.bestafg.com
Country Director: Mr Nazir Ahmad Mohmand
Basic Education Program for Afghanistan (GTZ/
BEPA)
Hs. 95, St. 1, Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
075 200 1243
0799 312 481
0088 216 2112 9857
Fax:
0093 75 200 1243
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.gtz.de
Head of Program: Dr Michael Hirth
BBC Afghan Education Project (BBC-AEP)
Hs. 271, St.1, Qalai Najarha
Khair Khana, Kabul
0700 278 093
020 240 0495
[email protected]
Director: Mr Shirazuddin Siddiqi
Contacts: Kabul Province
165
BBF NeRs
Hs.526 , St. 13, Ln. 2 ( right)
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0799 606 064
0799 341 917
0797 472 174
0088 216 6749 0141
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.news.bbc.co.uk
Correspondent: Mr Martin Patience
BBC World Service (BBC)
Hs. 24, Park Western Rd.
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
(PO Box 1)
0700 274 470
0799 021 251
Web:
www.bbcpersian.com
BeMringPoinPCUSAHG AfgOMnisPMn Economic
Governance Project
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0700 288 549
0700 279 815
007 037 474 545
steve.lu[email protected]
Web:
www.bearingpoint.com
Bearing Point In Charge: Mr Steve Lunceford
Hs. 15-17(behind N
adirya High School)
Kart-e-Parwan, Kabul
0790 000 130
0790 000 150
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.britishcouncil.org/afghanistan
Director: Mr Sital Dhi
Off St. 15, Roundabout
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
(PO Box 334)
0700 102 273
0700 102 000
0087 376 285 4939
Fax:
0093 70 010 2250
[email protected]
Web:
www.ukinafghanistan.fco.gov.uk/en/
Ambassador: Mr Sherard Cowper-Coles
FMnMdiMn ProgrMm SupporP UniP (FPSU)
Hs. 730, St. 15, Ln. 6 on the left
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
075 204 0767
Web:
www.cpsu.org.af
Director: Mr Mohammad Akbar Hamidi
CARE International in Afghanistan (CARE)
Charahi Haji Yaqoob, Park Road (next to Hanzala
Mosque)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
(PO Box 433)
020 220 1098
0700 277 247
0700 224 607
0088 737 6221 2630
Fax:
0093 20 220 1036
[email protected]
Web:
www.care.org.af
Country Director: Mr Lex Kassenberg
Care of Afghan Families (CAF)
Karte Parwan Part 2, Kabul
0700 063 813
0700 596 059
0799 311 619
0799 842 289
[email protected]
[email protected]
General Director: Dr Bashir Ahmad Hamid
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
166
Caritas Germany
ProjecP SupporP Of�ce – AfgOMnisPMn
Hs. 34 (Corner of street 4) Junction of Main
Road, District 10
Taimani, Kabul
(PO Box 3061)
0700 014 632
0798 250 735
0700 399 155
0088 216 5110 1940
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.caritas-international.de
Country Representative: Ms Sabine Verderber
FMPOolic OrgMnizMPion for Relief Mnd
Development Aid (CordAid)
Hs. 338, Alberoni Watt (behind Zarghona High
School) District 10
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0799 339 637
0700 223 436
0799 313 859
0088 216 5110 0144
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.cordaid.nl
IiMison Of�cer: Mr Mike PMrker
Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
Hs. 34, St. 4, District 10
Taimani, Kabul
0796 568 731
0700 283 481
0700 235 981
[email protected]
Web:
www.catholicrelief.org
Country Representative: Mr Matthew McGorry
Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE)
Hs. 1064, Aburaihan Alberuni Watt, Ahmad
Shah Masoud High School Road
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 250 361
[email protected]
Web:
www.cipe.org.af/www.cipe.org
Admin & IT Manager: Mr Riza Habib
Center for Policy and Human Development
Kabul University
Jamal Mina, Kabul
0708 815 971
0798 238 595
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.cphd.af
Project Coordinator: Mr Khwaga Kakar
Central Afghanistan Welfare Committee
(CAWC)
Borj-i- Barq Bus Stop, Ghulam Haidar Khan St.
Kolola Poshta, Kabul
0799 301 802
075 202 1729
0700 279 306
[email protected]
[email protected]
Director: Mr Nik Mohammad Ahmadi
Central Asian Development Agency (CADA)
Karte Sai, Kabul
[email protected]
Web:
www.mercy.se
FenPrMl SPMPisPics OrgMnizMPion (FSO)
Between Arian Hotel and Italian Embassy
Ansari Watt, Kabul
0776 432 149
020 210 0329
020 210 4095
Fax:
0093 20 210 0329
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.cso.gov.af
General President: Mr Abdul Rahman Ghafoori
Contacts: Kabul Province
167
CHF International (CHF)
Hs. 1064, Abu Raihan Al-Berooni Wat (Opp.
APPorney GenerMl Of�ce)
Sharh-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 380 580
0799 420 113
Mm�@cOfMfBorg
Web:
www.chfhq.org
Managing Director: Mr Suhail Awan
Child Fund Afghanistan (CFA)
Hs. 115, (Opp Sayed Jamaluddin Middle
Khart Char, Kabul
(PO Box 5264)
0799 758 399
0789 205 952
0088 216 3145 1748
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.christianchildrensfund.org
Country Director: Mr George Nzomo
Hs. 41, Jami Watt
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 826 828
0799 283 468
0700 243 929
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.childrenincrisis.org.uk
Country Director: Ms Feizin Amlani
Christian Aid (CA)
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
(PO Box 5894)
075 200 1610
0700 292 363
0799 565 799
0088 216 5110 0730
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.christian-aid.org
AdvocMcy Of�cer: Mr SulPMn MMqsood FMzel
FOurcO Jorld Service – PMkisPMnCAfgOMnisPMn
(CWS)
Hs. 61, Abu Hanifa Rd
Kolola Poshta, Kabul
0700 274 377
[email protected]
Web:
www.cwspa.org
Director: Ms Marvin Parvez
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
168
FommiPPee for ReOMNiliPMPion Aid Po
Apt 63, Block 23A, Macrorayon 3
Macrorayon, Kabul
0799 318 696
0700 006 850
[email protected]
Web:
www.craausa.org
Eng Saleem Bedya
Communication Team for Peace and
GevelopmenP (ErPeNMP)
3rd �oor of MoOeN ZMdM PlMzM (OppB former
Dehmazang, Kabul
0700 224 558
0799 426 092
0088 216 8444 3483/84
[email protected]
[email protected]
Director: Eng Yunus Akhtar
Foncern JorldRide (Foncern)
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0700 294 572
0799 411 662
0799 489 507
[email protected]
Web:
www.concern.net
Country Director: Mr Luke Stephens
Foncern JorldRide, KMNul ProgrMm (Foncern)
Down Street
De Khudaidad, Kabul
0700 285 492
0799 343 572
[email protected]
Web:
www.concern.net
Programme Coordinator: Mr Sayed Hamid Jafferi
Constella Futures International COMPRI-A
Social Marketing Project (COMPRI-A)
Hs. 2, St. 1, Shirpure , Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0798 149 742
0799 890 317
0700 201 108
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.constellagroup.com
Chief of Party: Mr Fortier Russell
Cooperation Center for Afghanistan (CCA)
Hs. 98, St. A (Kocha-i-Fateha Khani Zanana)
Karte Char, Kabul
(PO Box 26)
0700 294 693
0799 331 251
[email protected]
Web:
www.cca.org.af
Executive Director: Mr Sarwar Hussaini
FooperMPion for PeMce Mnd UniPy (FPAU)
Hs. 17, St. 1, (Sarak Makhzan Aab) Darul Aman
Karte Sai, Kabul
(PO Box 13032)
0799 136 296
0700 278 891
0798 037 183
0088 216 8444 1448
[email protected]
Web:
www.cpau.org.af
Managing Director: Mr Kanishka Nawabi
FooperMzione HnPernMzionMle (FOOPH)
Hs. 131, Kuchae Qasabi (next to Friends-2 Guest
House), District 10
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 277 287
0700 297 027
0088 216 5110 1255
[email protected]
Country Coordinator: Mr Faisal Ahmad Gilani
Coordination of Afghan Relief (CoAR)
Hs. 373, St 5 (Opp. Abdul Ali Mustaghni High
Contacts: Kabul Province
169
Karte Se, Kabul
0700 280 727
0700 280 726
0700 280 725
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.coar.org.af
General Director:
Hs. 2, 3 & 4, End of St. 5, Siloo (near Sangkasha
Mosque)
Karte Parwan, Kabul
0700 298 639
0774 545 945
0088 216 6444 3261
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.cha-net.org
Director: Dr Hamidullah Saljuqi
Counter Narcotics Trust Fund (CNTF)
4th Floor Banayi Building, Jalalabad Main Rd,
Macrorayon 3
Macrorayon, Kabul
0700 292 161
0700 152 874
0700 172 696
[email protected]
Web:
www.mcn.gov.af/cntf
Director: Mr Abdul Aleem Wahidi
Counterpart International (CPI)
Hs. 47, Darulaman Main Road, Maghzan Street
(near to parliamentary building)
Karte Sai, Kabul
0700 154 933
0700 060 489
0088 216 2113 3473
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.counterpart-afg.org
AdminisPrMPion Of�cer:
Mr Mohammad Bashir Stoor
FounPry GevelopmenP UniP (FGU)
Hs. 88, Charahi Haji Mohammad Dad, Taimani
Rd, Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
(PO Box 5510)
0700 276 411
0700 244 314
0700 244 299
0799 234 465
[email protected]
Web:
www.cduafghan.org
Director: Eng Abdul Qader
Da Afghanistan Bank (DAB)
Charahi Pashtonistan
Foroshgah, Kabul
020 210 0303
020 210 0302
020 210 0301
governorBof�[email protected]
fdgovernerBof�[email protected]
Web:
www.centralbank.gov.af
Governor: Mr Abdul Qadeer Fitrat
GMnisO AssisPMnce Po AfgOMn ReOMNiliPMPion Mnd
Technical Trianing (DAARTT)
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
(PO Box 1699)
075 200 4414
0799 852 005
0799 855 493
Fax:
0044 870 133 9649
[email protected]
[email protected]
Programme Manager: Mr Palle Westergaard
Danish Committee for Aid to Afghan Refugees
(DACAAR)
Paikob-e-Naswar
Wazirabad, Kabul
(PO Box 208)
0700 288 232
020 220 1750
Fax:
0093 20 220 1520
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
170
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.dacaar.org
Director: Dr Arif Qaraeen
Danish Demining Group (DDG)
Hs. 64, St. 3
Kart-e-Char, Kabul
0797 058 482
0798 179 638
0798 179 640
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.drc.dk
Proramme Manager: Mr Clinton Smith
Delegation of the European Commission to
Charahi Sadaraat (Opp. Interior Affairs Ministry),
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0799 095 004
020 210 1692
0032-2 473 0045
Fax:
0032-2 2473 0046
[email protected]
Web:
www.delafg.ec.europa.eu
Kretschmer
Development & Humanitarian Services for
Afghanistan (DHSA/TKG)
Hs. 423 (near Uzbeka Mosque)
Karte Se, Kabul
020 250 0717
0799 329 832
0799 341 707
077 333 3600
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.thekillidgroup.com
Director General: Mr Shahir Ahmed Zahine
GevelopmenP Mnd ANiliPy OrgMnizMPion (GAO)
Hs. 924, St. 11
Taimani, Kabul
0700 600 960
0700 175 759
0700 175 760
[email protected]
Web:
www.daoafghanistan.org
Director: Mr Haji Omara Khan Muneeb
Development and Humanitarian Services for
Afghanistan/ The Killid Group (DHSA/TKG)
Hs. 442, St. 6, Chardehi Watt (near Uzbakha
Mosque), District 6
Karte Sai, Kabul
0773 333 600
0773 333 609
0779 565 680
020 250 0717
[email protected]
sOM�[email protected]
Web:
www.dhsa.af / www.killid.com
Director General: Mr Shahir Ahmed Zahine
Directorate-General for Humanitarian Aid
Hs. 103, Abu Hanifa Lane
Kolola Poshta, Kabul
0700 282 318
0799 282 318
0700 282 501
0087 176 308 5358
Fax:
0087 376 248 5683
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.ec.europa.eu/echo
Dutch Committee for Afghanistan (DCA)
Baharistan Rd. (1st Lane west of park)
Karte Parwan, Kabul
0799 375 564
020 220 0708
020 220 0643
[email protected]
Administrative Manager: Mr Malik
GuPcO NGO NePRork for AfgOMnisPMn (GNNA)
Hs. 338, St. 1 (in front of Kabul Inn)
Contacts: Kabul Province
171
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0799 337 753
0700 067 531
[email protected]
[email protected]
FommunicMPion Of�cer: Mr AlexMndrM SPrMnd
Education and Training Center for Poor Women
Apt. 19, Block 14
Airport Blocks, Kabul
0700 276 065
0799 323 309
[email protected]
[email protected]
Director: Ms Malika Qanih
Education Development Center (EDC)
Taimani, Kabul
0700 280 881
0799 319 918
[email protected]
Web:
www.edc.org
HeMd of Of�ce: Mr RicOMrd JilliMmson
EducMPion Follege - KMNul UniversiPy
Afshar St. (Next to Police Academy) District 5
Afshar, Kabul
0799 305 478
0700 277 780
0799 342 904
[email protected]
President: Mr Hazrat Meer Totakhail
Educational Concepts International (ECI)
St. 2, off 40 Meter Road
Taimani, Kabul
0700 274 519
[email protected]
Field Director: Mr Fredrick von Heckmann
Darulaman, Kabul
[email protected]
Editor: Mr Sayed Mohammed Ali Rezvani
Representation of Belgium to Afghanistan
Hs. 1&3, Taimani Watt (Main Rd)
Qala-e-Fathullah, Kabul
0700 200 135
0700 294 149
[email protected]
Web:
www.diplomatie.be/kabul
Head of the Representation: Mr Jean-Louis Van
St. 15 (
Shirpur St)
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
Phone: 0700 278 789
020 210 3257
Fax:
0093 20 210 1089
[email protected]
Ambassador: HE Mr Vale
ry Arzhentinski
Hs. 256, St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0799 742 800
0799 304 499
[email protected]
[email protected]
Ambassador: HE Mr Ron Hoffman
EmNMssy of GenmMrk Po AfgOMnisPMn
(Denmark)
Hs. 36, Ln. 1, St. 13
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0797 888 112
0700 279 424
Fax:
[email protected]
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
172
Web:
www.afghanistan.um.dk
Ambassador: Mr Reimer Reinholdt Nielsen
Hs. 39, Ln. 1, St. 10
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0700 284 034
020 210 3051
Fax:
00358-9-160 581 504
[email protected]
JeN:
RRRB�nlMndBorgBMf
Chargé d’Affaires: Mr Timo Oula
EmNMssy of FrMnce (FrMnce)
Shair Poor Avenue
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 284 032
0799 215 053
0799 617 262
Email:
[email protected]
gouv.fr
Web:
www.ambafrance-af.org
Ambassador: HE Mr Regis Koetschet
Malalai Watt
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
020 220 0185
020 220 0181
0087 376 309 5560
Fax:
0093 202 203 818
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
meakabul.nic.in
Ambassador: Mr Jayant Prasad
Great Massoud Rd, Kabul
020 210 3144
075 202 307
0700 028 942
[email protected]
[email protected]
St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0700 224 451
0799 363 827
0087 376 285 3777
Fax:
0087 376 121 8272
Ambassador: HE Mr Hideo Sato
EmNMssy of IiNyM (IiNyM)
Charahi Zanbaq, Kabul
Phone: 020 210 1084
Charge d’Affairs:
HE Mr Mohammad Hassan Elayeb
EmNMssy of SReden (SReden)
Hs. 70, Ln. 1, St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0707 186 773
0799 300 061
0088 216 8440 0045
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.swedenabroad.se
Consul: Mr Hans lundquist
EmNMssy of POe ArMN RepuNlic of EgypP (EgypP)
St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
075 202 1901
075 202 1903
Fax:
020 210 4064
[email protected]
Chargé d’Affaires: Mr Karim Sharaf
EmNMssy of POe FederMl RepuNlic of GermMny
(Germany)
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
(PO Box 83)
020 210 1512
Fax:
0049 3050 0071 7510
Contacts: Kabul Province
173
[email protected]
Web:
www.kabul.diplo.de
EmNMssy of POe HslMmic RepuNlic of HrMn (HrMn)
Peace Ave
Charahi Shir Poor, Kabul
020 210 1396
020 210 1391
0700 282 001
0799 566 883
[email protected]
Ambassador: HE Mr Feda Hossien Maliki Jafari
EmNMssy of POe HslMmic RepuNlic of PMkisPMn
(Pakistan)
HsB 10, NMjMP JMPP RdB (oppB JHO Of�ce)
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
020 230 0911
020 230 0913
[email protected]
[email protected]
Shash Darak, Kabul
Phone: 020 210 2064
0799 349 198
Charge d’Affairs: HE Mr Ghorm Sayed Malhan
Shirpur Main St., Lane 3 (Right)
Sharh-i-Naw, Kabul
020 220aa3787
0797 649 695
0799 077 718
0777 210 817
[email protected]
[email protected]
Ambassador: HE Mr Jose Turpin
EmNMssy of POe Kingdom of POe NePOerlMnds
(Netherlands)
Hs. 2 & 3, St. 4, Ghiassudeen watt
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 286 641
0700 286 645
0798 715 509
[email protected]
Web:
www.minbuza.nl
Ambassador: HE Mr Hans Blankenberg
EmNMssy of POe People’s RepuNlic of FOinM
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt, Kabul
020 210 2548
020 210 2549
0700 276 670
0700 203 300
Fax:
008 706 001 50874
[email protected]
[email protected]
Ambassador: HE Mr Yang Houlan
EmNMssy of POe RepuNlic of HungMry (HungMry)
c/o Embassy of the Federal Republic of
Germany, Mena 6
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
(P.O.Box 83)
0797 035 375
0088 216 512 04035
Fax:
0049 228 177 518
Web:
EmNMssy of POe RepuNlic of HndonesiM
Interior Ministry Avenue, District 10
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
(PO Box 532)
020 220 1066
0797aa733 168
Fax:
020 220 1735
[email protected]
[email protected]
Third Secretary: Mr Ifan Mahdiyat
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
174
EmNMssy of POe RepuNlic of KMzMkOsPMn
(KMzMkOsPMn)
Hs. 11, Gandhi St.
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0700 083 663
0797 403 900
[email protected]
Ambassador: HE Mr Agybay Smagulov
EmNMssy of POe RepuNlic of KoreM (KoreM)
Hs. 34, St. 10/B
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0700 280 188
0700 280 189
020 210 2481
[email protected]
[email protected]
Ambassador: HE Mr Song Woong- Yeob
EmNMssy of POe RepuNlic of TMjikisPMn
(Tajikistan)
Hs. 41, St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0799 327 744
0700 275 135
0799 001 920
[email protected]
[email protected]
Consul: Mr Salohiddin Kiromov
EmNMssy of POe RepuNlic of Turkey (Turkey)
Hs. 134
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt, Kabul
020 210 1581
020 210 3253
0799 335 303
[email protected]
[email protected]
Contacts: Kabul Province
175
Karte Se, Kabul
Phone: 020 250 0431
0798 152 478
0700 282 447
[email protected]
[email protected]
E Mr Parviz M. Aliev
Park Rd (Opp. Flower Street)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0799 565 966
[email protected]
Web:
www.emergency.it
Country Coordinator: Mr Ognjen Predja
EnfMnPs du Monde – GroiPs de I’Homme
Hs. 60, St. 1 (near Intercontinental Hotel &
Polytechnic Institute) District 5
Karte Mamorin, Kabul
(PO Box 5416)
0799 339 969
0700 293 392
0087 376 212 3596
[email protected]
Web:
www.emdh.org
NMPionMl Of�cer: Eng HMmed SMrRMry
Eqtedaremilli Weekly (EM)
St. 4, Qala-e-Fataullah
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
Phone: 0799 348 791
[email protected]
[email protected]
Editor: Mr Sayed Mohammad Ali Rezvani
Equal Access (EA)
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0700 041 310
0799 731 838
0700 284 904
[email protected]
Web:
www.equalaccess.org
Country Director: Ms Michele Bradford
Euron Aid (EA)
Hs. 221
Alberuni St., Kabul
0700 280 881
[email protected]
Export Promotion Agency of Afghanistan (EPAA)
Karte Char, Kabul
075 200 6331
075 200 6332
0700 253 888
[email protected]
youso�@epMMBorgBMf
Web:
www.epaa.org.af
FOeif ExecuPive Of�cer:
Mr Sayed Suleman Fatimie
Farda
Ibn-Sina Market, 2nd Floor, Block 30
Da Afghanan, Kabul
HeMd of Of�ce: Mr ANdul GOMfMr HPeqMd
Farhat Architecture and Engineering
ReOMNiliPMPion (FAER)
Near Murwareed Resturant
Kolola Poshta, Kabul
0700 278 784
0799 318 198
0700 206 435
[email protected]
Director: Eng Wakeel Azizi
FemMle ReOMNiliPMPion Mnd GevelopmenP
HsB 260, TrMf�c SquMre, FOelmenPrM RdB
Kolola Poshta, Kabul
[email protected]
Director:
Ms Sharifa
FOFUS HumMniPMriMn AssisPMnce (FOFUS)
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
Phone: 0799 345 001
[email protected]
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
176
[email protected]
Web:
www.akdn.org/focus
ExecuPive Of�cer: Mr NMsOir KMrmMli
Food Mnd AgriculPure OrgMnizMPion of POe UniPed
Nations (FAO)
c/o Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation and
Livestock (opp. Kabul University)
Jamal Mina, Kabul
0700 288 154
0700 295 711
0700 274 515
0088 216 5112 1284
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.fao.org
Representative: Mr Tekeste Ghebray Tekie
Foundation for Culture and Civil Society (FCCS)
Hs. 839 (opp. National Archives) Salang Watt
Da Afghanan, Kabul
(PO Box 5965)
0700 276 637
0700 278 905
075 200 4005
Fax:
0093 75 202 3578
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanfccs.org
Director: Mr Mir Ahmad Joyenda
Foundation for International Community
Assistance (FINCA)
Jada-i-Zabuli, side of the river, Pule Surkh
Karte Char, Kabul
075 202 3146
0799 209 822
[email protected]�ncMMfgOMnisPMnBorg
Web:
www.villagebanking.org
Foundation Scholarships Afghanistan (FSA)
Chowk Dehbori (behind the Children’s Park
District 3, near Girls’ Hostel)
Dehbori, Kabul
0700 277 637
020 250 0709
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.mayhan.nl
Managing Director:
Mr Mohammad Shabir Nazary
FriedricO ENerP FoundMPion
Charahi Ansari, Yaftali St, (behind Setarah Hotel)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 280 441
0799 338 094
[email protected]
Web:
www.fes.org.af
Director: Ms Ursula Koch-Laugwitz
Friends for ReOMNiliPMPion Mnd HnPegrMPing
Emergency National Development (FRIEND)
Khushal Mina, Kabul
0799 353 935
0799 420 919
075 202 3595
0088 216 8444 8715
[email protected]
[email protected]
Deputy Director: Eng Mohammad Amin Partaw
Funders’ NePRork for AfgOMn Jomen (FNAJ)
Kabul
0708 299 592
[email protected]
Web:
www.funders-afghan-women.org
Coordinator: Ms Lauryn Oates
Wolayat Rd., Saray St.
Charahi Malik Asghar, Kabul
Director: Mr Abdul Wasey
General Independent Administration of Anti-
BriNery Mnd ForrupPion (GHAAF)
from Charahi Haji Yaqoob to Charahi Shaheed
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
075 202 3317
Contacts: Kabul Province
177
0799 183 468
0799 232 367
[email protected]
Generous ReOMNiliPMPion OrgMnizMPion (GRO)
FloRer SPB (Opp vegePMNle mMrkeP, 2nd �oor)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 254 351
0700 276 704
[email protected]
Director: Eng Mohammad Sakhi
German Afghanistan Foundation (GAF)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
[email protected]
German Development Service (DED)
Hs.33/10, House of German Development
Charahi Sedarat, Kabul
075 202 3451
075 202 3448
0087 076 164 2430
Fax:
0087 076 164 2431
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanistan.ded.de
Regional Director: Dr Andreas Schneider
German Technical Cooperation (GTZ)
Charahi Sedarat, Kabul
0707 716 986
0797 774 042
Web:
www.gtz.de/en/
Country Director: Dr Ingolf Vereno
GOMzni RurMl SupporP ProgrMm (GRSP)
Hs. 208, St 3T, Pule Surkh
Karte Sai, Kabul
0799 320 584
0700 280 588
0799 024 061
0798 020 071
[email protected]
Web:
www.grsp.af
Director: Mr Mohammad Eshaq Zeerak
GloNMl Hope NePRork HnPernMPionMl (GHNH)
Istadga Sabeka Saraje Ghazni
Dehbori, Kabul
(PO Box 3023)
0799 211 867
075 200 3296
Web:
www.ghni.org
Director: Mr Michael Mueller
GloNMl PMrPners (GP)
Hs. 15, St. 10
Taimani, Kabul
0799 246 813
Country Director: Mr Randal Paul
GloNMl PMrPnersOip for AfgOMnisPMn (GPFA)
Hs. 96, St. 11
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0799 652 659
0799 187 241
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.gpfa.org
Exuctive Director: Mr Roger Hardister
GloNMl PoinP AfgOMnisPMn (GPA)
Main Rd on Shafakhana bus stop, District 13
, Kabul
0799 373 957
077 882 0988
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.globalpointafghanistan.org
GloNMl RigOPs - PMrPners for JusPice (GR)
Hs. 200, St 3, Charah-i-Ansari, (Across from
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
178
0700 269 035
0797 753 955
020 220 3767
0700 070 148
[email protected]rg
Web:
www.globalrights.org
Country Director: Ms Wazhma Frogh
Goethe-Institute
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0700 274 606
Fax:
0049 373 8129 6052
[email protected]
Web:
www.goethe.de/kabul
Director: Ms Rita Sachse-Toussaint
Hs. 29, Muslim Street, Shar-e-Naw, Kabul
Sharh-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 224 434
0700 277 113
0700 275 751
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.gma.com.af
General Director: Mr Barry Salaam
Good Neighbors International Afghanistan (GNI)
Hs. 164, 1st St., Baharistan
Karte Parwan, Kabul
(PO Box 5774)
Phone: 0799 355 392
[email protected]
[email protected]
Country Director: Mr Lee Byounghee
Groupe Urgence RéOMNiliPMPion Mnd
GéveloppemenP (URG)
Hs. 333 (between St. 7 and 8)
Taimani, Kabul
0799 023 254
0799 573 061
0799 344 887
[email protected]
Web:
www.urd.org
Country Director: Mr Peggy Pascal
HAGAR Afghanistan (HAGAR Afghanistan)
Darulaman Rd. (street next to Habibia High
Ayub Khan Mena, Kabul
(PO Box 394)
0796 189 014
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.hagarinternational.org
Country Representative: Mr Phil Sparrow
Handicap International Belgium (H-Belgium)
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0700 274 540
0799 566 734
0700 277 314
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.handicap-international.org
Country Director: Mr Thierry Hergault
Handicap International France
Hs. 133, St. 5
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0700 274 540
0799 566 734
0799 320 051
0799 209 983
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.handicap-international.org
Programme Director: Mr Thierry Hergault
HMzMrMjMP AssisPMnce NeRslePPer (ArPiNMP NGO)
Opp. Maywand Hospital, above Tamem Khalid
Drugstore
Chindawol, Kabul
Phone: 0700 224 558
Contacts: Kabul Province
179
Health and Development Center for Afghan
Women (HDCAW)
Apt. 53, Block 14, Macrorayan 3
Macrorayon, Kabul
0708 220 600
0700 498 979
0797 474 85Fax:
[email protected]
[email protected]
Executive Director: Ms Qudsia Majeedyar
HeMlPONeP–TrMn culPurMl PsycOosociMl
OrgMnizMPion (HeMlPONeP-TPO)
Hs. 3, St 1, (Opp Kandahari Mosque)
Karte Char, Kabul
0799 332 096
020 250 1195
0700 294 627
[email protected]
Web:
www.healthnettpo.org
Head of Mission: Dr Abdul Majeed Siddiqi
Heinrich Böll Stiftung (HBS)
Hs. 25, St.1, District 10
Qala-e-Fathullah, Kabul
0700 295 972
of�[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.boell-afghanistan.org
Programme Manager: Ms Semin Qasmi
Help the Afghan Children (HTAC)
Shora Street (Opp. Rokhshana High School)
Karte Sai, Kabul
0700 296 462
0799 619 647
[email protected]
Web:
www.htac.org
Country Director:
Mr Mohammad Yousf Jabarkhail
Helping AfgOMn FMrmers OrgMnizMPion (HAFO)
Hs. 211, St. G, Pul-i-Surkh
Karte Sai, Kabul
0700 280 326
0700 279 752
0799 355 324
[email protected]
[email protected]
Director: Eng Javeed
HEWAD Reconstruction, Health and
Humanitarian Assistance Committee (HEWAD)
Hs. 118, St. 1 (left side)
Taimani Project, Kabul
(PO Box 5138)
0799 323 920
0700 632 330
0700 670 710
0700 670 710
[email protected]
[email protected]
Director: Mr Amanullah Nasrat
HindokosO NeRs Agency (HNA)
Hs. 3 (1158), Muslim Rd.
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 280 988
Director: Mr Syed Najeebullah Hashimy
Hope JorldRide (HOPE)
HsB 104 (OppB Su� HslMm Girls HigO ScOool, neMr
the end of Kabul University bus station)
Dehbori, Kabul
(PO Box 100048)
0700 275 168
0700 296 213
077 203 2632
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.hopeafghanistanblog.blogspot.com
Country Director: Mr Daniel R. Allison
Human Rights Research and Advocacy
Consortium (HRRAC)
Hs.458, St.7 (Behind Ministry of Commerce)
Karte Sai, Kabul
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
180
0797 503 590
0700 205 341
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanadvocacy.org.af
Acting Director: Mr Shapoor Qayyumi
Humanitarian Assistance for the Women and
Children of Afghanistan (HAWCA)
Hs.47, Selo-e-petrol pump street, 2nd block,
Khushal Khan (part Alef)
Kushal Khan, Kabul
(PO Box 419)
0799 308 864
0708 216 566
0797 075 976
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.hawca.org
Director: Ms Selay Ghaffar
HumMniPMriMn AssisPMnce NePRork Mnd
Development (HAND)
Hs. 263, St. 6, District 10
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
(PO Box 5318)
Phone: 0700 275 222
[email protected]
Web:
www.geocities.com/handkabul
Director: Mr Sayed Ahrar Abedi
HNnSinM PuNlic HeMlPO ProgrMmme for
AfgOMnisPMn (HNnSinM-PHPA)
Daramsal St. (Opp. Ghazi Mohammad Ayoob
Khan School), Khair Khana, Kabul
0700 282 122
0799 319 262
020 220 1731
0088 216 3330 4359
[email protected]
Human Resource Manager: Mr Atiqullah Ebadi
Independent Administrative Reform and Civil
Services Commission (IARCSC)
Prime Minister’s Compound (in front of Ministry
of Foreign Affairs)
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt, Kabul
(PO Box 5241)
020 210 3963
0799 095 561
020 210 2364
0700 184 306
Fax:
0093 20 210 3518
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.iarcsc.gov.af
Independent Directorate of Local Governance
(IDLG)
Aryana Squire (beside the Italian Embassy)
District 9, Kabul
0799 300 019
0799 405 717
020 210 4703
[email protected]
Executive Assistant: Mr Obaidullah Ekhlas
Independent Humanitarian Services
Association (IHSAN)
Hs. 44/45, St. 2, Taimani Project
Taimani, Kabul
0799 328 597
0700 283 813
0799 309 767
[email protected]
Institute for War & Peace Reporting (IWPR)
EsmMP Muslim SPreeP (AFBAR Old of�ce Nuilding)
Shahr-e-Naw, Kabul
0799 278 872
0700 025 635
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.iwpr.net
Country Director: Ms Jean Mackenzie
HnPegrMPed RegionMl HnformMPion NePRorks
(HRHN) - HumMniPMriMn NeRs & AnMlysis
Contacts: Kabul Province
181
Floor 2, Pajhwok Afghan News Building (Opp.
Ministry of Interior)
Charah-i-Sedarat, Kabul
0700 281 124
0799 182 824
0088 216 8980 0043
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.irinnews.org
Of�cer-in-FOMrge: Mr AkmMl GMRi
HnPernMPionMl AssisPMnce Mission – KMNul
RegionMl Of�ce (HAM)
Rahman Watt, Karte Sai
Karte Sai, Kabul
(PO Box 625)
020 250 1185
0799 343 849
Fax:
0087 376 284 1461
Web:
www.iam-afghanistan.org
Executive Director: Mr Dirk Frans
International Center for Agricultural Research in
the Dry Areas (ICARDA)
Hs. 165 (in front of Electricity Tower) part 1
Karte Parwan, Kabul
(PO Box 1355)
0700 274 381
0799 216 323
0799 216 322
0799 216 324
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.icarda.org
Country Manager: Dr Syed Javed Hasan Rizvi
International Center for Human Rights and
Democratic Development (ICHRDD)
Hs. 3 on the right, Burj-i-Barq bus stop
Kolola Poshta, Kabul
0799 190 344
0700 281 104
0799 829 326
0796 138 728
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.wraf.ca
Country Director: Ms Palwsha Hassan
International Committee of the Red Cross
(ICRC)
Charahi Haji Yaqoob, Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 279 078
0799 550 055
0700 297 777
0088 216 5110 1288
Fax:
0087 376 273 0941
[email protected]
Web:
www.icrc.org
Head of Delegation: Mr Reto Stocker
International Crisis Group (ICG)
0799 458 757
0799 660 990
0799 412 743
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.crisisgroup.org
HnPernMPionMl GevelopmenP IMR OrgMnizMPion
(IDLO)
Hs. 2, on left, St. 1(on left) Kulola Pushta Rd
Charahi-e-Ansari, Kabul
0799 274 262
0799 737 959
0799 116 602
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.idlo.int
Chief of Party: Ms Geralyn Busnardo
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
182
International Federation of Red Cross and Red
Crescent Societies (IFRC)
Co/ARCS, Qargha Rd., District 5
Afshar, Kabul
(PO Box 3039)
0700 016 218
0087 338 228 0530
Fax:
0087 338 228 0534
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.arcs.org.af
International Foundation for Election Systems
Hs. 325, St. 10, right hand
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0700 281 215
0700 215 170
0777 215 170
0088 216 5552 3654
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.ifes.org
Mr Mohammad Waseq Shadman
International Foundation of Hope
Kolola Pushta, Main Street, (across from Shams
Zair Super Market)
Kolola Pushta, Kabul
0700 605 705
0700 293 916
Web:
www.ifhope.org
International Islamic Relief Agency (ISRA)
Hs. 57, Shah-e Babo Jan Lane (near Sitara
Hotel)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0799 328 729
0088 216 8980 0758
[email protected]
Web:
www.isra-relief.org
Country Director: Mr Abdul Aziz Abbakar
HnPernMPionMl IMNour OrgMnizMPion (HIO)
UNDP Compound (Opp. Turkish Embassy)
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt, Kabul
0700 258 055
0088 216 8980 1021
[email protected]
[email protected]
Head of Agency: Mr Shengjie Li
HnPernMPionMl MMize Mnd JOeMP HmprovemenP
Hs. 157, Ln. 3, off Muhhaiudin St., west of
Baharistan Park
Karte Parwan, Kabul
(PO Box 5291)
0700 282 083
075 202 2335
[email protected]
Country Coordinator: Dr Mahmood Osmanzai
International Medical Corps (IMC)
Hs. 138 & 139, St. Jeem, Part 2, Kart-i-Wali
Shash Darak, Kabul
0777 343 905
0700 288 229
0799 343 905
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.imcworldwide.org
Country Operations Manager: Mr Naik
International Monetary Fund (IMF)
St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
[email protected]
Resident Representative: Mr Joshua Charap
HnPernMPionMl OrgMnizMPion for MigrMPion (HOM)
Hs. 1093, Ansari Watt (behind UNICA Guest
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
Contacts: Kabul Province
183
0700 278 820
020 220 1022
0700 185 960
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.iom.int/afghanistan
Deputy Chief of Mission: Mr Peter Krogh Sorensen
International Relief and Development in
Kolola Pushta Main Road
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
[email protected]
org
International Rescue Committee (IRC)
Hs. 61, Kochi Afghana, District 9
Shash Darak, Kabul
0700 283 930
0700 283 929
0700 281 081
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.theIRC.org
Country Director: Mr Ciaran Donnelly
International Security Assistance Force (ISAF)
Military Sports Club
Great Massoud Rd, Kabul
0799 511 155
0799 558 291
presof�[email protected]
Web:
www.jfcbs.nato.int/isaf
HnPerneRs AfgOMnisPMn (HnPerneRs)
Hs. 99, Sherkat bus stop, Darulaman Main Road
(near Ariana TV)
Karte Sai, Kabul
0700 291 564
0777 291 564
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.internews.org
Business Relation Coordinator: Mr Yama
Akramyar
HnPerneRs Europe in AfgOMnisPMn (HnPerneRs-E)
Sherkat Bus Stop, Darulaman Road, Ariana TV
Street (near Khuja Mullah Mosque)
Karte Sai, Kabul
0799 477 767
[email protected]
Project Director: Mr Agathe Dalisson
Hs. 1, St. 7, Taimani Rd, District 10
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0799 806 945
0799 806 943
0088 216 8985 2253
[email protected]
Web:
www.intersos.org
Head of Mission: Frederic Maio
Islah Daily Government (IDG)
Macrorayon Azadi Printing Press
Macrorayon, Kabul
HslMmic Relief – UK (HR-UK)
Hs. 1082, St. J
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0700 278 351
075 200 1137
0088 216 8980 0019
[email protected]
Web:
www.islamic-relief.org.uk
Country Director: Dr Ali Mohammad Noor
Hs. 7, Jami Watt
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
020 220 1207
0700 282 677
JMpMn FenPer for Fon�icP PrevenPion (JFFP)
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0799 029 684
0087 376 305 2650
[email protected]
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
184
Web:
www.jccp.gr.jp
Representative: Mr Hayashi Yutaka
Hs. 61, 3rd St.
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0700 280 921
0700 281 551
0088 216 5552 3097
0088 216 8985 2012
[email protected]
kMNul�[email protected]
Web:
www.jen-npo.org
HeMd of Of�ce: Ms KiyoPMkM TMmMri
Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)
Hs. 179, main Shash Darak Street (behind
Ministry of Defence)
Shash Darak, Kabul
(PO Box 461 Kabul)
0700 095 505
0799 540 836
0799 540 823
0087 376 342 2572
Fax:
0087 376 342 2573
[email protected]
Web:
www.jica.go.jp
Deputy Resident Representative: Mr Kazuto
Japanese International Friendship and Welfare
Foundation (JIFF)
Near Russian Embasy, Darulaman Road
Ayub Khan Mina, Kabul
0700 276 765
[email protected]
Director: Dr Akbar Ahmadyar
Johanniter International (JI)
HsB E1E (neMr EFHO Of�ce)
Kolola Poshta, Kabul
Project Coordinator: Mr Stephan Titze
JoOns Hopkins BloomNerg ScOool of PuNlic
Hs. 21 (maroon gate), Ln. 2
Shir Poor, Kabul
0799 209 576
Web:
www.jhsph.edu
Director: Mr Peter Hansen
JusP for AfgOMn FMpMciPy Mnd KnoRledge (JAFK)
Estgaye Jayee Raees, (in front of Sayed Kayan
Darulaman Road, Kabul
0795 051 998
0799 460 962
0707 819 855
[email protected]
General Director: Dr Abdul Ghafoor Qaderi
KMNul FenPer for SPrMPegic SPudies (KFSS)
Char Rahi Dehbori, western Kabul
Dehbori, Kabul
0700 421 884
075 209 1364
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.kabulcenter.org
Executive Director: Mr Waliullah Rahmani
KMNul MunicipMliPy (KM)
Opp. Ministry of Education, Zernegar Park
Da Afghanan, Kabul
0799 570 155
0799 330 283
020 210 1350
Mayor: Eng Mir Abdul Ahad Sahebi
KMNul PuNlic IiNrMry (KPI)
Charahi Malik Asghar, Kabul
Deputy Director: Mr A.H. Nabizada
KMNul Times (KT)
Macrorayon Azadi Printing Press
Macrorayon, Kabul
Editor-in-Chief: Mr Abdullah Haq Walla
Contacts: Kabul Province
185
KMNul UniversiPy (KU)
Jamal Mina, Kabul
020 250 0245
0799 733 856
0799 143 352
Fax:
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.ku.edu.af
Chancellor: HE Dr Abdul Rahman Ashraf
Kabul University Library (KU-Library)
Karte Sakhi, Kabul
KMNul Jeekly (KMNul Jeekly)
St. 2, Haji Yaqoub Square (on right)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 269 638
[email protected]
Senior Reporter: Mr Mir Mohammad Sediq. Zaliq
KfW German Development Bank (KfW-GDB)
Charah-i-Sedarat, Kabul
0799 020 991
0700 274 456
[email protected]
Web:
www.kfw.de
Country Director: Mr Stefan Lutz
Kherad Foundation (Kherad)
Posta Khana St.
Karte Char, Kabul
(PO Box 4021)
0700 154 508
077 203 9642
077 203 3829
[email protected]
Director: Mr Mohammad Hussain Alavi
Konrad Adenauer Foundation (KAS)
Hs. 291, St. 10
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0799 327 241
[email protected]
Web:
www.kas.de
Director: Mr Babak Khalatbari
Korea International Cooperation Agency
(KOICA)
Hs. 525, St. 11
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
075 201 7102
0700 157 989
0700 276 772
0087 076 319 0274
Fax:
0087 076 319 0276
[email protected]
Web:
www.koica.go.kr
Resident Representative: Mr Kim, Jin-Kwan
IMR Mnd Order TrusP Fund for AfgOMnisPMn
(LOTFA)
Inside Ministry of Interior (MOI)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
020 212 4074
0799 003 404
Web:
www.undp.org.af
NMPionMl ProgrMmme Of�cer: Mr MusOPMq RMOim
Legal & Cultural Services for Afghan Women &
Children (LCSAWC)
International Airport Street, Qalai Wakil Clinic Rd
Bibi Mahro, Kabul
0700 222 042
0700 292 671
0707 380 766
[email protected]
[email protected]
Director: Ms Parwanma Yousof
Ieprosy FonProl OrgMnizMPion (IEPFO)
Hs. 151, St. 4 (behind Daramsal)
Karte Parwan, Kabul
(PO Box 6057)
0700 283 956
077 202 4271
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
186
[email protected]
Admin Manager: Mr Mohammad Jawad Ahmadi
Local Governance & Community Development
ProjecPCARG (ARGCIGFG (USAHG))
Hs. 100, St. 3
Shash Darak, Kabul
0797 165 207
[email protected]
Web:
www.ardinc.com
Human Resources & Administration Manager:
Macrorayon 3
Macrorayon, Kabul
Director: Ms Jamila Mojaheed
Management Sciences for Health (Tech Serve)
Hs. 24, Darulaman Road
Ayub Khan Mina, Kabul
0700 241 782
Web:
www.msh.org/afghanistan
Operations and Finance Manager: Mr Stephen
Marie Stopes International - Afghanistan (MSI)
Hs. 193, Karti Char Main Street, (Opp. District 3
Police Station)
Karte Char, Kabul
0700 277 616
0799 372 597
0799 568 383
Web:
www.mariestopes.org
Country Director: Mr Farhad Javeed
MEDAIR (MEDAIR)
Hs. 3, St. 2, District 10 (behind Quassimi Win
Taimani, Kabul
(PO Box 5951)
0700 296 778
0799 337 581
0700 093 125
0088 216 5113 9402
Fax:
0087 362 945 643
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.medair.org
Country Director: Mr James Eyre
Medecins du Monde – FrMnce (MGM)
Qala-i-NajaraIn, front of second Public Bath
Room
Khair Khana, Kabul
(PO Box 224)
0700 282 412
0799 203 821
[email protected]
Web:
www.medecinsdumonde.org
Medi Educational Support Association for
Afghanistan (MESAA)
c/o JIFF Medical Center (near Russian
Ayub Khan Mina, Kabul
0700 292 095
[email protected]
Director: Mr Zabiullah Ahmadyar
Hs. 60, Jami Watt (behind District 10 Police
Station, next to Nawrooz Zada Co)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
(PO Box 1197)
0799 857 351
0700 997 586
0088 216 8444 2908
[email protected]
Web:
www.medicamondiale.org
Head of Mission: Ms Suzana Paklar
Contacts: Kabul Province
187
Medical Emergency Relief International
Taimani, Kabul
0799 651 622
0797 a186 931
0799 119 659
Web:
www.merlin.org.uk
Operations Coordinator: Ms Marinella Bebos
Medical Refresher Courses for Afghans (MRCA)
Hs. 94, east street Park Baharistan
Karte Parwan, Kabul
0700 281 698
0700 656 837
0799 129 364
00882 165 552 2961
[email protected]
Web:
www.mrca-asso.org
Head of Mission: Ms Justine Piquemal
Mercy Corps (MC)
Hs. 28, St. 2, Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
(PO Box 838)
0700 211 066
0799 218 894
0799 399 582
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.mercycorps.org
Country Director: Ms Christine Mulligan
Micro�nMnce HnvesPmenP SupporP FMciliPy for
Afghanistan (MISFA)
Hs. 195, Esmat Muslim Street
Sharh-i-Naw, Kabul
0799 499 505
0700 295 474
[email protected]a.org.af
[email protected]
Web:
www.misfa.org.af
Managing Director: Ms Katrin Fakiri
Mine Clearance and Planning Agency (MCPA)
Hs. 1, Ln. 1 on the right from Pul-i-Mahmood
Khan to Shashdarak
Shash Darak, Kabul
[email protected]_net.org
Director: Eng Haji Attiqullah
Mine Detection and Dog Centre (MDC)
Near Tapa-i-Maranjan
Macrorayan 1, Kabul
(PO Box 2001)
0700 222 899
0700 222 877
075 202 1808
Fax:
0093 20 230 0135
[email protected]
[email protected]
Director: Mr Mohammad Shahab Hakimi
Mines Advisory Group (MAG)
Chaman-i-Huzuri, Kabul
0799 837 001
0700 058 148
0088 216 2111 8483
[email protected]
Technical Operations Manager: Mr John R. Kirby
Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock
Opp. Kabul University, District 3
Jamal Mina, Kabul
(PO Box 10004)
020 250 0311
020 250 0315
0700 898 989
020 250 0146
Fax:
0093 20 250 0315
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.agriculture.gov.af
Minister: Mr Asif Rahimi
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
188
MinisPry of Borders Mnd TriNMl AffMirs (MoBTA)
Airport Rd. (Near Supreme Court) District 9
Macrorayan 3, Kabul
0700 212 448
020 230 1768
0799 335 270
Minister: Mr Abdul Karim Barahawi
Ministry of Commerce and Industry (MoCI)
Darulaman Road, Shora St.
Darulaman, Kabul
0700 203 870
Fax:
Web:
www.commerce.gov.af
Acting Minister: Dr Wahidullah Sharani
Ministry of Communications and IT (MoCIT)
Muhammad Jan Khan Watt (square) third
�oor, eigOPeen sPory mMin Nuilding, MinisPry of
Mohammad Jan Khan Watt, Kabul
(PO Box 5428)
020 210 1113
020 210 3700
0799 230 067
075 203 0508
Fax:
0093 20 210 3700
[email protected]
Web:
www.mcit.gov.af
Minister: Eng Amirzai Sangeen
Ministry of Counter Narcotics (MCN)
JMlMlMNMd mMin roMd (neMr POe TrMf�c
Department) Banayee, District 9
Macrorayan 3, Kabul
0798 242 837
0799 097 759
0798 982 531
0700 480 513
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.mcn.gov.af
Minister: General Khodaidad
Ministry of Culture and Youth Affairs (MoCY)
behind Ministry of Communications
Pul-i-Bagh Omomi, Kabul
0799 884 385
[email protected]
Minister: Mr Abdul Kareem Khurram
Ministry of Defense (MoD)
Opp. Presidential Palace, District 2
Pashtoonistan Watt, Kabul
020 210 0457
020 210 4200
0700 268 888
[email protected]
Web:
www.mod.gov.af
Minister: General Abdul Raheem Wardak
Ministry of Economy (MoEC)
Charahi Malik Asghar (opp. Ministry of Foreign
Affairs)
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt, Kabul
0700 263 748
020 210 0394
Fax:
0093 20 210 0328
[email protected]
Minister: Mr Mohammad Jalil Shams
Ministry of Education (MoE)
In front of Kabul Municipality
Da Afghanan, Kabul
0799 302 256
0799 321 517
020 210 3418
Minister: Mr Farooq Wardak
Ministry of Energy and Water (MEW)
Darulaman Road, Sanatoriam (in front of Kabul
Darulaman, Kabul
0700 400 400
0700 224 538
075 202 3394
[email protected]
Minister: Mr Mohammad Ismail Khan
Contacts: Kabul Province
189
Ministry of Finance (MoF)
Charahi Pashtonistan, District 2
Pashtoonistan Watt, Kabul
020 210 0387
020 210 2837
020 210 0390
075 202 9442
Fax:
0093 20 210 3439
[email protected]
Web:
www.mof.gov.af
Minister: Dr Anwarulhaq Ahadi
Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MoFA)
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt, Kabul
0700 281 980
0700 104 005
020 210 0366
Fax:
001 866 890 9988
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanistan-mfa.net
Minister: Dr Rangeen Dadfar Spanta
Ministry of Haj and Religious Affairs
Charahi Haji Yaqoob (opp. District 10 of Police
Department)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
020 220 1339
020 220 1338
0799 302 193
0700 231 116
[email protected]
Minister: Mr Nematullah Shahrani
Ministry of Higher Education (MoHE)
Opp. Mokhabrat Lane, (Beside Kabul University),
Karte Char, Kabul
0700 502 298
0799 007 554
0799 276 952
[email protected]
[email protected]
Minister: Dr Mohammad Azam Dadfar
Ministry of Interior Affairs (MoI)
Malalai Watt
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0799 320 818
020 220 0159
Minister: HE Eng Mohamad Hanif Atmar
Ministry of Justice (MoJ)
Charahi Pashtonistan, District 2
Pashtoonistan Watt, Kabul
020 210 0320
020 210 0321
020 210 0322
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.moj.gov.af
Minister: Mr Sarwar Danish
MinisPry of IMNour, SociMl AffMirs, MMrPyrs Mnd
GisMNled (MoISAMG)
Market Bus Stop
Macrorayan 1, Kabul
Phone: 0700 059 561
075 200 3671
075 201 7338
[email protected]
Minister: Mr Noor Mohammad Qarqeen
Ministry of Mines (MoM)
In front of Finance Ministry, Charahi
Pashtonistan, District 2
Pashtoonistan Watt, Kabul
020 210 0309
0700 222 813
0799 415 444
0088 216 5020 3746
Fax:
0093 20 293 4364
[email protected]
Web:
www.mom.gov.af
Minister: Eng Mohammad Ebrahim Adel
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
190
MinisPry of PuNlic HeMlPO (MoPH)
Near US Embassy, District 10
Charahi Sehat Aama, Kabul
0700 276 340
0798 931 886
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.moph.gov.af
Minister: Dr Sayed Amin Fatemi
MinisPry of PuNlic Jorks (MoPJ)
St. 1, Old Macrorayon, District 9
Macrorayan 1, Kabul
020 230 0374
0700 066 217
0799 311 875
0088 216 8444 3171
Fax:
0093 20 230 1361
[email protected]
[email protected]
Minister: Dr Sohrab Ali Saffary
Ministry of Refugees and Repatriation (MoRR)
behind Jangalak Factory, District 7
Waisalabad, Kabul
(PO Box 5806)
Phone: 0700 474 949
0700 285 091
0700 278 234
[email protected]
Web:
www.morr.gov.af
Minister: Mr Zarar Ahmad Moqbel
MinisPry of RurMl ReOMNiliPMPion Mnd
Development (MRRD)
MRRD Compound, Dar-ul- Aman Rd
Karte SE, Kabul
0799 879 466
0799 755 750
0700 281 352
0700 234 629
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.mrrd.gov.af
Minister: Mr Mohammad Ehsan Zia
Ministry of Transportation and Civil Aviation
(MoTCA)
Opp. ISAF Headquarters, next to National TV and
Ansari Watt, Kabul
(PO Box 165)
020 210 1032
0799 807 241
020 210 1031
0700 226 781
[email protected]
[email protected]
Minister: Eng Omar Zakhailwal
MinisPry of UrNMn GevelopmenP Mnd Housing
Macrorayan 3, Kabul
0700 282 072
0799 790 960
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.moud.gov.af
Minister: Eng Mohammad Yousuf Pashtoon
Ministry of Women’s Affairs (MoWA)
Next to Cinema Zainab
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
020 220 1378
075 200 1976
075 200 4546
075 200 4542
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.mowa.gov.af
Minister: Dr Hosn Banu Ghazanfar
Mission d’Aide au Développement des
Economies Rurales Mission Afghanistan
Hs. 113, St. 7
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0700 281 869
0798 018 616
Contacts: Kabul Province
191
0088 216 2116 4067
[email protected]
Web:
www.madera-asso.org
Country Director: Mr Pascal Arthaud
Hs. 164, St. 3,Qalah-e-Fatullah
Qala-e-Fathullah, Kabul
(PO Box 3114 SOMOr-i-NMR PosP Of�ce)
0799 297 562
0799 344 121
0088 216 5420 0532
[email protected]
Chief of Finance & Administration: Mr Asif
Nawaz
MoNile Mini Fircus for FOildren (MMFF)
Darulaman Rd., St. 2 on the right after Habibia
High School (behind Khoja Mulla mosque)
Karte Sai, Kabul
0700 229 975
0700 280 140
0700 291 120
0700 229 987
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanmmcc.org
Co-Directors:
Mr David Mason and Berit Muhlhausen
MoNy MediM
(Tolo TV, Lemar TV, Arman FM,
Lapism Kaboora Productions, Barbud Music)
House 3, Street 12
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
+93 (0)796009011
[email protected]
Sekander Saleh
Monitoring and Evaluation Training Agency
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
192
National Area-Based Development Programme
MRRD Compound, Dar-ul- Aman Rd
Karte Se, Kabul
0700 236 229
0797 889 674
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.mrrd-nabdp.org
Programme Manager: Mr Jamie Graves
National Democratic Institute for International
Affairs (NDI)
Hs. 159, Khuja Mullah Street, Sector 3, District
Karte Se, Kabul
0796 348 315
0797 821 792
0798 137 023
[email protected]
Web:
www.ndi.org
Country Director: Ms Susan B. Carnduff
National Environmental Protection Agency (NEPA)
Darulaman Road
Darulaman, Kabul
0799 565 458
[email protected]
Web:
www.ozone-afghan.gov.af
National Radio Television of Afghanistan (RTA)
Opp. ISAF Headquarters, next to Ministry of
Transportation
Ansari Watt, Kabul
(PO Box D44 KMNul mMin posP of�ce)
020 210 2487
0799 749 602
0700 277 519
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.rta.org.af
Director of Planning & International Relations:
Mr Hanif Sherzad
National Rural Access Program (NRAP)
Block 1, 4th Floor, Ministry of Public Works,
Macrorayon 1
Macrorayon, Kabul
020 230 1871
[email protected]
Web:
www.nrap.gov.af
Coordinator: Eng Abdul Sattar Salim
NATO Senior FiviliMn RepresenPMPive’s Of�ce
(NATO)
ISAF Headquarters
Great Massoud Rd, Kabul
0799 511 262
0799 511 255
0799 511 263
[email protected]
[email protected]
Senior Civilian Representative: Minister Hikmet
Noor Educational Center (NEC)
Jamal Mina Lane, Near to Jamal Mina Mosque
(Opp. Engineering Faculty Eastern gate)
Jamal Mina, Kabul
0799 337 667
0799 824 570
[email protected]
Web:
www.NEC.org.af
Director: Ms Jamila Afghani
NorRegiMn AfgOMnisPMn FommiPPee (NAF)
Hs. 148, St. 3, Nawai Watt
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 284 525
0799 320 667
020 220 1696
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanistan.com.
Country Director: Mr Zamarai Ahmadzai
NorRegiMn FOurcO Aid (NFA)
Hs. 1071 (near Laycee Hunarha), Saraye Ghazni
Contacts: Kabul Province
193
Karte Char, Kabul
0799 334 986
0700 282 989
0700 201 421
[email protected]
[email protected]
Resident Representative: Mr Gry Synnevaag
NorRegiMn Refugee Founcil (NRF)
HsB 127 (in fronP of FommunicMPion Of�ce)
Karte Char, Kabul
0700 228 509
0795 271 619
0700 198 935
0088 216 2134 4164
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.nrc.no
Country Director: Mr Petre
Nye Express Of�ce (Nye)
Hs. 424, near Uzbakha Mosque
Karte Sai, Kabul
0700 201 701
020 220 0573
020 220 0574
[email protected]
Web:
www.thekillidgroup.com
Of�ce Hn FOMrge: Mr SMyed JMn JMRMd
Of�ce of AdminisPrMPive AffMirs & Founcil of
Ministers Secretariat (OAA/CMS)
Marble Palace, Kabul
020 210 1772
0798 223 228
020 210 1773
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.oaa.gov.af
Deputy Director General – Programs:
Mr Farhadullah Farhad
Of�ce of POe EuropeMn Union SpeciMl
RepresenPMPive (EUSR)
Hs. 45 and 47, St. 3, Charahi Haji Yaqoob (Opp.
CARE International)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0700 279 204
0799 300 104
0700 293 841
[email protected]
[email protected]
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
194
Orphan Refugees and Aid - International (ORA)
Next to Habibia High School
Haji Ayub Mina, Kabul
(PO Box 2013)
0799 331 930
0799 582 812
[email protected]
Web:
www.oracentralasia.org
Country Director: Mr Joop Teeuwen
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Programme (NSP/OC)
NSP/OC HQ, Tashkilat Street, Darulaman Road
Darulaman, Kabul
0700 269 057
0799 234 170
0799 327 025
Web:
www.nspafghanistan.org
Management Assistant: Mr Abdul Rahman
Hs. 398, St. 1, District 10
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
(PO Box 681)
0799 109 769
0700 212 653
0087 376 294 5671
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.oxfam.org.uk
Country Director: Ms Grace Ommer
OxfMm NoviN (OxfMm NoviN)
Hs. 398, St. 1, District 10
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
(PO Box 681)
0797 519 510
[email protected]
Web:
www.oxfamnovib.nl
Manager, Humanitarian Programs: Ms Lisa Reilly
PMiRMsPon
Hs. 1, St. 3 , Fatema Rd
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
Phone: 0700 278 221
Publisher: Afghan Non-governmental
PMjORok AfgOMn NeRs
Opp BPosP Of�ce, HnPerior MinisPry RdB
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
(PO Box 3129)
0799 568 351
0700 237 747
0700 225 375
020 220 1814
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.pajhwok.com
Director: Mr Danish
Partners for Social Development (PSD)
Unchi Bagh Banan (in Shammama Model High
Dasht-i-Barchi, Kabul
0700 285 122
0799 329 113
0799 503 047
[email protected]
[email protected]
Director: Eng Abdulhai
Partners in Aviation and Communications
Technology (Pactec)
St.15 , Ln.1, 12th house on the right
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0700 282 679
0799 300 837
Fax:
0088 216 5426 1044
[email protected]
Web:
www.pactec.org
Flight Scheduling Manager: Mr Faraidoon Nasimi
PMrPners in ReviPMlizMPion Mnd Building (PRB)
Hs. 300 (Burje Barq Bus Stop)
Kolola Poshta, Kabul
Contacts: Kabul Province
195
0700 280 995
0799 391 820
0799 419 700
020 220 0012
Fax:
0093 20 220 0012
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.prb.org.af
Programme Manager/Acting Director:
PMrRMz Micro�nMnce HnsPiPuPion (PARJAZ)
Hajary Wa Najary Lane (near to Rabie Balkhi
High Scholl) First St., Karte Char, Kabul
0700 234 848
0799 779 553
0799 157 444
[email protected]
Web:
www.parwaz.org
Managing Director:
Mr Mohammed Siddique Durrani
PMPPM KOMzMnM (PMPPM KOMzMnM)
Karte Parwan (Opp. to Naderia High School)
Karte Parwan, Kabul
(Po Box 6047)
0799 307 854
020 220 2407
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.pattakhazana.tk
Director: Ms Sohaila Alekozai
People in Need (PIN)
Hs. 61, St. 2, Part 2
Karte Parwan, Kabul
Phone: 0799 398 805
0799 114 648
[email protected]
Web:
www.peopleinneed.cz
Head of Programs: Mr Michal Przedlacki
POysioPOerMpy Mnd ReOMNiliPMPion SupporP for
Afghanistan (PARSA)
Kabul Marastoon compound, Afshar Road, Kabul
0799 020 588
0700 284 286
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanistan-parsa.org
Executive Director: Ms Marnie Gustavson
Polish Humanitarian Organisation (PHO)
Hs. 521, St. 8
Taimani, Kabul
0797 472 536
0799 599 039
0700 283 334
[email protected]
Web:
www.pah.org.pl
Head of Mission: Mr Przemyslaw Kapuscinski
Polish Medical Mission (PMM)
Taimani, Kabul
0799 008 199
0799 008 177
[email protected]
Head of Mission: Mr Michal Matusiewicz
PolyPecOnic UniversiPy - KMNul (PolyPecOnic)
Afshar St., Karte Mamorin, District 5
Bagh-i-Bala, Kabul
075 200 1933
020 220 1114
0700 276 803
Director: Mr Izzatullah Hamed
Presidential Palace
Gul Khana Palace, Kabul
0700 282 508
0797 163 355
[email protected]
[email protected]
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
196
Web:
www.president.gov.af
President: HE Mr Hamid Karzai
RMdio IiNerPyCRMdio Free Europe (RFERI)
Hs. 26, Ln. 4 on the right, St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
(PO Box 1471)
0700 295 871
020 210 2719
[email protected]
Web:
www.rferl.org
ReNuilding AgriculPurMl MMrkeP in AfgOMnisPMn
Ministry of Agriculture and Irrigation
Karte Sakhi, Kabul
0799 211 206
[email protected]
Web:
www.ramp-af.com
Chief of Party: Mr Louis Faoro
Reconstruction Authority for Afghanistan
(RAFA)
Taimani, Kabul
0700 277 124
[email protected]
Director: Eng Abdurrashid Ghaiasi
Relief International (RI)
St. 5, Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0799 181 707
0700 216 279
0797 826 534
[email protected]
Web:
www.ri.org
Deputy Country Director: Ms Inge Detlefsen
ReneRMNle Energy, EnvironmenP Mnd SolidMriPy
Group (GERES)
Hs. 31, Qasabi Street (near Cinema Baristan)
Karte Parwan, Kabul
0799 182 809
0799 118 304
Web:
www.geres.free.fr
Country Director: Mr Jeff Ospital
Women, Peace and Governance (WP&G/
Muslim Street, District 10 (near Ministry of Haj)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0796 095 451
0707 106 043
[email protected]
Web:
http://afghanistan.unifem.org
Unite Manager:
ReuPers NeRs Agency (RNA)
Hs. 125, St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0700 275 943
0799 335 285
[email protected]
Web:
www.reuters.com
Senior Correspondent: Mr Sayed Salahuddin
Roots of Peace (RoP)
Karte Char Road (near Technique Bus Stop)
Karte Char, Kabul
Phone: 0799 403 246
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.rootsofpeace.org
Program Director: Ms Zach Lea
RoyMl NorRegiMn EmNMssy (NorRMy)
Hs. 3, lane 4 on the right, St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
070 110 5000
Fax:
070 110 5090
[email protected]
Web:
www.norway.org.af
Contacts: Kabul Province
197
Rural Expansion of Afghanistan’s Community-
NMsed HeMlPOcMre (REAFH)
Hs. 24, Darulaman Road (near Habibia High
School), Ayub Khan Mina, Kabul
0700 224 302
0799 320 508
[email protected]
Web:
www.msh.org/afghanistan
Director of Operations: Mr William Schiffbauer
RurMl ReOMNiliPMPion AssociMPion for
Hs. 1379, Sorya High School St. (beside Sayed
Jamaludin Secondary school) District 3
Karte Char, Kabul
075 201 4254
0700 276 213
0700 277 441
[email protected]
Director: Mr Dur Mohammad Fazil
Salam Watandar (SW)
Hs. 99, Sherkat Bus Station, (near Ariana TV)
Darulaman, Kabul
0797 253 759
0700 252 112
0700 244 938
0700 264 935
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.salamwatandar.com/farsi
SMnMyee GevelopmenP OrgMnizMPion (SGO)
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
(PO Box 73)
0700 220 638
020 220 1693
0795 759 833
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.sanay
Executive Director: Mr Raz Mohammad Dalili
Karte Sai, Kabul
0700 285 056
0799 338 973
0797 070 987
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.sandygallsafghanistanappeal.org
Save the Children Japan (SCJ)
c/o Save the Children USA (Sherkat Bus Stop,
Ayub Khan Mina, Kabul
0799 830 145
0700 279 425
020 220 2948
0097 376 308 8241
[email protected]
Web:
www.savechildren.or.jp
Country Representative: Mr Miho Wada
SMve POe FOildren SReden-NorRMy (SFS-N)
Hs. 134, Chaharahi Shaheed (close to British
Cemetery) District 10
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0798 454 510
0798 454 501
0798 454 500
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.rb.se/eng
Country Director: Mr Poul Brandrup
SMve POe FOildren UK (SF-UK)
Hs. 2127, St. A, District 6
Karte Sai, Kabul
0799 339 592
0700 267 416
[email protected]
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
198
Web:
www.savethechildren.org.uk
Program Director: Dr Sandra Renew
SMve POe FOildren USA (SF-USA)
Sherkat Bus Stop, Darulaman Rd, District 3
Ayub Khan Mina, Kabul
(PO Box 642)
0700 276 578
0700 298 230
075 201 4336
0087 376 291 5290
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.savethechildren.org
Serve Afghanistan (SERVE)
Nahre Darsun, Cinema St, Karte Char
Karte Char, Kabul
(PO Box
4015
0799 327 714
0799 653 015
0700 280 506
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.serveafghanistan.org
Executive Director: Mr Stephen E. Craig
Services for Humanitarian Assistance and
Development (SHAD)
Of�ce 407, 4PO Floor, NMjeeN ZMrMN MMrkeP
Quaimarkaz, Kabul
0700 470 770
0799 371 710
[email protected]
Web:
www.shade.org.af
Director: Dr Bakhtar Aminzay
Shanti Volunteer Association (SVA)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
[email protected]
Web:
www.jca.apc.org/sva/english
Shelter for Life (SFL)
Shora St. (next to Park St.)
Karte Sai, Kabul
[email protected]
SOelPer NoR HnPernMPionMl (SNH)
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
(PO Box 5648)
0700 279 814
0799 067 529
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.shelter.de
Director: Mr Georg Taubmann
Pul-e Surkh (near Omar Jan Kandahari Mosque)
Karte Sai, Kabul
0799 328 901
0799 315 201
[email protected]
[email protected]
Country Director: Mr Abdul Rauf Naveed
Social and Health Development Program
Hs. 497, St. 57, District 4
Karte Parwan, Kabul
(PO Box 601)
0700 247 863
Web:
www.shdp.org.af
GenerMl GirecPor: Gr KOMlid SOMri�
Social Research Institute (SRI)
Kote Sangi (next to Shahin restaurant)
, Kabul
0797 389 526
0799 301 248
[email protected]
Director: Mr Aziz Bakhtirai
Society for the Preservation of Afghanistan’s
Cultural Heritage (SPACH)
Hs. 399 (Opp. Oxfom), Street 1
Contacts: Kabul Province
199
075 202 4107
[email protected]
Web:
www.southasianmedia.net
President of Afghanistan Chapter: Mr
Ehsanullah Aryanzai
SOZO International (SOZO)
Taimani, Kabul
075 200 1120
0799 021 766
0700 278 633
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.sozointernational.org
National Director:
Mr Abdul Wakil Mehrabanzada
STEP - HeMlPO Mnd GevelopmenP OrgMnizMPion
(South of Pul-i-Surkh) Rahman Watt
Karte Sai, Kabul
0700 236 483
0700 294 193
0700 223 095
0798 012 572
[email protected]
[email protected]
General Director: Dr Latif Rashed
Supreme Court
Great Massoud Rd, Kabul
0700 162 407
Fax:
[email protected]
Chief Justice: HE Mr Abdul Salam Azimi
SRedisO FommiPPee for AfgOMnisPMn (SFA)
Paktia Kot
Pul-i-Charkhi, Kabul
(PO Box 5017)
Taimani, Kabul
0700 285 859
0700 290 141
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.spach.info
Programme Coordinator: Ms Ana Rosa Rodriguez
Solidarite Afghanistan Belgique (SAB)
Hs. 150, St. 1, Hisae-i-Du
Karte Parwan, Kabul
075 202 1124
0799 410 575
0799 193 486
Fax:
0032 4237 9331
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.assosab.be
Solidarités Afghanistan (SA)
Hs. 41, St. 12 (near Pai Kuba Naswar)
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0777 607 732
0797 863 934
0799 303 633
[email protected]lidarites-afghanistan.org
[email protected]
Web:
www.solidarites.org
Country Director: Mr Yara BURKA
Solidarity for Afghan Families (SAF)
Hs. 1, Golayee Estgah Akhir Pohantoon, Kabul
077 507 1978
[email protected]
Director: Mr Abdul Basir Mansoor
South Asian Free Media Association (SAFMA)
Hs. 3, St. 2 after the Russian Embassay towards
Darullaman Palace
Karte Se, Kabul
0799 278 667
0700 214 748
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
0700 037 711
0799 387 628
020 220 1655
Fax:
[email protected]
Web:
www.swedishcommittee.org
Country Director: Dr Anders Fänge
SRedisO HnPernMPionMl GevelopmenP Agency
(SIDA)
Hs. 70, Ln. 1, St. 15
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
020 230 1416
0700 284 210
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.sida.se
Second Secretary, Administrator:
Ms Agneta Lejdström
SRiss Agency for GevelopmenP Mnd FooperMPion
Hs. 486, Lane. 3, St. 13
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
020 230 1565
0700 274 902
0799 203 475
0700 284 703
Fax:
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.sdc.org.af
Country Director: Mr Andreas Huber
Hs. 485 & 486, St. 13, Lane 3 (right)
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0700 274 902
0799 203 475
020 230 1565
0700 295 390
Fax:
[email protected])
[email protected]
Web:
www.sdc.org.af
Country Director: Mr Willy Graf
SRiss FoundMPion for GevelopmenP Mnd
International Cooperation (Intercooperation IC)
Hs. 5, St. 2, Kolola Pushta Rd., Charah-e-Ansari,
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0798 261 715
0798 699 606
0798 206 206
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.intercooperation.ch
Country Representative: Mr Mujibur Rahman
SRiss PeMce (SP)
Hs. 45 (opp. Malalai Maternity Hospital)
Shahrara Watt, Kabul
Tear Fund (TF)
Taimani, Kabul
(PO Box 383)
0700 278 219
0799 868 597
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.tearfund.org
Director: Mr Joel Hafvenstein
Terre des Hommes (TdH)
St. 5 (next to Kabul London Market)
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0700 379 990
0797 477 027
0700 277 202
202 201 290
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.tdhafghanistan.org
Country Delegate: Mr Marcel Reymond
The Asia Foundation (TAF)
Hs. 55, St. 1, J
awzjan Watt, shahr-i-Naw
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
Contacts: Kabul Province
201
(PO Box 175)
0799 335 453
075 202 4196
0799 600 711
0088 216 4444 6184
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.asiafoundation.org
Representative: M
orge Varughese
The Children of War (TCW)
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0700 011 819
[email protected]
Web:
www.thechildrenofwar.org
Director: Mr Najeebullah Azizi
The HALO Trust International Mine Clearance
Jalalabad Rd., Hoot Khail Bazaar, near UNOCA
Compound
Pul-i-Charkhi, Kabul
(PO Box 3036)
0700 152 356
0799 351 541
0700 276 051
0087 376 193 1817
Fax:
0087 376 193 1818
Web:
www.halotrust.org
Country Director: Dr Farid Homayoun
TOe Killid Group (MediM Of�ce) (TKG-MO)
Hesa-i-Awale Kolola Pushta, near Abu Hanifa
mosque
Kolola Poshta, Kabul
0799 696 618
0799 329 832
020 220 0573
Fax:
0093 20 220 0574
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.thekillidgroup.com
Executive Director: Mr Aziz Ahmad Hakimi
TOe NeR York Times (NYT)
020 210 1088
0700 276 440
0700 279 339
0087 376 264 0225
Fax:
0087 077 226 0438
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.nytimes.com
Of�ce MMnMger: Mr ANdul JMOeed JMfM
The Welfare Association for the Development of
Afghanistan (WADAN)
Khushal Mina, Kabul
(PO Box 10043)
0700 295 315
0799 142 870
0799 889 928
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.wadan.org
Managing Director: Mr Mohammad Nasib
The World Bank (WB)
Hs. 19, St. 15, (next to Canadian Embassy)
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0700 276 002
0700 240 924
0700 280 800
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.worldbank.org.af
Country Manager: Ms Mariam J. Sherman
TodMy AfgOMnisPMn HnPernMPionMl OrgMnizMPion
(TAIO)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
[email protected]
[email protected]
Tolo Service & FulPurMl OrgMnizMPionC SociMl
Foundation for Remote Rustic Development
(TSCO/SFRRD)
Flez Kari Street (behind Rahman Baba High
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Deh Bori, Kabul
(PO Box 1590)
0799 301 247
077 882 3705
0707 593 727
[email protected]
[email protected]
Program Manager:
Mr Mohammad Mohsin Zia Ayoubi
Tolo Television (Tolo)
Kabul
(PO Box 225)
0798 139 530
0799 321 010
0700 287 226
Fax:
001 865 342 5771
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.arman.fm
Training Human Rights Association for Afghan
Women (THRA)
Apt. 1, Block 103, 2nd macrorayon
Macrorayon, Kabul
(PO Box 125)
0700 202 422
0700 286 774
0700 202 421
020 230 2724
[email protected]
[email protected]
Director: MS Roshan Sirran
TriNMl IiMison Of�ce (TIO)
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0799 335 000
0700 203 527
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.tlo-afghanistan.org
Director: Mr Ehsan Ahmad Zahine
Trocaire (Caritas Ireland)
Hs. 34, St. 4, District 10
Taimani, Kabul
0797 209 676
0797 209 676
0088 216 5201 9725
[email protected]
Web:
www.trocaire.org
Country Representative: Mr Matthew E. Gray
Turquoise Mountain Foundation (TMF)
Part 2 of Karte Parwan (behind former British
Karte Parwan, Kabul
0798 182 028
0799 143 362
0798 149 173
0088 216 5552 2508
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.turquoisemountain.org
Chief Executive: Mr Rory Stewart
Ufuq (Horizon) JelfMre SociePy (UJS)
Pole Khoshk, District 13
Dashte Barchi, Kabul
0700 206 867
[email protected]
[email protected]
Country Director: Mr Liaqat Ali
UK GepMrPmenP for HnPernMPionMl GevelopmenP
c/o British Embassy, St. 15, Roundabout
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
(PO Box 334)
0799 401 322
0797 222 003
[email protected]�dBgovBuk
[email protected]�dBgovBuk
JeN:
RRRBd�dBgovBuk
HeMd of Of�ce: Mr MMrsOMll EllioPP
Contacts: Kabul Province
UniPed Agency for POe ReOMNiliPMPion of
AfgOMnisPMn (UARA)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
Phone: 0700 224 952
UniPed MePOodisP FommiPPee on Relief (UMFOR)
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
0799 314 458
0799 201 953
[email protected]
Web:
Head of Mission: Mr Jonathan Bartolozzi
UniPed NMPion HumMn SePPlemenPs ProgrMmme
Taimani, Kabul
0700 282 464
0798 265 392
0707 461 126
[email protected]
[email protected]
Head of Agency: Ms Nouchine Yavari
UniPed NMPions AssisPMnce Mission in
UNAMA Compound B, Charah-i-Zambaq
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt, Kabul
079 000 6121
001 212 963 6121
0039 083 124 6121
Fax:
0039 083 124 6353
[email protected]
Web:
www.unama-afg.org
Of�ce of FommunicMPions & PuNlic HnformMPion
UniPed NMPions FOildren’s Fund (UNHFEF)
UNOCA Compound, Jalalabad Rd.
Pul-i-Charkhi, Kabul
(PO Box 54)
0790 507 100
0790 507 102
790 507 110
Fax:
0087 076 a404 2530
[email protected]
Web:
www.unicef.org
Representative: Ms Catherine Mbengue
UniPed NMPions GepMrPmenP of SMfePy Mnd
UNDP Compound (Opp. Turkish Embassy)
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt, Kabul
0700 281 673
0700 281 285
0700 218 882
0088 216 5420 0320
[email protected]
Mr David Lavery
UniPed NMPions GevelopmenP Fund for Jomen
UNDP Compound (Opp. Turkish Embassy)
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt, Kabul
(PO Box 5)
0700 282 446
0700 277 206
020 212 4706
0087 376 3467 625
Fax:
0087 376 346 8836
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanistan.unifem.org
Country Director: Ms Wenny Kusuma
UniPed NMPions GevelopmenP ProgrMmme
UNDP Compound (Opp. Turkish Embassy)
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt, Kabul
(PO Box 5)
020 212 4000-5000
020 212 4100
0700 281 593
Fax:
0087 676 346 8836
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.undp.org.af
Country Director: Mr Manoj Basnyat
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
UniPed NMPions GevelopmenP ProgrMmme
UNDP Compound (Opp. Turkish Embassy)
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt, Kabul
(PO Box 5)
020 212 4098
0700 475 714
Fax:
0087 376 346 8836
[email protected]
Web:
www.undp.org.af
PuNlic HnformMPion & AdvocMcy Of�cer: Ms FezeO
UniPed NMPions EducMPionMl, ScienPi�c Mnd
UNDP Compound
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt, Kabul
0700 283 008
0798 162 339
077 303 0330
Fax:
0083 776 346 8836
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.unesco.org
Director: Ms Shigeru Aoyagi
UniPed NMPions EnvironmenP ProgrMmme
Hs. 432, St. 8, Taimani
Taimani, Kabul
0799 208 721
0700 027 219
[email protected]
JeN:
RRRBposPcon�icPBunepBcO
Of�cer Hn FOMrge: Ms BelindM BoRling
UniPed NMPions HigO Fommissioner for
Refugees (UNHFR)
Hs. 41, Peace Av
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
(PO Box 3232)
0700 279 210
0700 279 231
020 220 381
Fax:
0041 227 397 501
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.unhcr.org
Acting Representative: M
r Ewen Macleod
UniPed NMPions HumMniPMriMn Air Services
Hs. 103, Peace St. (opp. French Embassy)
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
0700 284 070
[email protected]
Chief of Air Operations: Mr Philippe Martou
UniPed NMPions Mine AcPion FenPreCProgrMmme
for AfgOMnisPMn (UNMAFA)
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
(PO Box 520)
0700 276 645
0799 343 767
0700 043 447
0087 076 291 8170
Fax:
0087 076 291 871
[email protected]
External Relations Coordinator:
Mr Patrick Fruchet
UniPed NMPions Of�ce for ProjecP Services
UNOCA Compound, Jalalabad Rd.
Jalalabad Rd, Kabul
0799 761 052
0700 282 484
Fax:
0097 142 990 064
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.unops.org.af
Country Coordinator: Mr Gary King Helseth
UniPed NMPions Of�ce on Grugs Mnd Frime
Hs. 257, St.149 District 4, Kolola Pushta Main
Contacts: Kabul Province
Road
Kolola Pushta, Kabul
(PO Box 5)
0799 202 818
0799 129 291
Fax:
0087 376 346 8836
[email protected]
Web:
www.unodc.org
Representative: Ms Christina Oguz
UniPed NMPions PopulMPion Fund AfgOMnisPMn
(UNFPA)
UNOCA Compound, Jalalabad Rd.
Jalalabad Rd, Kabul
(PO Box 16030)
0700 263 100
0700 181 149
0700 181 150
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanistan.unfpa.org
Representative: Dr Ramesh Penumaka
UniPed NMPions SecuriPy FoordinMPor
UNDP Compound (Opp. Turkish Embassy)
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt, Kabul
UniPed NMPions VolunPeers (UNV)
UNDP Compound (Opp. Turkish Embassy)
Shah Mahmood Ghazi Watt, Kabul
0700 282 520
[email protected]
Web:
www.unv.org
Director: Ms Monica E. Villarindo
UniPed NMPions Jorld HeMlPO OrgMnizMPion
UNOCA Compound, Jalalabad Rd.
Pul-i-Charkhi, Kabul
0700 279 010
0799 761 066
0700 281 116
0799 409 996
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.emro.who.int/Afghanistan
Country Representative: Mr Peter Jan Graaff
US Agency for HnPernMPionMl GevelopmenP
(USAHG)
CAFE (Compound Across From US Embassy)
Great Massoud Rd, Kabul
0700 234 236
0799 825 907
[email protected]
Web:
www.usaidafghanistan.org
Mission Director: Mr Alonzo Fulgham
Voice of Afghan Woman Radio (VAWR)
Next to Rahim Gardizi Limited
Salang Watt, Kabul
0700 275 089
[email protected]
[email protected]
Director General: Ms Jamila Mujahed
Voice of America, Ashna TV & Radio/
Afghanistan (VOA Ashna)
Hs. 26, St. 15, Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
(PO Box 214)
075 200 4166
075 200 4172
0700 277 198
0088 216 8985 0499
Fax:
0042 221 121 913
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.voanews.com
Coordinator: Mr Mohammad Ekram Shinwari
Voice of Freedom (RMdio Mnd NeRspMper) (VoF)
ISAF Headquarter (near to US Embassy)
Great Massoud Rd, Kabul
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
0799 156 238
0799 511 320
[email protected]
Web:
www.sada-i-azadi.net
media director: Major Gernot Gierlinger
War Child Holland (WCH)
Qalai Fatullah, Kabul
(PO Box 3211)
0795 895 112
0031 618 969 151
[email protected]
Web:
www.warchild.nl
Country Director: Mr Ramin Shahzamani
Welthungerhilfe/German AgroAction
(AgroAction GAA)
Hs. 9, St. 3, Taimani Rd.
Taimani, Kabul
0798 260 244
Web:
www.welthungerhilfe.de
Interim Country Director: Mr HenkJan Postma
Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)
Kabul
0798 981 967
0088 216 5558 2607
Fax:
0093 20 315 3456
[email protected]
Country Director: Dr Alex Dehgan
Women and Children Legal Research
Foundation (WCLRF)
St. 1 (infront of Armaghan Training Center) west
side of Kabul University
Deh Bori, Kabul
0700 649 191
0700 076 557
075 200 2614
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.wclrf.org.af
Media & Public Relations Program Manager: Ms
Wazhma Abdulrahimzay
Women Assistance Association (WAA)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0799 354 350
0799 328 734
[email protected]
[email protected]
Director: Ms Fahima Kakar
Women for Women International (WWI)
Hs. 468, Shura Street
Karte Se, Kabul
0700 206 803
0700 206 790
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.womenforwomen.org
Country Director: Ms Sweeta Noori
Women Mirror (WM)
Hs. 186, St. 12
Wazir Akbar Khan, Kabul
Director: Ms Shokria Barikzay
World Food Programme (WFP)
St. 4, Koshani Watt (behind Kabul Bank)
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
(PO Box 1093)
0797 662 000-04
Fax:
0087 376 308 9561
[email protected]
Web:
www.wfp.org/afghanistan
Country Director: Mr Stefano Porretti
World Vision International (WVI)
Opp. Herati Mosque, District 4
Shahr-i-Naw, Kabul
0799 334 869
0799 252 799
[email protected]
Web:
www.wvi.org
Country Director: Mr Graham Strong
Contacts: Badakhshan Province
207
YouPO AssemNly for AfgOMn ReOMNiliPMPion
(YAAR)
Hs. 144, St. 8
Taimani, Kabul
(PO Box 5980)
ZMrdozi - MMrkePs for AfgOMn ArPisMns (ZMrdozi)
Hs. 30, St. 1, Kolola Pushta Rd.
Kolola Pushta, Kabul
0799 195 623
0700 287 963
0799 336 691
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanartisans.com
Executive Director: Ms Kerry Jane Wilson
ZOA Refugee Care Afghanistan (ZOA)
Hs. 27, St. 2 (Opp. Abu Hanifa Mosque) District
Kolola Poshta, Kabul
(PO Box 1515)
0700 239 825
0799 121 000
0799 373 759
Web:
www.zoa.nl
Country Director: Mr Bernhard W. Kerschbaum
Badakhshan Province
Faizabad City, Faizabad
(PO Box 6066, KMrP-i-PMrRMn PosP Of�ce)
0798 185 780
0799 452 909
0088 216 8440 0147
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanaid.org.uk
Provincial Programme Manager: Dr Najibullah
Commission (AIHRC)
Faizabad
075 631 1046
0088 216 2113 9562
[email protected]
Web:
www.aihrc.org.af
AfgOMnisPMn ReOMNiliPMPion Mnd ReconsPrucPion
Agency Falah (ARRAF)
On the same street as UNAMA
Shahr-i-Naw Faizabad
075 631 0629
[email protected]
Of�cer Hn FOMrge: Mr KMmil SM�
Agency for Technical Cooperation and
Development (ACTED)
Flose Po AFIU Of�ce, GisPricP D
Shahr-i-NawFaizabad
Phone: 0799 021 976
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.acted.org
Provincial Manager: Mr Noorullah Baqi
Aga Khan Education Services (AKES)
Sayeed Village (beside DJI)
Faizabad
0799 010 254
[email protected]
Web:
www.akdn.org
National Program Manager:
Mr Faruq Rahmtullah
Agha Khan Foundation, Afghanistan (AKF)
Shahr-i-NawFaizabad
0087 376 265 2480
Fax:
0087 376 363 1489
[email protected]
Web:
www.akdn.org
Regional Programme Manager: Mr Farman Ali
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
BMdMkOsOMn UniversiPy
Faizabad
0799 454 263
Rector Mr Abdul Qadeer Mahan
Care of Afghan Families (CAF)
Hs. 189, WFP St.
Shahr-i-Naw Faizabad
Web: www.caf.org.af
Foncern JorldRide (Foncern)
Faizabad
0088 216 5426 0515
[email protected]
Web:
www.concern.net
Programme Coordinator: Mr Istvan Vukovich
Cooperation Center for Afghanistan (CCA)
Faizabad
0088 216 2113 8244
[email protected]
FooperMPion for PeMce Mnd UniPy (FPAU)
Hesa-i-Awal, Subdistrict 5 (next to Afghan Red
Shahr-i-NawFaizabad
Phone: 075 631 0578
Mr Haji Qudratullah Durkhani
Food Mnd AgriculPure OrgMnizMPion of POe UniPed
Nations (FAO)
Department of Agriculture
Faizabad
0799 431 937
0799 725 786
[email protected]
Web
www.fao.org
Gender Of�cer: Ms NMzifM NMPiq
Generous ReOMNiliPMPion OrgMnizMPion (GRO)
Faizabad
0799 413 961
HeMd of Of�ce: Mr MurPMzM HMmed
GTZ- Basic Education Program (GTZ/ BEPA)
TTC Faizabad, Turgani School, Faizabad old city,
Faizabad
0799 028 316
[email protected]
Web:
www.gtz.de
BEPA Of�cer for NE provinces:
Health Net International (HNI)
Shahr-i-Naw Faizabad
Phone:0088 216 890 2893
Email:[email protected]
Web:
www.healthnetinternational.org
Programme Manager: Mr Habib Niazi
HNnSinM PuNlic HeMlPO ProgrMmme for
AfgOMnisPMn (HNnSinM-PHPA)
Part 1, Shahr-i-Jadeed, Faizabad
075 631 0716
0088 213 2129 6237
ProgrMmme MMnMger: Gr SMid SOM�q
International Assistance Mission (IAM)
Faizabad
(PO Box 626)
0707 470 710
[email protected]
Web:
www.iam-afghanistan.org
Regional Manager :Mr Mirjam Rheinlander
HnPernMPionMl OrgMnizMPion for MigrMPion (HOM)
St. 1, Haji Muhebullah Hs.
Shahr-i-Naw Faizabad
0799 215 128
0088 216 2113 8385
[email protected]
Web:
www.iom.int/afghanistan
MEDAIR
Shahr-i-Naw, District 3
Dasht-i-Sangi, Faizabad
0799 336 644
0088 216 5112 1090
Contacts: Badakhshan Province
[email protected]
Web:
www.medair.org
Shahr-i-Naw, Faizabad
0799 431 927
075 631 0577
0088 216 5420 2970
Web:
www.miseast.org
Programme Coordinator: Ms Ulla Mogensen
Sarak-i-Do Ab
0088 216 5420 2970
Web:
www.miseast.org
Programme Coordinator: Ms Ulla Mogensen
NorRegiMn AfgOMnisPMn FommiPPee (NAF)
Shahr-i-Naw, Faizabad
075 631 0443
0799 020 478
Web:
www.nrc.no
Of�ceCEnvironmenP MMnMger:
Mr Mirza Mohammad
NorRegiMn AfgOMnisPMn FommiPPee (NAF)
Faizabad
Web: www.nrc.no
Environment Manager: Mr Mirza Mohammad
Orphan Refugees and Aid - International (ORA)
Gaz Khan (village of around 20 houses) Walkan
Faizabad
(PO Box 594)
0799 331 930
[email protected]
Web:
www.oracentralasia.org
Project Leader:
Dr Alex Duncan
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
Behind Badakshan Pump Station
Shahr-i-Naw Faizabad
0799 139 773
0799 139 660
Web:
www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader: Eng Nazira
Ustad Burhanudin Rabani’s House, Park 2, Part
Shahr-i-Naw Faizabad
0700 294 365
0087 376 227 9436
Web:
www.oxfam.org.uk
PMrPners in ReviPMlizMPion Mnd Building (PRB)
Shahr-i-Naw Faizabad
075 631 0699
Web:
www.prb.org.af
Admin Of�cer: Mr ANdul SMNor
UniPed NMPions FOildren’s Fund (UNHFEF)
Faizabad
0088 216 8980 0421
Web:
www.unicef.org
UniPed NMPions Of�ce on Grugs Mnd Frime (UNOGF)
Part. 3, (Opp Alfath Mosque)
Shahr-i-Naw Faizabad
0799 438 332
[email protected]
Web:
www.unodc.org
Provincial Coordinator:
Mr Mohammad Alem Yaqobi
Jorld HeMlPO OrgMnizMPion, AfgOMnisPMn (JHO)
Faizabad
075 631 0814
075 631 0811
0088 216 3333 0740
[email protected]
Web:
www.emro.who.int/Afghanistan
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
210
Badghis Province
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee
(BRAC)
Qala-i-Naw
0088 216 2113 7082
Web:
www.bracafg.org
Ockenden International (Ockenden)
IOM Transit Camp (next to the Building of Board
Production Company)
Bala Murghab Qala-i-Naw
0088 216 8980 0027
[email protected]
Web:
www.ockenden.org.uk
Provincial Programme Manager: Eng Tawab Zafar
Baghlan Province
AfgOMnisPMn HumMn RigOPs OrgMnizMPion (AHRO)
Javed Hotel, Floor 2 (near Pul-i-Khumri
0700 025 389
[email protected]
[email protected]
Mr Abdul Ahad
Aga Khan Education Services (AKES)
Hs. 279/84, St. 1 (Near Silo Pul-i-Khumri)
Phone: 0799 045 892
Web: www.akdn.org
Admin Assistant: Mr Said Qubad
Aga Khan Foundation, Afghanistan (AKF)
Shash Sad Koti, Zer-i-Mada
0087 376 363 1489
[email protected]
Web: www.akdn.org
Regional Programme Manager:
Mr Shakeel Kakakhail
Agency for Technical Cooperation and
Development (ACTED)
near Quleurdu # 4
Shashsad Kotie Pul-i-Khumri
0700 707 182
0799 173 332
0088 216 5020 8386
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.acted.org
Program/Base Coordinator: Mr Daler Javod
Baghlan Institute of Higher Education (BIHE)
075 591 0292
0700 037 997
Rector: Mr Rahime
BMkOPMr GevelopmenP NePRork (BGN)
Near Police station 4
0700 216 507
0700 238 778
Programme Manager:
Mr Sayed Najibullah Sayedi
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee
(BRAC)
NeMr Governor Of�ce
0700 010 163
0088 216 2117 5951
Web:
www.bracafg.org
Care of Afghan Families (CAF)
Walayat St., Shashsad Koti
Shahr-i-Naw Pul-i-Khumri
0088 216 8444 2878
Web:
www.caf.org.af
Cooperation Center for Afghanistan (CCA)
Near Agha Khan Foundation
Contacts: Balkh Province
211
0088 216 2113 8244
[email protected]
Emergency Programme of Italian Cooperation
BMgO-i-QMORMkOMnM (neMr POe FourP Of�ce)
0700 287 100
0700 286 272
0088 216 3332 4414
Foundation for Culture and Civil Society (FCCS)
0088 216 3335 2799
[email protected]
Web:
www.afghanfccs.org
Provincial Rd., Area 3, Shash Sad Koti (at the
0797 192 158
[email protected]
Web:
www.hbaid.org
Program Director: Mr Zoltan Venczel
Nye Express Of�ce (Nye)
Diware Mardan, Ahmad Shah Pump Station,
Near Kunduz Bandar
0799 151 451
Web:
www.thekillidgroup.com
Of�ce Hn FOMrge: Mr SMyed ANdul KMNir
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
Go SMrMkM-i-Kunduz, RRG Of�ce (neMr POe PRT
center), Pul-i-Khumri
0799 047 884
Web:
www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader: Mr Haji Younus
UniPed NMPions HigO Fommissioner for
Refugees (UNHFR)
0700 707 930
0700 703 734
0088 216 5110 0693
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.unhcr.org
Balkh Province
ActionAid (ActionAid)
Pul-i-HawaieeMazar-i-Sharif
0777 372 907
0798 025 308
Web:
www.actionaidafg.org
cCo AFBAR MMzMr-i-SOMrif Field Of�ce
Darwaza-i-Jamhoriat, Kocha-i-Aka Yassin Mazar-
Web:
www.afghanaid.org.uk
(AHRO)
Siddiq Yar ChawkMazar-i-Sharif
0700 504 850
[email protected]
[email protected]
Dr Abdul Samad Loqmani
Commission (AIHRC)
Behind Municipality, Guzar-i-khair Khwa (near
Khair khwa Mosque)
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 502 665
[email protected]
Web:
www.aihrc.org.af
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
212
Afghanistan Information Management Services
UNAMA Compound, Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 515 915
[email protected]

[email protected]
Web:
www.aims.org.af
Field Of�cer: Mr AimMl MMiRMnd
ANSO NorPOern Region Of�ce
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 511 414
0700 030 064
0799 404 617
0088 216 2112 4672
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.afgnso.org
Northern Region Safety Advisor: Mr Amu Wais
AfgOMnisPMn ReOMNiliPMPion Mnd ReconsPrucPion
Agency Falah (ARRAF)
Mazar-i-Sharif
0799 378 717
0700 504 041
[email protected]
Of�cer Hn FOMrge: Eng Mir ANdul AOMd
Agency Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief
(ACBAR)
Darwaz-e-Jamhoriate, Kocha-e-Aka Yassin
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 500 499
0799 445 000
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.acbar.org
Manager: Eng Abdul Raouf Qaderi
Agency for ReOMNiliPMPion Mnd Energy
Conservation in Afghanistan (AREA)
cCo AFBAR MMzMr-i-SOMrif Field Of�ce
Darwaza-i-Jamhoriat, Kocha-i-Aka
Yassin Mazar-i-Sharif
Agency for Technical Cooperation and
Development (ACTED)
Madan-e-Namak St.(in front of Sultan Razia High
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 501 310
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.acted.org
Area Coordinator: Mr Robert Anderson
Aide Médicale Internationale (AMI)
cCo AFBAR MMzMr-i-SOMrif Field Of�ce
Darwaza-i-Jamhoriat, Kocha-i-Aka Yassin Mazar-
Web:
www.amifrance.org
Area Mine Action Center (AMAC)
SPB 1 (nexP Po HFRF Of�ce)
Karte Bokhdi Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 502 710
[email protected]
ASFHHANA: AfgOMnisPMn’s FOildren, A NeR
Approach (ASCHIANA)
Kocha-i-Shortak Zaar
Mazar-i-Sharif
0799 375 404
[email protected]
BMkOPMr GevelopmenP NePRork (BGN)
Passport St., District 3
Mazar-i-Sharif
Phone: 0700 260 619
0799 217 125
0700 238 778
0799 112 813
[email protected]
Project Manager:
BMlkO ProvinciMl MMnMgemenP UniP, of NMPionMl
Contacts: Balkh Province
213
SolidMriPy PorgrMmme (NSPCPMU)
BeOind FommunicMPion FenPer, RRG Of�ce
Mazar-i-Sharif
Phone: 0700 505 339
0799 263 600
077 826 7595
[email protected]
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Provincial Manager:
Eng Mohammad Humayoon Ajam
BMlkO UniversiPy (BU)
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 517 255
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee
(BRAC)
Zerat, Mazar-i-Sharif-Sibergan Road (near
Kefayet Hotel)
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 240 019
0088 216 5026 9663
Web:
www.bracafg.org
Central Asian Free Exchange (CAFE)
Guzar-i-Marmol (Opp. Mosque 1)
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 509 252
0799 239 988
[email protected]
Web:
www.cafengo.org
Regional Director: Mr Rob Graves
Child Fund Afghanistan (CFA)
cCo AFBAR MMzMr-i-SOMrif Field Of�ce
Darwaza-i-Jamhoriat, Kocha-i-Aka Yassin Mazar-
Web:
www.christianchildrensfund.org
Foncern JorldRide (Foncern)
cCo AFBAR MMzMr-i-SOMrif Field Of�ce
Darwaza-i-Jamhoriat, Kocha-i-Aka Yassin Mazar-
(PO Box 2016, Kabul)
Web:
www.concern.net
Cooperation Center for Afghanistan (CCA)
NeMr HFRF of�ce
Karte Bokhdi Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 500 373
Email: [email protected]
Coordination of Afghan Relief (CoAR)
Mastofyat St. (beside Mohammad Gul Khan
mosque)
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 520 986
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.coar.org
Project Manager: Mr Ghulam Nabi Sediqi
Karte Aryana Mazar-i-Sharif
0799 104 830
0089 216 5113 4074
[email protected]
Web:
www.cha-net.org
Mr Mohammad Rashid Sakandari
Danish Demining Group (DDG)
Karte Parwan Mazar-i-Sharif
0088 216 8980 2256
[email protected]
Web:
www.drc.dk
Deutsche Welthungerhilfe/German AgroAction
(AgroAction)
cCo AFBAR MMzMr-i-SOMrif Field Of�ce
Darwaza-i-Jamhoriat, Kocha-i-Aka Yassin Mazar-
Web: www.welthungerhilfe.de/home_eng.html
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
214
Development and Humanitarian Services for
Afghanistan (DHSA/TKG)
Baba Qalandar St. (behind Mazar-i-Sharif Hotel)
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 508 237
0799 807 571
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.thekillidgroup.com
Of�ce MMnMger: Eng ANdul BMri HMmidi
Dutch Committee for Afghanistan (DCA)
cCo AFBAR MMzMr-i-SOMrif Field Of�ce
Darwaza-i-Jamhoriat, Kocha-i-Aka Yassin Mazar-
(PO Box 1107)
Food Mnd AgriculPure OrgMnizMPion of POe UniPed
Nations (FAO)
Department of Agriculture
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 501 211
[email protected]
Web:
www.fao.org
Of�cer Hn FOMrge: Mr SOM�uddin MirzMd
Generous ReOMNiliPMPion OrgMnizMPion (GRO)
Mazar-i-Sharif
Phone: 0799 150 694
0799 433 759
EmMil: rM�[email protected]
HeMd of Of�ce: Eng MoOMmmed RMfee
GTZ- Basic Education Program (GTZ/ BEPA)
TTC Balkh, Dasht-e-Shor (Near to Sayed Kaihan
0799 885 958
[email protected]
Web:
www.gtz.de
Education Expert German Development
Services: Mr Hans Kapser
Health Net International (HNI)
SPB 10, KMrP-i-BukOdi (SouPO of HFRF Of�ce)
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 504 810
[email protected]
Web:
www.healthnetinternational.org
Technical Coordinator: Dr Samad Hami
Helping AfgOMn FMrmers OrgMnizMPion (HAFO)
West of Rouza Sharif, Darwaza-i-Shadian (near
Mazar-i-Sharif
0799 567 752
[email protected]
Regional Manager: Eng Saif Ali Nodrat
HNnSinM PuNlic HeMlPO ProgrMmme for
AfgOMnisPMn (HNnSinM-PHPA)
Karte Ariana
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 509 366
0700 507 034
[email protected]
Programme Manager:
Dr Feda Mohammad Paikan
Independent Administrative Reform and Civil
Services Commission (IARCSC)
In front of Balkh University, Located in Tafahusat
Mazar-i-Sharif
Phone: 0799 404 845
Web:
www.iarcsc.gov.af
Director Mr Abdurahman Rasekh
International Assistance Mission (IAM)
Koche-e-Marmol (behind Sultan Marzia High
Mazar-i-Sharif
(PO Box 1167, Peshawar)
0796 199 622
0799 835 263
[email protected]
Web:
www.iam-afghanistan.org
Regional Manager: Rita Reading
Contacts: Balkh Province
215
International Federation of Red Cross and Red
Crescent Societies (IFRC)
Kart-e-Bukhdi
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 500 008
0087 376 304 3435
[email protected]
Web:
www.arcs.org.af
HnPernMPionMl OrgMnizMPion for MigrMPion (HOM)
Karte Mamorin Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 224 895
0088 216 2112 9197
[email protected]
Web:
www.iom.int/afghanistan
Joint Development Associates International
(JDAI)
Hs. 2, Kah Forushi St.
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 506 035
0088 216 2127 6131
0099 897 130 5971
Programme Coordinator: Mr Mark J. Henning
Ieprosy FonProl OrgMnizMPion (IEPFO)
St. 3, Nawshad Project, Dasht-i-Shor
Mazar-i-Sharif
(PO Box 6057)
0799 184 297
077 115 1010
[email protected]
Of�ce MMnMger: Mr HMNiNy
c/o UNHCR Mazar, St. 2 of Kart-i-Shafakhana
(behind the vegetable market)
Mazar-i-Sharif
0799 857 351
0799 355 841
[email protected]
Web:
www.medicamondiale.org
HeMd of Of�ce: Mr GurcOMrMn Virdee
National Democratic Institute (NDI)
Mazar-i-Sharif
0799 389 485
0700 509 766
Web: www.ndi.org
NorRegiMn Refugee Founcil (NRF)
Guzari Tajqorghaniah, Behind Gumrok( in front
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 524 073
0797 385 326
0700 516 447
Fax:
0088 216 2136 3593
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.nrc.no
Of�ce AdminsPrMPor: Ms SoniPM BMkOPMry
NPOCRurMl ReOMNiliPMPion AssociMPion for
Karte Aryana Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 500 441
[email protected]
Web:
www.rraa.net
NPOCRurMl ReOMNiliPMPion AssociMPion for
cCo AFBAR MMzMr-i-SOMrif Field Of�ce
Darwaza-i-Jamhoriat, Kocha-i-Aka Yassin Mazar-
Nye Express Of�ce (Nye)
Baba Qalandar St. (behind Mazar-i-Sharif Hotel)
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 507 760
Web:
www.thekillidgroup.com
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
St. Shadian, Bagh-i-Zanana (after Qamar Shop,
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
216
old SolidMriPe Of�ce)
Mazar-i-Sharif
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Regional Manager: Mr Patrick Crofskey
Partners for Social Development (PSD)
Hs. 276, Guzar-i-Mirza Qasim (left side St. of
Foreign Affairs Department) District 3
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 505 128
0799 254 938
[email protected]
Programme Manager: Mr Zabehullah Sultani
PMrPners in ReviPMlizMPion Mnd Building (PRB)
St. 1 (near Balkh University)
Takhnikum Mazar-i-Sharif
Phone: 0700 500 463
[email protected]
Web: www.prb.org.af
Peace Winds Japan (PWJ)
Mazar-i-Sharif
[email protected]
Web: www.peace-winds.org/en
Country Representative: Mr Tetsuya Myojo
People in Need (PIN)
Kochi Baba Qamber 82
Mazar-i-Sharif
Phone: 0700 696 639
Web: www.peopleinneed.cz
Reconstruction Authority for Afghanistan
(RAFA)
cCo AFBAR MMzMr-i-SOMrif Field Of�ce
Darwaza-i-Jamhoriat, Kocha-i-Aka Yassin Mazar-
(PO Box 1D1D, FenPrMl PosP Box Of�ce)
Refugee Care, Northern Afghanistan (ZAO)
Mazar-i-Sharif
0799 150 353
0700 502 435
[email protected]
Deputy Country Director: Mr Mannu Pereira
SMve POe FOildren UK (SF-UK)
Mandawi, Karti Mamorin, District # 2 (In front of
Dr Sowaida’s Hs.)
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 500 637
0700 510 623
[email protected]
[email protected]
Programme Manager: Mr Manish
SMve POe FOildren USA (SF-USA)
cCo AFBAR MMzMr-i-SOMrif Field Of�ce
Darwaza-i-Jamhoriat, Kocha-i-Aka
Yassin Mazar-i-Sharif
Web: www.savethechildren.org
SRedisO FommiPPee for AfgOMnisPMn (SFA)
Guzar-i-Marmol (beside Mosque 1)
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 510 756
[email protected]
Web: www.swedishcommittee.org
RAD Programme Manager:
Turkmenistan Consulate (Turkmenistan)
Shaheed Ahmad Shah Massoud Road
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 501 382
0799 569 311
Consul: Mr Kabayev Bazarbai
UniPed NMPion HumMn SePPlemenPs ProgrMmme
Aisha-i-Afghan St., Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 501 396
[email protected]
Web:
www.habitat.org
Contacts: Bamiyan Province
217
Country Director: Mr Stephen J. Kutzy
UniPed NMPions AssisPMnce Mission in
Darwaza-e-Shadyan, Sarak-e-Chihl Metree
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 106 910
Web:
www.unama-afg.org
UniPed NMPions FOildren’s Fund (UNHFEF)
Mazar-i-Sharif
0087 376 292 5535
Web:
www.unicef.org
UniPed NMPions GepMrPmenP of SMfePy Mnd
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 257 653
0700 500 927
0088 216 5110 7775
[email protected]
UniPed NMPions HigO Fommissioner for
Refugees (UNHFR)
Mazar-i-Sharif
Phone: 0700 500 938
0700 500 810
0088 216 5112 1598
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.unhcr.org
HeMd of Of�ce: Ms Anne MMry FMmpNell
UniPed NMPions Of�ce on Grugs Mnd Frime
St. 1, (Opp. Pul-i-Hawayee, Next to Balkh
University)
Takhnikum Mazar-i-Sharif
0799 212 752
0700 293 035
[email protected]
Web: www.unodc.org
ProvinciMl FoordinMPor: Mr IuPf RMOmMn IuP�
Welfare Association for the Development of
Afghanistan (WADAN)
Pelkeen St. (behind Municipality, east of Rawza
Mazar-i-Sharif
0799 639 810
0799 506 231
[email protected]
[email protected]
Web:
www.wadan.org
Regional Coordinator: Mr Amanullah
Women for Women International (WWI)
cCo AFBAR MMzMr-i-SOMrif Field Of�ce
Darwaza-i-Jamhoriat, Kocha-i-Aka Yassin
Mazar-i-Sharif
(PO Box 35)
Web:
www.womenforwomen.org
Jorld HeMlPO OrgMnizMPion, AfgOMnisPMn (JHO)
St. Urosa, Darwaza-e-Balkh
Karte Mamorin
Mazar-i-Sharif
0700 288 401
Web:
www.emro.who.int/Afghanistan
HeMd of Of�ce: Gr Mir AOmMd GOMffMry
Bamiyan Province
Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA)
Panjao
Phone: 0799 828 852
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.adra.org
Project Director Dr Konrad Juszkiewicz
Afghan Women Service and Education
OrgMnizMPion (AJSE)
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 326 132
0799 188 762
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
218
Email: [email protected]
Executive Director Ms Gulsoom Satrzai
Commission (AIHRC)
Karte Sulh, Mullah Ghulam
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 304 845
075 272 002 30
[email protected]
Web: www.aihrc.org.af
Regional Programme Manager Mr Musa Sultani
AfgOMnisPMn ReOMNiliPMPion Mnd ReconsPrucPion
Agency Falah (ARRAF)
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 049 455
Email: [email protected]
Of�cer Hn FOMrge Ms NMOid KMrimi
Aga Khan Foundation, Afghanistan (AKF)
Sar Asyab
Phone: 0799 400 132
0799 040 926
0082 162 2113 4448
Fax: 0087 376 273 1746
[email protected]
Web: www.akdn.org
Programme Manager Mr Tim Holmes
Agency for Assistance and Development of
Afghanistan (AADA)
In front of Bomika Hotel
Sar Asyab Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 660 082
Web: www.aada.org.af
Project Manager Mr Daud
Area Mine Action Center (AMAC)
Sari Asyab, center of Bamiyan (West side of the
Governor’s of�ce)
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0088 216 5112 0305
Email: [email protected]
Mr Ashoqullah Hedayat
BMmiyMn UniversiPy (BU)
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 304 656
FOMncellor ProfB MoO Arif Yousu�
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee
(BRAC)
Charahi Siab (near Bamiyan Airport)
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 409 809
0088 216 2113 0194
Web: www.bracafg.org
Cooperation Center for Afghanistan (CCA)
Shahr-i-NawYakawlang
Phone: 0088 216 2113 8244
Email: [email protected]
Cooperation Center for Afghanistan (CCA)
Next to Ghol Ghola, Shahr-i-Naw
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 036 653
Email: [email protected]
Food Mnd AgriculPure OrgMnizMPion of POe UniPed
Nations (FAO)
UNICEF Compound
Sar Asyab Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 027 793
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.fao.org
Senior Technical Advisor Mr Karim Merchant
HNnSinM PuNlic HeMlPO ProgrMmme for
AfgOMnisPMn (HNnSinM-PHPA)
Tolwara Village (Opp. But-i-Kalan)
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 371 436
0799 311 096
Contacts: Bamiyan Province
219
0088 216 2113 3828
Project Manager Dr Mohammad Saber
International Medical Corps (IMC)
Tolwara Village
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 410 390
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.imcworldwide.org
Project Manager Dr Toorkhan Sherzad
HnPernMPionMl OrgMnizMPion for MigrMPion (HOM)
Sar AsyabBamiyan City
Phone: 0799 236 719
0088 216 8980 0579
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.iom.int/afghanistan
Management Sciences for Health (Tech Serve)
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 144 259
Web: www.msh.org/afghanistan
Provincial Health Advisor Mr Habib ullah Sahak
Marie Stopes International (MSI)
Nayak, Yakawalang
Bamiyan
Phone: 0700 277 616
0799 856 459
0088 216 5552 7194
[email protected]
Web: www.mariestopes.org
Country Director Mr Farhad Javid
National Democratic Institute (NDI)
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 384 918
Web: www.ndi.org
Manager Mr Jawad Hakimi
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
RRG Building (NeOind POe ProvinciMl Of�ce)
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 371 005
0088 216 2113 4040
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Anwar
Telegraph Post (near Education Department)
Panjao
Phone: 0700 293 846
0087 376 201 5379
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.oxfam.org.uk
Rural Expansion of Afghanistan’s Community-
NMsed HeMlPOcMre (REAFH)
SMrMsyMN VillMge (Neside UNAMA Of�ce)
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 144 259
Web: www.msh.org/afghanistan
Health Advisor Dr Habib Sahak
Save the Children Japan (SCJ)
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 393 281
0087 376 349 1444
Email: [email protected]
Country Representative Mr Miho Wada
Solidarités Afghanistan (SA)
New Bazaar (next to Radio Bamiyan)
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 303 633
0700 282 704
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.solidarites.org
Country Director Mr Clement Bourse
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Spring of FonsPrucPion, ReOMNiliPMPion, FulPurMl
and Social Organisation (SCRCSO)
Next to Giant Buddha, Old Bazaar of Bamiyan,
Old Bazaar Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 472 483
0796 843 427
077 481 3456
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.baharaf.org
Director Mr Mohammad Akbar Danish
UniPed NMPions AssisPMnce Mission in
Sarasyab village (UNAMA Compound) Bazaar
Sarak-e-Maidan Hawayee
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0700 106 460
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.unama-afg.org
AcPing HeMd of Of�ce Mr FOrisPine KuOn
UniPed NMPions FOildren’s Fund (UNHFEF)
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0088 216 2111 0557
Web: www.unicef.org
UniPed NMPions HigO Fommissioner for
Refugees (UNHFR)
Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 016 242
0799 016 245
0088 216 5110 0860
Web: www.unhcr.org
Welfare Association for the Development of
Afghanistan (WADAN)
Sar Asyab Bamiyan City
Phone: 0799 506 240
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.wadan.org
Regional Coordinator Mr Alif Khan
Jorld HeMlPO OrgMnizMPion, AfgOMnisPMn (JHO)
Bamiyan City
Web: www.emro.who.int/Afghanistan
Admin Assistant Mr Hamid Rahmani
Daikundi Province
Action Contre La Faim (ACF)
Daikundi City
Phone: 0087 376 215 5450
Web: www.actioncontrelafaim.org
Commission (AIHRC)
Daikundi City
Phone: 0088 216 8444 8556
Web: www.aihrc.org.af
BMkOPMr GevelopmenP NePRork (BGN)
Khawalak village, Nilli centre
Phone: 077 432 2596
0796 584 711
077 209 0413
OM�[email protected]
Web: www.bdn.org.af
Project Manager Dr Wasiullah Yousaf Zai
Cooperation Center for Afghanistan (CCA)
Bazaar-i-Chaparak, Alqan District
Phone: 0088 216 2113 8007
Email: [email protected]
Coordination of Afghan Relief (CoAR)
Chaprasak Village, Daikundi City
Phone: 0799 223 246
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.coar.org
Project Manager Eng Mohammad Azeem
Contacts: Farah and Faryab Provinces
221
Development and Humanitarian Services for
Afghanistan (DHSA/TKG)
OlgOMn VillMge, eMr Po GisPricP Governor Of�ce
Phone: 0088 216 8980 2658
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.thekillidgroup.com
Of�ce Hn FOMrge Eng ANdul JMli HMmidi
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
FenPer of Nilee (ResP of UNOPS Of�ce,
NorPOResP from Governor Of�ce)
Daikundi City
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Ali Jan
Dahan-i-Taq Mosque Valley
Ashterlay Village Kadeer
Web: www.oxfam.org.uk
Ufuq (Horizon) JelfMre SociePy (UJS)
Daikundi City
Phone: 0088 216 3335 1863
Farah Province
House 277, Bagh-i-pul St. (south of Barq bus
Farah City
Phone: 0799 615 389
0088 216 5551 8015
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.cha-net.org
Of�ce MMnMger Mr MMlek AfgOMn JMkili
Ockenden International (Ockenden)
Hs. 132, St. 7, District 1
Farah City
Phone: 0088 216 8980 0804:
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.ockenden.org.uk
Provincial Manager Eng Mohammad Amin
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
Farah City
Phone: 0088 216 2113 4050
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Abdul Khaliq Fakori
Faryab Province
Commission (AIHRC)
Phone: 0088 216 2128 0264
Web: www.aihrc.org.af
Agency for Assistance and Development of
Afghanistan (AADA)
Sarak-e-Maidan-e-Hawaie (In front of Imam Abu
Hanifa mosque)
Nawabad Faryab City
Phone: 0799 878 580
Web: www.aada.org.af
Project Manager Mr Abdullah Hanif
Agency for Technical Cooperation and
Development (ACTED)
Kohi Khana Street, Sharab Big’s House
Phone: 0799 173 840
0088 216 5060 1538
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.acted.org
Area Coordinator Mr Robert Anderson
House of Ab. Raouf Soori (near Qaisar and
Almar Bus Stop)
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Phone: 0799 169 783
0088 216 5113 4098
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.cha-net.org
FMryMN HnsPiPuPe of HigOer EducMPion (FHHE)
Phone: 0799 274 711
Rector Mr Shair Moh Ehsan
International Assistance Mission (IAM)
Faryab Provincial Hospital
(PO Box 625)
Phone: 0799 188 781
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.iam-afghanistan.org
Project Leader Ms Mark Allan
HnPernMPionMl OrgMnizMPion for MigrMPion (HOM)
Kohi Khana, Haji Rahimi Hs. (in front of the WFP
Phone: 0700 251 262
0088 216 2113 1260
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.iom.int/afghanistan
Management Sciences for Health (Tech Serve)
Phone: 0799 108 196
Web: www.msh.org/afghanistan
Provincial Health Advisor Mr Kamran Hekmat
Marie Stopes International (MSI)
EMsP of FiPy PMrk, neMr UNAMA Of�ce (NeOind
Sayed drug store)
Phone: 0700 277 616
0799 856 459
0088 216 5552 7194
[email protected]
Web: www.mariestopes.org
Country Director Mr Farhad Javid
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
Phone: 0799 123 454
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Khalilullah
PMrPners in ReviPMlizMPion Mnd Building (PRB)
Near Ikhlas mosque
Shahr-i-NawAndkhoy
Phone: 0799 448 328
Web: www.prb.org.af
Admin Manager Mr Mohammad Arif
Rural Expansion of Afghanistan’s Community-
NMsed HeMlPOcMre (REAFH)
Main St. Hs. 87-1/45, Char Samawar St.
Phone: 0799 108 196
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.msh.org/afghanistan
Health Advisor Dr Kamran Hakmati
SMve POe FOildren USA (SF-USA)
Phone: 0799 124 462
0087 376 286 9810
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.savethechildren.org
Program Manager Ms Lisa Piper
SMve POe FOildren USA (SF-USA)
Andkhoy
Phone: 0799 643 249
0087 376 287 3055
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.savethechildren.org
Contacts: Ghazni Province
UniPed NMPions HigO Fommissioner for
Refugees (UNHFR)
Phone: 0799 023 155
0799 568 750
0088 216 5110 0657
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.unhcr.org
Ghazni Province
AfgOMn AmpuPee BicyclisPs for ReOMNiliPMPion
and Recreation (AABRAR)
Phone: 077 858 5585
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.aabrar.org
In Charge Mr Attar Uddin
Afghan Women Service and Education
OrgMnizMPion (AJSE)
Moy Mubark
Phone: 0799 326 132
0799 188 762
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Executive Director Ms Gulsoom Satrzai
BMkOPMr GevelopmenP NePRork (BGN)
Phone: 0799 337 895
0700 019 782
[email protected]
Project Manager Dr Mirwais Sidiqi
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC)
Hayder Abad (near Air Port)
Phone: 0700 077 993
Web: www.bracafg.org
FooperMPion for PeMce Mnd UniPy (FPAU)
Sang-i-Mash, Jaghori Center
Eng Jawad Bahunar
Coordination of Afghan Relief (CoAR)
Jahan Malika Girl High School Lane
Phone: 0700 363 400
0799 391 814
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.coar.org
Project Manager Eng Gul Zada
Generous ReOMNiliPMPion OrgMnizMPion (GRO)
Phone: 0799 152 258
Helping AfgOMn FMrmers OrgMnizMPion (HAFO)
PlMn-i-Se (close Po SOMms-ul-Ari�een HigO
Phone: 0799 234 219
0799 227 468
Email: [email protected]
Regional Manager Eng Ehsan
International Medical Corps (IMC)
AdminisPrMPive Of�ce)
Phone: 0799 350 613
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.imcworldwide.org
Project Manager Dr Ahmad Shah Noorzada
Management Sciences for Health (Tech Serve)
Phone: 0799 027 566
Web: www.msh.org/afghanistan
ProvinciMl HeMlPO Advisor Mr HumMyon SM�
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
224
NorRegiMn AfgOMnisPMn FommiPPee (NAF)
Post-i-Chehl, Jahan Malika High School St.
(behind Farukhi Resturant)
Phone: 0797 868 968
0799 228 450
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.nrc.no
ProgrMmme Of�ce MMnMger Mr MoOMmmMd
Nye Express Of�ce (Nye)
PlMn-i-Se (close Po SOMms-ul-Ari�een HigO
Phone: 0700 656 722
Web: www.thekillidgroup.com
Of�ce Hn FOMrge Mr ANdul RMouf
Ockenden International (Ockenden)
Zabth Hs., Planning area 1 (next to Haji Akhound
Mosque)
Phone: 0799 003 567
0088 216 8980 0110
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.ockenden.org.uk
Provincial Programme Manager Mr Ghouse
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
Plan-i-Se, Kandahar bus station
Phone: 0799 371 008
0088 216 2113 4073
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Provincial Manager Mr Abdullah Azadzoi
SMnMyee GevelopmenP OrgMnizMPion (SGO)
PlMn-i-Se (close Po SOMms-ul-Ari�een HigO
Phone: 0799 003 129
0799 394 897
Web: www.sanayee.org
SRedisO FommiPPee for AfgOMnisPMn (SFA)
Phone: 0799 384 395
075 361 0339
[email protected]
Web: www.swedishcommittee.org
Deputy Regional Director Mr Habib Jan
Ufuq (Horizon) JelfMre SociePy (UJS)
Now Abad Bazar (near Refah)
Phone: 0799 330 890
Ghor Province
Action Contre La Faim (ACF)
Taywara
Phone: 0087 376 252 3543
Web: www.actioncontrelafaim.org
Phone: 0797 069 169
0798aa405 611
0088 216 8440 0129
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.afghanaid.org.uk
Provincial Programme Manager Mr Mohammad
North of Toolak District Center
Toolak
Phone: 0088 216 5115 0956
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.cha-net.org
Contacts: Helmand Province
International Assistance Mission (IAM)
Lal-wa-sarjangal bazaar
(PO Box 9)
Phone: 0796 199 285
0088 216 2125 6733
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.iam-afghanistan.org
Project Leader Ms Hannelore Stein
Mission d’Aide au Développement des
Economies Rurales en Aghanistan (MADERA)
Taiwara and Pasabad
Phone: 0088 216 2116 4064
Email: [email protected]
Area Manager Mr Cedric Fleury
National Development Association (NDA)
Phone: 0088 216 5110 6703
Eng Ghafoor
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
TMpe-e-SOoOMddM (nexP Po UNOPS Of�ce, NorPO
of Hareerod River)
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Nasir
Web: www.oxfam.org.uk
Ufuq (Horizon) JelfMre SociePy (UJS)
Sarak Military Commissioner
Email: [email protected]
Helmand Province
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee
(BRAC)
Lashkar Gah
Phone: 0799 007 640
0088 216 3331 2211
Web: www.bracafg.org
Lashkar Gah
Phone: 0707 778 154
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.emergency.it
HNnSinM PuNlic HeMlPO ProgrMmme for
AfgOMnisPMn (HNnSinM-PHPA)
Laghman Lane, Kandahar St.
Lashkar Gah
Phone: 0799 136 164
0700 297 423
0088 216 2117 5271
Email: [email protected]
Project Manager Dr Said Sharif Habibi
Mercy Corps (MC)
Corner of Shamalan and Aghman Rd. (next to
Lashkar Gah
Phone: 0076 397 3116
0075 391 0766
Web: www.mercycorps.org
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
Radio Saba-UN Rd. (next to Haidery Pharmacy,
Opp. Commander Khan’s house), Lashkar Gah
Phone: 0799 179 055
0799 164 382
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Awal Khan
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Welfare Association for the Development of
Afghanistan (WADAN)
Bost St. (Opp. Culture and Youth Department)
Lashkar Gah
Phone: 0700 045 299
0799 142 870
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.wadan.org
Coordinator Drug Demand Reduction Dr Sardar
Wali
Herat Province
Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL)
Sarak Bank Khoon, Char Rahi Haji Ayoub
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.creatinghope.org
cCo AFBAR HerMP Field Of�ce
Web: www.afghanaid.org.uk
Mr Sayed Kabir Weyar
Commission (AIHRC)
0700 400 689
0088 216 2122 7751
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.aihrc.org.af
Afghanistan Information Management Services
UNDP Compound, Gazar Gah Road
(PO Box 005, UNDP Kabul)
Phone: 0700 246 841
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.aims.org.af
Regional Manager Mr Abdul Qahar Mahmoodi
ANSO JesPern Region Of�ce
Phone: 0700 405 697
0799 322 192
0087 376 358 4425
0088 216 2112 4811
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.afgnso.org
Western Region Safety Advisor Mr Daniel St
Agency Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief
(ACBAR)
Bagh-i-Azadi St. (Opp. UNICA guesthouse, beside
Phone: 0799 346 901
0799 474 746
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.acbar.org
Manager Mr Farid Niazi
Agency for Basic Services (ABS)
Sarak-i 64 Metra, Ittehad St. (behind Heraidost
Pump Station)
Phone: 0700 404 838
040 446 296
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Director Mr Javed Ahmad Noori
Agency for ReOMNiliPMPion Mnd Energy
Conservation in Afghanistan (AREA)
Hs. 386, Jada-i-Kaj
Charahi Haji AyoubHerat City
Phone: 0700 400 190
Contacts: Herat Province
227
040 220 843
Email: [email protected]
Regional Director Mr Aminullah Khairandish
Agency for ReOMNiliPMPion of VillMges (ARV)
Phone: 0799 202 031
0700 404 147
0088 216 5026 6223
Email: [email protected]
Web:
HeMd of Of�ce Mr ONMid Seddiqui
Agha Khan Trust for Culture (AKTC)
West to Qala-e-Ikhtyaruddin, District 7
Phone: 0799 387 526
0799 360 458
0021 655 598 034
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.akdn.org
AdminCFinMnce Of�cer Mr KOMlil AOmMd
Area Mine Action Center (AMAC)
HsB 176, MMONMs SPB (neMr JFP Of�ce)
Phone: 0700 404 434
0799 418 382
0088 216 5110 9511
EmMil: yous�@OoPmMilBcom
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee
(BRAC)
Phone: 0700 416 219
Web: www.bracafg.org
Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
Dr. Katib Lane, Qomandani St. (Opp.
Phone: 0799 111 093
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.catholicrelief.org
HeMd of Of�ce Mr PMul Hicks
Christian Aid (CA)
(PO Box 1362)
Phone: 0700 407 837
0799 416 256
040 227 852
0088 216 5110 2689
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.christian-aid.org
Country Representative Mr Joz van Mierlo
Coordination of Afghan Relief (CoAR)
TMllMr QMmMr, SOMmMli SPB (NeOind Noor SM� FoB)
Shahr-i-Naw Herat City
Phone: 0700 409 108
0700 404 352
040 229 973
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.coar.org
Jada-i-Khwaja Abdullah Ansar (near Malem
Kocha-i-Moallem Ghani Herat City
Phone: 0799 661 299
0799 429 123
0088 216 2112 4916
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.cha-net.org
FounPry GevelopmenP UniP (FGU)
Shirkate Pakhta, Pole Pashto
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Phone: 0799 239 087
0700 169 472
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.cduafgan.org
Regional Manager Eng Shair Ahmad
Danish Afghanistan Committee (DAC)
Phone: 0798 106 761
Web: www.afghan.dk
Project Director Ms Inge-Lise Aaen
Danish Committee for Aid to Afghan Refugees
(DACAAR)
cCo AFBAR HerMP Field Of�ce
Web: www.dacaar.org
Ms Charlotte Olsen
Dutch Committee for Afghanistan (DCA)
cCo AFBAR HerMP Field Of�ce
Dr Abdul Wadud Gulistani
EmNMssy of HPMly, FiviliMn FomponenP of PRT
c/o PRT Herat
Phone: 0088 216 2119 0569
0039 064 691 3666
Fax: 0039 064 735 8673
Head of Programme Mr Carlo Ungaro
Food Mnd AgriculPure OrgMnizMPion of POe UniPed
Nations (FAO)
Department of Agriculture
Phone: 0700 400 527
0799 443 222
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.fao.org
Of�cer Hn FOMrge Mr PMimMn ZiMuddin
Foundation for International Community
Assistance (FINCA)
Walayat St.
Phone: 040 225 851
Web: www.villagebanking.org
German Technical Cooperation (GTZ)
cCo AFBAR HerMP Field Of�ce
Web: www.gtz.de
Handicap International Belgium (H-Belgium)
Western Street of Walayat Park (near the Faculty
of Law and Political Science)
Phone: 0799 033 119
040 221 670
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.handicap-international.org
Site Manager Dr Abdul Basir Atef
Handicap International France (HI-France)
Charahi Haji Ayoub
Web: www.handicap-international.org
Helping AfgOMn FMrmers OrgMnizMPion (HAFO)
Phone: 0799 567 752
040 226 121
Email: [email protected]
Administration Manager Mr Ahmad Zia
HerMP UniversiPy (HU)
Contacts: Herat Province
Phone: 0799 566 168
Independent Administrative Reform and Civil
Services Commission (IARCSC)
Administration Building of Governor House
Phone: 0799 339 256
Web: www.iarcsc.gov.af
Director Mr Haji Abul Salam
International Assistance Mission (IAM)
(PO Box 625)
Phone: 0799 205 905
0700 400 139
Fax: 0087 076 345 5820
Web: www.iam-afghanistan.org
Regional Manager Ms Kaija Liisa Martin
International Federation of Red Cross and Red
Crescent Societies (IFRC)
Phone: 0700 400 986
0087 376 292 9355
EmMil: �[email protected]
Web: www.arcs.org.af
International Islamic Relief Agency (ISRA)
cCo AFBAR HerMP Field Of�ce
Web: www.isra-relief.org
HnPernMPionMl OrgMnizMPion for MigrMPion (HOM)
Hs. 1095, Mahbas St., District 1
Phone: 0700 400 278
040 220 143
040 220 144
0087 176 288 1825
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.iom.int/afghanistan
International Rescue Committee (IRC)
Phone: 0799 565 331
0700 452 785
040 227 640
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.theirc.org
Field Coordinator Dr Basir Ahmad Amini
Management Sciences for Health (Tech Serve)
Phone: 0799 141 070
Web: www.msh.org/afghanistan
Provincial Health Advisor Mr Ghulam Seyed
Marie Stopes International (MSI)
Gerdai Park-e- Taraqi(in front of Gymmasium)
Phone: 0700 277 616
0799 856 459
0088 216 5552 7194
[email protected]
Web: www.mariestopes.org
Country Director Mr Farhad Javid
Hs. 6, Jada-i-Kaj, Bagh-i-Azadie St.
Phone: 0799 857 351
0799 355 842
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.medicamondiale.org
Mine Clearance and Planning Agency (MCPA)
cCo AFBAR HerMP Field Of�ce
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Mission d’Aide au Développement des
Economies Rurales en Aghanistan (MADERA)
St. behind Karwan Sarai Atah
Phone: 0799 405 282
0799 035 563
0088 216 2116 4064
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Area Manager Mr Cedric Fleury
MOVE JelfMre OrgMnizMPion (MOVE)
Park 2 Ali (East Park Taraqi)
Phone: 0799 386 750
Email: [email protected]
Project Manager Mr Dr.Qadeer Ahmad Timori
National Democratic Institute (NDI)
Phone: 0799 205 618
Web: www.ndi.org
Manager Mr Abdul Aziz
Nippon International Cooperation for
Community Development (NICCD)
Jada-i-Kaji
Shahr-i-Naw Herat City
Phone: 0700 431 533
040 230 676
0087 376 308 8347
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.kyoto-nicco.org
HeMd of Of�ce Mr YosOiPMkM MrMkMmi
NPOCRurMl ReOMNiliPMPion AssociMPion for
Jada-i-Layce Mehri (Opp. Tawheed Co. Ltd.)
Phone: 0799 358 354
040 224 469
0700 406 252
Email: [email protected]
moOd_sOM�[email protected]
Web: www.rraa.net
JesP Zone MMnMger Gr MoOMmmMd SOM�q YMri
Nye Express Of�ce (Nye)
Mukhabrat Street
Phone: 0799 301 971
0799 022 601
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.thekillidgroup.com
Of�ce Hn FOMrge Mr SMyed TMRMN
Ockenden International (Ockenden)
Jada-i-Majidi, Taraqi Park, District 6
Phone: 0700 414 959
0799 210 484
040 224 059
[email protected]
Web: www.ockenden.org.uk
Regional Coordinator Eng Ghulam Sakhi Alemi
OrgMnizMPion for Mine FleMrMnce Mnd AfgOMn
ReOMNiliPMPion (OMAR)
Sayed Abdurrazq Hs. 5, Jada-e-Kag, District 5
Email: [email protected]
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
Walayet Compound (Opp. RRD Building)
Phone: 0799 137 602
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Regional Manager Mr Simon Burdett
Contacts: Herat Province
231
Rural Expansion of Afghanistan’s Community-
NMsed HeMlPOcMre (REAFH)
St. 5 Mokhabrat, Ab Bakhshbad Murghab Rd.
Phone: 0799 141 070
Web: www.msh.org/afghanistan
Health Advisor Dr Ghulam Rashid
SMnMyee GevelopmenP OrgMnizMPion (SGO)
Jad-i-Mahtab, Mirza Asheq lane
Phone: 0700 400 765
040 222 627
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.sanayee.org
Mr Abdul Khaliq Stanikzai
The HALO Trust International Mine Clearance
(HaloTrust)
Sarake Ferqa, Jadid Abad
Phone: 0798 998 469
040 444 515
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.halogoestothepole.com
Turkmenistan Consulate (Turkmenistan)
Jada-i-Ansari
Phone: 040 223 718
0700 402 803
0799 329 305
Consul Mr Gurbanov Ahmet
Ufuq (Horizon) JelfMre SociePy (UJS)
Sarak-i-see Metra, Bagh-i-Azadi
Phone: 0700 414 455
UniPed NMPion HumMn SePPlemenPs ProgrMmme
Phone: 0799 416 237
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Provincial Manager Mr Sayed Sadullah Wahab
UniPed NMPions AssisPMnce Mission in
Herat Multi Agencies Compound (HMAC), Herat -
Kandahar Road
Phone: 0700 106 657
Web: www.unama-afg.org
UniPed NMPions FOildren’s Fund (UNHFEF)
Phone: 0087 376 236 0050
Web: www.unicef.org
UniPed NMPions HigO Fommissioner for
Refugees (UNHFR)
Phone: 0700 400 089
0700 402 157
0088 216 5110 0921
Email: [email protected]
youso�@unOcrBcO
Web: www.unhcr.org
HeMd of Of�ce Mr BernMrd Goyle
UniPed NMPions Of�ce on Grugs Mnd Frime
Phone: 0799 226 434
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.unodc.org
Provincial Coordinator Mr Altaf Hussain Joya
US Agency for HnPernMPionMl GevelopmenP
(USAHG)
(PO Box 3211, Shahr-i-Naw)
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Phone: 0700 230 673
040 222 213
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.usaidafghanistan.org
Field ProgrMm Of�cer Ms Kim PeMse
Voice of Women (VWO)
Badmorghan (across from masjed Raza)
Phone: 0700 298 732
0799 209 386
040 226 061
Email: [email protected]o.com
[email protected]
Web: www.vowo.org
Executive Director Ms Suraya Pakzad
War Child Holland (WCH)
Jada-i-Mahtab (Opp. Talar-i-Mahtab)
Web: www.warchild.nl
JMr FOild-UK (JF-UK)
Janb-e-Kocha-e-Bagh-e-Morad, seemetra street
Phone: 0797 919 802
0799 327 683
040 220 815
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.warchild.org.uk
Field Director Ms Padmavathi Yedla
Welfare Association for the Development of
Afghanistan (WADAN)
Qul-e-Urdu St., Jada-e-Lyce Amir Ali, Khwaja Ab.
Ansari Road
Phone: 0799 506 224
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.wadan.org
Regional Coordinator Mr Fazel Hadi Rodwal
Women Activities & Social Services Association
(WASSA)
Bagh-i-Azadi Rd., Gulistan St.
Phone: 0799 407 660
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Executive Director Ms Hulan Khatibi
Jorld HeMlPO OrgMnizMPion, AfgOMnisPMn (JHO)
Phone: 0700 286 750
Web: www.emro.who.int/Afghanistan
HeMd of Of�ce Gr ANoNMkr RMsooli
Jorld HeMlPO OrgMnizMPion, AfgOMnisPMn (JHO)
Telecommunications St.
Phone: 0799 205 569
0088 216 314 5155
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.emro.who.int/Afghanistan
Programme Manager Ms Mary Troutman
World Vision International (WVI)
cCo AFBAR HerMP Field Of�ce
Web: www.wvi.org
Mr Graham Strong
Jawzjan Province
Adventist Development and Relief Agency
Phone: 0799 411 516
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.adra.org
Of�ce MMnMger Mr Genis BMrMPov
Contacts: Jawzjan Province
(AHRO)
Phone: 0799 410 413
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee
(BRAC)
Bande Sar-i-Pul Rd.Sheberghan
Phone: 0799 112 005
0088 216 2117 6393
Web: www.bracafg.org
Generous ReOMNiliPMPion OrgMnizMPion (GRO)
Phone: 0799 150 694
Email: [email protected]
HeMlPO Mnd GevelopmenP OrgMnizMPion (STEP)
Koche Camisari
Phone: 0799 202 943
0786 270 286
Email: [email protected]
Regional Director Dr Abdul Basir Mawlawizada
JMRzjMn HnsPiPuPe of HigOer EducMPion (JHHE)
Phone: 075 751 0204
0799 411 499
Rector Mr Habibullah Habib
MOVE JelfMre OrgMnizMPion (MOVE)
Haji Karim House
Aina Television Street (across
from Masjid Itfaq)
Phone: 0799 266 013
Email: [email protected]
Project Manager Dr. Said Raouf
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
Haji Rasheed’s Hs., Sre Miasht St., Rast-i-Zargari
(Opp. Kohna Feroshi)
Phone: 0700 047 885
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Obidullaha
SMve POe FOildren UK (SF-UK)
Bandar-i-Aqcha, Ayena TV Station Rd.
Phone: 0700 500 639
0700 500 639
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Health Program Manager Dr Santa
SMve POe FOildren USA (SF-USA)
Phone: 0799 476 988
0087 376 269 2745
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.savethechildren.org
Program Manager Ms Lynn Robson
Tearfund (TF)
Qari Amin House, Cinema Road (near SERVE
Of�ce) AqcOM FiPy
Aqcha City
Phone: 0797 745 560
0799 721 526
0088 216 5119 0481
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.tearfund.org
Project Manager Mr Mohammad Ismael Musmer
UniPed NMPions HigO Fommissioner for
Refugees (UNHFR)
Phone: 0799 023 160
0799 435 394
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
0088 216 5110 0857
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.unhcr.org
Mr Mohammad Qadir Karimzada
Kandahar Province
Madad Khan Chowk, District 6
Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 308 028
0799 639 434
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.aduafghanistan.org
Afghan Health and Development Services
Kandahar City
Phone: 030 300 1422
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.ahds.org
Commission (AIHRC)
Stadium St. (Opp. Afghan Felez, near Muslim
Chawk) District 6
Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 307 086
0700 303 133
0088 216 2123 0089
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.aihrc.org.af
Afghanistan Information Management Services
UNAMA Compound Kandahar
Kandahar City
(PO Box 005, UNDP Kabul)
Phone: 0700 515 915
Web: www.aims.org.af
ANSO SouPOern Region Of�ce
Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 294 395
0797 414 100
0087 386 356 4140
0088 216 2113 7056
Web: www.afgnso.org
Southern Region Safety Advisor Mr David
Richards
Area Mine Action Center (AMAC)
Haji Nazar Mohammad House, Kabul Shah
Shahr-i-Naw Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 302 037
0088 216 5112 0302
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.unmaca.org
Area Manager Mr Abdul Samy
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee
(BRAC)
Shahr-i-Naw Park Kandahar City
Phone: 0799 214 665
Web: www.bracafg.org
FMPOolic OrgMnizMPion for Relief Mnd
Development Aid (CordAid)
Herat Rd. (near Haji Omar Mosque) District 6
Shahr-i-Naw Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 304 481
0700 234 781
0700 305 293
0700 300 380
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.cordaid.nl
Mr Janepher Odenyo
Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
Omer Market, District 6
Contacts: Kandahar Province
Shahr-i-Naw Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 303 439
0700 303 441
0088 216 5026 0826
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.catholicrelief.org
Deputy Mr Abdul Nafe Ulomi
Cooperation Center for Afghanistan (CCA)
Madad Chawk, Main Road
Kandahar City
Phone: 0799 415 916
Email: [email protected]
Hs. 5830 (near Haji Habibullah Mosque)
Kabul Shah Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 201 657
0090 216 5113 4068
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.cha-net.org
Of�ce MMnMger Mr HMyMPullMO MusOkMni
Food Mnd AgriculPure OrgMnizMPion of POe UniPed
Nations (FAO)
Sara Mosque (close to fruit market)
Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 299 022
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.fao.org
Handicap International Belgium (H-Belgium)
Behind the Ice Factory, District 6
Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 240 647
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.handicap-international.org
Site Manager Mr Homayun
Health Net International (HNI)
Shahr-i-Naw Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 306 383
0087 376 185 8249
Web: www.healthnetinternational.org
Programme Manager Mr Fazel Elahee
Helping AfgOMn FMrmers OrgMnizMPion (HAFO)
Kart-e-Malemin, Manzil Bagh
Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 303 797
Email: [email protected]
Regional Manager Eng Faruq
Hope JorldRide (HOPE)
Ghazi Park Main Rd. (near Ghazi Park) District 6
Shahr-i-Naw Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 301 387
Web: www.af.hopeww.org
Independent Administrative Reform and Civil
Services Commission (IARCSC)
Beside Culture and Youth Department, Darwaza-
Kandahar City
Phone: 0799 193 029
Web: www.iarcsc.gov.af
Director Mr Gul Ahmad Nzri
International Assistance Mission (IAM)
Kandahar
(PO Box 625)
Phone: 0796 199 285
0799 732 644
Email: [email protected],org
Web: www.iam-afghanistan.org
Regional Manager Ms Hannelore Stein
International Federation of Red Cross and Red
Crescent Societies (IFRC)
Kandahar-Herat Rd.
Shahr-i-Naw Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 300 266
0087 376 304 3385
EmMil: �[email protected]
Web: www.arcs.org.af
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
HnPernMPionMl OrgMnizMPion for MigrMPion (HOM)
Dand District (next to the Mirwais Hospital)
Shahr-i-Naw Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 301 549
0088 216 2112 9191
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.iom.int/afghanistan
HslMmic Relief – UK (HR-UK)
Opp. Turk High School, off Herat Road
District 6 Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 300 297
0088 216 5115 0701
[email protected]
Web: www.islamic-relief.org.uk
Coordinator Administration and Programme
Support Unit Mr Neqeebulah
KMndMOMr UniversiPy (KU)
Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 018 302
FOMncellor ProfB QMmMruddin SMi�
Management Sciences for Health (Tech Serve)
Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 283 286
Web: www.msh.org/afghanistan
Provincial Health Advisor Mr Jawid Omar
Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 211 585
0700 211 933
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.medicamondiale.org
HeMd of Of�ce Mr Anou Borrey
Mercy Corps (MC)
Haji Ismail Kandahari House (near Muslim
Chawk)
Shahr-i-Naw Kandahar City
Phone: 0799 448 061
0087 376 264 1443
Web: www.mercycorps.org
Area Coordinator Mr Hazrat Umar Khaleeji
National Democratic Institute (NDI)
Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 307 725
Web: www.ndi.org
MMnMger Mr HMyMPullMO RM�qi
Nye Express Of�ce (Nye)
Deh Khwaja, Haji Habib Mosque St., next to the
Pump Station
Kandahar City
Phone: 0799 697 704
Web: www.thekillidgroup.com
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
RRD Compound, Sar-i-Poza Rd., Kandahar-Herat
Highway
Kandahar City
Phone: 0799 494 229
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Regional Manager Mr Dan Hallett
HsB 38E (nexP Po UNHFEF of�ce)
Shahr-i-Naw Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 278 837
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.oxfam.org.uk
Programme Coordinator Mr Sediqulla Fahim
Rural Expansion of Afghanistan’s Community-
NMsed HeMlPOcMre (REAFH)
Hs. 4945, Muslim Chawk, District 6
Shahr-i-Naw Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 283 286
Web: www.msh.org/afghanistan
Health Advisor Dr Jawid Omar
Contacts: Kandahar Province
237
SMve POe FOildren UK (SF-UK)
Near Read Mosque, District 6
Shahr-i-Naw Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 306 245
Email: [email protected]
Programme Coordinator Mr Mohammad Saeed
Southern and Western Afghanistan and
Balochistan Association for Coordination
(SWABAC)
Herat Road, after the Red Mosque, next to
Shahr-i-Naw Kandahar City
Phone: 0799 088 036
0700 301 105
0799 147 400
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Executive Coordinator Eng Jan Mohammad
TearFund (TF)
Kabul Shah Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 304 673
0087 376 302 0071
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.tearfund.org
Terre des Hommes (TdH)
Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 302 677
0087 076 163 8760
Web: www.tdhafghanistan.org
Project Coordinator Dr Taj Muhammad
TOe GloNe Mnd MMil NeRspMper - FMnMdM (TGM)
Kandahar City
Phone: 0798 988 164
0700 498 423
Web: www.globeandmail.com
UniPed NMPions AssisPMnce Mission in
Haji Musa Jan’s House (Near Muslim Chowk)
Shahr-i-Naw Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 106 700
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.unama-afg.org
HeMd of Of�ce Mr TMlMPNek MMsMdykov
UniPed NMPions FOildren’s Fund (UNHFEF)
Kandahar City
Phone: 0088 216 8980 0370
Web: www.unicef.org
UniPed NMPions GepMrPmenP of SMfePy Mnd
Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 224 954
0700 300 184
0088 216 5110 7773
[email protected]
UniPed NMPions HigO Fommissioner for
Refugees (UNHFR)
Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 301 267
0700 302 873
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.unhcr.org
UniPed NMPions Of�ce on Grugs Mnd Frime
Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 300 069
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.unodc.org
Provincial Coordinator Mr Fazel Mohammad
Fazli
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Welfare Association for the Development of
Afghanistan (WADAN)
Hs. 3, St. 2 (across from Jama-i-Omar) District 6
Karaiz Bazaar Kandahar City
Phone: 0799 024 150
0799 448 117
0700 306 841
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.wadan.org
Regional Manager Mr Zamarai Khan Alokozai
Jorld HeMlPO OrgMnizMPion, AfgOMnisPMn (JHO)
Hs. 2752 (behind Chamber of Commerce)
Shahr-i-Naw Kandahar City
Phone: 0700 288 402
0700 303 356
Web: www.emro.who.int/Afghanistan
HeMd of Of�ce Gr SOMRMli PopMl
Kapisa Province
AlNeruni UniversiPy (AU)
Phone: 0700 284 504
0799 200 884
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee
(BRAC)
Abdullah Khail, Deh Baba Ali
Phone: 0700 236 054
Web: www.bracafg.org
Generous ReOMNiliPMPion OrgMnizMPion (GRO)
Phone: 0700 153 548
Marie Stopes International (MSI)
Anwar Khan Khil, 1st Part of Kohistan
Kapisa
Phone: 0700 277 616
0799 856 469
0088 216 5552 7194
[email protected]
Web: www.mariestopes.org
Country Director Mr Farhad Javid
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
Phone: 0799 234 168
0088 216 2113 4059
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Abdul Hadi
Tearfund (TF)
Abdul Bashir House,Oshtorgram Road (near Mir
Phone: 0799 048 073
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.tearfund.org
Project Manager Mr Abdul Zahir Payeez
Khost Province
Afghan Women Service and Education
OrgMnizMPion (AJSE)
Phone: 0799 326 132
0799 188 762
Email: [email protected]
Executive Director Ms Gulsoom Satrzai
Basic Education for Afghans (BEA)
Bagh-i-Prozha
Phone: 0799 137 115
[email protected]
HnfrMsPrucPurMl ReOMNiliPMPion (BAHHR)
Floor 1, Jalali Market (behind the Khost Cinema)
Contacts: Kunar Province
Phone: 0799 210 689
0799 110 212
Deputy Director Mr Naeem Jan
Development and Humanitarian Services for
Afghanistan (DHSA/TKG)
Behind Government Main Gust House
Phone: 0799 137 346
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.thekillidgroup.com
Of�ce MMnMger Mr HMji SediqullMO
Foundation for Culture and Civil Society (FCCS)
Phone: 0088 216 5551 5700
Web: www.afghanfccs.org
International Medical Corps (IMC)
Near the Khost Administrator House
Phone: 0799 350 614
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.imcworldwide.org
Project Manager Dr Faiz Mohammad Atif
International Rescue Committee (IRC)
Next to the Northern Gate of Khost City
Phone: 0799 135 190
0088 216 2144 7655
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.theirc.org
Field Coordinator Mr Salamath Khan
KOosP UniversiPy (KU)
Phone: 0799 249 230
Chancellor Mr Faiz Moh Fayaz
Management Sciences for Health (Tech Serve)
Khost Provincial Public Health Directorate
Phone: 0708 889 091
Email: [email protected]
Provincial Health Advisor Mr Sakhi Sardar
National Democratic Institute (NDI)
Phone: 0799 135 656
Web: www.ndi.org
Kunar Province
Basic Education for Afghans (BEA)
Hejrat Kelai Kramar
Phone: 075 652 0028
0700 643 593
0700 643 594
0088 216 5026 3536
Email: [email protected]
Of�ce Hn cOMrge Mr GulMmmullMO JMqMr
Independent Humanitarian Services
Association (IHSAN)
International Medical Corps (IMC)
Phone: 0700 604 210
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.imcworldwide.org
Project Manager Dr Ihsanullah Shenwari
Mission d’Aide au Développement des
Economies Rurales en Aghanistan (MADERA)
Phone: 0088 216 5025 4325
Field Of�cer Mr ANdul RMOmMn
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
RRD Compound
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
240
Phone: 0088 216 2113 4060
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Habiburahman
Kunduz Province
AfgOMn AmpuPee BicyclisPs for ReOMNiliPMPion
and Recreation (AABRAR)
Asad Abad City
Phone: 077 926 8318
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.aabrar.org
In Charge Mr Saif-Ur-Rahaman
(AHRO)
Sapin Zar Family, Kabul Bandar
Kunduz City
Phone: 0799 264 495
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Mr Hamidullah Attorney
Commission (AIHRC)
Kocha-i-Zakhail, Maidan-i-Pukhta (south of PRT
Kunduz City
Phone: 0799 212 895
0088 216 2123 0047
0088 216 5026 8966
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.aihrc.org.af
Afghanistan Information Management Services
UNDP Compound, Opposite of Kunduz University
Kunduz City
(PO Box 005, UNDP Kabul)
Phone: 0799 243 816
0700 721 992
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.aims.org.af
Regional Manager Mr Assadullah Siyall
AfgOMnisPMn ReOMNiliPMPion Mnd ReconsPrucPion
Agency Falah (ARRAF)
Kucha-e-Sardara, Kabul Port
Kunduz City
Phone: 0799 270 870
Email: [email protected]
Agency for Technical Cooperation and
Development (ACTED)
Kocha-e-Mistari Khana, Azaadi St.
Kunduz City
Phone: 0700 706 742
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.acted.org
Deputy Area Coordinator Eng Abdul Qahar
Area Mine Action Center (AMAC)
NexP Po POe HOM of�ce, oppB ZoOrM RMdio SPMPion
Koche Kasani Kunduz City
Phone: 0799 226 274
0088 216 2113 3246
Email: [email protected]
Operations Assistant Mr Sayed Agha Atiq
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee
(BRAC)
Kunduz City
Phone: 0700 713 654
Web: www.bracafg.org
Cooperation Center for Afghanistan (CCA)
In center of the city
Kunduz City
Phone: 0088 216 2128 0659
Email: [email protected]
Contacts: Kunduz Province
241
FounPry GevelopmenP UniP (FGU)
opp. Khwaja Mashhad School
Bandare Khan AbadKunduz City
Phone: 0799 394 869
0799 359 453
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.cduafgan.org
Regional Manager Mr Sayed Padshah
Education Training Center for Poor Women and
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
242
Web: www.kra-af.org
ProgrMmme IiMison Of�cer Mr ANdul HMmeed
Mercy Corps (MC)
Fatema-tul-Zahra High School, Bandar-i-Kabul
Kunduz City
Phone: 0799 207 592
0097 376 280 1856
Web: www.mercycorps.org
Of�ce MMnMger Mr MoOMmmMd FMrid
National Democratic Institute (NDI)
Kunduz City
Phone: 0799 206 531
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.ndi.org
Manager Mr Abdul Basir
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
Near Zar Company
Kunduz City
Phone: 0799 405 236
0799 047 883
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Zaman
PMrPners in ReviPMlizMPion Mnd Building (PRB)
St. 3, Bagh-e-Nasher (Opp. Lysa-e-Naswan
Kunuz, next to Sarandui Hospital)
NawabadKunduz City
Phone: 0700 050 283
0799 015 213
0799 184 125
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.prb.org.af
Vet. Coordinator Dr Mohammad Zia
People in Need (PIN)
Khwaja Mashad St., Naw Abad
Kunduz City
Phone: 0799 398 805
Web: www.peopleinneed.cz
SRedisO FommiPPee for AfgOMnisPMn (SFA)
Mahkama Road
Kunduz City
Phone: 0799 389 756
0799 389 755
[email protected]
Web: www.swedishcommittee.org
Acting Project Manager Dr Esmat Shinwari
UniPed NMPions AssisPMnce Mission in
Chai Frushi St., Bandar-i-Imam Sahib
Kunduz City
Phone: 0700 106 400
0799 113 016
0799 825 961
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.unama-afg.org
AcPing HeMd of Of�ce Ms NMOid ANuMkMr
UniPed NMPions FOildren’s Fund (UNHFEF)
Kunduz City
Phone: 0088 216 2111 0560
Web: www.unicef.org
UniPed NMPions HigO Fommissioner for
Refugees (UNHFR)
Kunduz City
Phone: 0799 012 073
0700 712 300
0088 216 5110 0486
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.unhcr.org
Mr Hamidullah Ezatyar
Welfare Association for the Development of
Afghanistan (WADAN)
Abu Baker Siddiq Mosque, St. 5
Nawabad, Khwaja MashadKunduz City
Contacts: Laghman and Logar Provinces
243
Phone: 0799 214 682
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.wadan.org
Regional Coordinator Mr Khan Mohammad
Jorld HeMlPO OrgMnizMPion, AfgOMnisPMn (JHO)
Bandar-i-Khanabad (near Cinema)
Kunduz City
Phone: 0799 321 339
Web: www.emro.who.int/Afghanistan
Admin Assistant Mr Abdul Basir Haidary
Laghman Province
AfgOMn AmpuPee BicyclisPs for ReOMNiliPMPion
and Recreation (AABRAR)
Phone: 077 282 8290
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.aabrar.org
In Charge Mr Inayat Ullah
HNnSinM PuNlic HeMlPO ProgrMmme for
AfgOMnisPMn (HNnSinM-PHPA)
Qarghayee (next to Qarghayee District)
Phone: 0700 600 675
0700 606 958
Project Manager Dr Sanaullah Sana
Independent Humanitarian Services
Association (IHSAN)
Mission d’Aide au Développement des
Economies Rurales en Aghanistan (MADERA)
Behind Mehterlam Warehouses
Shahr-i-NawMehtherlam
(PO Box 1464)
Phone: 0799 032 844
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
NeR RRG Building (neMr HMF Of�ce)
Shahr-i-NawMehtherlam
Phone: 0799 178 294
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Humayun Akseer
Logar Province
Afghan Women Service and Education
OrgMnizMPion (AJSE)
Mohammed Agha District, Dahnow Village
Phone: 0799 326 132
0799 188 762
Email: [email protected]
Executive Director Ms Gulsoom Satrzai
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee
(BRAC)
Uoni Su�M (norPO of OmMr-i-FMrooq HigO ScOool)
Pul-i-Alam
Phone: 0700 206 219
Web: www.bracafg.org
Coordination of Afghan Relief (CoAR)
Behind Police Department
Pul-i-Alam Pul-i-Alam
Phone: 0799 832 120
0700 260 453
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.coar.org
Project Manager Mr Mohammad Rahim Wardak
FounPry GevelopmenP UniP (FGU)
Uni Saiedan
Pul-i-Alam Pul-i-Alam
Phone: 0700 019 749
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.cduafgan.org
Regional Manager Eng Mahboob
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
244
Generous ReOMNiliPMPion OrgMnizMPion (GRO)
Mohammed Agha District
Pul-i-Alam
Phone: 0799 182 097
0799 153 025
International Rescue Committee (IRC)
Behind Baraki Barak Bus Station, Agriculture/
Pul-i-Alam
Phone: 0700 260 491
0088 216 3335 1530
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.theirc.org
Medical Refresher Courses for Afghans (MRCA)
Opp. Governor’s House
Pul-i-Alam Pul-i-Alam
Phone: 0799 399 414
Web: www.mrca-asso.org
Provincial Coordinator Dr Abdul Habib Alem
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
Pul-i-Alam
Phone: 0799 371 004
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Zafar Khan
Welfare Association for the Development of
Afghanistan (WADAN)
Kabul Bus Station, Qala-i-Khwaja Afzal
Pul-i-Alam
Phone: 0700 045 299
0799 142 870
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.wadan.org
Coordinator Drug Demand Reduction Dr Sardar
Wali
Nangarhar Province
ANdul HMq FoundMPion, MMin Of�ce (AHF)
Kama Bus Stand St. (close to Charahi
Phone: 0700 602 182
0799 323 931
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.abdulhaq.org
Executive Director Mr Nasrullah Baryalai
Arsalaie
AfgOMn AmpuPee BicyclisPs for ReOMNiliPMPion
and Recreation (AABRAR)
Phone: 0700 611 917
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.aabrar.org
Mr Abdul Nasir
(AGHCO)
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.Jalalabad
Organisation (AHSAO)
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.Jalalabad
Hs. 1, 1st Road, ICRC (opp. Univeristy Hospital
(PO Box 1041)
Web: www.ancb.org
Mr Sayed Fazlullah Wahidi
Afghan Women Welfare Department (AWWD)
St. 1, Charahi Sehat-i-Ama
Phone: 0700 634 054
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Contacts: Nangarhar Province
245
Executive Director Ms Jamila Akberzai
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St. Jalalabad
Web: www.afghanaid.org.uk
Afghanistan Development Association (ADA)
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.Jalalabad
(AHRO)
Barbari Charahi Sehat Auma
Phone: 0700 600 559
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Commission (AIHRC)
(PO Box 005, UNDP Kabul)
Phone: 0799 352 558
0088 216 2123 0095
Web: www.aihrc.org.af
Afghanistan Information Management Services
UNAMA Compound Jalalabad
(PO Box 005, UNDP Kabul)
Phone: 0700 604 916
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.aims.org.af
Field Of�cer Mr SMyed GOMliN
ANSO EMsPern Region Of�ce
Phone: 0700 606 601
0799 248 362
0799 407 309
0088 216 2116 4140
Web: www.afgnso.org
Eastern Region Safety Advisor Mr Khisrow Shoar
AfgOMnisPMn ReOMNiliPMPion Mnd ReconsPrucPion
Agency Falah (ARRAF)
Miya Aslam Plaza
Phone: 0700 605 378
Email: [email protected]
Agency Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief
(ACBAR)
St. 1, Charahi Sehat-i-Ama
Phone: 0700 601 917
0700 157 003
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.acbar.org
Agency for ReOMNiliPMPion Mnd Energy
Conservation in Afghanistan (AREA)
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St. Jalalabad
Aide Médicale Internationale (AMI)
Chiknowri High School)
Phone: 0799 208 390
0700 635 258
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.amifrance.org
Project Manager Ms Valerie Brunel
Amitie Franco-Afghane (AFRANE)
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.Jalalabad
Web: www.afrane.org
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
246
AnPi TuNerculosis AssociMPion AfgOMnisPMn
Programme (ATA)
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.Jalalabad
Area Mine Action Center (AMAC)
Phase 1, Cheshmi Khanji Bank St. (across from
Phone: 0700 230 802
0088 216 5112 0301
Email: [email protected]
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee
(BRAC)
Haji Ab. Qader Rd. (near National Bank of
Pakistan)
Phone: 0700 602 923
Web: www.bracafg.org
Basic Education for Afghans (BEA)
Phone: 075 600 1508
0799 490 167
0700 280 666
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Director Mr Noor Mohammad Najeeb
FOurcO Jorld Service – PMkisPMnCAfgOMnisPMn
(CWS)
Police Head Quarter, Lyce Naswan 2 (near Girls
Phone: 0799 331 519
Web: www.cwspa.org
FOurcO Jorld Service – PMkisPMnCAfgOMnisPMn
(CWS)
Police Head Quarter, Lyce Naswan 2 (near Girls
Phone: 0799 331 519
0088 216 8980 0210
Fax: 0092 512 103 172
Web: www.cwspa.org
FommiPPee for ReOMNiliPMPion Aid Po
Hs. 6, St. 2, Area 1, Chashma-i-Khanji
(PO Box 785, Kabul University)
Phone: 0799 322 493
0700 686 951
0088 216 8980 2320
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.cr fg.org
FounPry GevelopmenP UniP (FGU)
Koch-i-Itfaya, Chaprahar Rd. (Near Police Station
Phone: 0799 684 972
0700 028 972
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.cduafgan.org
Regional Manager Eng Abdul Hameed
Danish Committee for Aid to Afghan Refugees
(DACAAR)
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.Jalalabad
Web: www.dacaar.org
Deutsche Welthungerhilfe/German AgroAction
(AgroAction)
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.Jalalabad
Web: www.welthungerhilfe.de/home_eng.
Food Mnd AgriculPure OrgMnizMPion of POe UniPed
Nations (FAO)
Close to Shesham Bagh research station
Torkham Bus StationJalalabad
Contacts: Nangarhar Province
247
Phone: 0700 056 616
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.fao.org
Generous ReOMNiliPMPion OrgMnizMPion (GRO)
Phone: 0799 150 694
0799 233 142
HeMd of Of�ce Mr SMid RuOullMO
Health Net International (HNI)
Zala Saranwaly (behind Torkham Bus Stop)
Phone: 0799 383 807
0700 606 183
0087 376 361 9919
EmMil: Oni_jM_of�[email protected]
Web: www.healthnetinternational.org
HNnSinM PuNlic HeMlPO ProgrMmme for
AfgOMnisPMn (HNnSinM-PHPA)
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.Jalalabad
Independent Administrative Reform and Civil
Services Commission (IARCSC)
Opp. Military Hospital, beside Pakistan
Consulate
Phone: 0700 070 365
Web: www.iarcsc.gov.af
Director Mr Gulalai Jabarkhail
Independent Humanitarian Services
Association (IHSAN)
Hs. 2, Area 3 (Opp. Dar-ul-Malimeen)
Phone: 0700 600 591
0700 603 050
International Federation of Red Cross and Red
Crescent Societies (IFRC)
Phone: 0700 603 574
0087 376 304 3395
EmMil: �[email protected]
Web: www.arcs.org.af
International Foundation of Hope (IFHope)
Block 7, Torkham Rd
Phone: 0700 605 705
0700 605 703
[email protected]
Web: www.ifhope.org
International Islamic Relief Agency (ISRA)
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.Jalalabad
Web: www.isra-relief.org
International Medical Corps (IMC)
Main Road (beside Daroul-Malimeen Ali, in front
of RosOMn TelepOone Of�ce)
Phone: 0799 216 186
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.imcworldwide.org
Project Coordinator Dr Enayatullah Mayel
International Rescue Committee (IRC)
Hs. 1,Fazlulhaq Mujahed St., District 4
New DaramsalJalalabad
Phone: 0799 021 207
0700 600 885
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.theirc.org
Field Coordinator Mr Abdul Ahad Samoon
Mine Clearance and Planning Agency (MCPA)
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.Jalalabad
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
248
Mine Detection and Dog Centre (MDC)
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.Jalalabad
Mission d’Aide au Développement des
Economies Rurales en Aghanistan (MADERA)
Hs. 16, St. 2, Chawk-i-Talashi
Parke Awa Jalalabad
Phone: 0700 601 591
0088 216 5060 1094
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
NMngMrOMr UniversiPy (NU)
Phone: 0700 640 460
National Democratic Institute (NDI)
Phone: 0799 382 598
Web: www.ndi.org
NorRegiMn AfgOMnisPMn FommiPPee (NAF)
Phone: 0700 605 345
Web: www.nrc.no
NorRegiMn Refugee Founcil (NRF)
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.Jalalabad
Web: www.nrc.no
NPOCRurMl ReOMNiliPMPion AssociMPion for
Hazratha St. (near Medical faculty hospital)
Phone: 0700 601 853
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.rraa.net
Nye Express Of�ce (Nye)
Hs. 3, St. 3, Golaye Araban, Charahi Marastoon
Phone: 0799 014 031
0700 684 447
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.thekillidgroup.com
Of�ce Hn FOMrge Mr Gul GMd KMOn
OrgMnizMPion for Mine FleMrMnce Mnd AfgOMn
ReOMNiliPMPion (OMAR)
Phone: 0799 312 948
Email: [email protected]
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
Hs. 2, St. 1, Sub Rd. 2 (west of Charahi
Marastoon, behind Pakistani Consulate)
Phone: 0799 234 165
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Regional Manager Ms Bentzien
Relief International (RI)
Dr. Asif Qazizada’s Hs. (Charahi Marastoon)
Phone: 0799 331 448
Web: www.ri.org
Programme Manager Mr Randhir Singh
Phone: 0700 603 083
0700 263 283
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.sandygallsafghanistanappeal.org
Regional Programme Manager Mr Samiudin Saber
Contacts: Nangarhar Province
249
SMve POe FOildren SReden (SFS)
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.Jalalabad
Serving Emergency Relief and Vocational
Enterprises (SERVE)
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.Jalalabad
Web: www.serveafghanistan.org
Social Service and Reconstruction of
Chaperhar Bus stop (behind Meia Omar High
Phone: 0700 600 729
0700 625 970
Email: [email protected]
Director Dr Kanishka
Solidarite Afghanistan Belgique (SAB)
cCo AFBAR JMlMlMNMd Field Of�ce
Kama Bus Stand, Easter St.Jalalabad
Web: www.solidariteafgha.com
SRedisO FommiPPee for AfgOMnisPMn (SFA)
Dr Sharifullah House, old Attorney Street
Phone: 0700 604 984
0799 864 045
Web: www.swedishcommittee.org
Of�ce MMnMger Mr MoOMmmMd TMOir EsmMP
UniPed NMPions AssisPMnce Mission in
Arzaaq St., Zone 3
Phone: 0700 106 500
Web: www.unama-afg.org
UniPed NMPions FOildren’s Fund (UNHFEF)
Phone: 0087 376 273 1990
Web: www.unicef.org
UniPed NMPions GepMrPmenP of SMfePy Mnd
Phone: 0700 608 010
0700 603 351
0088 216 5110 7774
UniPed NMPions HigO Fommissioner for
Refugees (UNHFR)
Phone: 0700 611 631
0799 345 464
0088 216 5110 0868
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.unhcr.org
UniPed NMPions Of�ce on Grugs Mnd Frime
Haji Hayatullah Building (Near to Hazrat Anas
Bine Malik Mosque)
Charahi MarastoonJalalabad
Phone: 0700 605 007
Web: www.unodc.org
Provincial Coordinator Mr Mohammad Alem
Welfare Association for the Development of
Afghanistan (WADAN)
Angoor Bagh, Mashko St. (near Hameed
Medicos Center)
Phone: 0799 113 901
0799 407 386
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.wadan.org
Regional Manager Mr Nazir Ahmad Mohmand
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Jorld HeMlPO OrgMnizMPion, AfgOMnisPMn (JHO)
Behind new Kabul bus stand
Phone: 0700 281 131
Web: www.emro.who.int/Afghanistan
HeMd of Of�ce Gr ANdul SOMkoor JMsiqi
Nimroz Province
Ockenden International (Ockenden)
Hamoon St. 9, Jada-e-Riyasat Taleem-wa-Terbiat
(PO Box 2013, Kabul)
Phone: 0088 216 8980 0104
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.ockenden.org.uk
Provincial Programme Manager Eng Amanullah
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
Governor’s House Rd. (next to the new UNOPS
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Mr Sayed Esa
Nuristan Province
AfgOMn AmpuPee BicyclisPs for ReOMNiliPMPion
and Recreation (AABRAR)
Wama, Nuristan
Phone: 077 282 8290
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.aabrar.org
In Charge Mr Inayat Ullah
Kamo Village, Kamdish District
Nuristan City
(PO Box 6066, KMrP-i-PMrRMn PosP Of�ce)
Phone: 0088 216 8444 9765
Fax: 0044 207 225 3344
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.afghanaid.org.uk
Programme Manager Mr Sayed Usman
Basic Education for Afghans (BEA)
Want Main Bazar, Want District
Nuristan City
Email: [email protected]
Of�ce Hn cOMrge Mr MoOMmmMd ANdullMO
Independent Humanitarian Services
Association (IHSAN)
Nuristan City
(PO Box 625)
Paktia Province
Commission (AIHRC)
Gardez
Phone: 0799 394 284
0088 216 2123 0058
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.aihrc.org.af
Agency for Technical Cooperation and
Development (ACTED)
NexP Po FommunicMPions Of�ce
Gardez
Phone: 0799 138 783
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.acted.org
Area Mine Action Center (AMAC)
Agriculture Building (adjacent to RRD)
Gardez
Phone: 0799 012 567
0088 216 5112 0307
Email: [email protected]
Operations Assistant Mr Mirwais Hassani
GTZ- Basic Education Program (GTZ/ BEPA)
Ghazni line, near to Paktia university (next to
Paktia
Phone: 0796 582 311
Contacts: Paktia Province
251
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.gtz.de
GTZ Master Trainer Coordinator Mr Abdul Malik
HNnSinM PuNlic HeMlPO ProgrMmme for
AfgOMnisPMn (HNnSinM-PHPA)
Next to the Paktia Bank
Gardez
Phone: 0799 237 007
0799 237 006
0088 216 5020 5583
Email: [email protected]
Project Manager Dr Mohammad Fahim
Independent Administrative Reform and Civil
Services Commission (IARCSC)
Governor Of�ce Building
Gardez
Phone: 0799 407 062
Web: www.iarcsc.gov.af
Director Mr Ghulam Ali Joshan
HnPernMPionMl OrgMnizMPion for MigrMPion (HOM)
UN Compound
Gardez
Phone: 0799 004 838
0088 216 8980 0576
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.iom.int/afghanistan
International Rescue Committee (IRC)
Walayat Rd. (next to The Afghanistan Bank,
Gardez branch)
Gardez
Phone: 0799 394 082
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.theirc.org
Field Coordinator Mr Hazrat Gul Barekzai
Management Sciences for Health (Tech Serve)
Gardez
Phone: 0799 314 804
Web: www.msh.org/afghanistan
Provincial Health Advisor Mr Ahmadullah
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
RRD Compound, Paktya-Ghazni Rd. (near
UNAMA/UNHCR Compound)
Gardez
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Kalimullah
PMkPiM UniversiPy (PU)
Gardez
Phone: 0799 231 887
People in Need (PIN)
Gardez
Phone: 0799 142 023
Web: www.peopleinneed.cz
Rural Expansion of Afghanistan’s Community-
NMsed HeMlPOcMre (REAFH)
Do Saraka-i-Walayat
Gardez
Phone: 0799 314 804
Web: www.msh.org/afghanistan
Health Advisor Dr Ahmadullha
Services for Humanitarian Assistance and
Development (SHAD)
Darul Shefa Hospital, Old Military Hospital (near
Governor Hs.)
Gardez
Phone: 0799 188 270
Web: www.shade.org.af
Project Supervisor Dr Qayum
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
UniPed MePOodisP FommiPPee on Relief (UMFOR)
Gardez
Phone: 0799 393 883
0799 393 885
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.umcor-ngo.org
HeMd of Of�ce Mr MicOel KersPen
UniPed NMPions AssisPMnce Mission in
Darul Malemeen, Zeraat Project
Gardez
Phone: 0700 106 200
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.unama-afg.org
AcPing HeMd of Of�ce Mr Anne FMlOer
UniPed NMPions GepMrPmenP of SMfePy Mnd
Gardez
Phone: 0700 037 470
0799 371 963
0088 216 5110 8836
[email protected]
UniPed NMPions HigO Fommissioner for
Refugees (UNHFR)
Gardez
Phone: 0799 341 088
0700 295 028
0088 216 5112 1666
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.unhcr.org
Welfare Association for the Development of
Afghanistan (WADAN)
near Dubai Hotel
Shahr-i-NawGardez
Phone: 0700 045 299
0799 142 870
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.wadan.org
Coordinator Drug Demand Reduction Dr Sardar
Wali
AfgOMn AmpuPee BicyclisPs for ReOMNiliPMPion
and Recreation (AABRAR)
Urgon Paktika
Urgon
Phone: 0700 273 558
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.aabrar.org
Paktika Province
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee
(BRAC)
Phone: 0799 477 579
0088 216 3331 2130
Web: www.bracafg.org
FounPry GevelopmenP UniP (FGU)
Phone: 0700 065 905
0088 216 2122 7723
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.cduafgan.org
Regional Manager Eng Muhibullah Khan
Panjshir Province
Unaba
Phone: 0700 228 574
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.emergency.it
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
Unaba District (behind the Emergency Hospital)
Panjshair City
Phone: 0088 216 8444 3590
Contacts: Parwan and Samangan Provinces
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Jamil
Parwan Province
Afghan Women Service and Education
OrgMnizMPion (AJSE)
Charikar City (inside women affairs department)
Charikar City
Phone: 0799 326 132
0799 188 762
Email: [email protected]
Executive Director Ms Gulsoom Satrzai
ASFHHANA: AfgOMnisPMn’s FOildren, A NeR
Approach (ASCHIANA)
Charikar
Phone: 0700 224 208
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee
(BRAC)
Parch-e-Naw (opp. Bandh-e-Barg)
Charikar
Phone: 0700 236 055
0088 216 2113 9690
Web: www.bracafg.org
Wolayat St., Chawk-i-Charikar
Charikar
Web: www.cha-net.org
Generous ReOMNiliPMPion OrgMnizMPion (GRO)
Charikar
Phone: 0700 286 627
Opp. Governor’s House, District 2
Charikar
Phone: 0700 280 921
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.jen-npo.org
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
Main City (behind Charikar Hospital)
Charikar
Phone: 0700 248 580
0088 216 2113 4058
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Mahfooz
PMrRMn HnsPiPuPe of HigOer EducMPion (PHHE)
Parwan City
Phone: 0700 225 286
Rector Mr Saber Saberi
Samangan Province
Adventist Development and Relief Agency
Aybak
Web: www.adra.org
Jada-i-Qutbuddin (Opp. Mastofyat)
Aybak
Phone: 0088 216 8444 0200
Fax: 0044 207 225 3344
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.afghanaid.org.uk
Programme Manager Mr Abdul Samad
Aide Médicale Internationale (AMI)
Karte MamorinAybak
Phone: 0700 403 851
Web: www.amifrance.org
Logistician Mr Herve Boudin
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee
(BRAC)
Takthe Rustom Road
Aybak
Phone: 0799 216 348
0088 216 2115 6255
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Web: www.bracafg.org
Development and Humanitarian Services for
Afghanistan (DHSA/TKG)
Near to Old Cinema
Aybak
Phone: 0700 553 884
Web: www.thekillidgroup.com
Acting In Charge Mr Sayed Qasim
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
RRG Of�ce, AyNMk HigO ScOool SPB
Aybak
Phone: 0799 150 645
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Fazel Haq
People in Need (PIN)
Poieen District Aybak
Phone: 0798 995 850
Web: www.peopleinneed.cz
Sar-i-Pul Province
Coordination of Afghan Relief (CoAR)
Close to the Cinema Building
Shahr-i-Naw Sar-i-Pul City
Phone: 0799 127 335
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.coar.org
Field Manager Mr Rafeallah Numani
HNnSinM PuNlic HeMlPO ProgrMmme for
AfgOMnisPMn (HNnSinM-PHPA)
Rahmatabad (near the Provincial Hospital)
Sar-i-Pul City
Phone: 0799 149 384
0799 149 385
0088 216 3332 9441
Email: [email protected]
Project Manager Dr Mohammad Jawad Osmani
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
SPB UNAMA, NorPO of GAA Of�ce (in fronP of
Gudamdar Mosque)
Shahr-i-Naw Sar-i-Pul City
Phone: 0799 151 430
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Nabi
Peace Winds Japan (PWJ)
Shahr-i-Naw Sar-i-Pul City
Phone: 0798 264 837
Web: www.peace-winds.org/en
Country Representative Ms Reiko Hiria
SMve POe FOildren USA (SF-USA)
Sar-i-Pul City
Phone: 0799 043 961
0799 043 962
0087 376 291 5295
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.savethechildren.org
Takhar Province
Afghan Women Service and Education
OrgMnizMPion (AJSE)
Takhar City (inside women affairs department)
Takhar City
Phone: 0799 326 132
0799 188 762
Email: [email protected]
Executive Director Ms Gulsoom Satrzai
Agency for Technical Cooperation and
Development (ACTED)
Kocha-e-Mashtania
Taloqan
Phone: 0700 706 742
0088 216 5060 1527
Email: [email protected]
Contacts: Takhar Province
Web: www.acted.org
Deputy Area Coordinator Eng Abdul Qahar
AriMmeOer ReOMNiliPMPion EsPMNlisOmenP (ARE)
Taloqan
Phone: 0700 203 654
Mr Massoud Sroor
Association for Aid and Relief-Japan (AAR-
Hs. 88, St. 2 Reyaz Amir Moh
Sesad Family Park Taloqan
Phone: 0700 007 076
0799 876 570
0087 376 121 6487
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.arrjapan.gr.jp
Programme Manager Mr Masato Tabe
Care of Afghan Families (CAF)
Hs. 1, Ln. 1, St. High School (next to Bajawory
Mosque)
Taloqan
Phone: 0088 216 5559 0362
Web: www.caf.org.af
Foncern JorldRide (Foncern)
Rustaq
(PO Box 2016, Kabul)
Phone: 0087 376 228 0289
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.concern.net
Programme Coordinator Mr Mohammad Aslam
Foncern JorldRide (Foncern)
Wakil Mohammad Nazar St. (behind Great
Mosque
Taloqan
(PO Box 2016, Kabul)
Phone: 0700 707 753
0700 707 752
0087 376 249 8470
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.concern.net
Assistant Country Director Mr Luke Stephens
Foncern JorldRide (Foncern)
Warsej
Phone: 0088 216 5426 0509
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.concern.net
Programme Coordinator Jess Garana
GTZ- Basic Education Program (GTZ/ BEPA)
Takhar TTC, St Education Department
Takhar
Phone: 0799 394 684
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.gtz.de
GTZ Capacity Development Advisor Mr
Mohammad Ayub Aryayee
Management Sciences for Health (Tech Serve)
Taloqan
Phone: 0700 704 861
Web: www.msh.org/afghanistan
Provincial Health Advisor Mr Ahmad Wali
Wakil Mohammad Nazar St.
Taloqan
Phone: 0799 865 699
0088 216 5420 0531
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.miseast.org
Country Director Mr Mark Grewcoe
NMPionMl SolidMriPy PorgrMmmeCPMU (NSPC
Taloqan
Phone: 0799 229 248
0700 705 045
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
ProvinciMl mMnMger Eng MoOMmmMd HsmMil ZMri�
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Relief International (RI)
St. 5 (on the way to the airport from the center
of Taloqan)
Taloqan
Phone: 0700 708 788
Web: www.ri.org
SRedisO FommiPPee for AfgOMnisPMn (SFA)
St. 7, Sarai-e-Sang Road
Taloqan
Phone: 075 561 0078
0700 706 659
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.swedishcommittee.org
RAD Programme Manager Dr Saied Hamidullah
TMkOMr UniversiPy (TU)
Taloqan
Phone: 0700 709 539
Terre des Hommes (TdH)
Rustaq
Phone: 0092 915 702 379
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.tdhafghanistan.org
Project Coordinator Mr Fazel Mehmood
Uruzgan Province
Afghan Health and Development Services
Trinkote
Phone: 0088 216 2119 0515
032 271 6116
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.ahds.org
Wardak Province
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee
(BRAC)
Maidan Shahr Families
Phone: 0799 115 419
Web: www.bracafg.org
Cooperation Center for Afghanistan (CCA)
Ab-i-Shiroom, Behsood 2
FooperMPion for PeMce Mnd UniPy (FPAU)
Sayedabad Center (near Health Clinic)
Sayeed Abad
Coordination of Afghan Relief (CoAR)
Sayed Abad DistrictMaidan Shahr
Phone: 0700 363 400
0799 391 816
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.coar.org
Project Manager Eng Gul Zada
Helping AfgOMn FMrmers OrgMnizMPion (HAFO)
Admin Of�cer Mr JumM Gul KOMn
Mission d’Aide au Développement des
Economies Rurales en Aghanistan (MADERA)
Gardandewal Behsood 1, Ab-i-Shiroom Behsood
11 Maidan
Phone: 0088 216 8983 1413
Email: [email protected]
Area Manager Mr Ramazan Mehdiyar
Oversight Consultants of the National Solidarity
Porgramme (NSP/OC)
Phone: 0799 170 720
0799 170 721
0088 216 2113 4073
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.nspafghanistan.org
Team Leader Eng Nasir
Contacts: Pakistan
257
SRedisO FommiPPee for AfgOMnisPMn (SFA)
Phone: 0799 425 181
0799 030 874
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.swedishcommittee.org
Deputy Project Manager Dr Wakil Ziar
Zabul Province
HNnSinM PuNlic HeMlPO ProgrMmme for
AfgOMnisPMn (HNnSinM-PHPA)
Near the Governmental Hs.
Phone: 0088 216 3331 3930
Acting Project Manager Dr Fazel Rahman
Pakistan
(AGHCO)
Hs. 399, St. 12, Sector E/2, Phase 1
Hayatabad Peshawar
(PO Box 6066, KMrP-i-PMrRMn PosP Of�ce)
Phone: 0092 915 917 709
0092 333 910 709
Organisation (AHSAO)
Peshawar
0092 915 853 495
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Hs. 399, St. 12, Sector E/2, Phase 1
HayatabadPeshawar
Phone: 0092 915 812 503
Fax: 0092 915 812 503
Web: www.ancb.org
Mr Sayed Fazlullah Wahidi
(AHRO)
Hs. 38 B, Park Rd
University TownPeshawar
(PO Box 1494, Peshawar University)
Phone: 0092 300 901 0336
0092 915 704 255
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Basic Education for Afghans (BEA)
Aziz Building, St. 1, University Rd.
Shaheen TownPeshawar
Phone: 0092 915 843 470
0092 915 --850 725
0092 915 850 725
Fax: 0092 915 842 693
Admin/Finance Manager Mr Faisal Mir
FOurcO Jorld Service – PMkisPMnCAfgOMnisPMn
(CWS)
Hs. 137, St. 7, Sector F-11/1
Phone: 0092 512 103 171
0092 512 102 293
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.cwspa.org
FommiPPee for ReOMNiliPMPion Aid Po
Hs. 309, Gul Haji Plaza, University Rd
Peshawar
(PO Box 2016, Kabul)
Phone: 0092 915 853 220
Fax: 0092 915 840 169
Email: [email protected]
[email protected]
Web: www.cr fg.org
Director Dr Sana ul Haq Ahmadzai
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Danish Demining Group (DDG)
Hs. 283, St. 40, F-10/4
Phone: 0092 512 104 632
0092 512 104 634
Fax: 0092 512 104 635
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.drc.dk
Development and Humanitarian Services for
Afghanistan (DHSA/TKG)
8 A - Mulbery Rd.
University TownPeshawar
Phone: 0092 915 704 239
0092 915 851 378
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.thekillidgroup.com
Of�ce MMnMger Mr SMyed EsM
Helping AfgOMn FMrmers OrgMnizMPion (HAFO)
53-B, Park Avenue, University Town
Peshawar
0092 915 844 674
Email: [email protected]
Programme Coordinator Mr Qaisar Khan
HNnSinM PuNlic HeMlPO ProgrMmme for
AfgOMnisPMn (HNnSinM-PHPA)
Hs. 81, St. 6, Sector G-2, Phase 2
Peshawar
Phone: 0092 915 825 442
0092 915 816 380
Fax: 0092 915 825 516
Email: [email protected]
IiMison Of�cer Mr FMpiPMn FMzel
International Assistance Mission (IAM)
University TownPeshawar
Phone: 0092 915 842 634
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.iam-afghanistan.org
Of�ce MMnMger Mr ArsOMd
Mission d’Aide au Développement des
Economies Rurales en Aghanistan (MADERA)
Peshawar
Phone: 0092 915 842 237
0092 915 840 234
Fax: 0092 915 840 234
Email: [email protected]
IiMison Of�cer Mr ANMss KOMn
Orphan Refugees and Aid - International (ORA)
F-27 Khushal Khan Khattak Rd.
University Town Peshawar
Phone: 0092 915 841 280
Fax: 0092 915 701 089
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.ora-centralasia.org
Programme Coordinator Mr Shahzad Bashir
Relief International (RI)
Mahmood’s Hs. ZB 436/1, Sector 111, Sir
Sayed, St.
Rawol Pendi Islamabad
Phone: 0092 303 651 1561
[email protected]
Web: www.ri.org
SMnMyee GevelopmenP OrgMnizMPion (SGO)
F-10 Rahman Rd.
University TownPeshawar
Phone: 0092 915 842 165
Fax: 0092 915 845 139
Web: www.nawidefarda.com/sanayee.org
Services for Humanitarian Assistance and
Development (SHAD)
Hs. 13, St. 2, Canal Town, Nasir Bagh Rd.
Peshawar
Phone: 0092 915 853 008
0092 915 844 390
Web: www.shade.org.af
Administration Manager Mr Riaz ur Rehman
Contacts: Pakistan
SRedisO FommiPPee for AfgOMnisPMn (SFA)
Rahman Baba Rd., Uni Town
Peshawar
(PO Box 689)
Phone: 0092 915 843 095
0092 302 593 5772
Fax: 0092 915 840 519
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.swedishcommittee.org
Terre des Hommes (TdH)
Hs. 84 E, Rahman Baba Rd.
University TownPeshawar
Phone: 0092 915 702 379
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.tdhafghanistan.org
Project Coordinator Mr Fazel Mehmood
UniPed NMPions FOildren’s Fund (UNHFEF)
Phone: 0092 512 800 128
Web: www.unicef.org
Jorld HeMlPO OrgMnizMPion, AfgOMnisPMn (JHO)
Institute of Health, Chak-i-Shahzad
Phone: 0092 333 510 1940
0092 512 245 584
Fax: 0092 512 245 587
Email: [email protected]
Web: www.emro.who.int/Afghanistan
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Reference and Index
261
Acronyms in Afghanistan Assistance

Afghan Border Police
ACBAR

Agency Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief
ACKU

Kabul University
ACP

Afghan Customs Police
ACSF

Afghan Civil Society Forum
ACSP

Afghanistan Country Stability Picture

Asian Development Bank

Afghanistan Development Forum

Afghan Interim Administration
AIHRC


Afghanistan Information Manage
ment Service

Alternative Livelihoods

Afghan Military Forces

Afghan National Army

Afghan National Auxiliary Police

Afghanistan New Beginnings Programme

Afghan NGO Coordination Bureau

Afghan National Civil Order Police

Afghanistan National Development Strategy

Afghan National Police

Afghan National Security Forces

AfgOMnisPMn NGO SMfePy Of�ce
APAP

Afghanistan Parliamentary Assistance Project
APPPA

Afghanistan Pilot Participatory Poverty Assessment

Afghanistan Rural Enterprise Development Programme

Afghanistan Reconstruction Steering Group

ACBAR Resource and Information Centre
ARTF

Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund

Afghanistan Social Outreach Programme
ATA

Afghan Transitional Authority
AUP

Afghan Uniformed Police
AWN

Afghan Women’s Network

Community Development Council

Community Development Plan
CENTCOM
United States Central Command

Coalition Forces
CFC-A

Combined Forces Command–Afghanistan

Consultative Group
CGAP

Consultative Group to Assist the Poor

Criminal Investigation Division (of the
Afghan National Police)
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
CIDA

Canadian International Development Agency

Constitutional Loya Jirga

Council of Ministers Secretariat

Counter-narcotics

Counter Narcotics Trust Fund
CNPA

Counter Narcotics Police of Afghanistan

Centre for Policy and Human Development
CRC

Constitutional Review Commission

CSTC-A

Combined Security Transition Command–Afghanistan

Counter Terrorism Police
D&RC

Disarmament & Reintegration Commission
DAD

DAI

Development Alternatives, Inc.

Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration

German Development Service

Department for International Development (UK)
DIAG

Disbandment of Illegal Armed Groups

Department of Mine Clearance

European Commission

EuropeMn Fommission HumMniPMriMn Aid Of�ce

Enhancing Legal and Electoral Capacity for Tomorrow

Emergency Loya Jirga

Educational Quality Improvement Project
ERW

explosive remnants of war

European Union

European Union Police Mission in Afghanistan

Focused District Development
GAA

German AgroAction (Deutsche Welthungerhilfe)
GIAAC

General Independent Administration for Anti-Corruption
GOFORGOLD
Good Governance for Local Development

Good Performance Initiative

GermMn Police ProjecP Of�ce
GTZ

German Technical Cooperation (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Technische


HRRAC

Human Rights Research and Advocacy Consortium

Interim
Afghanistan National Development Strategy
IARCSC

Independent Administrative Reform and
Civil Service Commission

HnPernMPionMl FenPre for NoP-for-Pro�P IMR

Islamic Development Bank
IDLG

Independent Directorate for Local Governance

internally displaced persons
Reference and Index

Independent Electoral Commission

International Foundation for Electoral Systems

International Monetary Fund

Initiative to Promote Afghan Civil Society
IPCAG

Inter-Agency Police Coordinated Action Group

International Police Coordination Board

Interim
Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper
IRC

International Rescue Committee

International Security Assistance Force

Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board

Joint Electoral Management Body

Justice Sector Reform
KMTC

Kabul Military Training Centre
KPA

Kabul Police Academy
LOTFA

Law and Order Trust Fund for Afghanistan
MACA

Mine Action Centre for Afghanistan
MAPA

Mine Action Programme for Afghanistan

Ministry of
Counter Narcotics

Millennium Development Goal(s)

micro�nMnce insPiPuPions
MHSFA

Micro�nMnce HnvesPmenP SupporP FMciliPy in AfgOMnisPMn

Ministry of Interior Affairs

Ministry of Public Health

Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development
NATO

North Atlantic Treaty Organization

National Drug Control Strategy

National Development Framework

National Development Programme

National Directorate of Security

National Endowment for Democracy

National Emergency Employment Programme

nongovernmental organisation

National Human Development Report

National Priority Programmes
NRVA

National Risk and Vulnerability Assessment

National Solidarity Programme

National Surveillance System
OAA

Of�ce of AdminisPrMPive AffMirs

Operation Enduring Freedom
PAG

Policy Action Group
PAR

Public Administrative Reform

Provincial Development Plan
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
264

Public Investment Programme

Project Oversight Committee (Justice Sector Reform)

Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper
PRT

Provincial Reconstruction Team

Program Support Unit (Justice Sector Reform)

Securing Afghanistan’s Future

Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (

Support to the Establishment of the Afghan Legislature

Support for an Effective Afghan Legislature
SNTV

Single Non-Transferable Vote

Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General

Security Sector Reform
SUNY-CID
State University of New York – Center for International Development

SWABAC

Southern and Western Afghanistan and Balochistan Association for


Coordination
SY

Solar year (see Calendars used in Afghanistan, p. 265)

United Kingdom

United Nations

United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan
UNDAF

United Nations Development Assistance Framework

United Nations Development Programme

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

United Nations Children’s Fund

United Nations Development Fund for Women

UniPed NMPions Of�ce for FoordinMPion of HumMniPMriMn Mnd Economic


Assistance Programmes
UniPed NMPions Of�ce for FoordinMPion of HumMniPMriMn AssisPMnce

UniPed NMPions Of�ce on Grugs Mnd Frime


United Nations Special Mission to Afghanistan

United States

United States Agency for International Development
USFOR-A
United States Forces Afghanistan
UXO

unexploded ordnance
VAU

Vulnerability Analysis Unit

World Food Programme
Reference and Index
Calendars Used in Afghanistan
Three calendar systems are used in Afghanistan:
Hejri shamsi
(solMr HslMmic) cMlendMr, AfgOMnisPMn’s of�ciMl cMlendMr, esPMNlisOed in POe
consPiPuPion Mnd in use of�ciMlly since 1ED7 (monPO nMmes differ from POe HrMniMn or PersiMn
forms). In 2009, the Afghan year begins on 1 Hamal 1388 (=21 March 2009). In
The A to Z
, the solar year is sometimes referred to as SY (e.g. SY1387 spans March 2008 to March
2009; SY1388 spans March 2009 to March 2010).
(lunar Islamic) calendar, used for religious events and holidays.
, or Miladi (solar Christian), used in international relations.
The website, www.nongnu.org/afghancalendar, provides downloadable versions of Afghanistan’s
of�ciMl cMlendMrsB
To convert dates between
and Miladi years (or to Persian dates using Iranian names)
www.fourmilab.ch/documents/calendar
www.iranchamber.com/calendar/iranian_calendar_converter.php
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Index
Abdul Haq Foundation (AHF)
Academy for Educational Development (AED)
Academy of Sciences of Afghanistan (ASA)
ACCESS Health Services Support Project
Accessibility Organization for Afghan Disabled
(AOAD)
ActionAid Afghanistan (ActionAid)
Action Contre La Faim (ACF)
Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA)
Afghanaid
Afghan Amputee Bicyclists for Rehabilitation and
Recreation (AABRAR)
Afghan Center
Afghan Center for Socio- Economic & Opinion Re
search
Afghan Civil Society Forum (ACSF)
Afghan Community Development Organization
(ACDO)
Afghan Conservation Corps (ACC)
AfgOMn GenerMl Help FoordinMPion Of�ce (AGHFO)
Afghan Health and Development Services (AHDS)
Afghan Health and Social Assistance Organization
(AHSAO)
Afghan Institute of Learning (AIL)
Afghan Institute of Management, Training and En
hancement of Indigenous Capacities (AIMTEIC)
Afghan Institute of Training and Management (AITM)
Afghan Interim Authority (AIA)
Afghanistan Bureau for Reconstruction (ABR)
Afghanistan Centre at Kabul University (ACKU)
Afghanistan Chamber of Commerce and Industries
(ACCI)
Afghanistan Compact
Afghanistan Country Stability Picture (ACSP)
Afghanistan Development Association (ADA)
Afghanistan Development Forum (ADF)
Afghanistan Human Rights Organization (AHRO)
Afghanistan Independent Human Rights Commis
sion (AIHRC)
Afghanistan Information Management Services
Afghanistan Investment Support Agency (AISA)
Afghanistan Market Development (AMD)
Afghanistan National Development Strategy (ANDS)
Afghanistan Navid Sehat Organization
Afghanistan New Beginnings Programme (ANBP)
AfgOMnisPMn NGO SMfePy Of�ce (ANSO)
Afghanistan Parliamentary Assistance Project (APAP)
Afghanistan Primary Education Programme (APEP)
Afghanistan Reconstruction Trust Fund (ARTF)
Afghanistan Rehabilitation and Reconstruction Agen
cy Falah (ARRAF)
Reference and Index
Afghanistan Research and Evaluation Unit (AREU)
Afghanistan Rights and Social Justice Foundation
Afghanistan Rural Enterprise Development Program
Afghanistan Women Council (AWC)
Afghan Landmine Survivors’ Organization (ALSO)
Afghan Media and Cultural Center (AINA)
Afghan National Army (ANA)
Afghan National Auxiliary Police (ANAP)
Afghan National Police (ANP)
Afghan National Security Forces (ANSF)
Afghan NGO Coordination Bureau (ANCB)
13
13
Afghan Organization of Human Rights & Environ
mental Protection (AOHREP)
Afghan Relief Committee (ARC)
Afghan Technical Consultants (ATC)
Afghan Transitional Authority (ATA)
Afghan Turk Cag Education (ATCE)
Afghan Woman and Trade Magazine
Afghan Woman Magazine
Afghan Women Empowerment & Education Organi
zation (AWEEO)
Afghan Women’s Educational Center (AWEC)
Afghan Women Services and Education Organization
(AWSE)
Afghan Women’s Network (AWN)
13
Afghan Women’s New Foundation (AWNF)
Afghan Women’s Resource Centre (AWRC)
Afghan Women Welfare Department (AWWD)
Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN)
Aga Khan Education Services (AKES)
Aga Khan Foundation - Afghanistan (AKF)
Aga Khan Health Service Afghanistan (AKHS)
Aga Khan Trust for Culture (AKTC)
Agence France Presse (AFP)
Agency Coordinating Body for Afghan Relief (ACBAR)
13
13
Agency for Assistance and Development of Afghani
stan (AADA)
Agency for Basic Services (ABS)
Agency for Rehabilitation and Energy Conservation
Agency for Rehabilitation of Villages (ARV)
Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development
(ACTED)
Agency French Development (AFD)
Agency of Consultancy for Training (ACT)
Agro-Meteorology Project of United States Geological
Survey (USGS)
Aide Médicale Internationale (AMI)
AKTC
Alberuni University (AU)
Albironi Reconstruction & Rehabilitation Institute
Alternative Livelihoods (AL)
American Broadcasting Company News
American Friends Service Committee/Quaker Ser
American Institute of Afghanistan Studies (AIAS)
Amitie Franco-Afghane (AFRANE)
Ansar Relief Institute (ARI)
Area Mine Action Center (AMAC)
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
Ariameher Rehabilitation Establishment (ARE)
Armane Milli Newspaper
ASCHIANA: Afghanistan’s Children, A New Approach
Asian Development Bank (ADB)
Associated Press (AP)
Association for Aid and Relief-Japan (AAR-Japan)
Association for Community Development (ACD)
Association of Experts in the Fields of Migration and
Development Cooperation (AGEF)
APPorney GenerMl Of�ce (AGO)
Badakhshan University
Baghlan Institute of Higher Education (BIHE)
Bakhtar Development Network (BDN)
Bakhtar Information Agency (BIA)
Balkh University
Bamiyan University
Bangladesh Rural Advancement Committee (BRAC)
Basic Education & Employable Skill Training (BEST)
Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS)
BBC Afghan Education Project
BBC News
BBC World Service
BearingPoint/USAID Afghanistan Economic Gover
nance Project
Bonn Agreement
Budget
see National Budget
Bureau of Afghan Humanitarian and Infrastructural
Rehabilitation (BAHIR)
Canadian Program Support Unit (CPSU)
CARE International in Afghanistan (CARE)
Care of Afghan Families (CAF)
Caritas Germany
Catholic Organization for Relief and Development
Aid (CordAid)
Catholic Relief Services (CRS)
Center for International Private Enterprise (CIPE)
Center for Policy and Human Development (CPHD)
Central Afghanistan Welfare Committee (CAWC)
Central Asian Development Agency (CADA)
Central Asian Free Exchange (CAFE)
FenPrMl SPMPisPics Of�ce (FSO)
CHF International (CHF)
Child Fund Afghanistan (CFA)
Church World Service – Pakistan/Afghanistan (CWS)
CiC Education Training Centre
Citizens’ Network for Foreign Affairs
Civil Service Commission
see Independent Adminis
trative Reform and Civil Service Commission
Civil Service Reform Commission (CSRC)
Civil Society Magazine
Coalition Forces (CF)
Combined Security Transition Command–Afghani
stan (CSTC-A)
Committee for Rehabilitation Aid to Afghanistan
Communication Team for Peace and Development
(Ertebat)
Community Development Council (CDC)
Concern Worldwide
Constella Futures International COMPRI-A Social
Marketing Project
Reference and Index
Constitutional Loya Jirga (CLJ)
Constitution of Afghanistan
13
Consultative Group (CG)
Cooperation Center for Afghanistan (CCA)
Cooperation for Peace and Unity (CPAU)
Cooperazione Internazionale (COOPI)
Coordination of Afghan Relief (CoAR)
Coordination of Humanitarian Assistance (CHA)
Counter-narcotics (CN)
, 6,
, 13, 15, 23, 24, 25,
, 30, 31, 37, 41, 54,
, 59, 79, 83, 117, 119,
121, 124, 125, 127, 169, 188,
Counter Narcotics Trust Fund (CNTF)
Counterpart International (CPI)
Country Development Unit (CDU)
Danish Afghanistan Committee (DAC)
Danish Assistance to Afghan Rehabilitation and
Technical Trianing (DAARTT)
Danish Committee for Aid to Afghan Refugees (DA
Danish Demining Group (DDG)
17
Development and Ability Organization (DAO)
17
Development and Humanitarian Services for Afghan
istan/ The Killid Group (DHSA/TKG)
17
Development Budget
see National Budget
Disarmament, Demobilisation and Reintegration
Disbandment of Illegal Armed Groups (DIAG)
Donor Assistance Database (DAD)
Dutch Committee for Afghanistan (DCA)
17
Dutch NGO Network for Afghanistan (DNNA)
17
Educational Concepts International (ECI)
17
Education and Training Center for Poor Women and
Education Development Center (EDC)
17
17
Electoral System 73-75
17
17
17
Embassy of Denmark
17
17
Embassy of France
17
17
17
17
Embassy of Libya
Embassy of Norway (Royal Norwegian Embassy)
196
Embassy of Sweden
17
Embassy of the Arab Republic of Egypt
17
Embassy of the Federal Republic of Germany
17
17
Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Iran
17
Embassy of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan
17
17
17
Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands
17
Embassy of the People’s Republic of China
17
Embassy of the Republic of Hungary
17
Embassy of the Republic of Indonesia
17
Embassy of the Republic of Kazakhstan
17
Embassy of the Republic of Korea
17
Embassy of the Republic of Tajikistan
17
Embassy of the Republic of Turkey
17
Embassy of the Russian Federation
17
Embassy of the United Arab Emirates
17
Embassy of the United States of America
17
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
270
Embassy of Turkmenistan
17
17
17
17
17
Emergency Loya Jirga (ELJ)
Enfants du Monde
17
Enhancing Legal and Electoral Capacity for Tomor
row (ELECT)
Eqtedaremilli Weekly
17
Equal Access
17
17
Euron Aid
17
European Commission (EC)/European Union (EU)
17
EuropeMn Fommission HumMniPMriMn Aid Of�ce
(ECHO) 19, 270, 184
Export Promotion Agency of Afghanistan (EPAA)
17
Farda
17
Farhat Architecture and Engineering Rehabilitation
(FAER)
17
Faryab Institute of Higher Education (FIHE)
FOCUS Humanitarian Assistance
17
Food and Agriculture Organization
17
Foundation for Culture and Civil Society (FCCS)
17
Foundation for International Community Assistance
17
Foundation Scholarships Afghanistan (FSA)
17
Friedrich Ebert Foundation
17
Friends for Rehabilitation and Integrating Emergency
National Development (FRIEND)
17
Funders’ Network for Afghan Women (FNAW)
17
17
General Independent Administration of Anti-Bribery
and Corruption (GIAAC)
17
Generous Rehabilitation Organization (GRO)
17
German Afghanistan Foundation (GAF)
17
German Development Service (DED)
17
German Technical Cooperation (GTZ)
17
Ghazni Rural Support Program (GRSP)
17
Global Hope Network International (GHNI)
17
Global Partners (GP)
17
Global Partnership for Afghanistan (GPFA)
17
Global Point Afghanistan (GPA)
17
Global Rights - Partners for Justice (GR)
17
Goethe-Institute
17
17
Good Neighbors International Afghanistan (GNI)
17
Groupe Urgence Réhabilitation and Développement
17
HAGAR Afghanistan
17
Handicap International Belgium
17
Handicap International France
17
Hazarajat Assistance Newsletter (Artibat NGO) (HAN)
17
Health and Development Center for Afghan Women
(HDCAW)
17
Health Net International (HNI)
HealthNet–Transcultural Psychosocial Organization
(HealthNet-TPO)
17
Heinrich Böll Stiftung (HBS)
17
Helping Afghan Farmers Organization (HAFO)
17
Help the Afghan Children (HTAC)
17
Herat University
HEWAD Reconstruction, Health and Humanitarian
Assistance Committee
17
Hindokosh News Agency (HNA)
Hope Worldwide (HOPE)
17
Humanitarian Assistance for the Women and Chil
dren of Afghanistan (HAWCA)
18
Reference and Index
271
Humanitarian Assistance Network and Development
18
Human Rights Research and Advocacy Consortium
(HRRAC)
18
IbnSina Public Health Programme for Afghanistan
(IbnSina-PHPA)
18
Independent Administrative Reform and Civil Ser
vice Commission (IARCSC)
18
Independent Directorate of Local Governance (IDLG)
18
Independent Election Commission (IEC)
Independent Humanitarian Services Association (IH
18
Institute for War & Peace Reporting (IWPR)
18
Integrated Regional Information Networks (IRIN)
18
Interim Afghanistan National Development Strategy
(I-ANDS)
International Assistance Mission (IAM)
18
International Center for Agricultural Research in the
Dry Areas (ICARDA)
18
International Center for Human Rights and Demo
cratic Development (ICHRDD)
18
International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC)
18
International Crisis Group (ICG)
18
International Development Law Organization (IDLO)
18
International Federation of Red Cross and Red Cres
cent Societies
18
International Foundation for Election Systems (IFES)
18
International Foundation of Hope
18
International Islamic Relief Agency (ISRA)
18
International Labour Organization (ILO)
18
International Maize and Wheat Improvement Centre
18
International Medical Corps (IMC)
18
International Monetary Fund (IMF)
18
International Organization for Migration (IOM)
18
International Relief and Development in Afghanistan
18
International Rescue Committee (IRC)
18
International Security Assistance Force (ISAF)
17
18
Internews Afghanistan (Internews)
18
Internews Europe in Afghanistan (Internews-E)
18
INTERSOS Humanitarian Aid Organization (INTER
18
Islah Daily Government (IDG)
18
Islamic Relief - UK (IR-UK)
18
18
JMpMn FenPer for Fon�icP PrevenPion (JFFP)
18
Japanese International Friendship and Welfare Foun
18
Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA)
18
Jawzjan Institute of Higher Education (JIHE)
Johanniter International (JI)
18
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
18
Joint Coordination and Monitoring Board (JCMB)
Joint Development Associates International (JDAI)
Joint Electoral Management Body (JEMB)
Judiciary 76-78
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
272
Just for Afghan Capacity and Knowledge (JACK)
18
Justice Sector Reform (JSR)
Kabul Center for Strategic Studies (KCSS)
18
Kabul Municipality
18
18
Kabul Public Library (KPL)
18
Kabul Times (KT)
18
Kabul University
, 171,
17
17
18
18
18
Kabul University Library
18
Kabul Weekly
18
Kandahar University
KfW German Development Bank (KfW-GDB)
18
Kherad Foundation
18
Khost University
Konrad Adenauer Foundation
18
Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA)
18
Kunduz Institute of Higher Education (KIHE)
Kunduz Rehabilitation Agency (KRA)
Law and Order Trust Fund for Afghanistan (LOTFA)
18
Legal & Cultural Services for Afghan Women & Chil
dren (LCSAWC)
18
Leprosy Control Organization (LEPCO)
Local Governance & Community Development Proj
ect/ARD (ARD/LGCD (USAID))
18
London Conference
18
Management Sciences for Health (Tech Serve) (MSH)
18
Marie Stopes International - Afghanistan (MSI)
18
MEDAIR
18
Medecins du Monde - France (MDM)
18
Medical Emergency Relief International (MERLIN)
18
Medical Refresher Courses for Afghans (MRCA)
18
Medica Mondiale In Afghanistan (MM)
18
Medi Educational Support Association for Afghani
18
Mercy Corps (MC)
18
Micro�nMnce HnvesPmenP SupporP FMciliPy for AfgOMn
istan (MISFA)
18
Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)
Mine Action Programme for Afghanistan (MAPA)
Mine Clearance and Planning Agency (MCPA)
18
Mine Detection and Dog Centre (MDC)
18
Mines Advisory Group (MAG)
18
Ministry of Agriculture, Irrigation and Livestock
18
Ministry of Borders and Tribal Affairs (MoBTA) 79,
18
Ministry of Commerce and Industry (MoCI) 79,
18
Ministry of Communications and IT (MoCIT) 79,
18
Ministry of
Counter Narcotics (MoCN)
18
Ministry of Culture and Youth Affairs (MoCY) 79,
18
Ministry of Defense (MoD)
18
Ministry of Economy and Labor (MoEC) 79,
18
Ministry of Education (MoE)
18
18
Ministry of Energy and Water (MEW) 79,
18
Ministry of Finance (MoF)
18
Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MoFA)
, 79,
18
18
18
Ministry of Higher Education (MoHE) 79,
18
Ministry of Interior Affairs (MoI)
18
18
18
Ministry of Justice (MoJ)
Reference and Index
273
18
Ministry of Labor, Social Affairs, Martyrs and Dis
18
Ministry of Mines (MoM)
18
Ministry of Public Health (MoPH)
, 79,
18
Ministry of Public Works (MoPW) 79,
Ministry of Refugees and Repatriation (MoRR) 79,
Ministry of Rural Rehabilitation and Development
(MRRD)
, 79,
Ministry of Transportation and Civil Aviation 79,
Ministry of Urban Development and Housing 79,
Ministry of Women’s Affairs (MoWA) 79,
Mission d’Aide au Développement des Economies
Rurales Mission Afghanistan (MADERA)
Mobile Mini Circus for Children (MMCC)
Moby Media
Norwegian Church Aid (NCA)
Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC)
NPO/Rural Rehabilitation Association for Afghani
Nye Express Of�ce
Ockenden International
Of�ce of AdminisPrMPive AffMirs Mnd Founcil of Min
isters Secretariat (OAA/CMS)
Of�ce of AdminisPrMPive AffMirs & Founcil of MinisPers
Secretariat (OAA/CMS)
Of�ce of POe EuropeMn Union SpeciMl RepresenPMPive
Open Asia, Armanshahr Foundation (Armanshahr)
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
274
Organisation of Rehabilitation, Development and
Economic Recovery (ORDER)
Organization for Mine Clearance and Afghan Reha
Orphan Refugees and Aid - International (ORA)
Oxfam Great Britain (Oxfam GB)
Oxfam Novib
Paiwaston
Pajhwok Afghan News
18
Paktia University
Paris Conference
Partners for Social Development (PSD)
Partners in Aviation and Communications Technol
ogy (PACTEC)
Partners in Revitalization and Building (PRB)
Parwan Institute of Higher Education (PIHE)
PMrRMz Micro�nMnce HnsPiPuPion
Patta Khazana
Peace Winds Japan (PWJ)
People in Need (PIN)
Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation Support for Af
ghanistan (PARSA)
Policy Action Group (PAG)
Polish Humanitarian Organization (PHO)
Polish Medical Mission (PMM)
Polytechnic University - Kabul
Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP)
Provincial Councils
Provincial Development Plan (PDP)
Provincial Reconstruction Team (PRT)
Public Administration Reform (PAR)
Radio Liberty/Radio Free Europe (RFERL)
Rebuilding Agricultural Market in Afghanistan
Reconstruction Authority for Afghanistan (RAFA)
Refugee Care, Northern Afghanistan
Relief International (RI)
Renewable Energy, Environment and Solidarity
Group (GERES)
Resource Centre for Women in Politics (RCWP/
Reuters News Agency (RNA)
Rome Conference on Justice and Rule of Law
Roots of Peace (RoP)
Rural Expansion of Afghanistan’s Community-based
Healthcare (REACH)
Rural Rehabilitation Association for Afghanistan
Salam Watandar (SW)
Sanayee Development Organization (SDO)
Sandy Gall’s Afghanistan Appeal (SGAA)
Save the Children
Securing Afghanistan’s Future (SAF)
Security Sector Reform (SSR)
Serve Afghanistan (SERVE)
Services for Humanitarian Assistance and Develop
Shanti Volunteer Association (SVA)
Shelter Now International (SNI)
Social and Health Development Program (SHDP)
Social Research Institute (SRI)
Reference and Index
275
Social Service and Reconstruction of Afghanistan
Society for the Preservation of Afghanistan’s Cultural
Heritage (SPACH)
Solidarity for Afghan Families (SAF)
South Asian Free Media Association (SAFMA)
Southern and Western Afghanistan and Balochistan
Association for Coordination (SWABAC)
13
13
SOZO International (SOZO)
Spring of Construction, Rehabilitation, Cultural and
Social Organisation (SCRCSO)
STEP - Health and Development Organization (STEP)
Support for an Effective Afghan Legislature (SEAL)
(or Support for the Establishment of the Afghan
Supreme Court
18
Swedish Committee for Afghanistan (SCA)
Swedish International Development Agency (SIDA)
Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation
Swiss Peace (SP)
Takhar University
Tear Fund (TF)
Terre des Hommes (TdH)
The Welfare Association for the Development of Af
ghanistan (WADAN)
Today Afghanistan International Organization (TAIO)
Tokyo Meetings
Tolo Service & Cultural Organization/ Social Foun
dation for Remote Rustic Development (TSCO/
Tolo Television
Training Human Rights Association for Afghan Wom
TriNMl IiMison Of�ce (TIO)
Trocaire (Caritas Ireland)
Turkmenistan Consulate
Ufuq (Horizon) Welfare Society (UWS)
UK Department for International Development (DFID)
United Agency for the Rehabilitation of Afghanistan
(UARA)
United Methodist Committee on Relief (UMCOR)
United Nation Human Settlements Programme
United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan
(UNAMA)
United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF)
United Nations Department of Safety and Security
United Nations Development Fund for Women
United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
UniPed NMPions EducMPionMl, ScienPi�c Mnd FulPurMl
United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)
United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
(UNHCR)
United Nations Humanitarian Air Services (UNHAS)
UniPed NMPions Of�ce for ProjecP Services (UNOPS)
UniPed NMPions Of�ce on Grugs Mnd Frime (UNOGF)
The A to Z Guide to Afghanistan Assistance
276
United Nations Population Fund Afghanistan (UN
FPA)
United Nations Security Coordinator (UNSECOORD)
United Nations Volunteers (UNV)
United Nations World Health Organization (UNWHO)
United States Forces Afghanistan (USFOR-A)
US Agency for International Development (USAID)
Voice of Afghan Woman Radio (VAWR)
Voice of America, Ashna TV & Radio/Afghanistan
(VOA Ashna)
Voice of Freedom (Radio and Newspaper) (VoF)
Voice of Women (VWO)
War Child-UK (WC-UK)
Welfare Association for the Development of Afghani
stan (WADAN)
Welthungerhilfe/German AgroAction (AgroAction
GAA)
Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS)
Women Activities & Social Services Association
(WASSA)
Women and Children Legal Research Foundation
(WCLRF)
Women Assistance Association (WAA)
Women for Women International (WWI)
Women Mirror (WM)
World Bank (WB)
World Food Programme (WFP)
World Health Organization, Afghanistan (WHO)
World Vision International (WVI)
Youth Assembly for Afghan Rehabilitation (YAAR)
Zardozi - Markets for Afghan Artisans
ZOA Refugee Care Afghanistan (ZOA)

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